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DZYAN

Krautrock • Germany


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Dzyan biography
Formed in 1972, this ethnic/kraut jazz quintet (Jochen Leuschner, Reinhard Karwatky, Gerd Bock-Ehrmann, Deiter Kramer, and Ludwig Braun) released their self titled album the same year in a relative discretion. This album made an exploration in long / space rock improvisations relied on jazz grooves and weird electro -acoustic sounds. The "ethnic", mystical elements are obvious notably due to the acoustic percussions rhythm sections. Compositions are mainly instrumental and improvised, brightly showing the technical capacities of the musicians. After several departures the band will be organised under a trio form, recording in 1973 the seminal "Time Machine". This album features astonishing manifestations of freaky fusion jazz exercises mixed with weird experimentations and mysticism. This album was recorded at Dieter Dierk's mythical studio. After this very convincing effort, the band recorded what we can consider to be his masterwork "Electric Silence". It combines with passion a stylistic jazz rock to nice Eastern elements. A very pleasant journey in "kraut", "kosmische" eccentricities.

: : : Philippe Blache, FRANCE : : :

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Electric SilenceElectric Silence
Limited Edition · Import
Long Hair Germany 2010
Vinyl$25.00
$35.00 (used)
Time MachineTime Machine
BELLAPHON
Audio CD$19.99
$17.89 (used)
samesame
LONG HAIR
Vinyl$35.00 (used)
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Dzyan Blood by Bucolic (CD, Apr-2000, BSI) US $6.00 Buy It Now 34m 39s
Dzyan-ELECTRIC SILENCE-'74-jazzy kraut prog rock-NEW LP US $32.99 Buy It Now 1 day
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DZYAN - DZYAN - KRAUT / PROG ROCK - NEW US $38.18 Buy It Now 4 days
Dzyan Blood by Bucolic (CD, Apr-2000, BSI) - CD US $6.50 Buy It Now 5 days
Dzyan-Mandala SWF-Session-'72-jazzy kraut prog rock-LP US $33.99 Buy It Now 5 days
Dzyan-TIME MACHINE-'73-jazzy kraut prog rock-NEW LP US $32.99 Buy It Now 5 days
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DZYAN: Dzyan LP (Germany, re, w/ insert) Rock & Pop US $35.00 Buy It Now 10 days
DZYAN Mandala LP Vinyl NEW Krautrock Psych RE US $39.85 Buy It Now 13 days
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DZYAN - MANDALA - SWP SESSION 1972 - NEW US $36.52 Buy It Now 17 days
DZYAN: Electric Silence LP (Germany, reissue) Rock & Pop US $35.00 Buy It Now 17 days
Dzyan-Mandala SWF-Session-'72-jazzy kraut prog rock-CD US $28.99 Buy It Now 20 days
DZYAN - Time machine Reissue NEW Vinyl LP Krautrock US $44.85 Buy It Now 26 days
NEW - Dzyan Blood by Bucolic US $3.00 Buy It Now 28 days
Dzyan-S/T-'72 ethnic jazzy kraut prog rock-NEW CD US $24.99 Buy It Now 29 days

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DZYAN discography


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DZYAN top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.50 | 49 ratings
Dzyan
1972
3.75 | 67 ratings
Time Machine
1973
4.03 | 154 ratings
Electric Silence
1975

DZYAN Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.53 | 9 ratings
Mandala
2010

DZYAN Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

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DZYAN Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 Electric Silence by DZYAN album cover Studio Album, 1975
4.03 | 154 ratings

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Electric Silence
Dzyan Krautrock

Review by friso
Prog Reviewer

5 stars Dzyan - Electric Silence (1975)

The search for obscure progressive records is the search for magic, but as you listen to an obscure record the magic usually fades - it was made by people with instruments, like every other record. This record 'Electric Silence' is however an obscurity that sounds so mysterious and non-human that the feeling of magic doesn't fade that much.

No vocals, just multi-ethnic jams by brilliant musicians with an other-wordly ethos, if the avant- prog moments would not have been present it would have been spiritiual. The musicianship is plain brilliant and all three musicians play multiple instruments. The recording is good - not perfect - but the amosphere is great; delicate, mysterious and spacious. I like the fact that the record can not be understood, it can only be listened to in amazement.

