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JADE WARRIOR

Psychedelic/Space Rock • United Kingdom


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Jade Warrior picture
Jade Warrior biography
The music of JADE WARRIOR is somewhat difficult to describe. Among the influences you'll hear in various aspects of JADE WARRIOR's music are rock, jazz, Latin, Japanese, African, ambient, and the kitchen sink (almost literally - there are spoons and an empty whiskey bottle in there somewhere!). It's often melodically simple, and rhythmically complex... or vice versa. This is the kind of music that everyone can hear different dimensions within and is conqueror of none.

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JADE WARRIOR discography


Ordered by release date | Showing ratings (top albums) | Help Progarchives.com to complete the discography and add albums

JADE WARRIOR top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.63 | 124 ratings
Jade Warrior
1971
3.53 | 119 ratings
Released
1971
3.67 | 140 ratings
Last Autumn's Dream
1972
3.69 | 121 ratings
Floating World
1974
3.61 | 105 ratings
Waves
1975
3.27 | 78 ratings
Kites
1976
3.68 | 95 ratings
Way Of The Sun
1978
2.85 | 34 ratings
Horizen
1984
2.12 | 28 ratings
At Peace
1989
3.30 | 35 ratings
Breathing The Storm
1992
3.72 | 27 ratings
Distant Echoes
1993
3.02 | 41 ratings
Eclipse
1998
3.24 | 32 ratings
Fifth Element
1998
3.72 | 31 ratings
Now
2008

JADE WARRIOR Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

JADE WARRIOR Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

JADE WARRIOR Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

2.65 | 8 ratings
Reflections
1979
4.21 | 20 ratings
Elements: the Island Anthology
1995

JADE WARRIOR Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

0.00 | 0 ratings
We Have Reason to Believe / Barazinbar
1971
0.00 | 0 ratings
A Winter's Tale / The Demon Trucker
1972

JADE WARRIOR Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 Last Autumn's Dream by JADE WARRIOR album cover Studio Album, 1972
3.67 | 140 ratings

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Last Autumn's Dream
Jade Warrior Psychedelic/Space Rock

Review by mickcoxinha

4 stars It is difficult to give a good summary of the first Jade Warrior albums because the band explores many directions, but at least with Last Autumn's Dream, just judging by the cover, you can at least see glimpses of the direction they were going to take with the series of albums with similar covers and largely mellow instrumentals.

To start with the least interesting, early Jade Warrior had the tendency of having hard rock songs that they fortunately ditched later because they were not good on that. In this album, you have Snake and Joanne as good examples of what could have been left off the album and probably no one would miss. Snake even has some interesting touches in the intro and the outro, but both seem to be recorded in a lousy manner.

It is completely different story with A Winter's Tale, May Queen, Demon Trucker. They are also on the more commercial side, but they are well-crafted songs. One of the strenghts of early Jade Warrior, in my opinion, was their use of electric guitar as complementary instrument to their sound, and this feature is present in these alongs, along with the usual flute and percussion combo. They are all enjoyable.

Then, there is the great songs, starting with Dark River, which is a long instrumental with mostly percussion and flute, then Obedience, which is another great instrumental with excellent guitar work (lots of different guitar tracks providing different effects) over the percussion.

Then there are the two great songs with vocals. Morning Hymn is very mellow with excellent flute and vocal melodies, and points toward what Jade Warrior would do as a duo. Then Lady of The Lake, which could be lumped in the "more commercial" songs of the album, but it is extremely well crafted.

Finally, to close the album, a great choice. Borne On The Solar Wind is another instrumental that points towards what Jade Warrior would do later, mixing oriental influences in the fold, mainly through the electric guitar motif that is doubled by flutes and strings, freeing the guitar to make a countermelody. A short song, but a real gem.

The first impression is that this album is not so good as other consistent prog albums, but on the strength of the best songs, it is more remarkable than many albums with sound great but have nothing really special.

