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EXPLOSIONS IN THE SKY

Post Rock/Math rock • United States


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Explosions In The Sky biography
Formed in Austin, Texas in 1999, EXPLOSIONS IN THE SKY have become one of the most recognized bands in the post-rock movement. Like most bands within their style, their music is slow and epic (despite also featuring a distinctly more upbeat feel than GODSPEED YOU BLACK EMPEROR or MOGWAI). Although 2001's "Those Who Tell the Truth Shall Die, Those Who Tell the Truth Shall Live Forever" gained them some attention, 2003's "Earth Is Not a Cold Dead Place" was a breakthrough of sorts, increasing their popularity quite considerably.



Why this band must be listed in www.progarchives.com :
Their music is very comparable to that of bands like SIGUR ROS, GODSPEED YOU BLACK EMPEROR and MOGWAI, featuring many of the same slow buildups and gradual developments throughout their rather lengthy tracks.

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EXPLOSIONS IN THE SKY discography


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EXPLOSIONS IN THE SKY top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

2.88 | 40 ratings
How Strange, Innocence
2000
3.44 | 46 ratings
Those Who Tell the Truth Shall Die, Those Who Tell the Truth Shall Live Forever
2001
3.90 | 191 ratings
The Earth Is Not a Cold Dead Place
2003
3.00 | 11 ratings
Friday Night Lights: Original Motion Picture Soundtrack
2004
3.55 | 91 ratings
All of a Sudden I Miss Everyone
2007
3.61 | 68 ratings
Take Care, Take Care, Take Care
2011
3.05 | 2 ratings
Prince Avalanche: An Original Motion Picture Soundtrack (with David Wingo)
2013

EXPLOSIONS IN THE SKY Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

EXPLOSIONS IN THE SKY Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

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EXPLOSIONS IN THE SKY Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

2.86 | 21 ratings
Travels in Constants (Vol. 21): The Rescue
2005

EXPLOSIONS IN THE SKY Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 The Earth Is Not a Cold Dead Place by EXPLOSIONS IN THE SKY album cover Studio Album, 2003
3.90 | 191 ratings

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The Earth Is Not a Cold Dead Place
Explosions In The Sky Post Rock/Math rock

Review by Neu!mann
Prog Reviewer

5 stars The '01 album "Those Who Tell the Truth (...etc. etc. etc.)" marked a quantum leap forward in confidence and style for the Post Rock shamans from Austin, Texas, after their uncertain studio debut the previous year. But that sophomore effort still showed the stretch marks of a difficult gestation: stealing voice-over film monologues to underline musical points, and so forth. It would be another two years before the maturing sound of Explosions in the Sky finally matched the band's fanciful name: erupting into the west Texas firmament on a rapturous blaze of instrumental glory.

And once again I find myself apologizing for the hothouse flowers of my over-fertilized prose (hardly inappropriate in a Progressive Rock forum, you would think). I had already heard a few isolated selections from the album, on their page here at ProgArchives and at the band's own web site. But absorbing the entire thing in a single, uninterrupted sitting was a revelatory experience, by turns uplifting, mournful, triumphant, cathartic, elegiac, and devastating. It's no wonder my rhetoric turned purple in response.

On a strictly emotional level the closest kneejerk comparison would be to the majestic year 2000 GY!BE epic "Lift Your Skinny Fists (...etc. etc. etc.)", re-imagined on a more intimate and personal scale. There's an almost symphonic grandeur to the album that Beethoven or Wagner might have recognized and applauded, beginning with the nine-plus minute intro "First Breath After Coma": a brilliant title, by the way, for such transfiguring music. And yet there's also a disarming simplicity to the arrangements and performances, wistful and delicate one moment but overpowering elsewhere.

The music achieves its apotheosis in the awesome climax of "Memorial", rising gradually from a series of long, overlapping guitar sustains toward a pyrotechnic release of dramatic tension, before reaching graceful resolution in the beautiful coda "Your Hand in Mine". All five of the album's tributary movements combine into one broad river, flowing together more smoothly than any other EitS effort before or since. The writing is likewise more intuitive, and the balance of sound more natural: the expected bursts of fuzzed-out noise are less abrupt, and the drumming less reliant on over-produced boom-thud cacophony.

To be honest I wasn't expecting anything more than the usual Post Rock epiphanies, aglow with higher purpose but stuck in the same shining rut. The typically long-winded, moody yet hopeful album title; the lovely but reticent artwork by Esteban Rey (...Stephen King?); the chiming double- guitar configurations...all point to standard Post Rock style and usage. But musically it remains one of the defining albums of its kind: a desert-island essential in the remote Post Rock archipelago.

A word of advice, however: don't cherry-pick samples as I first did. Immerse yourself fully in the unabridged 46-minute aggregate, and (again, with apologies!) touch the wonder.