Conclusion. Brilliant other-worldly music. Recommended to fans of krautrock, spacerock, jazzrock, avantprog and prog with world-music influences.

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 Mandala by DZYAN album cover Live, 2010
3.53 | 9 ratings

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Mandala
Dzyan Krautrock

Review by Mellotron Storm
Prog Reviewer

4 stars This was a posthumous release originally recorded live in studio back in 1972 but not released until 2010. I was a little nervous about this one only because I found the 1972 debut to be a little hit and miss for my tastes and this live recording came between that one and the followup "Time Machine" which I really like. And while the syle here may be more like the debut this one is a winner folks. Already since the debut the band has a new drummer and lead guitarist on this live recording. Not a bad thing though as the great Eddy Marron plays lead guitar on here, and he would also play on their next studio album "Time Machine". Interesting that the lead vocalist and sax player would also leave before "Time Machine" was recorded. I should also mention that only one track on here can be found on their studio albums making this a must for DZYAN fans.

"Resurrection" is the almost 10 minute opener. Lots of dark atmosphere to start on this one as sounds come and go. Some heavy outbursts a minute in including sax. The song finally kicks into gear before 3 1/2 minutes as the tempo picks up. Vocals around 4 minutes for the first time. Love the instrumental section before 5 1/2 minutes as the guitar starts to let it rip. Nice heavy rhythm section here too. This lasts for just over a minute then the vocals return. Atmosphere ends it. A good tune but my least favourite of the bunch. "Dragonsong" is the only track on here found on another album by them (debut) . Killer intrumental work as the vocals come in. Great sound ! This is the longest tune at 11 1/2 minutes. Love the sax playing over top when the vocals stop. Vocals are back after 4 1/2 minutes. Excellent guitar work 6 1/2 minutes in as Eddy lights it up for an extended period. A drum solo follows before 8 1/2 minutes. The music kicks back in a minute later. Big finish on this one. "Mandala-Transmigration" is a short two minute piece that is very atmospheric with no melody.

"Steel's Electric" is a jazzy offering with intricate drum work and lots of sax leads. Crunchy bass lines too on this one. The guitar comes to the spotlight before 4 minutes and Eddy is fantastic as usual. An awesome instrumental. "Daddy Groove" is laid back as the sax rips it up over top. Vocals follow in a bluesy style. The vocals give way to another hair raising solo from Eddy that starts before 4 minutes and continues until after 5 1/2 minutes when the vocals return. The vocals get pretty passionate at times. Another great track. "Saz" has a distinct Eastern sound to it with trippy percussion as well. Vocals 5 1/2 minutes in. A groovy track. "Celestial City" is also from 1972 but a live recording from an open-air concert. The sound isn't as good but it's fine. Love when it kicks in after 2 1/2 minutes and Eddy plays at the speed of light. The drummer is trying to keep up with him and the bass player too. Too much !

A solid 4 stars and well worth getting for those into jazzy / psychedlia.

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 Time Machine  by DZYAN album cover Studio Album, 1973
3.75 | 67 ratings

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Time Machine
Dzyan Krautrock

Review by apps79
Special Collaborator Neo Prog Team

3 stars One thing noone can acuuse Dzyan for was their music flexibility.As the original line-up slowly split into pieces, the only one staying put was Reinhard Karwatky.He recruited Eddy Marron from Vita Nova and drummer Lothar Scharf, but soon Scharf was gone to join Virgo, replaced by Peter Giger.A new album, entitled ''Time machine'' was recorded at Dierks Studios and it was released in 1973, this time on Bacillus.