 Floating World by JADE WARRIOR album cover Studio Album, 1974
3.69 | 121 ratings

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Floating World
Jade Warrior Psychedelic/Space Rock

Review by friso
Prog Reviewer

4 stars On 'Floating World' Jade Warrior continues its musical travels through the Orient with their first fully instrumental record. The band had changed labels, from Vertigo to Island Records. Had the band been an oddity of a progressive heavy psych band with lots of Asian world music influences, they would now fully focus on creating a new genre of world music and jazz infused art rock. You'll hear standing bass, triple flutes, Asian percussion, classical guitar, organ, some choral sections and the sometimes doubled melodic fuzz guitar of Tony Duhig. There's one heavy guitar piece on the album, and I myself don't bother that the band would leave that all together on their next records. I do really like the strange tribal/choral piece with the heavy fuzz guitar on side two. Besides these two outburst of heavy psychedelic energy, the moods are ethereal, melancholic, majestic, tribal and optimistic. The record has its individual tracks, but it all flows rather naturally from one moment to another. The mixing has that nice wide sound-stage that really allows for loosing oneself in its majestic soundscapes. The quality recording sounds rather timeless as well. Jade Warrior has its own way of musical story telling and because they aren't much like any other progressive rock group they aren't even considered to be a major group of the genre. It's even rather bizarre how the band doesn't fit in any category because of their heavy psych roots. Moreover, their type of (Asian) folk influences aren't anything like the other English groups. For me personally Jade Warrior has become one of my favorite eclectic prog groups and their's a lot to discover in both their 1970-1972 Vertigo period and their instrumental run on Island Records (1974-1978). Four stars for this gem for sure.
 Eclipse by JADE WARRIOR album cover Studio Album, 1998
3.02 | 41 ratings

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Eclipse
Jade Warrior Psychedelic/Space Rock

Review by Beautiful Scarlet

3 stars

This album wasn't released till much later but it was recorded in 1973, thus it recalls the CLASSIC Jade Warrior sound because it is.

Track 1 is a nice stripped down ballad like Yellow Eyes and Travelling, though mediocre in comparison.

Track 2 is a vigorous world music workout with great percussion work as always.

Track 3 is an anti war harder song. I've never enjoyed Jade Warriors rockin' moments, it's why I can't give them a five stars. Anyways this one is not as offensive as the second track of side b from Released.

Track 4 is kind of like track 3 and 2 put together. Mostly instrumental but with pieces of not so good vocals (the melody is bad when they are singing it isn't that Glyn Harvard is a bad singer)

Track 5 opens with spacey space stuff then it breaks into a furious percussion driving workout with screaming guitar. For the first time on this album the music feels inspired and heads in the right direction. After about 1-2 minutes a muted guitar playing chords introduces a pleasant woodwind section. Before the song can drag bass drags the song to new pastures. The song then ends following a short percussion solo introducing the finishing move, a full band closer.

Track 6 is rock n roll complete with the voice and lyrics including baby. This song is rather dated and I dislike it.

Track 7 starts with calm percussion and is joined by great vocals harkening back to Dragonfly Day. The song heads to an intense sound with powerful guitar lead and aggressive drumming. The song then concludes on a fade out and the album is done.

Overall this albums short songs range from bad to okay, thus the lower review then their earlier albums which had some great short songs and great longer songs. Instead, Eclipse best moments are solely vested in the longest songs while the short throwaway tracks are all of them.

 Jade Warrior by JADE WARRIOR album cover Studio Album, 1971
3.63 | 124 ratings

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Jade Warrior
Jade Warrior Psychedelic/Space Rock

Review by Beautiful Scarlet

4 stars Awesome worldly music, should be under Indo/raga rock or jazz rock, not psychedelic.

The tracks only have congas(?) and other ethnic percussion for drums. Awesome, well used stuff that fits the music perfectly. The guitar is beautiful and strong, the singer has an amazing voice, the songs mix shorter and lengthier, what's not to love?

What's not to love with this album is the drop in quality from the stellar 5/5 first side to the mediocre second side.

Opening with the tasteful Traveller, you get the soft side of Jade Warrior then Prenormal day at Brighton gives an amazing introduction to Jade Warriors harder aspects. These two tracks then give way to Masai Morning which is fantastic an African (?) infused mini suite. Then Windweaver, so good, so good and it goes right into the also amazing Dragonfly Day.

