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DAVE BAINBRIDGE

Crossover Prog • United Kingdom


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Dave Bainbridge picture
Dave Bainbridge biography
Born in Darlington, England

Multi-instrumentalist and song-writer Dave BAINBRIDGE is co-founder of IONA. His solo material is more or less an extension/progression of the band's, combining progressive rock with traditional Celtic folk. On his only solo album to date, BAINBRIDGE himself plays over twelve instruments, aided by eleven musicians who share bass guitar, drums and percussion, violin, cello and vocal duties, including three impressive female vocalists who alternately sing in English and Gaelic.

The album "Veil of Gossamer" features some splendid guitar work over a tapestry of delicate folk melodies. Although this may sound borderline 'New Age', the reader shouldn't expect an easy listening here, as Bainbridge often breaks through the pastoral atmosphere with some highly progressive rockers - shades of CAMEL's "Harbour of Tears" and IRIS' "Crossing the Desert" come to mind. The compositions are rich and complex and the acoustic guitar tracks sit most comfortably between the electric guitar workouts and the splendid vocal and ethereal passages. The production is top notch and the album has an ebb and flow that holds the listener's attention throughout.

Will please fans of the more contemplative form of prog as well as those who appreciate technical perfection of virtuoso guitar play.

: : : Lise (HIBOU), CANADA : : :

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DAVE BAINBRIDGE discography


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DAVE BAINBRIDGE top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.60 | 10 ratings
The Eye of the Eagle (with David Fitzgerald)
1998
4.18 | 70 ratings
Veil of Gossamer
2004
4.50 | 2 ratings
Troy Donockley & Dave Bainbridge: When Worlds Collide
2005
3.00 | 1 ratings
Nick Fletcher & Dave Bainbridge: The Breaking of the Dawn
2007
3.92 | 12 ratings
Life Journey (with David Fitzgerald)
2009
3.97 | 103 ratings
Celestial Fire
2014
3.50 | 4 ratings
The Remembering
2016
4.26 | 64 ratings
To the Far Away
2021

DAVE BAINBRIDGE Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

4.00 | 1 ratings
Troy Donockley & Dave Bainbridge: From Silence
2005

DAVE BAINBRIDGE Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

5.00 | 5 ratings
Celestial Fire - Live in the UK
2017
5.00 | 1 ratings
Live in the Studio (with Sally Minnear)
2018

DAVE BAINBRIDGE Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

DAVE BAINBRIDGE Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

DAVE BAINBRIDGE Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 To the Far Away by BAINBRIDGE, DAVE album cover Studio Album, 2021
4.26 | 64 ratings

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To the Far Away
Dave Bainbridge Crossover Prog

Review by kev rowland
Special Collaborator Honorary Reviewer

5 stars It is now 30 years ago since I first came across Iona and the magical wonderful album which is 'The Book of Kells'. Since then, I have followed the career of those involved with some interest, and I do wonder if the millions of Nightwish fans ever look back to see what Troy Donockley was doing in his earlier days. Mind you, his old mate Dave hasn't been lazing around too much either. 2020 saw him producing the epic 17 CD 'Book of Iona' box set celebrating the 30th Anniversary of Iona, as well as contributing in various degrees to new albums by Kimmo Porsti, Cronofonia, Downes Braide Association, Lifesigns, Nick Fletcher, Glass Hammer, Celtish and Strawbs. If that wasn't enough to keep him going, he also found time to work on his fourth solo album, 'To The Far Away'.

Iona fans may well recognise those words as being from "Edge of the World" from 'Beyond These Shores'. That album recounts the ancient story of St Brendan's epic voyage across the Atlantic Ocean, whilst 'To The Far Away' tells a more contemporary story of lovers on opposite sides of the sea, separated for many months by the global pandemic. Dave and Sharon, who lives in Baltimore, were due to be married at the beginning of 2020, but it took until the very end of the year for it to take place due to the enforced and unplanned separation. All those emotions and feelings were pouring through Dave as he worked on this album, bringing in old friends and guests to assist him in building something very special indeed.

He worked with poet Lynn Caldwell on the lyrics, as he wanted to ensure the words were perfect for what he was trying to express. Musically, he of course provided the multiple instruments he is renowned for, while also recruiting Sally Minnear (Lord of the Dance, Celestial Fire) and Iain Hornal (Jeff Lynn's ELO, 10CC, Three Friends, solo artist) on vocals, Troy Donockley (Iona, Nightwish, The Enid, Maddy Prior) on Uilleann Pipes, whistles and voices, Jon Poole (Cardiacs, Lifesigns) on bass, Frank van Essen (Iona, Martin Garrix) on drums, violins and violas, Jonas Pap (Epica, Cronofonia) cello, Nigel Cameron (Celtish) whistles, Julie Cameron-Hall (Celtish) violin and Martin Nolan (Iona) whistles.

With a band like that behind him it is of no surprise whatsoever that the music is of the very highest order indeed, and the arrangements are immense. This is reminiscent at times of Iona, dream and very Celtic, but at others it is much more direct. The atmosphere created within is palpable, and I can imagine myself on the Western Isles again, going on a tramp, thinking of the girl on the other side of the ocean. The islands are a magical place, no wonder they make the water of life there, and just from playing this music I am transported back to a place on the other side of the world from where I now live. My grandfather was District Officer Coastguard Western Isles at one point, and my father grew up in a small village at the very tip of Kintyre, where he now lives again, and I can't listen to this without thinking of my times there.

Sally and Dave have a wonderful working relationship (their 2018 'Live In The Studio' album is also essential), which is perhaps no surprise given she is the daughter of multi-instrumentalist Kerry Minnear (Gentle Giant), so she literally grew up in music. Her vocals and melodies are clear and fine and are just what is needed at times to cut through the complexity of the arrangement. One of the delights of this album for me is that Dave allows himself to show some of his stunning soloing skills on tracks such as "Girl and the Magical Sky". But Dave is also content to take the back seat when it is right for the music, so although he may be providing focal points at different places, or the foundation, all the musicians and singers have their time in the spotlight ? it is all about the music.

I have been fortunate enough to hear many of Dave's albums over the years, and this is undoubtedly the finest of his career to date. We get long pieces, short ones, some that are simple, others furiously complex, instrumentals and others where the words are the focus. They are all imbued with that sense of majesty, mystery, atmosphere and Celts, and the result is simply stunning. Essential.