Marron was credited all guitars of the album and Karwatky was the the handler of the electric and double bass, as well as a unidentified instrument called ''super string''.Its propably the one we hear on the opening, deeply experimental and totally improvised ''Kabisrain'', full of bizarre strings, featuring a strong Ethnic flavor in Free Improvisation, but at the end sounding completely cold and pointless.The long ''Magika'' is what the listener actually expects from Dzyan.Opening with superb, complex and frenetic guitar exercises by Marron, much in a KING CRIMSON style, retaining some of the Ethnic flavors around the middle, and moving on in a Kraut/Fusion enviroment, full of jazzy bass lines and scratching, loose guitar solos.''Light shining out of darkness'' is again closer to Ethnic Music with some good but indulgent acoustic crescendos with light electric guitars supporting in a very dark and melancholic mood.The 18-min. title track is an amalgam of the new Dzyan trio's influences.Kraut/Fusion with sparkling guitars, Jazz Rock with attacking improvisations and typical Heavy/Kraut rhythmic lines with excellent bass work and superb drumming complete a schizophenic piece of music, that has its moments.The heavy side of KING CRIMSON vibes is all over the place with many cool breaks included, while the closing groove is absolutely addictive and narcotic.

One of the most uneven albums I've ever heard.The boring passages are trully boring, the more interesting ones are absolutely fantastic and extremely nervous, that you'll have a hard time while going to sleep.At the end, this album from the new Dzyan core is recommended.

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 Mandala by DZYAN album cover Live, 2010
3.53 | 9 ratings

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Mandala
Dzyan Krautrock

Review by Neu!mann
Prog Reviewer

3 stars Better late than never, I suppose, but this live-in-the-studio novelty was too long overdue, released almost forty years after it was recorded. Dzyan never achieved anything more than cult stardom, at best. But to fans this belated addition to their slim discography will provide a fascinating slice of audio anthropology: the missing link between the band's jazzy 1972 debut and the blossoming Krautrock of their "Time Machine" and "Electric Silence" albums (the latter title currently the Number Ten rated Krautrock album on this site).

The prevailing style was still the Canterbury Fusion of that first LP, with Gerd Ehrmann's frenetic saxophone the primary instrument on most tracks, and percussionist Jochen Leuschner providing the bluesy lead vocals. But the ace up their collective sleeve was new guitarist Eddy Marron, recently enlisted but already making an impact, even in a relative supporting role.

Under his galvanizing influence the music was beginning to show a harder edge, in tracks like "Steel's Electric": an obvious signpost toward the MAHAVISHNU intensity of the "Time Machine" sessions. Listening to Marron's absolutely torrid solo at the end of "Dragonsong" (a holdover song from the first album) it's easy to imagine the jaws of his bandmates falling to the studio floor in flabbergasted awe, as the guitarist shredded his fretboard into ragged tatters.

In this track and elsewhere you can hear the later, psychedelicized Dzyan trying to break free of its Jazz Rock shell, especially when Marron begins strumming his beloved Turkish saz, in the song of the same name. The more exploratory instrumental jams show their age best, and the band itself no doubt felt the same. After this rehearsal 'concert' the way ahead must have seemed clear: ditch the singer and the sax, and continue as a trio (but with a more sympathetic drummer).

The title track is an odd droning entr'acte from bassist Reinhard Karwatky (recording date unknown), and the incomplete "Celestial City" is the only selection actually performed on stage. It was included here as a bonus track, but really the entire album is a welcome bonus, 38-years late but worth the wait.

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 Electric Silence by DZYAN album cover Studio Album, 1975
4.03 | 154 ratings

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Electric Silence
Dzyan Krautrock

Review by Neu!mann
Prog Reviewer

4 stars Album number three by the newly psychedelicized Dzyan followed the same illuminated path of their sophomore effort "Time Machine" in 1973, but strayed even further away from the band's Fusion roots. The new LP mapped an alien landscape not unlike its alarming if somewhat comical sleeve illustration, and depending on your mood (or drug intake) the results will sound either intrepid or aimless, or possibly both.

What might have been a merely routine collection of Jazz-Rockish jams spiced up with token Oriental textures (de rigueur in the early '70s) became something altogether more adventurous, thanks in large part to Eddy Marron's discordant electric guitar. The combination of mellotron strings and atmospheric sitars made this a real meeting between East and West, further reinforced when Marron indulged his love for the Turkish zaz, the same instrument that gave his (highly recommended) pre-Dzyan project VITA NOVA its distinctive voice.

