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SUBMARINE SILENCE

Rock Progressivo Italiano • Italy


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Submarine Silence picture
Submarine Silence biography
Founded in Mantova, Italy in 1996

SUBMARINE SILENCE is a new Italian group that was born from the idea of Mellow Records owner Mauro Moroni. The group can be regarded as a side-project of the neo-progressive group MOONGARDEN. Based on the idea of Mr. Moroni, the MOONGARDEN keyboardist Cristiano Roversi founded the group. The group consists of Cristiano Roversi (keyboards), David Cremoni (guitars) and Emilio Pizzoccoli (drums & percussions). David Cremoni is also a member of MOONGARDEN. Bass sounds are made by Taurus pedals.

The band first appeared in a GENESIS tribute "The River of Constant Change - A Tribute to Genesis". In 2001 they released the self-titled debut album. It is very GENESIS inspired instrumental progressive. Even the album artwork resembles "Foxtrot" and it is by the same artist Paul Whitehead. In 2002 they also appeared in the Finnish KALEVALA project.

Not very original but should especially please fans of GENESIS.

: : : Markus Mattsson, FINLAND : : :

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SUBMARINE SILENCE discography


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SUBMARINE SILENCE top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.37 | 53 ratings
Submarine Silence
2001
3.15 | 41 ratings
There's Something Very Strange In Her Little Room
2013
3.81 | 67 ratings
Journey Through Mine
2016
3.95 | 56 ratings
Did Swans Ever See God?
2020

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SUBMARINE SILENCE Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 Did Swans Ever See God? by SUBMARINE SILENCE album cover Studio Album, 2020
3.95 | 56 ratings

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Did Swans Ever See God?
Submarine Silence Rock Progressivo Italiano

Review by Rivertree
Special Collaborator PSIKE Team & Band Submissions

4 stars The band started as a Genesis clone more or less, but soon they have found their unique niche regarding the widespread progressive rock realm. On the one hand SUBMARINE SILENCE constants are David Cremoni (guitars) and keyboarder Cristiano Roversi, both also known for operating with the band Moongarden, yet on a hiatus probably. Furthermore, with Guillermo Gonzalez there is a rather prominent singer aboard, Not for the first time really, the predecessor album from 2016 already sees him participating. And that would be the band's core. What comes in addition to this are bass player Alberto Zanetti and drummer Valerio Michetti, plus two female/male singers, just caring for some additional background vocal duties.

Distributed via the acclaimed label Ma.Ra.Cash Records 'Did Swan's Ever See God?' shines with strong symphonic traces. Roversi does not skimp on Mellotron and Hammond. The great plus goes to the sophisticated and overly accessible compositions offered during around 45 minutes playing time. Well, I'm not willing to hightlight any specific song in this case. The album simply sounds rounded, coherent all the way through. The entertainment factor is in full blow here. Also a quality feature, I guess approximately half of all the prog album covers must have been painted by Ed Unitsky. This is very recommended, especially dedicated to the typical retro tinged symphonic prog lover who also prefers to hear music from bands like the early Genesis, The Watch, Karmakanic, The Flower Kings aso.

 Did Swans Ever See God? by SUBMARINE SILENCE album cover Studio Album, 2020
3.95 | 56 ratings

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Did Swans Ever See God?
Submarine Silence Rock Progressivo Italiano

Review by BrufordFreak
Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

3 stars Cristiano Roversi and David Cremoni are both known from the Italian Neo Prog band MOONGARDEN. This is their fourth album released since 2001 under the Submarine Silence moniker.