 To the Far Away by BAINBRIDGE, DAVE album cover Studio Album, 2021
4.26 | 64 ratings

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To the Far Away
Dave Bainbridge Crossover Prog

Review by BrufordFreak
Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

5 stars Virtuosic guitarist of IONA fame is back with another solo release--this time collaborating with a who's-who of prog nobility--many of whom worked with Dave or Iona in the past.

1. "Sea Gazer" (6:12) simple prog folk with catchy, if too-repetitive melody and fine performances. (8.75/10)

2. "Girl and the Magical Sky" (8:00) opens with poem being read over strummed mandolin. In the second minute band with organ set musical foundation over which multi-tracked voices of Sally Minnear establish a choral base. At 2:35 we break down to simple piano, mandolin, Uilleann pipes and whistles for a bit before scaled down multi-Sally choir rejoins. At the end of the fourth minute it strips down further to just piano and Sally. Beautiful ballad builds from here. bass, keys, background vocals provide gentle support. Then, in the sixth minute organ ramps up and rock band rejoins while Dave expresses himself through a commanding electric guitar solo. Strings, piano, and organ are doing interesting things in the wings. In the eighth minute pipes and Sally-choir return with full church organ to bring the song to a close. (Nice drumming, Frank.) (13.5/15)

3. "Rain and Sun" (4:12) an instrumental in which picked acoustic guitars and mandolin and synth washes are joined by Dave's plaintive solo electric guitar. Haunting melodies and music! Almost Genesisian. Final minute softens to become more orchestral, more IONA-like. (9/10)

4. "Clear Skies" (6:21) ethereal beginning turns into full-on IONA-like prog-rock romp. Interesting piano-with-whistles interlude in the third minute is followed by powerful prog jam in which Dave's electric lead really flames and the drums and bass really excel. A true display of virtuosity from Jon Poole and Frank van Essen! A top three song for me. (9.5/10)

5. "Ghost Light" (14:13) opens with more of Dave's excellent electric guitar lead play--with very little support. In the third minute things quiet down as keys, percussives, and acoustic strings provide subtle, delicate background for Sally's vocal. In the fourth minute as Sally moves into a chorus, the full band joins in but then things quiet down again for her second verse--this time accompanied by mail voice (whom I am going to assume is that of a-credited Iain Hornal). Unfortunately, the chorus is shaped and melodically too similar to an old YES motif. The instrumental section that begins after the second time through the chorus is interesting, as is its followup. Then in the ninth minute Sally is given another, more original approach to the chorus melody and delivery. This is great! Then the band returns, a little slower and more melody-centric, and thn Iain takes a turn in the lead. At the 11-minute mark Dave's wailing lead tears at our heart-strings--simply masterful, gorgeous guitar playing! You might say, if you threw away the first five minutes, this would be a full masterpiece. (26.25/30) 6. "Cathedral Thinkers" (3:09) piano arpeggi and Sally-vocalise open this before drums, bass, and soloing synth join in. Synth and lead electric guitar mirror each other in the second and third minutes. Nice! Very pretty. A very unusual finale with fading electric guitar being supplanted by speed-demon classical grand piano play. (9/10)

7. "To Gain the Ocean" (4:07) feels like the same song as before as the melody is here carried by male vocalist (Iain Hornal) and supported by same arpeggiating piano. In the second verse drums, fretless bass, synth strings, synth glockenspiel, acoustic guitars, and Sally Minnear join in. Absolutely gorgeous tapestry of music! Powerful song! (10/10)

8. "As Night Falls" (1:52) more dulcet wailing JEFF BECK-like guitar, this time with orchestral strings (both acoustic and synth-generated) support. Nice. (4.25/5)

9. "Infinitude (Region of the Stars)" (6:48) opens with slow-shifting strings arrangement which is joined by solo viola at 0:45. Reminds me of music to support some auspicious foggy film scene. The music and violin solo are not unlike those of Ralph Vaughn Williams' "Lark Ascending"--and may, in fact, be modeled after it. Really beautiful and complex. At 4:28 Sally Minnear's distant vocalise joins in, bring more of a human element into the landscape. It is brief, having the effect of turning the beautiful soaring music of joy and achievement into one of failure and sadness. Wow! What an amazing journey we were just taken on! (15/15)

10. "To the Far Away" (4:43) a very traditional Celtic melody turned almost mechanically into a rock song. I can see how this anthemic song could have been chosen as the title song and representative of this stage of Dave's evolutionary path. It is so solid. Almost perfect in a boring kind of way that makes me ashamed to be casting aspersion upon this kind of maturity and mastery. (9/10)

11. "Speed Your Journey" (4:29) Such a fine composition delivered to perfection! Though Sally's involvement is rather minimal it makes such a difference. (9/10)

12. "Fells Point" (2:58) another folk-rock delivery of what feels like old, traditional Celtic melodies. Very cool to have Troy Donockley and Dave (as well as the whistle players) mirroring each other on their respective specialty instruments. (4.5/5)

13. "Something Astonishing" (4:18) beautiful Ant Phillips/Genesis-like 12-string + synth washes opening before organ and lead electric guitar supplant at the end of the first minute. Another melody that could have come from liturgical or Celtic folk traditions here rendered by rock instruments. The final 70 seconds sounds like a fairy-like departure from Avalon over the sea. (9/10)

Total Time 71:22

While I've yet to really find any fault to anything Dave has contributed to, I have to admit to being lulled into a state of numb appreciation for his past albums. They are without question excellent albums with great compositions and stellar performances throughout, it's just that there comes a point where the Iona sound starts to sound homogenous. I really appreciate both the compositional mastery on display here as well as the level of performance commitments demanded of--and delivered by--his collaborators here.

A-/five stars; a minor masterpiece of progressive rock music; highly recommended for all fans of intricately composed and masterfully performed prog.