The second side is just uninspired versions of the first side. Bad melodies, short songs, etc. This album is superb on the first side, but gives way to a mediocre second side, causing the final score to be 4/5.

 Last Autumn's Dream by JADE WARRIOR album cover Studio Album, 1972
3.67 | 140 ratings

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Last Autumn's Dream
Jade Warrior Psychedelic/Space Rock

Review by Heart of the Matter

4 stars Probably the main problem which the newcomer to this album stumbles with, being a fervent proghead, is that the musicians here were determined not to stay strictly within the boundaries of the Prog genre, but rather to verge on the fringe of its difuse frontier with Art-rock. What sort of things did they find and collect there? Well, that makes for a long and extremely varied list, so I will pick up just a couple of examples, in order to prevent boring the reader.

In the first place, there's a very beautiful, sustained and textured electric guitar tone going all over the instrument's range, and recurring along the entire album, which undoubtedly makes a lot for the prog aspect of it.

Regarding the art-trending side of the equation, I can point my finger to the ethnic elements, such as the contributed by the japanese woodwinds, and also to some occasional big amount of electric feedback, that goes beyond the normal and rather polished idea of what a prog guitar should sound like. I also feel compelled to find something balancing right in the middle of both genres, and that would be some very angular guitar riffs attacking here and there.

Summing up: really enjoyable, specially if you concentrate more in the product and less in the formula.

 Now by JADE WARRIOR album cover Studio Album, 2008
3.72 | 31 ratings

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Now
Jade Warrior Psychedelic/Space Rock

Review by kenethlevine
Special Collaborator Prog-Folk Team

4 stars With the benefit of almost a half century of hindsight, one can assess the classic era of JADE WARRIOR as being divided into two equally significant epochs, conveniently demarcated by the labels on which they recorded but also by something of a shift in style and content.

The first chapter, the Vertigo years, offered 3 releases and one minor classic, that being the self titled debut. It was characterized by a vocal orientation and a certain collision between yin and yang that didn't always end happily. Still, the blend of early KING CRIMSON and JETHRO TULL meets BLACK SABBATH in the quaint college town of Canterbury turned a few heads I dare say, and with reason.

The next phase was on Island records, where they magically parlayed a 3 record deal with continued lack of commercial windfall into a 4 record sojourn, of which the first and fourth, "Floating World" and "Way of the Sun", can be considered minor classics as much for the quality of the work as for their uniqueness and their apparent influence in the prog world and beyond. This was an all instrumental proposition, more ambient and world oriented but still with occasionally uneasy outbursts of fuzzy guitar that didn't always work. Hmm plus ca change...

That takes us to the end of the 1970s. But this is a review of their 2008 album, so I'd like to fast forward over the 30 intervening years to just say that, while to varying degrees they tried to resurrect the lifeblood of the Island work, they hadn't attempted to reclaim the early Vertigo sound, until "Now". It could not have been otherwise given that original songwriter and vocalist Glyn Havard was back in the fold for the first time since he was kicked out simply because he was a singer, coincident with the Island signing. The simple monosyllabic title is so a propos, for this is JADE WARRIOR now, today, but also now is all that matters; all the past experiences and reflections upon them can help inform our today, but only if one can learn to be in the here and now.

JADE WARRIOR has never made it easy upon themselves, but what "Now" does accomplishes is that most elusive triumph of drawing upon the old sound without retreading, updating without losing their vintage coolness, even if nobody can even imagine, let alone remember when they were cool. A group that barely managed to produce one near perfect piece has arranged two here, in a row! First is the ROUSSEAU like ballad "Journey", which would be miraculous if it didn't name-check "Last Autumn's Dream", but it does, and fully merits the shout out. Then we have "Lost Boys", with all the wisdom of an elder chiding today's spiritual bankruptcies. Yet as lyrically fascinating as it is, the meter here is the real marvel.