1. "Undone" (10:43) beautiful GENESIS-like music with unusual vocals from Guillermo Gonzales (made better by the harmony vocals of Manuela Milanese). The music, unfortunately, stays too long in the pleasant but boring 2nd gear of songs like "Mad Man Moon" and "Ripples" without delivering much excitement until the guitar solo in the eighth minute (unless you count the rafters-vibrating pulsing single notes of bass pedals). Guillermo's voice finally clicks with me in the final minute when Manuela goes first and he comes in with deep panache. (17.5/20)

2. "Echoes of Silence" (3:12) super lush GENESIS and-when-there-were-four soundscapes la TONY PATTERSON's Equations of Meaning make for a beautiful listen but then Guillermo's delay-echoed and self-backed voice tracks keep coming in off time, confusing and confounding my ears. (8.25/10)

3. "Runaway Strain" (9:14) humming along like something from GENESIS's Invisible Touch, this one rides on solid drumming and nimble-fingered Hammond organ play while Guillermo sings in his NAD SYLVAN voice. At 3:00 we slow down for a beautiful 12-string passage, embellished by "oboe" and multiple male voices singing. At 4:25 we then move into a "The Cage"-like passage complete with Tony's solo synth sound. Another switch back to the song's second motif before moving back into a high-speed chase with Hammond and Moog soli while Guillermo continues singing at 6:00. At 7:25 we're back to the "oboe," 'tron and guitar picking (though not 12-string this time). I like the thick bass play here beneath multiple "woodwinds." And that's how it closes. (17.25/20) 4. "A Deeper Kind of Cumber" (6:26) opening with a plethora of deep, ominous sounds woven together in a DAAL-kind of way. The Mellotron and simple hitches meant to signify odd time signatures tries to garner interest and respect, but is then abandoned at the two-minute mark for a "Land of Confusion"-like sound and pace for Guillermo to begin singing over. Nice downshift at 3:25. The attempts to bring in a more sinister KING CRIMSON sound run a-muck when those impassioned vocals and Steve Hackett-like guitars join in. Interesting. (8.5/10) 5. "Aftereffect" (6:25) Is this a different vocalist? (Davide Marani, perhaps)? I like it better. Guillermo sounds great as the background vocalist. And the simpler music, even with the bombast in the fourth minute, is a much better match for this kind of song/singing. (8.75/10)

6. "Echos of Silence, Pt. 2: The Answer" (9:35) A bombastic opening slows down to the lush GENESIS 12-string & Mellotron soundscape over which Manuela Milanese takes the lead vocal--using a relaxed, almost hypnotic approach with her beautiful sonorous voice similar to a cross between Anne Pigalle and Christina Booth. At the end of the third minute a much more vibrant, dynamic theme takes over--over which Guillermo Gonzales jumps like a GLASS HAMMER theatric performance. The "shadow" section begins at 5:00: gently picked classical guitar over which first Manuela, and then Guillermo, sing. A pleasant but predictable instrumental section then follows occupying most of the seventh and eighth minutes. In my opinion it is this approach--with two singers, male and female--that works best for this music. (17.5/20)

Total Time 45:35

While I am, of course, enamored of the Genesis soundscapes, I am not a convert to the decision of using Guillermo Gonzales to sing the lyrics. I think I was expecting the pleasant voice of There's Something Very Strange in Her Little Room's Ricky Tonco (which, for me, was the highlight of that particular album. I have not yet listened to 2017's Journey Through Mine.)

B/four stars; a very nice contribution to the Neo Prog lexicon and one that I recommend all prog lovers hear to judge for themselves.

 Did Swans Ever See God? by SUBMARINE SILENCE album cover Studio Album, 2020
3.95 | 56 ratings

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Did Swans Ever See God?
Submarine Silence Rock Progressivo Italiano

Review by prog_traveller!!

4 stars DID SWANS EVER SEE GOD? Is a forth album from Submarine Silence. What is really important to say that Italian progress had a fantastic year with new albums from Logos and La Maschera Di Cera, which are in my top three albums of the year and I ranked them with five stars and this album is a real gift to prog rock world.

"Undone" is the first song on the album and it starts with a nice acoustic feel with fantastic vocals. Calm Mellotron part over acoustic guitar introduces a little change in tempo and introduces Hammond again featured by interesting vocal performance. Organ, mellotron and flute lead the central piece of the song and entrance of electric guitar with slyghtly distorted bass brings more heaviness into this piece.