Bassist Reinhard Karwatky and drummer Peter Giger joined the vision quest as well. Karwatky doubled on synthesizers and something called the 'Super String', an undefined electronic device invented by a protégé of Karlheinz Stockhausen. Giger added an assortment of ethnic tablas, steel drums, and tuned African woodblocks to his percussion arsenal, and was even allowed a brief, accompanied solo (with himself) in "For Earthly Thinking".

The music throughout is often oblique, usually unstructured, and typically weird in a way almost guaranteed to excite the synapses of any dedicated Krauthead. The adjective 'spacey' wouldn't be inappropriate, but not in the far-out sense of boilerplate Kosmische Rock. Here the word describes a wider, uncluttered soundstage, and the broad scope of the music itself, with each of the trio of players allowing the others plenty of room for their own explorations.

The album as a result may not seem as immediately assertive as its predecessor. But it can prove equally rewarding in other, more introspective ways. This LP and "Time Machine" are both short enough to fit on a single compact disc, and in fact were (illegally) re-issued together in the mid-1990s, by the pirate label Germanofon. I would recommend hearing them back-to-back, for the best complimentary effect, but the album by itself is still a trip worth taking.

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 Time Machine  by DZYAN album cover Studio Album, 1973
3.75 | 67 ratings

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Time Machine
Dzyan Krautrock

Review by Neu!mann
Prog Reviewer

4 stars Normally one imagines a time machine being used to travel backward through the fourth dimension, but the second Dzyan album marked a huge leap forward from the band's erratic 1972 debut. It was, in fact, the work of an entirely different group, reduced to a trio, with only bass player / keyboardist Reinhard Karwatky remaining from the original line-up.

The new band quickly jettisoned the more obvious Canterbury sound of the earlier album, along with the bluesy vocals, in favor of something more challenging: a blend of nascent Krautrock, Oriental ragas, Jazz Rock fusion, and the sort of free improvisation practiced by the likes of CAN, KING CRIMSON, and other groups operating outside the functional straightjacket of mere 'jamming'.

The change in direction is obvious from the opening notes of "Kabisrain", an eight-minute Near Eastern improv as compelling as it is formless. In stark contrast, the aptly-titled "Magika" comes wrapped in layers of tightly-arranged, MAHAVISHNU ORCHESTRA intensity. Here and elsewhere the range of playing shows exactly what the band gained by hiring Eddy Marron, possibly the most underappreciated guitarist in Germany (if not all Europe) at the time.

The pinpoint accuracy, tricky time signatures, and startling instrumental creativity of this track alone are something to hear. But check out the hyperactive John McLaughlin-like prelude to the side-long (on vinyl) title track, introducing a 17-plus minute series of blistering solos over a rhythm section that can't stand still. All of which makes the gorgeous acoustic guitar interlude of "Light Shining Out of Darkness" an even more effective detour.

It's hard to call this music Jazz Rock, or just Rock, or something else entirely. Either way it's the sound of a band re-born, and one that should have had a much higher profile. This is one of those rare albums that, even forty years later, is almost impossible to overrate.

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 Time Machine  by DZYAN album cover Studio Album, 1973
3.75 | 67 ratings

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Time Machine
Dzyan Krautrock

Review by Aussie-Byrd-Brother
Special Collaborator Rock Progressivo Italiano Team

4 stars Dzyan's instrumental second album `Time Machine' combines eastern raga, dark jazz and progressive rock set amongst an ocean of psychedelic experimentation. Quite schizophrenic and disjointed in structure, the album tracks alternate between ethnic influenced ambient acoustic pieces and noisy spacey guitar heavy jazz workouts that sometimes don't hold together too well placed side by side, but are always endlessly inventive, full of incredible musicianship and original arrangements. Krautrock fans unaware or unsure of this album should look into it straight away!

