MENU
Progarchives, the progressive rock ultimate discography
Progarchives, the progressive rock ultimate discography

TREM DO FUTURO

Trem Do Futuro

Symphonic Prog


From Progarchives.com, the ultimate progressive rock music website

Trem Do Futuro Trem Do Futuro album cover
3.48 | 17 ratings | 5 reviews | 0% 5 stars

Write a review
Buy TREM DO FUTURO Music
from Progarchives.com partners
Studio Album, released in 1995

Songs / Tracks Listing

1. Vagao 1 - Requiem Da Louca (6:22)
2. Mental Fisica (4:30)
3. Revolucao Das Flores (5:05)
4. Labirinto - Danca Dos lirios (5:33)
5. Bivar (3:43)
6. Moksha (3:24)
7. Sila (4:57)
8. O Anjo (6:53)
9. A Louca (6:05)
10. Entree (0:54)

Total Time: 47:26

Lyrics

Search TREM DO FUTURO Trem Do Futuro lyrics

Music tabs (tablatures)

Search TREM DO FUTURO Trem Do Futuro tabs

Line-up / Musicians

- Gilmar Moura / keyboards
- Marcelo Macedo / guitars
- Marcos Bye Bye / drums
- Paulo Rossglow / vocals
- Jomar Sergio / bass
- Vlissea Germano / flute

Releases information

CD Progressive Rock Worldwide PRW 021

Re-released in April 2017 digitally by Progshine Records
progshinerecords.bandcamp.com/album/trem-do-futuro

Thanks to ProgLucky for the addition
and to progshine for the last updates
Edit this entry

TREM DO FUTURO MP3, Free Download (music stream)


Open extended player in a new pop-up window | Random Playlist (50) | How to submit new MP3s
No MP3/Stream available for this artist.
Collaborate with Progarchives.com, learn how to submit new MP3s.

Buy TREM DO FUTURO Trem Do Futuro Music


No release results - showing artist results instead
O TempoO Tempo
Masque Records
Audio CD$21.23
$21.98 (used)


More places to buy TREM DO FUTURO music online Buy TREM DO FUTURO & Prog Rock Digital Music online:

TREM DO FUTURO Trem Do Futuro ratings distribution


3.48
(17 ratings)
Essential: a masterpiece of progressive rock music(0%)
0%
Excellent addition to any prog rock music collection(53%)
53%
Good, but non-essential (35%)
35%
Collectors/fans only (12%)
12%
Poor. Only for completionists (0%)
0%

TREM DO FUTURO Trem Do Futuro reviews


Showing all collaborators reviews and last reviews preview | Show all reviews/ratings

Collaborators/Experts Reviews

Review by Atkingani
SPECIAL COLLABORATOR Honorary Collaborator / Retired Admin
3 stars The band name, TREM DO FUTURO (Train Of The Future), makes a clear reference to something deeply impregnated in souls and minds of all Brazilians: "when will we take this 'train of the future' and fulfill the entire potential of our beloved nation, this sleeping giant?"; there are also many references about this never-attained and much desired future in literature, fine arts and other musical and political movements.

That said I expected to hear an album stuffed with a dense folk core added with various insertions of the original Brazilian popular music, being all covered by a fine layer of symphonic cortex - but I became a bit disappointed seeing that "Trem Do Futuro" is a work much more in the vein of Italian and British counterparts with only soft and distant touches of the music made here in Pindorama. Once the disappointment dissipates it turns into a fair surprise when realizing that TREM DO FUTURO issued a valuable product fully hearable and amusing.

Cover artwork is interesting while the general production barely exceeds the average stair. The fine musicianship of band's members compensates with advantage some minor defects and once you're not too much into the recording technical aspects, the hearing experience might be enjoyable - just remembering that songs are sung in Portuguese. Singer Paulo Rossglow is tuned and has a powerful voice but for those initiated in the Brasiliana features, his accent is totally diverse from that of the state (Ceará) & region (Northeast) where it's said the band come from; certainly, a Southern, unless he's pretending.

The first chords of 'Vagão 1 - Réquiem da louca' grab the listener with its blend of thunderous and catchy tunes provided by keyboards; flutes and drums complete nicely the panel of this introductory piece. The album follows in the same line as portrayed in the first track: symphonic melodies - sometimes calm sometimes frenzy, rock passages, and pop spots; anyway it's a prog-rock album, no doubt about it. Songs are not memorable but not dispensable too, but some deserve to be highlighted like the tasteful 'Revolução das flores', the colorful 'Bivar', the appealing 'Moksha' and the short and gorgeous 'Entrée', responsible to close the album. Lyrics are so-so; I swear I could understand almost everything.