"Echoes of Silence" is an interesting keyboard driven space song and it closes with a nice acoustic guitar. "Runaway Strain" starts really heavy with a guitar and bass driven riff followed by Hammond and later on other keys, a real prog rocker with slower parts and various mood changes all followed by great musicianship, a calming finish leads to "A Deeper Kind of Cumber" which is really dark and with lots of eclectic elements. "The aftereffect" is jet another slow song with elements of psych and space.

"Echoes of Silence, Pt. 2: The Answer", is a nine minute album closer and it starts fantastically with great guitar and Hammond. This album represents a great prog journey with elements of symphonic, eclectic, psych/space prog, great musicianship and tempo changes that are masterfully done, full, complete and balanced, a truly great effort.

4,5 stars

 Did Swans Ever See God? by SUBMARINE SILENCE album cover Studio Album, 2020
3.95 | 56 ratings

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Did Swans Ever See God?
Submarine Silence Rock Progressivo Italiano

Review by bartymj

5 stars One of the few reasons 2020 has been a remotely good year is the standard of modern prog, which I think is at its best for some time. At the heart of that has been the resurgence in the RPI genre: Logos' "Sadako e le mille gru di carta", La Maschera Di Cera's "S.E.I.", and now this one to finish the year, all three of which are 5* albums for me.

Here's where I show a bit of ignorance though - I've not listened to Submarine Silence's previous albums - however looking at the line-ups, this album adds the vocals of Manuela Milanese, who's harmony with the male voices really adds something special. I also don't know an awful lot about Milanese herself, but a quick google led to a YouTube video of her taking on The Great Gig in the Sky, and doing it well.

"Did Swans Ever See God?" for me is a brilliant symphonic album - many modern symphonic offerings I often score poorly due to sounding dated - If I wanted 70s sound, I'd listen to something from the 70s. This though doesn't give me that feeling despite the clear Genesis/Yes influence.

Best tracks on the album bookend it - the opener Undone is more Genesis-like, plus a long belting guitar solo, while Echoes of Silence Pt 2 is more of a Yes-meets-classic-rock grand finale. In between, the fast paced Runaway Strain and darker, heavier Deeper Kind of Cumber are also great tracks.

 Did Swans Ever See God? by SUBMARINE SILENCE album cover Studio Album, 2020
3.95 | 56 ratings

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Did Swans Ever See God?
Submarine Silence Rock Progressivo Italiano

Review by rdtprog
Special Collaborator Heavy / RPI / Symphonic Prog Team

5 stars Submarine Silence is the side project of Moongarden which gives us a good idea of how this band sound. The first song is some Genesis 70's inspired music with a long and breathtaking guitar solo from David Cremoni, Hackett style. ''Runaway Strain'' is in a faster tempo mode. It sounds a lot to the band THe Watch with some heavy bass playing, but the music switch on an acoustic mode inspired again by the pastoral side of Genesis. The band switch frequently from quiet parts to more upbeat passages. ''A Deeper kind of Cumber'' is a dark and slightly heavier track. I have heard previous releases of this project and Moongarden albums and that album click with me more than others. The production is excellent with the sound of every instrument, the songs are all engaging. 5 stars close to God!
 Journey Through Mine by SUBMARINE SILENCE album cover Studio Album, 2016
3.81 | 67 ratings

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Journey Through Mine
Submarine Silence Rock Progressivo Italiano

Review by Aussie-Byrd-Brother
Special Collaborator Rock Progressivo Italiano Team

4 stars Italian symphonic group Submarine Silence, whose core line-up is comprised of guitarist David Cremoni and keyboardist/multi-instrumentalist Cristiano Roversi of Moongarden, find themselves in an interesting position for their third album, 2017's `Journey Through Mine'. The oddly titled disc combines the two worlds of the previous couple of SS albums, their fully instrumental self-titled debut from seventeen years ago (and a much-loved minor modern symphonic classic it's often considered) and the difficult to love vocal-driven `There's Something Very Strange In Her Little Room' from 2013, by offering a balance of both approaches together, with highly consistent results this time around that often lift to real greatness - vintage prog fans are in for a treat!