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 Those Who Tell the Truth Shall Die, Those Who Tell the Truth Shall Live Forever by EXPLOSIONS IN THE SKY album cover Studio Album, 2001
3.44 | 46 ratings

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Those Who Tell the Truth Shall Die, Those Who Tell the Truth Shall Live Forever
Explosions In The Sky Post Rock/Math rock

Review by Neu!mann
Prog Reviewer

3 stars Their 2001 album wasn't the first by Explosions in the Sky. But I'm willing to bet they wish it had been, in retrospect. After an underwhelming debut the year before, the Austin quartet rebooted their career and inaugurated the new millennium by doing something more than simply recording and packaging another album. They succeeded in creating a lasting mystique for themselves, in the evocative Angel of Mons artwork and in the radiance of the music itself suggesting ideas of redemption, transcendence, and prophetic vision...classic Prog, in other words, despite the usual Post Rock trappings.

The aesthetic was inspired in large part by the films and philosophy of (kindred Texan) Terrence Malick, showing a similar deep reverence for natural beauty, inner truth, and a spiritual harmony far above and way beyond the petty metaphysical straightjacket of religion. The CD booklet includes a quote from Sean Penn's world-weary Sgt. Welsh in Malick's 1998 masterpiece "The Thin Red Line" ("...there ain't no world but this one"). And the filmmaker's influence becomes explicit in the song "Have You Passed Through This Night", with its awkward appropriation of a key voice-over monologue from the same movie (which already had its own emotive soundtrack, and didn't need any extra help).

That's a lot of thematic freight for one fifty-minute album of instrumental music to carry...even when divided into complimentary halves, corresponding (in vinyl terms) to Sides One and Two but here named "Die" and "Live Forever" (I doubt either was intended literally, or in a trite Born Again sense). Considering the band's uncertain track record at the time it may have been too much baggage, a little too soon. But they were learning on the job how to be more patient, in both composition and performance, slowly building their own wide-screen musical language using only electric guitars and very loud drums.

Later albums would articulate the band's collective vision better. The vernacular here was still a bit crude (Christopher Hrasky's cymbal-abuse borders on sadism). But this was where EitS found its voice. And that discovery might have been expressed in the unspoken reflections of another Malick voice-over, overheard on an outbound troop transport as the battlegrounds of Guadalcanal recede over the South Pacific waves:

Oh, my soul...let me be in you now. Look out through my eyes. Look out at the things you made. All things shining...

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 How Strange, Innocence by EXPLOSIONS IN THE SKY album cover Studio Album, 2000
2.88 | 40 ratings

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How Strange, Innocence
Explosions In The Sky Post Rock/Math rock

Review by Neu!mann
Prog Reviewer

2 stars Using the word "innocence" in the title was a modest way for the Texas quartet of Explosions in the Sky to appraise their own recording debut without saying "naïve" or "amateurish" (the latter not always a negative term, by the way). The band members don't even consider it their first album, but rather their "first attempt" at making an album, a subtle distinction printed alongside other mixed feelings and misgivings smack-dab on the label of the CD itself.

That almost apologetic attitude isn't entirely unjustified, either. For a band now celebrated as Post Rock icons it was an inauspicious beginning, which of course only makes it more attractive in an academic sort of way. Collectors and completists can approach it as a living embryo in the EitS fossil record, captured at the primitive, single-cell stage of its musical evolution.

The twin-guitar instrumental sound of the album won't be unfamiliar to fans. But the performances are tentative, as if the players were still getting acquainted with each other. You can expect a few goofed notes, not always played by mistake: in the halfhearted climax of "Snow and Lights", and during the somewhat awkward intros to "Magic Hours" and "Glittering Blackness" (the song titles already showing signs of what would later become a trademark visionary ethos). A few studio tricks were attempted, most likely out of curiosity: a random reverb effect here, some clumsy fuzzed guitar there, and so forth. And nobody told drummer Chris Hrasky that his enthusiastic cymbal bashing (in "Time Stops") would totally overwhelm the contributions of his bandmates.

It might be kinder in retrospect to hear the effort as the band's earthbound rehearsal before ascending into the sweet hereafter of upcoming albums. The hackneyed cliché about a journey beginning with a single step applies here; ditto the old maxim about learning to crawl before you can walk. The Explosions team was still on infant hands and knees while making this album, and unsure of its collective balance. But the young group was at least toddling in the right direction.

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 Travels in Constants (Vol. 21): The Rescue by EXPLOSIONS IN THE SKY album cover Singles/EPs/Fan Club/Promo, 2005
2.86 | 21 ratings

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Travels in Constants (Vol. 21): The Rescue
Explosions In The Sky Post Rock/Math rock

Review by Neu!mann
Prog Reviewer

3 stars Number 21 in a series of 23 mini-albums commissioned by the TRL record label works almost like a biographical sketch: a week in the life of Explosions in the Sky. The Austin post-rockers, normally very deliberate in their songwriting, challenged themselves for this project, approaching it with no planning, no premeditation, no rehearsals, and the goal of recording one complete track each day for eight days, with a further six reserved for mixing.