 To the Far Away by BAINBRIDGE, DAVE album cover Studio Album, 2021
4.26 | 64 ratings

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To the Far Away
Dave Bainbridge Crossover Prog

Review by tszirmay
Special Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

5 stars Dave Bainbridge is without any question, one of my favourite current artists, having followed his path since the early Iona days, where my left eyebrow was first raised on numerous albums by that celebrated British prog band, such as Open Sky and the Circling Hour. Since those heady days, his solo albums such as Veil of Gossamer, Celestial Fire and Celestial Fire live have been decorated with every star at my disposal, though I would have added the Victoria Cross, La Legion d'Honneur and the US Medal of Honor, thus raising the other supercilium. His work with Lifesigns and Downes/Braide on guitar and the Strawbs on keyboards proves his mettle on all forms of main rock instruments and as such, has carved out quite the reputation in the prog community. David's guitar acrobatics are spirited to say the least, a heady blend of Hackett-like melody and Holdsworthian sizzle, obviously tinged with a Celtic sheen that can not and should not be denied. The music is therefore very spiritual, with warm cascades of Uillean pipes, tin whistles and bodhran, while also incorporating violin and viola, courtesy of former Iona stalwart Frank Van Essen, a fabulous drummer who is also a crack virtuoso on the strings. But do not be fooled by this side of their repertoire as these musicians have no fear of rocking and often blazing (The Celestial Fire live album is full of classic Yes reprises that will make your jaw drop). Powerful, heartfelt, and exhilarating progressive rock of the highest order.

Lately, Dave has been working with Sally Minnear, a female vocalist with a glorious voice (that name should be familiar to those fans of the Kind Behemoth that lived in a glass house, full of power and glory with a freehanded octopus and his three friends etc..). The apple falls not far from the tree, as the two have a chemistry that is hard to describe. Spirit, I guess. The lockdown had taken Dave away from touring with both Strawbs and Lifesigns, putting himself in composing mode and the result will probably outclass the previous glories as this whopper is a timeless classic of the finest vintage.

The sea churns, the lively gale and the salty mist coalesce as one, the cold fuses with the warm heartbeat of an unconquerable soul. "Sea Gazer" is a grandiose opener, a Celtic showcase that seeks to introduce the moody atmosphere that will permeate the entire set as well as the talent that this band owns in spades, with clubs, diamonds, and hearts in tow. The aptly named finale "Something Astonishing" perfectly conveys the scintillating 72- minute journey that any music fan can enjoy by inserting this masterpiece into their eternal prog collection. Sandwiched in between these two colossal pieces, 11 other tracks offer a plethora of variations on the adventuresome theme, such as the hugely contrasted epic "Girl and the Magical Sky" where gentle child-like serenity finds delicate piano ornamentations allied with the sweetest voice on one hand, smartly clashing with bombastic swells of unmitigated explosions of fiery organ, rampaging bass and screeching electric guitars, all held in place with deft yet muscular drumming. Dave's solo is a killer. "Rain and Sun" consolidates further this divergence of attitude, acting as a near segue to the previous piece, allying swelling string orchestrations with an Oldfieldian tinge that was last heard on Mike's Voyager album. The sense of flow lingers on "Clear Skies", where a playful guitar lead scours the clouds, tin whistles in support of another powerful mellotron fueled explosion, as Jon Poole's nimble bass hopscotches over the flat stones like some drunken madman, as also expressed by a charging synth solo that just kills it. Breathtaking!

Still woozy from the onslaught, Dave propels the core 14-minute blockbuster into the melee, the astonishing "Ghost Light", a showcase piece if there ever was one, showing off the talent described earlier, Sally's voice soaring mightily one moment, then suddenly hushed in internal contemplation. The Jon Poole bass guitar carves quite the path in the undertow, nimbly lunging across the sonic landscape, with plenty of ebb and flow. A male voice belonging to Iain Hornal from 10cc and ELO fame encourages the duet, raising the stakes even higher. The electric guitar slithers and slices the spectral horizon, towering, swerving, and veering into the stars above. This is such a majestic and grandiose adventure, magnificently played and sung! Wow! Really wow!

A trio of shorter tracks certainly help calming down all the previous goose bumps, an ornate piano and voice piece that evolves quickly into an extended synth, morphing into a wicked guitar ramble. Lots of polyrhythmic drumming complicate the mood, with great indulgence and a dazzling rip on the piano. Next, Iain Hornal takes the mike and enters ballad mode, with Donockley providing the slick Celtic accoutrements and Sally joins in. Breezy, sweeping ocean mist and loads of melancholia. ''As Night Falls'' ends this triumvirate with a solo guitar rant, an oozing flurry that squeezes every ounce of passion from the stringed neck, a mix of Latimer and Holdsworth rolled in one. Divine.

Van Essen leads some spirited violins and violas, combining with Julie Cameron-Hall, on a majestic neo-classical instrumental that is painfully strident and gorgeous, overwhelming, and touching. ''Infinitude (Region of the Stars)'' is an everlasting explosion on a timeless album. I am not always a fan of such orchestral interludes but this is just plain off the charts, both in gut wrenching emotion and technique.

The next four tracks seem to reflect another set (or suite) of tunes that continue to raise the bar. Starting with the thrilling title track, a more traditional Celtic jig, except the main protagonist is a devilishly exuberant electric lead guitar, doubled by violin, aided by sturdy bass lines and extraordinary drum fills. And just to add a little Irish/Scot sauce, Uillian pipes and whistles finishes off the delight. That Celtic undertone continues on the next piece, the rather hopeful sounding ''Speed Your Journey'' , where Sally gets to sing her piece , sublimely encouraged by wicked bass and drum support. Another jig like piece serves to showcase the rather complex melody, full of swerving notes, played at blistering speeds by all the musicians, Dave leading the band on his sulfurous guitar, mellotron swirls in the background. I mean, just incredible to listen to such dexterity! (Yngwie eat your heart out!) .

And the finale, a starlit gaze into the reflected sky, searches out the last drop of creative juice, offering up a glorious, almost cathedral-like experience, where organs, guitars and choirs are ablaze in ecstasy. A no nonsense top 3 album for 2021, a true prog classic. A must hear and a must have.

5 Remote Distances

 To the Far Away by BAINBRIDGE, DAVE album cover Studio Album, 2021
4.26 | 64 ratings

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To the Far Away
Dave Bainbridge Crossover Prog

Review by omphaloskepsis

2 stars In my search for the ultimate Prog Folk album of the decade, I purchased Dave Bainbridge's new album. It's the only way you can hear it. Got to shell out the cash to put it in your ear.