Submarine Silence are unashamedly influenced by the early-mid Seventies era of Genesis, but thankfully most of the time they are more a case of `inspired by' as opposed to blatantly recycling themes and motifs of that legendary English group (although little moments still pop up here and there like that, so you might need to be a little forgiving!), and they are similar in approach to international acts like the Agents of Mercy and Willowglass, and Italian groups such as The Watch (or even PFM's `Chocolate KIngs' era) that continue in the classic Genesis style. About half the pieces on `Journey...' have English lyric vocals delivered by a raspy and deeply hoarse new singer in Guillermo Gonzales, but thankfully he never tries to ape Peter Gabriel, if anything he reminds a little of Johan Hansson from the Swedish act Twin Age, another Genesis-like group, and while he will likely still prove divisive with listeners, he's a marked improvement on the singer on the previous disc `Something Very Strange...' that frequently distracted from some colourful musical backings.

Opening instrumental `The Astrographic Temple' is all dizzying synth spirals, whirring Moog sprints, Mellotron-lifted fancy, loopy electronic programming, crisply nimble electric guitar runs and punchy drums (courtesy of Emilio Pizzocoli, returning from the debut), sounding not unlike another modern group Trion. `Black Light Back' is full of pretty and dramatic atmosphere, built around haunting Mellotron choirs, sparkling twelve-string acoustic chimes in unison with weeping ethereal electric guitar strains, and Guillermo delivers a curiously charismatic and charmingly accented vocal (and a lovely highlight is the proper grand piano instead of keyboard emulation in the intro, a difference that is instantly noticeable and should be thoroughly appreciated by listeners!). `Swirling Contour' reminds of numerous 80/90's Neo-Prog bands like Grey Lady Down with its overexcited and energetic vocals, and Genesis-flavoured instrumental `Canova's Gypsoteque' swoons with all the regal organ, aching Steve Hackett-like guitar strains and haunting Mellotron choirs beloved of that band.

The twelve minute title-track `Journey Through Mine' is overloaded with heroic instrumental passages, heavy rumbling bass playing and a theatrically tortured lead vocal, but parts of it could come a little too close to branding Submarine Silence with a dreaded `clone band' tag in the way it borrows similar themes and sounds from Genesis' `Unquiet Slumbers/Quiet Earth/Afterglow' medley off their `Wind and Wuthering' LP - still sounds wonderful and proves very effective though! Gloriously romantic Andy Latimer-esque guitar reaches full of longing burn throughout soloing-heavy instrumental `Five Lands Nightwind' that will be adored by Camel fans, and `Butterflies' is a class act to close on, starting as a delicate piano ballad backing Guillermo's tenderly reflective words and voice as sweet guitar ruminations and inspiring Mellotron choirs raise everything to the heavens in a dreamily hazy finale.

Despite the fact that it doesn't do much in the way of anything new, some vocals can be a little trying and the disc does have a slightly stuffy and boxy production (although it's a welcome antidote to the over-polished lifelessly pristine sound of many modern works), `Journey Through Mine' has an authenticity to its vintage sounds, a warmth in its use of old equipment and an unending pride in the proudly grandiose symphonic prog sounds of old that plenty of vintage prog fans cherish. Submarine Silence are to be commended for stepping up in quality again here, and their latest album, that frequently unveils a very special magic, is highly deserving of more attention.

Four stars.

 Submarine Silence by SUBMARINE SILENCE album cover Studio Album, 2001
3.37 | 53 ratings

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Submarine Silence
Submarine Silence Rock Progressivo Italiano

Review by apps79
Special Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

3 stars Submarine Silence was originally created in mid-90's as a project from Moongarden musicians Cristiano Roversi and David Cremoni in order to participate in the Mellow Records Genesis tribute ''The river of constant change'', covering ''Entangled'' with Paolo Sterzi on violin.They ended up to become a regular Moongarden off-shoot band, recruiting drummer Emilio Pizzoccoli.The three Italians recorded the parts of what was going to become the band's debut album in their own home studios and ''Submarine silence'' was eventually released in 2001, of course on Mellow Records.