That way, this Train moves on and from what they apprehended along the road we may expect a superior work with their recently released album, after a gap of 13 years; meanwhile, this one fits the metric-gauge category, being good, but non-essential.

Review by apps79
SPECIAL COLLABORATOR Honorary Collaborator
4 stars Outstanding Brazilian band,started in Fortaleza in early-80's.They focused more on their local live performances during their early years,but the 90's find the band getting into a more serious mold,sending a demo tape to the Brazilian label Progressive Rock Worldwide.The label decided to release their self-titled debut in 1995.

Fortunately this sextet was not lost and their debut offers some really splendid flute-driven Symphonic Rock with a bit of Brazilian Ethnic influences, great guitars and some grandiose organ and synths throughout.Not to speak about the vocals of founding member Paulo Rossglow,who have a balanced romantic and at the same time gracious feeling.The compositions are really superb with some great number of breaks to be heard but also deeped into melody,harmonic passages and furious interplays.Flutist Ulissea Germano is out of another planet,sometimes delivering strong flute drives in the vein of JETHRO TULL/OSANNA,other ones being more smooth and melodic on his performance close to the likes of WURTEMBERG.He is in a constant battle with Gilmar Moura keyboards,who's style is reminiscent of Italian bands like NUOVA ERA or IL CASTELLO DI ATLANTE.As for the guitars of Marcelo Macedo,these come as another highlight, ranging from strong groovy playing to ultra- melodic solos.

With not a simply boring moment,''Trem do futuro'' belongs among the best Symphonic Rock albums to have seen the light in the 90's.Grandiose, bombastic but also melodic and delicate music.Do yourself a favor and listen to this album,it will be a fantastic experience.Highly recommended.

Review by kev rowland
SPECIAL COLLABORATOR Crossover Prog Team
3 stars The progressive rock band Trem Do Futuro (Train Of The Future) was formed in 1981 in Cear', a state located in the north-eastern region of Brazil. Given that this is area better known for its deep folk roots and rhythms, it perhaps isn't too surprising that it took some fourteen years for the band to build enough momentum to release their first album! The self-titled 'Trem Do Futuro' was released through the Progressive Rock Worldwide label in 1995. Since then it has been unavailable, and has now been released digitally for the first time, by Progshine Records, who keep unearthing gems from Brazil. It is obvious that the band were heavily influenced by both the British and Italian progressive scenes, while flautist Ulisses Germano had obviously been playing very close attention to Ian Anderson. His phrasing, and the use of clear sounds at certain points combined with a rougher much harder approach at others, intervening at just the tight time, is one of the highlights of this album. But, the band never sound like Tull, as their symphonic approach, combined with some folk influences, is quite different indeed.

The lyrics are sung in Portuguese, but even without knowing the language this is an album that can be enjoyed immensely and on the very first time of playing. The band are content to move between direct rock and acoustic styles, but they are let down at times with the quality of the production, and I'm still not totally convinced about singer Paulo Rossglow. It could be argued that he is singing with lots of emotion, but he doesn't always hit the note as true as he should. It doesn't sound like an album of the Nineties to me (apart from the odd keyboard sound), as this feels much more like a long-lost album from the Seventies as it feels genuinely of that period, as opposed to attempting to recreate something that had gone before. But, given that the band took fourteen years to release the debut album that may well have something to do with it as they did start playing together back in 1981. Overall this is an interesting album, and all power to Progshine for making it available again after so long.

Latest members reviews

4 stars TREM DO FUTURO "Same" in my opinion the best of three albums from this Brazilian band. Whit very good instrumental moments and fantastic psychedelic lyrics. highly inspired by their countryman from O TERÇO, MUTANTES ("Tudo foi feito pelo Sol and O A E O Z ) and the masters of symphonic prog like ... (read more)

Report this review (#1555134) | Posted by maryes | Saturday, April 23, 2016 | Review Permanlink

4 stars TREM DO FUTURO has released an only album so far. The album is quite fine, full of beautiful passages afforded by splendid flute tunes and majestic guitars, that delight the ears. I also appreciate the vocals, which are sung in portuguese language. For those who can latch unto the language, ... (read more)

Report this review (#33247) | Posted by | Monday, November 15, 2004 | Review Permanlink

Post a review of TREM DO FUTURO "Trem Do Futuro"

You must be a forum member to post a review, please register here if you are not.

MEMBERS LOGIN ZONE

As a registered member (register here if not), you can post rating/reviews (& edit later), comments reviews and submit new albums.

You are not logged, please complete authentication before continuing (use forum credentials).

Forum user
Forum password

Copyright Prog Archives, All rights reserved. | Legal Notice | Privacy Policy | Advertise | RSS + syndications

Other sites in the MAC network: JazzMusicArchives.com — jazz music reviews and archives | MetalMusicArchives.com — metal music reviews and archives