Small sections impressed me. Mostly Bainbridge's Gilmorish guitar work. That's about it. Too many recycled Celtic grooves that I heard decades ago. Sure, they were surrounded by symphonic keyboards, but the retread Celtic schtick left me flat. Most the songs had promising sections. They would begin and I'd think, "This is going to be good, but they quickly wore out their welcome the way Neal Morris songs fall short...for me. That said, I'm sure some folks will love this album. But will they circle back around in five years to listen again? I doubt it. For now "To the Far Away" may circulate and pulsate through their speakers, but soon their Bainbridge CD will haunt their overflowing music shelves...gathering dust. Not me. I'll sell mine. I'm sure there are plenty Americans who'll pay my $15 asking price, plus free shipping to the far away place that is their CD player.

 To the Far Away by BAINBRIDGE, DAVE album cover Studio Album, 2021
4.26 | 64 ratings

BUY
To the Far Away
Dave Bainbridge Crossover Prog

Review by Squonk19

5 stars To the Far Away is the fourth solo album by multi-instrumentalist, Dave Bainbridge; co-founder of Iona and currently a touring and studio member of Lifesigns and Strawbs, amongst other projects and collaborations. It is undoubtedly his finest solo album to date and perfectly encapsulates his Celtic, progressive, rock, folk and classical music influences in a wonderfully vibrant, diverse and yet coherent release - making it one of the best progressive albums of the year.

I have followed Dave's musical journey through many decades - from those early releases from the Christian- tinged, Celtic progressive rock of Iona in the 90s, through his guitar-driven solo output that followed with Veil of Gossamer (2004), Celestial Fire (2014) and The Remembering (2016), where his keyboard virtuosity was also showcased. His live collaboration with Sally Minnear in the band, Celestial Fire, has not only maintained the rich legacy of Iona, but added new, fresh compositions to his repertoire. His contributions to the recent releases by Lifesigns (Altitude) and Strawbs (Settlement) have made them sparkle and glisten - making him the 'go-to' guest musician for many other modern, progressive rock bands.

The lockdown of 2020 was a difficult time for all musicians, and Dave experienced both the personal and professional uncertainties of that time. Dave recalls that 2020 was a bittersweet year for him. "The complete shutdown of venues left us without places to play and income, but also, paradoxically, gave us the time and space to write, record and bring to fruition projects we may not have otherwise got around to finishing." His enforced separation from his American fiancée (now wife), Sharon, was a difficult one - but he was able to express, through music, the emotions and feelings he was experiencing during this time as he went on his daily runs and walks along the rural lanes around his home. In fact, the original title of the album was A Lincolnshire Country Lane.

The start of 2021 saw recording progress, with Dave joined by vocalist, Sally Minnear and his erstwhile friends from Iona, Frank van Essen (drums, violin & viola), Troy Donockley (uilleann pipes, low and high whistles), Martin Nolan (whistles), together with Jon Poole (bass), Iain Hornal (vocals) ? along with Jonas Pap (cello), Nigel Cameron (whistles) and Julie Cameron-Hall (violin) - providing wonderful ensemble playing to enhance Dave's extraordinary guitar and keyboard work (with a bouzouki and mandolin throw in for good measure here and there!) Lynn Caldwell supplied some lovely poetic lyrics for the album as well.

The result is almost 72 minutes of immersive, expressive and emotional Celtic-tinged progressive rock over 13 multi-faceted tracks; both instrumental and lyric-driven, which will take you away from our daily concerns and pressures for a short time at least.

The sound of the sea starts the opening track, Sea Gazer, along with ethereal harmonies, subtle keyboards themes and melodic, electric guitar building, almost Clannad-like, as Celtic pipes and whistles are layered over the sound. Early Mike Oldfield soundscapes are conjured up here (and throughout the album) before the clear, angelic vocals of Sally Minnear are introduced mid-way, with those of Iain Hornal following on seamlessly, with wonderfully descriptive and atmospheric lyrics creating a lovely, magical showcase of the album as a whole.

Girl and the Magical Sky begins with Sally's poetic, spoken words conjuring up images of a stroll along country lane under a magical sky indeed, to an acoustic guitar accompaniment. Organ and swirling keyboards build on a driving drum and bass rhythm, and then ebbs and flows with chanted vocals and folk whistles floating over it all. Piano adds poignancy to the lyrical content before some real powerful progressive rock, especially a soaring electric guitar solo from Dave over slabs of organ, concludes this mini-epic of a track.

Rain and Sun is a charming instrumental, beginning acoustically before electric guitar takes over the baton. Strings, piano and pipes create an Ommadawn-like, Oldfield musical soundscape which could easily have continued on from its modest duration. However, in many ways it is an aperitif to one of the highlights of the album, the Iona-like Clear Skies - whose plaintive pipes and percussion soon build up to a truly powerful Celtic progressive sound. Piano and soft vocals calm proceedings before Frank van Essen's driving drumming accompany Dave's electric guitar to the stratosphere and then a full-blown rock conclusion full of proggy keyboard noodlings. Wow!

The extended Ghost Light starts contemplatively with some soaring guitar notes, but Sally's expressive vocals then take centre stage. "We are the music makers, and we are the dreamers of dreams." The chanting vocal section that follows certainly has a touch of Pink Floyd's Dark Side of The Moon at times (especially Eclipse), but any such knowing nods are soon dispelled with a heady amalgam of pastoral prog, powerful rock and symphonic classical influences. Iain's vocals combine well with Sally's on the choruses and more uplifting, Roine Stolt-like guitar over the expressive rhythm section, soon get the goosebumps appearing by the end.

Cathedral Thinkers starts and ends with some beautiful piano playing, but keyboards and then electric guitar make the music rise to the galleries - acting as a prelude for To Gain the Ocean. Iain's flowing vocals over piano work well, and when lush instrumentation and Sally's harmonies joins in, the yearning spirit of Iona's classic Beachy Head track is conjured up for me.

As Night Falls is a short, but atmospheric instrumental, with resonating guitar sailing over a sea of lush sounds, before the violin, accompanied by the other string instruments, begin the beautifully contemplative Infinitude (Region of the Stars). The spirit of Vaughan Williams and The Lark Ascending is strong here, and Sally's dreamy tones complement the symphonic soundscape wonderfully.

To the Far Away returns us a joyous slab of driving progressive rock, with a paced, jig-like character at times and the Celtic folk influence throughout. Dave continues to supply some delicious guitar soloing as the instrumentation once again builds up the tempo through to the fade-out. The sound of birds and Troy Donockley's uilleann pipes recall Iona's Flight of the Wild Goose initially on Speed Your Journey, before Sally's vocals join the instrumental fray. Frank's inventive and expressive drumming and Jon Poole's melodic bass runs are once again a joy to listen to on this album.