Stylistically the trio sounds like an instrumental version of MOONGARDEN, at least with what their normal group was sounding at the time.It's heavily GENESIS-influenced Neo/Symphonic Prog, overcoming the absence of a bassist by using bass pedals and strongly relying on the use of analog keyboards like the Moog synthesizer and the Mellotron.The arrangements are lush and deeply symphonic with a strong tendency towards melodic and refined music textures, they sound a lot like mid-70's GENESIS with an obvious aura of the Neo Prog scene due to the sense of melody in the guitar work.Great music, albeit rather unoriginal, with heavy bits of Mellotron and TONY BANKS-like synth solos over a talented David Cremoni, who's guitar has always a STEVE HACKETT-like sensitive touch.The man adds also a good amount of 6- and 12-string guitars in the process, leading to multi-part compositions with beautiful electroacoustic changes and a mood of rural enviroment around.The absence of vocals is what sets them apart from MOONGARDEN, the focus here is on elaborate and atmospheric Symphonic and Melodic Rock with a monster retro feel.

Consider this as a MOONGARDEN off-shoot both literally and stylistically.GENESIS-inspired Prog Rock with analog keyboards and plenty of interesting, melodic sections.Recommended.

 There's Something Very Strange In Her Little Room by SUBMARINE SILENCE album cover Studio Album, 2013
3.15 | 41 ratings

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There's Something Very Strange In Her Little Room
Submarine Silence Rock Progressivo Italiano

Review by Aussie-Byrd-Brother
Special Collaborator Rock Progressivo Italiano Team

3 stars Hmmm...`There's Something Very Strange...about what's gone a little wrong here' might have been a better title for this one. It was easy to buy the CD of `There's Something Very Strange In Her Little Room' simply on the strength of Submarine Silence's previous self titled album back in 2001, and anyone who has heard that one may remember it was a lush and sophisticated instrumental album in the tradition of classic period Genesis. It's a work that has endured, so the promise and anticipation of a long- awaited follow-up after 12 years was very high. What a shame it is to discover that the band themselves seem to have somewhat lost focus of what made them special and endearing in the first place, despite many moments of greatness scattered sporadically throughout the disc.

Things look fine on the surface. The album has lovely evocative cover art with a lavish CD booklet, even if the colours are a little dark and ominous. The album is essentially one continuous 38 minute 14 part title track with three additional numbers at the end, and like the previous album, much of the music is grandly symphonic and full of numerous instrumental movements. There's an endless overload of majestic Mellotron, dazzling Minimoog, stirring electric guitar solos and delicate acoustic atmospheres, as well as some brief orchestral flourishes. This Italian band works closer to the Neo and symphonic genres than proper RPI, though there are still glimpses of that every now and then. The previous album showcased what a talented band of musicians they are, especially main composer Cristiano Roversi, and from an instrumental point of view, that is still very much evident. Just listen to the multi Mellotron choir `Prologue' that opens the album, the exhilarating `Childs At Play', the haunting `Sleepfall' and sumptuous `Aftersong'.

However, where the album badly falters is the use of vocals this time around. The addition alone wouldn't necessarily be cause for alarm, but in this particular case it has quite damaging results. Lead vocalist Ricky Tonco employs a forced gothic slur, a kind of pained David Bowie by way of Marilyn Manson-esque croon that pushes the wondrous music so far to the background. It sounds like the band were kind of hoping for an IQ/Arena dramatic and theatrical sound here, but despite much of the album having extended instrumental sections, everything crashes to the ground because of the endless use of the drab vocals, and it gives the music a colourless, mundane quality overall. Just compare how much the album picks up the second the vocals stop and you suddenly start paying attention again. Challenge yourself to make it through the eighth track `Passing Strange' and not give up on the album altogether, absolutely excruciating. Oddly, one of the extra tracks at the end features a different vocalist, Mirko Ravenoldi (of fellow Italian prog band Catafalchi Del Cyber), and even his delivery is quite shrill and harsh! Can't win either way here.