It must have been an intense experience, but you wouldn't know it from the unaffected ease of the finished product. Supposedly there's a concept of sorts behind the music, recalling a nervous week after the band's tour van broke down in western New York, stranding the quartet in a stranger's attic, where they "read books and watched blizzards and ate Chinese food and went sort of nuts" (quoting their own account). Not exactly epic subject matter, but it was never meant as an epic album.

In another setting any one of these tracks might have been the ground floor to a much larger structure. Here each day's output was designed to be self-sufficient, and that conceptual simplicity extends to the music itself: miniatures of understated mood and emotion, all of them refreshingly short and sweet (only one cracks the five-minute ceiling). Working on a smaller canvas may have yielded smaller results, but good things often hide in undersized gift wrap, and by not allowing themselves any time to develop and polish each piece of music the band attained a level of spontaneity seldom heard in their more ambitious recordings. No time is wasted on superfluous gestures: once an idea is played out, the song stops.

Don't bother listening for any narrative or thematic continuity. Each piece is a stand-alone unit, collectively flowing together very well. The wordless voices on "Day Two" and elsewhere add a celestial halo to the usual twin-guitar textures. And the gentle, Fripp-like sustains of "Day Three" provide a magical counterpoint to the mundane audio-vérité discussion of the cost to repair a busted transmission: the earthbound dialogue intersecting sharply with the soaring harmonics.

There was always an element of cinematic drama to the music of Explosions in the Sky. And this modest album, brief as it is, could have been a warm-up to the band's later soundtrack sessions. The album is no longer offered as a freebie on their website, but by all means stop by the merchandise table at your next EitS concert and pick up a copy. Support a worthy cause, and reward yourself with some worthwhile music.

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 Prince Avalanche: An Original Motion Picture Soundtrack (with David Wingo) by EXPLOSIONS IN THE SKY album cover Studio Album, 2013
3.05 | 2 ratings

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Prince Avalanche: An Original Motion Picture Soundtrack (with David Wingo)
Explosions In The Sky Post Rock/Math rock

Review by Neu!mann
Prog Reviewer

3 stars I'm not surprised at the lack of recognition here for the latest (to date) album from Explosions in the Sky. The film itself was an unassuming indie sleeper, and the soundtrack is likewise a below-the-radar gemstone, hidden in plain sight.

The music, co-written by EitS and veteran movie composer David Wingo, does an excellent job of capturing the quirky, character-driven narrative: an offbeat, possibly allegorical buddy film about two mismatched highway workers (Paul Rudd and Emile Hirsch) painting road stripes across an almost empty stretch of fire-scarred West Texas woodland. The tone of the film, combining deadpan humor, understated pathos, and a touch or magic realism, is a long way from the Hollywood assembly line. And the score is far removed from the Post Rock rut of other Explosions albums, enough to sound like an entirely different set of musicians.

The music is more ambient than expected, and more playful, evincing a fragile delicacy at right angles to the band's usual Panavision guitar epics. Note the dominance of acoustic instruments - gently plucked guitar and minimalist piano. You'll notice too (or maybe not, if you're as entranced as I was) the lack of percussion in all but two of the fifteen short tracks. And is that a sequencer I hear, driving the melody "Join Me in My Avalanche"?

Like any movie soundtrack the album is arranged in brief thematic fragments, only three of which pass the four-minute threshold: again, atypical for this group. It's unclear how much of it is David Wingo and how much belongs to the Explosions quartet. But the distribution of credit isn't important. This was definitely a band stepping outside its comfort zone, and reaping the benefits of the unfamiliar footing.

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 Take Care, Take Care, Take Care by EXPLOSIONS IN THE SKY album cover Studio Album, 2011
3.61 | 68 ratings

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Take Care, Take Care, Take Care
Explosions In The Sky Post Rock/Math rock

Review by Neu!mann
Prog Reviewer

4 stars Two years after its release the latest album by the celebrated Austin, Texas quartet still hasn't attracted much attention in these pages, despite being arguably their best effort yet. No new ground was broken here, but the group continues to mature, building their panoramic Post Rock epiphanies with a little more variety in style than usual, and showing a better developed sense of nuance as well.

The music as usual presents a dynamic contrast between serenity and noise, but this time around the balance is more organic and the transitions much smoother. "Be Comfortable, Creature" (I'd love to know how they invent such evocative titles) opens with a delicate moodiness worthy of early GENESIS, gradually lifted into the big skies of West Texas on an updraft of laser beam guitar sustain recalling a young Robert Fripp enjoying a Rio Grande vacation. Two tracks later the album closer "Let Me Back In" offers a quintessential EitS apotheosis, but with an atypically swinging rhythm underneath.