Fells Point is a short, but pleasing, jig-like instrumental with the guitar soloing as inventive as ever, and the enjoyment the musicians had playing on it is clear for the listener to hear (it definitely had my toes tapping away). The final song, Something Astonishing, begins with chiming, Steve Hackett-like, acoustic guitar but then develops into a vibrant guitar solo over a rich keyboard background, with choir-like accompaniment - before the sound of the sea and Sally's soft vocals take us full circle back to the start. It's an optimistic and satisfying end to a very pleasurable listening experience.

Dave Bainbridge and friends have conjured up a magical album full of progressive rock majesty and Celtic folk influences with power, delicacy and warmth throughout. Despite its difficult gestation period coming from the dark days of the pandemic, Dave has the produced his best solo album ever and it deserves as wide an audience as possible. The 2 CD release has a bonus disk of demos, alternative versions etc. that provides an interesting insight to the creative process. The album artwork is beautiful and if you stretch to the deluxe edition, a hardback photographic book and postcards are your reward.

I said many years ago that Dave Bainbridge remains the best thing to come out of my hometown of Darlington, since Locomotion No.1. Hopefully progressive rock fans less familiar with his solo work will soon discover it with To the Far Away. Highly recommended!

(from THE PROGRESSIVE ASPECT)

 To the Far Away by BAINBRIDGE, DAVE album cover Studio Album, 2021
4.26 | 64 ratings

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To the Far Away
Dave Bainbridge Crossover Prog

Review by astrophotographer

5 stars A classic Celtic prog album, infused with brilliance, a joy to give careful listen to.

From the outset, you know this is going to be a (an electric) guitar driven Celtic venture - and the guitar work is stellar - but watch out, there's so many surprises and delights to this album.

Sally Minnear's voice and harmony has never sounded so good, it fits in the mix and shines, you really believe. The choice of Iain Hornal (10CC, Jeff Lynne's ELO) adds perfect weight, emotion and sense.

The orchestration is something else, very carefully balanced and full of interest. Who would have thought spoken word and bouzouki could sit so real ... the forward progression on that track alone gets the frisson going.

After my first few plays through, I've found myself lost in the bass playing (Jon Poole - Cardiacs) and drums (Frank van Essen - Iona) already. Such thought and care. And they both make flippin' amazing contributions too.

Dave has brought in many Celtic musicians, (stablemates from Iona Troy Donockley and Martin Nolan as well as John & Julie Cameron), their contributions weave magically. Again, the care, arrangement and placement is just so well done.

I've already mentioned Frank van Essen's extraordinary and imaginative drumming. He has a unique talent in being master of both drums and violin/viola. His string contributions are sumptuous as ever. Fellow countryman Jonas Pap makes fine contribution on cello.

Another piece to the whole work comes through the lyrics, particularly those of celebrated poet Lynn Caldwell. It's a melding of lyrics and tone that matches so well, again, it's believable.

Then there's moments of music that slam you with "wow". That doesn't happen to me often these days. I hope you get to feel this too.

I'm a sucker for bass pedal, if you're still in possession of a great hi fi then crank it and enjoy those passages where the bottom notes blaze your soul!

I feel like what I'm writing is a prog track in itself... all this time and I'm only just getting to the main theme! Dave wrote To The Far Away during (in his words) the "terrible times" of the Covid lockdown, and the heartbreak of enforced separation from his now wife Sharon. You feel this separation, lyrically and musically throughout. Big vast skies, and calling to your beloved through them. The concept itself creates a freshness, it's a valuable new addition to the collection.

I'm fascinated by what appear to be homage references: Ommadawn, Vaughan Williams, Floydian Eclipse... even Iona. If I'm hearing right, I wonder what more subtle references Dave might have waiting to be explored. For sure this is an album that reveals and rewards more with each play.

And so to the producer, guitarist (oh! the guitar work on this album), keys, and yes even bouzouki/mandolin . Let's just say to my ears anyway, he has excelled in all these in what - very high bar though it is - I personally feel on all levels is his best work yet.

 Live in the Studio (with Sally Minnear) by BAINBRIDGE, DAVE album cover DVD/Video, 2018
5.00 | 1 ratings

BUY
Live in the Studio (with Sally Minnear)
Dave Bainbridge Crossover Prog

Review by kev rowland
Special Collaborator Honorary Reviewer

— First review of this album —
5 stars I don't receive nearly as many DVDs as I used to, but I am so glad that this one made it all the way to New Zealand as it is a real gem. I have followed Dave's career for some years, firstly with the amazing, wonderful, brilliant Iona and then with his other projects. Prior to this I hadn't previously come across Sally, although for some reason her surname seemed familiar, and it was only when watching the conversation between the two of them at the end of the disc, where they interview each other, that I realised that she is the daughter of Kerry Minnear of Gentle Giant fame. Her and Dave met initially as Dave is friends with her parents, and she grew up listening to Iona albums. Kenny is of course a multi-instrumentalist, which means that there were always a great many different instruments in the house, and Sally also can turn her hands to most things.

The main part of the DVD features Dave and Sally performing in his studio, with Dave providing keyboard, guitars and bouzouki while Sally is on vocals, acoustic guitar, percussion, recorded, whistle, violin and keyboards. The two of them perform surrounded by instruments, so much so that it can be quite hard to have enough space to stand. But, using these and combining them with some triggers (there are only two of them after all), they create music which is based in the Celtic tradition, and is hauntingly beautiful. My wife, Sara, walked into the study at the end of the DVD and asked what I was watching, and I told her that the only word to really describe their music was "Beautiful", and that nothing else mattered.

The production is clear, and there is nothing fancy about the camerawork as there doesn't need to be. There are a few different cameras being used, which allows the watcher/listener to be close to what is going on, and really enjoy the feeling of being there. As well as the songs recorded live in the studio, there are another four from a show earlier this year, plus the conversation. My only personal gripe, which is incredibly minor, is that I would love for this to have been released with a CD or download of the music so that I could also play this in the car, as it is truly glorious in every facet. This is absolutely essential for any fans of Iona, Dave or Sally, Celtic music, or who just want to hear music where vocals and instruments combine to create something which is ethereal and powerful, both at the same time. Simply stunning.