Opening with a slow building and immersive eastern influenced ambient piece, `Kabisrain' is a heady mix of acoustic guitar, sitar and ethnic percussion that, with it's occasional frantic and tense outbursts, creates a very disorientating mood. But nothing prepares you for the thunderstorm of dirty bass, spasmodic violent drumming and maddening repetitive jagged guitar playing that is `Magika'! Very oppressive improvised jazz with a slightly sinister tone, with complex rhythms weaving in and out of the dissonant and atonal noise. Some sections remind me of the extended aggressive guitar workouts on Guru Guru's `Hinten', with groovy moments and jammy solos squeezed in too. Totally addictive and sure to drive you up the wall - in a good way, of course! `Light Shining Out Of Darkness' is a warm acoustic diversion with confident guitar playing and gentle percussion. There's some lovely and memorable musical themes throughout the short piece, alternately reflective, sad and joyful.

The improvised side long title track is an explosive electric guitar, aggressive drumming and pummeling bass atmospheric jazz assault. Overloaded with liquid bass runs, wailing guitar solos and loose jazzy drumming, the jammy piece has a propulsive and fiery fusion sound that drives it along. It's frequently up-tempo and constantly changing directions, and a real showcase to the talent of the musicians. Some brief sections of the piece become stuck in a repetitive and plodding groove that is quite maddening!

On the first few listens, the album is quite jarring and messy. The odd combination of ambient ethnic pieces placed next to alternating guitar heavy and jazzy experimentations means the album is strangely unbalanced. Some listeners may enjoy some of the pieces, but not other ones. A few replays reveal an addictive work you can't wait to listen to again, and I think anyone with an interest in progressive rock will find something interesting amongst the whole album. The band would better incorporate all the conflicting different styles together on the next album `Electric Silence', which is even stronger than this one, but `Time Machine' is still an incredible and original work filled with energy and imagination. It's also aged exceptionally well, and is highly recommended for psychedelic, jazz-rock and Krautrock followers.

Both this album and the follow-up are available on a single value priced CD, which is a steal considering both of them are superb. Well worth snapping up for almost 75 minutes of incredible progressive musicianship.

Again, thanks to Doug and John for the initial Dzyan recommendation I took a chance on!

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 Electric Silence by DZYAN album cover Studio Album, 1975
4.03 | 154 ratings

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Electric Silence
Dzyan Krautrock

Review by Aussie-Byrd-Brother
Special Collaborator Rock Progressivo Italiano Team

4 stars The knockout third Dzyan album is an addictive combination of instrumental playing with trippy experimental elements, contrasting earthy aspects with deep space and beyond. `Electric Silence' has a strong eastern raga-rock sound, utilizing the sitar and other ethnic percussion instruments, with more typical progressive Mellotron and even German styled electronics. Some parts of it would appeal to fans of the darker jammy King Crimson tracks that appeared on their seventies albums, or raga-rock albums like the early Kebnekaise ones. The bass playing has a murky swallowing sound, the drumming violent and guitar play ragged and wild! It's an album of delicate subtlety and intense outbursts.

`Back To Where We Came From' opens with bubbling electronics, marimbas, tension-building almost tribal percussion, then floating bass and groovy guitar that weaves through the piece. It's a slow burner like much of the album as it gradually builds in mood and form, with the band really taking off in the second half. `A Day In My Life' is an Indian styled tornado of sitar and tambura with harsh electronics that quickly builds in urgency. The darker and more eerie free-form `The Road Not Taken' has disorientating effects, tuneless jagged guitar stabs, chaotic and furious drum-work and creeping bass lurking amongst the track.

Spacey raga piece `Khali' is a deeply hypnotic Mellotron/sitar duet, with a rising electric guitar solo drifting among the background. Very immersive and easy to become lost in. The more experimental and fusion styled `For Earthly Thinking' has a slightly sinister opening, with impossibly hard, deep drawn out bass notes and fiery jazzy guitar play, before maddening steel drums and heavy percussion whip up a storm. It finally collapses into an addictive mess of suffocating and exhausting noise! The title track is a jazz flavored heavy guitar and stormy drum workout with lots of jamming and soloing. It gives the last minutes of the album a fitting finale, a real showcase to the talented band members, but it's way too short and seems to fade out too abruptly with the band still in full flight. The album barely runs 37 minutes, so time constraints was not an issue.