While the rest doesn't maintain this high level, "3 AM meltdown" manages to channel frenetic outbursts into gentle aftermaths better than most of what they attempted before. Everywhere are Field's flutes softening the face of the new band, while Gowan Turnbull and Theo Travis contribute lazy brass to persuade us of a jazzy timbre we may have missed before, especially noteworthy on the opener "Fool and His Bride". Shockingly, a dulcimer player happened to be in the studio at that time! Havard dominates in his DAVID SYLVIAN voice...or had Sylvian borrowed Havard's pipes for his uber elegant 1980s albums?. Either way, I do wish DAVID/GLYN would not use them to convey "Screaming Dreams" ever ever again.

Since this last JADE WARRIOR release is 12 years old as of this writing, and FIELD and HAVARD are both pushing 80, one would be pardoned for thinking that "Now" is the final chapter, though apparently there has been work on a successor since at least 2012, called "Haiku". One can hope, but "Now" is a vital release that more or less closes all those pesky loops that were uncomfortably littering our prog fairy tales for too long, if in somewhat typically chaotic WARRIOR fashion. 3.5 stars, of course rounded up!

 Distant Echoes by JADE WARRIOR album cover Studio Album, 1993
3.72 | 27 ratings

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Distant Echoes
Jade Warrior Psychedelic/Space Rock

Review by kenethlevine
Special Collaborator Prog-Folk Team

3 stars After the creative nadir of "At Peace", Jon Field and Tony Duhig took a break in the late 1980s. As they were about to begin recording of a new album in 1990, Duhig suffered a fatal heart attack. After a period of uncertainty, Field regrouped with two recruits and issued the far superior "Breathing the Storm", which, while clearly steadying the ship, lacked the oomph of any self respecting JADE WARRIOR release. A couple of years later the same trio emerged with a chorus line of distinguished guests including ex KING CRIMSON violinist David Cross and accomplished saxophonist Theo Travers for "Distant Echoes". To date, it's the post-Island era JADE WARRIOR album that most closely approximates the all instrumental approach that persistently considered threatening to make them almost famous in the mid to late 1970s.

Chief among the improvements is the more spirited percussion and the added prominence of electric guitar courtesy of Colin Henson. From the outset, with "Evocation" and "Into the Sunlight", you can almost see Tony Duhig smiling with a glass raised, hopefully where landscape, seascape and soundscape meet in the beyond. Apart from the classic sound, Field and company have integrated reputable influences like CAMEL and PAT METHENY. And, though Island had originally signed them rather unfairly to be their rival to "Tubular Bells", it's on the ethereal "Standing Stones" that we finally hear what WARRIOR and OLDFIELD might have sounded like the morning after waking up together, both minimalizing the experience.

By Jon Field's own admission, JADE WARRIOR never quite made the album they had in them, a species of "Lonely Planet" travelogue between one's dreams, where the journey is all, but they tried, how they tried. "Distant Echoes" is arguably one of their most authentic, but it too falls short of illuminating their intrinsic brilliance consistently enough to ascend to the heights afforded so relatively few. That's a flaw I can live with.

 Breathing The Storm by JADE WARRIOR album cover Studio Album, 1992
3.30 | 35 ratings

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Breathing The Storm
Jade Warrior Psychedelic/Space Rock

Review by kenethlevine
Special Collaborator Prog-Folk Team

2 stars A few years after the entirely ambient anomaly, "At Peace", recorded at Tony Duhig's ill fated studio, JADE WARRIOR reformed with two new members, Colin Henson and Dave Sturt. Before they could begin recording, Duhig died suddenly. Shaken by the loss, the trio regrouped and created "Breathing the Storm", the first Duhig-less album in band history. While still a bit too comfortably soporific, it is nonetheless a huge improvement on "At Peace" .