 Celestial Fire - Live in the UK by BAINBRIDGE, DAVE album cover DVD/Video, 2017
5.00 | 5 ratings

BUY
Celestial Fire - Live in the UK
Dave Bainbridge Crossover Prog

Review by tszirmay
Special Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

5 stars This review will be a long one but rest assured, it will be a good one.

Being a long-time fan of Celtic prog stalwarts Iona and deeply impressed by guitarist Dave Bainbridge's releases as well, I was looking forward to this new start for the mercurial multi-instrumentalist, as Iona has sadly put their career on hold, after the rather disappointing "Another Realm" album. Both 2004's stunning "Veil of Gossamer" and 2014's delirious "Celestial Fire" got perfect marks for me, exhilarating works that conjure profound images of time and space, with numerous examples of technical prowess and emotional expression. Throughout the latter, Dave's exemplary guitar work shines like no other, adding luxuriant keyboards to the mix but more importantly a colossal amount of energy and passion, features that went often missing on most of that "Another Realm" album. It was only fitting then that Iona members went their separate ways, presumably for the time being, recharging their batteries and concentrating on solo projects.

Dave has put together a new touring band named Celestial Fire and presented live them in the UK, going through some of his solo material, a few classic Yes covers as well as some rarely played Iona classics. Replacing Iona vocalist Joanna Hogg was not going to be easy but Sally Minnear (yes, you read right, Gentle Giant keyboard maestro is her dad) does a lovely job indeed, albeit in a different tone than the legendary Northern Irish vocalist. Fellow Iona colleague Frank van Essen supplies his usual dual punch of drums and violin (how often do you see that?) and two newcomers are added on bass and Chapman Stick in Simon Fitzpatrick (Carl Palmer's Legacy) as well as secondary guitarist Dave Brons. There are 2 CDs worth of music as well as a concert DVD and bonus material, which is the coolest idea ever for a reviewer as one can see who plays what and how well and intense they express themselves. A radiant package to say the least, recorded at Fibbers, York on October 1st 2015. Celestial Fire begins the concert on explosive and optimistic notes, waiting little time in sizzling the crowd with heavenly music and emotional release. The title track weaves into Roger Dean-inspired images of divine glows of infinite space, dense instrumental technique from all players and a bombastic approach that speaks volumes of their craft. Again, we have Yes music played by non-Yes musicians and doing it sublimely. Simon Fitzpatrick's bruising bass drone hits the speakers with a vengeance, always a great platform to permit melodies to thrive and expand. Van Essen is a polyrhythmic octopus, driving, pushing and propelling the arrangement with undeniable gusto, so it comes as no surprise that the blistering Bainbridge guitar feels free to roam, soar and scour unabated. Guitarist Brons shuffles some delectable slide guitar that is straight out of the Steve Howe book, showing some slippery licks and smiling widely in the process. The lovely Sally Minnear uses her angelic voice with feminine delicacy, a true treat to behold. Well-oiled machine right from the get-go. Impressive!

In all, Dave proposes 3 pieces from the "Celestial Fire" album, namely the title track described above, "Love Remains" and "In the Moment". 2 are from "Veil of Gossamer", the breathtaking "Until the Tide Turns" featuring a spectacular vocal display as well as "Over the Waters". The Iona material is taken from the classic "the Kells" album, 3 pieces including the title track, "Revelation" and "Chi-Rho". "Beyond these Shores" provides the title track as well as "Today" and the 2 part "Brendan" suite ("Voyage" and "Return"). Lastly for the Iona set, a single track from the stupendous "Open Sky" album in the form of "Song of Ascent #2". The classic and the immediately recognizable arpeggio on "Roundabout" and "Soon" section of "Gates of Delirium" are the Yes covers. Done to perfection.

The folk insinuations of "Today", featuring a tortuous Minnear vocal and surprisingly including a short bass solo, some tectonic skins bashing from Van Essen and a genuine zeal from all involved. Throw in Dave's celebrated bouzouki and the deal is done. The glorious Celtic chant of "Kells Opening Theme" sounds like a classic piece that transcends time, musical swirling mists permeating the dew-drenched valleys that evoke the deepest sentiments. Its companion piece "Revelation" offers a towering vocal performance, charging guitars, Chapman Stick and nifty drumming. Dave's staggering guitar style is spotlighted on the reel-like instrumental blowout "The Storm", which is as Irish as it gets, with blistering finger work and seemingly effortless technique, the man is a first rate guitar slinger, a sultry synthesis of Howe, Hackett, Latimer and Holdsworth. He "needs a little rest after that one?", no kidding!

One of the outright glowing jewels from his first solo album Veil of Gossamer is the spectral "Until the Tide Has Turned", a gently romantic ballad expertly delivered by Minnear's impassioned vocals and carved underneath by Fitzpatrick's gorgeous bass loops, while Dave concentrates on the elegant piano. This is so poignant and crushingly beautiful. Gulp! When Dave stands up and shoots off a sizzling, arching guitar solo, I mean I am slayed. Plunging into razor-sharp semi-jazz fusion on "Love Remains", the piano work is dazzling, hints of Chick Corea while Brons streaks the sky with lightning blasts, the buildup is extraordinary in terms of mastery and feeling. Sally grasps the microphone and does quite a melodic interpretation, heartfelt and profound, before the boys slam headfirst into a bombastic symphonic explosion, led by a mad synthesizer folly and a moody mid-section that floats serenely. Then things get ecstatic: bubbly bass backflips, schizophrenic drum rolls, infused by a blooming vortex of Mach 5 notes from the guitars and synths that wink at classic The Flower Kings. Fast and furious, at breakneck speed and yet under complete control, the extended axe solo is beyond explanation. A flurry of ivory delight puts this love story to bed. Thus ends the first set.

The second set flings "Over the Waters" into high gear, like a speedy low flying drone, screaming over hills and valleys before veering into the tumultuous North Sea, waves crashing and whitecaps cresting majestically. This is quite the guitar fest, a long and extended solo that is highly melodic and yet audacious. Sally wails in whispered serenity, and then both join as one sound that soars above the aquatic expanse, evoking a plethora of images and impressions. The playing by all instrumentalists is sheer nirvana.