`Electric Silence' sounds quite different than the previous album `Time Machine'. That one also had the Indian/ethnic elements, but they were on separate tracks altogether to the alternating guitar heavy and atonal jazzy experimentations, resulting in a strangely unbalanced (although addictive!) album. Here, however, all those elements are blended together, resulting in a better realized and varied vision. The band certainly captured a very original and imaginative sound. The two albums are available on a single CD, outstanding value considering both of them are superb.

A truly inventive spiritual and spacey Krautrock stunner, `Electric Silence' is an intoxicating mixture of progressive rock, world music and psychedelic atmosphere, music to truly become lost in.

Thanks to Doug and John for the recommendation in the first place!

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 Electric Silence by DZYAN album cover Studio Album, 1975
4.03 | 154 ratings

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Electric Silence
Dzyan Krautrock

Review by Negoba
Prog Reviewer

5 stars Highest Quality Ethno-Space-Jazz Jams

I'm not sure what attracted me to this album compared to all the other Krautrock choices I could have jumped on. Perhaps it was the strange alien illustration on the cover. Probably it had something to do with the reviews referencing world music. In any case, I am so glad I found this album. Of all the albums of jamming I own (and there are many in the J/F, Krautrock, and Space Rock categories), this is probably my favorite. The musicianship is superb, the pacing is well done, and the variety of textures is simply astounding. This is an album that can sit in the background, fill a darkened room, or weather direct and careful inspection. While this is a far cry from composed Symphonic Prog, I think any fan on this site can appreciate the masterful artistry found here.

Every track has something unique to raise the interest level above that of other space-jam artists. The first track, "Back To Where They Come," opens and closes with a watery fast mallet part similar to what King Crimson uses on LTiA. "A Day in my Life" is overtly raga-derived, with very well executed sitar and tabla parts. (I am a huge tabla fan. Any band the effectively incorporates tabla is going to get extra points from me). However, the piece evolves to include electronic space elements that add just a little extra spice. "The Road Not Taken" is more free form, with a humourous spring sound from the bass that is used to tie the piece together. A whole album of this style would have been tedious, but after the fast, ultra-rhythmic track preceding it, it works perfectally. "Khali" is another raga-derived song, but boasts soaring mellotron and is much more open and airy. "For Earthly Thinking" veers more toward Weather Report / fusion range, and boasts some virtuosic bass playing and gamelan style percussion. "Electric Silence" ends the album on a more Pink Floyd, rock vein.

Not everyone is going to like long meandering jams. It's a specific style of listening experience and may bore some. To be certain, ELECTRIC SILENCE is not an album with specific direction or clear big-picture planning. But if you like textural pieces that also sport top-notch playing ability, this may be your album. Again, to this writer, it may be the best of its kind.

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 Electric Silence by DZYAN album cover Studio Album, 1975
4.03 | 154 ratings

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Electric Silence
Dzyan Krautrock

Review by AtomicCrimsonRush
Special Collaborator Symphonic Team

3 stars Dzyan's "Electric Silence" is an enigmatic album with colourful iconic album cover and colourful enigmatic music. There are huge influences of Indian mystical music and massive slabs of jazz throughout the album. If one has no interest in the Eastern Indian nuances and over indulgence in Sitar, they may be in awe of the last two tracks that are simply incredible musicianship on display and Krautrock at its best.

'For Earthly Thinking' is a 9 minute dramatic musical montage of jazz meets space rock. The dissonance of odd time sigs and jazz frenzy at the intro is improvised expertly. The percussion of Giger is an amazing accomplishment and the jangly guitar of Marron is terrific. As the song progresses we get conga drums squealing sax, and Karwatky's synth effects and pulsing improv bass work. The percussion solo is frenetic jazz metrics that fly off the handle; Giger is a master drummer.

'Electric Silence' is another of the gems on the album that resonates well with the listener. Simply brilliant musicality and structure throughout. The guitar harmonics ring out beautifully. The drums are sporadic and the bass changes time sigs with the drums constantly. It is beautiful chaos. This is an album that is important to Krautrock but is a one off for Dzyan. It definitely is worth checking out even if it is just for one or two treasures.

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