Fields' flutes abound and the keyboards are neither tacky nor monotonous for the most part. A few moments even evoke the spirit of the the Island years, especially in "Gift of Wings". Elsewhere, as in "Memory of the Deep", a certain homage is paid to KITARO in the repetition of short colourful motifs that form an underlying rhythm of sorts, which is propitious because, while 2 members apparently contribute percussion, they may well have just brought them into the studio and neglected to set them up, or forgotten them entirely. Sturt contributes a robust fretless bass to a few cuts, which of course is worth half a star just on the face of it, but unfortunately it can't save the title cut from being an utterly banal expose on infinity. Both Field and Henson contribute guitars but they mostly act as a sign that reads "This isn't Patrick O'Hearn", got it? The only piece where I sense some authentic emotional transfer is "Asa no Kiri", which is ironic given its preponderance of high pitched synths, but then Kitaro himself excels in that realm as well.

Some reviews here and there on the web state that this is far and away superior to the new age music of its day but I suspect many who gained that impression spent a lot of time listening to Jade Warrior and very little listening to new age music, and who can blame them? Nonetheless, I'm here to tell you that "Breathing the Storm" is a slightly above average new age recording with an average new age title that, like many of its ilk, under-delivers on its promise. 2.5 stars.

 At Peace by JADE WARRIOR album cover Studio Album, 1989
2.12 | 28 ratings

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At Peace
Jade Warrior Psychedelic/Space Rock

Review by kenethlevine
Special Collaborator Prog-Folk Team

1 stars Now for my first review on meditationmusicarchives, I will be discussing this 1986 album that went unreleased for a few years by one-off British duo JADE WARRIOR. Apart from the first track, which actually has a few clips of discernible melody congealed in its interstices, this is an ideal album to which to meditate, to drift off and be certain that nothing untoward will banish your mantra, or whatever you're using to stay on point. The ambient arrangements are gently imparted on amorphous synths, synthy flutes, and fluty synths, with loooooong loooong notes with no beginning and no end, never wavering thank Buddha. A few nature sounds ensure that you will be transported back to the last time you camped outdoors, but will act as calamine lotion to whatever bug bites you might have endured in passing. I would even add that one could overlay guided meditation imagery on "At Peace" without disturbing the titular promise one bit. Don't worry, there are ZERO drums to unbliss you! 4 stars for the opening track and 5 stars for the closing 2 tracks for a 4.5 star rating.......

Wait what? This isn't MMA? And JADE WARRIOR is a venerable prog rock group? Someone wake me now! No, let me sleep, it feels soooooooo gooooood. I'll rate this when I'm awake and can feel at peace with my choice.

 Horizen by JADE WARRIOR album cover Studio Album, 1984
2.85 | 34 ratings

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Horizen
Jade Warrior Psychedelic/Space Rock

Review by kenethlevine
Special Collaborator Prog-Folk Team

3 stars According to original member and vocalist Glyn Havard, who was unceremoniously written out of the group when they signed to Island Records as an all instrumental band, the group named itself JADE WARRIOR to reflect their yin and yang, their predilection for juxtaposing heavy and soft interludes, sometimes abruptly. They certainly lived up to this name throughout their Vertigo years, and even during the mellower albums that followed. Of course, all along we wondered what the group JADE would sound like, stripped of the WARRIOR. Wait, we didn't? Well, regardless, that question was at least in part answered by 1984's "Horizen", which is largely a Tony Duhig solo album with invited guests. Even Jon Field himself is only on several tracks.

This is a uniformly smooth and mellow album, but, all things considered it could have been a lot worse. Yes the whole production is coated in a lustrous sheen that befits the ascendancy of the New Age era which JADE WARRIOR pioneered, but the compositions are actually reasonably thought out and executed. The album opens with its most triumphant and lucid piece, the "Dune" suite which was ostensibly an ultimately unsuccessful candidate for soundtrack to the movie of the same name, based on the work of science fiction writer Frank Herbert. That doesn't diminish the brilliance of the piece. This is followed with the only major contrast on the album, the steel-drum led "Caribbean Wave", which is certainly one of their more vivacious pieces, and wholly successful.

While the remainder is a notch or two below the opening numbers, "East Wind" and the closing "Long Wait at Mount Li" do offer modest challenges, including a choir on the finale. Overall, this is a rather successful attempt to integrate the classics of the Island era into a more chill 1980s format that still promotes mindfulness. 3.5 stars rounded down.

Thanks to ProgLucky for the artist addition. and to easy livin for the last updates

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