A serious rethink concerning the vocals is in order with this band. Artists trying new things should be supported, and we likely all have prog albums in our collection with poorer or average vocals that we still grow to love, but for now they are a serious liability for Submarine Silence. It's a shame they cover so much of the music (probably about 80% of the album), because the actual compositions and performance here are so promising. If you are willing to be patient, to take the time to focus on the playing and can overlook the vocals, you may really end up liking this. It's quite sad to be so critical of this point, and probably Tonco would sound fine under different circumstances, but hopefully other listeners can enjoy the album more and can see past this factor.

So a bit of a frustrating missed opportunity, but let's not write write the band off just yet, as there's too much talent to dismiss them quite so easily. Let's also hope we don't have to wait another 12 years for their next work.

Two and a half stars...rounded up to three for the actual playing and compositions.

 There's Something Very Strange In Her Little Room by SUBMARINE SILENCE album cover Studio Album, 2013
3.15 | 41 ratings

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There's Something Very Strange In Her Little Room
Submarine Silence Rock Progressivo Italiano

Review by Second Life Syndrome
Prog Reviewer

2 stars I wasn't sure what to expect from this new album, "There's Something Very Strange in Her Little Room", by Submarine Silence. They are usually labeled as rock progressivo italiano, but that sub-genre is usually quite diverse in style. When I received my review copy, I was immediately unimpressed with the cover art, as it seems very gaudy to me. I admit, though, that I go for the "less is more" approach.

Submarine Silence is a side project from the more well-known group, Moongarden. This group is usually quite revered, but I really don't see the need for this side project. Submarine Silence embraces a very keyboard-driven style without much variety. I recently saw them compared to Genesis and Marillion, but they literally sound nothing like them in any way. The style is completely different.

Every song on this album consists of the same basic beats, atmospheric keys, and quirk. That would normally be fine, but I find that the compositions are severely lacking here. The style is just fine, but there is little or no inspiration that can be found. All we get are tracks that drone on and on without any direction or focus. Even with the plethora of different instruments they utilize, the music still sounds dull.

Another issue I have is the vocalist, Mirko Ravenoldi. His voice is way below average, and even cringe-worthy many, many times. I can't help but feel like his soulless delivery is part of why this album stinks for me. Don't get me wrong: This album has some interesting moments, such as the short instrumental interludes. These interludes, such as "Sleepfall" and "Evening Comes", are usually heavy on the RPI influences, and feature grand, airy synth that just feels right. Indeed, there are even some great moments within the major tracks with some decent solos, but whenever Mirko starts singing, the album plummets in quality.

Overall, this album just goes on and on and on for what seems like two hours. I had to check the play time, and was surprised at how short it actually is! The dull, uninspired tracks that make up the majority of this album really make time crawl. If you start looking at your timepiece while listening to an album such as this one, maybe you shouldn't listen to it at all.

 There's Something Very Strange In Her Little Room by SUBMARINE SILENCE album cover Studio Album, 2013
3.15 | 41 ratings

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There's Something Very Strange In Her Little Room
Submarine Silence Rock Progressivo Italiano

Review by robbob

4 stars Well

An improve in this second album

Nothing very new or original here...

But i like very much this album

This one man band is not ironic....directely takes the influences of Genesis,IQ and Marillion... Is a mix of music of those bands but very well done...with touches of the Rock Progresivo Italiano

So.... nice songs like the classical Genesis or Marillion or IQ...very good musician...very good inspired in........composer.

Vocals quality a little weak but...is not very disturbing...

So as I like so much old Genesis and IQ music , I only have to thanks to Submarine Silence to keep those sounds alive.

4 stars(or 5 ?... for maybe the best Genesis and IQ inspired band)

Thanks to Todd for the artist addition. and to Quinino for the last updates

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