Always a perennial Iona concert favorite, "Chi-Rho" keeps the bustling electricity flowing, albeit in a more traditional folk setting, ringing and chiming guitars, mandolins and the voice front and center. Blustery then sedate, the piece travels up and down the spine, sizzling guitars pirouetting in the haze. This is the proverbial breezy moment, a gentle reminder of tradition and accessibility, Sally singing convincingly.

The classic Yes hit "Roundabout" is given a more homey coating, it is after all a live experience, so the overt symphonics are downplayed here in order to focus on the thrill of the moment, a bass solo spotlight of the finest order. Fitzpatrick shows off tremendous dexterity, which is what the piece is famous for, brawny muscle and subtle technique all rolled into one, molesting his 6 string bass monster like a true maestro, expertly navigating the low end parts as well as the famous tingling arpeggios . Audience participation adds to the thrill but this is quite a jazzy interpretation and a fun tribute. 'Open Sky' remains my favorite Iona album and "Song of Ascent Part 2" is the loftiest point to be discovered there, a nearly 10 minute festival of spiritual journey and unlimited freedom. The godly piano guides the way, shimmering and dreamy voice phrasings adding to the ultimate liberation. Van Essen's delicate percussion decorates the throb, as the drums kick in full force and the electric guitar signals the upward elevation towards the stars. Evocative, you think? When Van Essen's glorious violin duets with Dave's piano, thus exulting in the utmost sensations, the spiritual high so many seek but do not always find, finally arrives. This is progressive rock at its sharpest, a moment in time that is awe inspiring, Sally humming gently, what a thrill?. "Beyond These Shores" is a song of crushing beauty, a whopping melody and profound emotional exuberance. Intense atmospheric keyboards meander into the violin's shimmering path, blooming into a sublime vocal foray, tempting the soul with a panacea of sounds that highlight the serenity of discovery, "wherever I may go?".

A two-part suite that has been rarely played in concert, the fairy tale embossed "Brendan's Voyage" and "Brendan's Return" is quite the exploration, combining historical anecdote with mystical surrealism. Once again, the overall impression of escape into the past and revisit hallowed ground, makes this perhaps the most overt prog section of the set list, focused on slick electric guitar curls up and down the spine, Minnear's soaring scat singing and that darn piano and accompanying synths. Bainbridge shows off his considerable talents on the lead guitar, peeling off glittering notes with effortless zeal, switching speeds and carrying on with unfettered passion.

The powerful epic leviathan "In the Moment" is just as glorious as on the Celestial Fire album, as it encompasses within one track, all the attributes that makes Bainbridge's music so utterly appealing and eternal, constantly reigniting the original thrill, as if it never even faded away in the first place, like some universal flame burning deep inside. Evocative, genuinely spiritual, empowering, positive and comforting, this is the power of music, able to instill various sensations on numerous levels while still proposing a honed dedication to artistic feeling. Sally sings "wisdom can be found?". Indeed!

Arguably one of the most beautiful pieces of music ever created in any genre, "Soon" has always been a spectacular marvel, a melody of cosmic preciousness and a simple musical arrangement based around extraordinary guitar manipulations (effect pedal, slide and synthesized sheen) and thus a fitting encore finale. A stellar performance by a genius artist. Having served as a replacement keyboardist for John Hawken on the recent "Hero & Heroine" revisited tour, I can only shudder at the realization that Bainbridge is tugging at my heartstrings, in that mythical Strawbs album will accompany me to my Iona graveyard and resting place. So it has been written.

A masterful package that deserves a huge audience. Right on top of my 2017 list as we speak as this is my kind of gorgeous melodic prog and an invitation to further dream.

5 heavenly sparks

 Celestial Fire by BAINBRIDGE, DAVE album cover Studio Album, 2014
3.97 | 103 ratings

BUY
Celestial Fire
Dave Bainbridge Crossover Prog

Review by BrufordFreak
Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

4 stars This album has been difficult for me to get a grip on. It's amazing and yet, somehow, disappointing. At times I've listen to it with little or no emotional connection and others I'm completely drawn in with my jaw on the floor. The problem is, I think, that you have to be willing and able to give Celestial Fire your full attention to appreciate its magnificence. As Thomas said in his review of 2/9/15, there is a lot of "old Yes" feeling to this album. Some of the songs could have come from Drama or should have been on Tormato. Much in the IONA tradition, the violins of Frank van Essen, Celtic wind instruments of Troy Donockley and David Fitzgerald, and "ethereal" vocals of Joanne Hogg provide tremendous contributions to this album. And Mr. Bainbridge's keyboard work has never been more impressive (Note: "Love Remains"!) My problem is perhaps with some of the other contributors and parts of the album and its songs. Don't get me wrong, bassist Randy George and drummer Collin Leijenaar are incredible. I just feel confused sometimes whether the music is going hard rock, or Celtic folk, Jazz rock or ethereal ambient. And Dave's impressive guitar play spills over a few too many times into the area I call "bombast"--as if he's really going overboard trying to impress us (like on "For Such a Time as This"). Also, there are moments--too many, perhaps--that sound just like Yes songs (or THE FLOWER KINGS). I love(d) Yes and I even like many of the Yes-inspired or imitators. For some reason the voice of uber-competent Demian WIlson is hidden way back in the mix. Maybe I just need to chill and let it flow. I had it on heavy rotation when I first got it and then kind of forgot about it. That might be indicative of some of my hesitation with this album--it really hasn't drawn me back much less lassoed my heart. However, I cannot help but exclaim that this is prog rock composition and performance at its very highest level.

Favorite songs: the weave of piano, strings, synth, guitar and voice of 4. "The First Autumn" (4:04), the opening half of "Celestial Fire" (15:23); the gorgeous Disney-like first half of "In the Moment" (14:22), and; the pair of softer Celtic pieces, "Innocence Found" (5:49) (gorgeous weave throughout) and the Mike Oldfield Hergest Ridge-like instrumental finale, "On the Edge of Glory" (3:05).

A solid four star album that might deserve more.

 Celestial Fire by BAINBRIDGE, DAVE album cover Studio Album, 2014
3.97 | 103 ratings

BUY
Celestial Fire
Dave Bainbridge Crossover Prog

Review by tszirmay
Special Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

5 stars Dave Bainbridge released the meticulous "Veil of Gossamer" back in 2005 and that album has remained a perennial favorite, sliding into my top 20 all-time, sitting among the giants of the glory days as well as a few recent monuments to prog's everlasting genius. Nine long years have passed, focused on discovering many wonderful albums from a myriad of distant masters but always hoping that one day, this tremendously talented leader of legendary Celtic prog band Iona would deliver another palpitating release that would bowl me over like Veil did. Being a big fan of Iona, I was deeply dismayed in 2011 by their last album, "Another Realm" a 2cd affair that had little teeth, even less adventure and had literally forced me to write a negative review, an abhorrent perspective in my line of pleasure. So I was somewhat anxious about "Celestial Fire" and its impact on my adulation for this gifted man. Yes, I read that it was going to be over an hour of music, with fabulous guests such as Threshold's Damian Wilson (a recent discovery for me) , muscular bassist Randy George of Neal Morse and Alan White fame, as well as stellar Dutch drummer Colin Leijenaar (also from Morse and Jordan Rudess). Obviously Iona colleagues past and present like David Fitzgerald, Troy Donockley, Frank van Essen, Martin Nolan and Joanna Hogg all helped their crafty maestro. I am proud to announce that the wait was definitely worth it, as Dave proposes nearly 75 minutes of splendid contemporary progressive rock music. Bainbridge is not only a tremendous acoustic and electric guitar player but his keyboard work is just as overpoweringly awesome.

After a typical Celtic ethereal introduction on the spirited "Heavenfield", the title track comes in as quite a shock to the system, and many of you prog fans will not believe your ears as Bainbridge opts for a quasi-classic Yes sound, orchestral Wakeman-esque keyboard splurges, bold and trebly bass and complex polyrhythmic splendor, with male vocals that would make Jon Anderson blush. Toss in some delightful female backing and choir vocals and the deal is done. Yes has not sounded this fresh and explosive since the 70s! Dave was certainly "going for the one", delivering a masterful homage to the Tormato boys of yore. Even his guitar playing hearkens back to the Howe glory days. My goodness!

This same audacity is continued on the volcanic "See What I see" , giving Damian Wilson the front of the stage to really show off his lungs as Colin thumps mightily, crowned by a rampaging bass and those massed choir voices that we all know and love. Compare this to the recent soporific Yes recording and you wonder what many of us knew long ago, Yes has been out-Yessed by a vast group of musicians who simply have taken the legacy further. Hello Flower Kings, Simon Says, Wobbler, Moth Vellum, Perfect Beings etc?

Let us be reminded that Iona is squarely in the prog-folk sub-genre, so a lovely pastoral deviation is entirely to be expected. The delicate beauty of "The First Autumn" suggest aromas that rural/magical aura that invites reverie and introspection, led by Yvonne Lyon's magical voice that hints at classic Enya, but with way more edge than the celebrated new age artist from Eire. The string support colors the fragile theme with dense classicism and an entirely lovely intermezzo.

The epic 10 minute+ "For Such a Time as This" looks back to Dave's previous album, his mighty guitar up-front twirling amid the glorious piano work while being pursued by a colossally effective George/Leijenaar rhythm section, alternating between serene and explosive (though far from the Yes sound expressed earlier). Violinist Todd Reynolds and cellist Corinne Frost give the arrangement immense depth and variation. Then Dave handles the acoustic guitar in perfect fashion, playing it in parallel with some slide guitar in the background, a Jan Akkerman-like moment one should not skip over. This segues into one of Bainbridge's patented soaring electric leads, a trait that he simply owns in spades, scratching the stratosphere with a flurry of sizzling notes, lush with emotion and feeling. The drum work is jaw-dropping, George popping his fat strings mercilessly in unison, it's enough to make any prog fan drool. The speed, the precision and the emotion are unfathomable, nearly unbearable! This is a classic piece and a jewel of a track that defines the artist perfectly.

"Innocence Found" proves once again that Celtic propensity of emotional readings of simple folk songs and elevating them to celestial heights, as vocalists Julia Malyasova, Sally Minnear, Debbie and Evie Bainbridge weave a convincing tale, spurred by a delirious violin, delicate piano phrasings, lovely tin whistles and flutes and a heavenly guitar. This is veering near Mike Oldfield territory, something that occurs with this artist ever since Mike released his much debated Voyager record (an album I happen to adore), a certain Iona parallel that is impossible to negate. Fact is, this is achingly beautiful music, period.

Another epic piece "Love Remains" and its intense 13 minutes reignite the bold progressive symphonics, with Dave's majestic piano now taking the lead, speeding like a midnight train to nowhere. Damian gently builds up the flames of passion, as the fizzling synths kick in with near delirious fervor, propelling this massive piece into impossibly complex twists and turns, shifts and feints, the drums in particular doing some serious mental damage. I am reminded of Roine Stolt's The Flower Kings brand of colossal exuberance, this is certainly on par with what the Swedish band has best to offer. Dave's electric axe solo alternates between long sustained notes and blistering Mach 5 licks that will leave your jaw in the proverbial gutter.

As if to drive home that message, the majestic "In the Moment" relies on another quarter of an hour to unleash some more sonic magic, acoustic ripples that soothe soul, close to bucolic British folk and all its trappings until the theme blooms into another prog juggernaut, bass and drums pummeling ahead, then suddenly retreating back into a sun-drenched rainbow of beautiful voices with orchestral backing, 'no space between' sings the choir, as Damian shows off his softer side. In an album bursting with mystical highlights, this track just takes you into another world, a massive expanse where artist and fan coalesce into one. Colossal, imperial, spacious, ethereal, grandiose all words that define what the ears and brain absorb, this is what music should mean to any audiophile. When the smoking organ, the relentless bass and the steam-roller drum assault kicks in, one can only surrender to the magic. Wilson wails in the background and the moment is reached! The afterglow violin flutters in the ether, reminding one of the eargasm that just tremored, the quaking now only occasional, the gentle rest not far away.

"Heavenfield "gets a brief reprise before the final cut "On the Edge of Glory" brings the curtain down an a thrilling musical adventure, dual tin whistles (Nolan and Fitzgerald) vie for the center stage, percussive shivers and vocal shimmers follow in reverent style, a perfect finale.

Needless to say, this is a killer album, a 2014 masterpiece that begs to be heard, admired and adulated. Fans of the afore-mentioned bands should hunt this one down and relish the music within.

5 cosmic fervours

Thanks to ProgLucky for the artist addition. and to Quinino for the last updates

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