Those huge, booming drums are still an acquired taste, in songs like "Trembling Hands" and "Last Known Surroundings" all but obliterating the adjoining frequencies. Maybe there wasn't another way for percussionist Chris Hrasky to compete against the wall of sound generated by three electric guitarists, but the album improves when the production exercises more restraint, as in "Postcard From 1952" or the gentle waltz-like intro to "Human Qualities".

There continues to be something attractively transcendental about this band and its music: an unspoken striving toward the empyrean light of whatever plateau you choose to recognize as heaven. As suggested by their collective moniker the experience is often beautiful, bright, and very loud, animated by an eloquence sometimes lacking in the music of kindred Post Rockers with a similar agenda. This collection of six songs, four years in the making (and worth every minute of the wait), brings them one step closer to paradise.

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 The Earth Is Not a Cold Dead Place by EXPLOSIONS IN THE SKY album cover Studio Album, 2003
3.90 | 191 ratings

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The Earth Is Not a Cold Dead Place
Explosions In The Sky Post Rock/Math rock

Review by Warthur
Prog Reviewer

4 stars By the mid-2000s, post-rock was by no means a fresh or original idea, any more than (say) jazz fusion was by the middle of the 1970s or symphonic prog was by 1977. That doesn't, of course, mean that it was impossible for bands to make a good post-rock album in 2003, or even a classic one - and indeed many did. But what it did mean is that you couldn't expect to get many props simply for playing in a standard, generic post-rock mode, any more than you could expect to impress people by playing generic and uninspired Yes-ripoffs in the late 1970s: by the time The Earth Is Not a Cold Dead Place came out, post-rock bands - even the founding fathers of the genre - really needed some sort of unique aspect to their sound to distinguish them from their peers.

For the longest time (and in an earlier version of this review) I was one of those who didn't count Explosions In the Sky as being anything special; despite the fact that The Earth Is Not a Cold Dead Place is supposedly a concept album about love, numerous early listens failed to make an emotional connection between me and the album, not least because at first they seem to be engaging in rote repetition of Godspeed You Black Emperor/Mogwai-inspired atmospheres without the emotional overtones. Time and experience has clearly changed me though; in particular, I now detect an underpinning of hope in the tone of these compositions which, perhaps, I previously wasn't in the mood to acknowledge. This sits sufficiently at odds with the melancholy and apocalypticism that is usually more associated with post-rock that I find myself compelled to reassess Explosions In the Sky, and find that there's more to them than met my ears at first.

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 The Earth Is Not a Cold Dead Place by EXPLOSIONS IN THE SKY album cover Studio Album, 2003
3.90 | 191 ratings

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The Earth Is Not a Cold Dead Place
Explosions In The Sky Post Rock/Math rock

Review by The Runaway

5 stars The Earth is Not A Cold Dead Place by Explosions in the Sky is one of those albums that words can describe the music but not the feeling you get while listening to it. This is the album you will listen to when you get your first kiss, your first crush, your first real girlfriend, this is the best album ever. It can make you feel emotions you've never felt about things that have never happened, it can make you cry just because of reading reviews about it, it is the most important post-rock album that has ever been released, to me at least.

Mainly my reviews are long and dwell deep into each song and its contents but I am very tired and thus can only say my emotions regarding each of these amazing tracks. First off, only the names are amazing and heartbreaking, songs like "The Only Moment We Were Alone" and "Your Hand in Mine" are simple names and yet they can tear you up just by staring at the titles.

The album starts with First Breath After Coma, which literally sounds like how you would feel. The slow awakening followed by the urge to live life to the maximum, that is what I would do. The three guitars and pumping drums convey that feeling beautifully and throughout these nine and a half minutes you feel empty yet full, reborn.

The Only Moment We Were Alone is also amazing, however less memorable. I cannot write about every song because most of them make me feel the same way, but that is one amazing feeling and you just have to listen to the album to understand.

The next two songs, Six Days at the Bottom of the Ocean, and Memorial, are songs that are beautiful as well but I did not manage to connect to them as well as I did with the other three.

The next and final song is heartbreaking post-rock masterpiece Your Hand in Mine. This is my favorite song in the entire world. It has followed me throughout every time I fell in love, lost a family member, or a friend. The things that it makes you feel are things I have never felt in my life. It's as if the post-rocky riffs combined with simple but powerful drum parts, and that ever-memorable guitar line played in the second part, just make you feel like some sort of god. You feel like you can do anything, like you can climb any mountain and succeed or jump off any building and live (do not try this, because it is only a feeling and will most likely get you killed), it is the most epic post-rock song written.

This album, influenced a bit by bands like Mogwai and in some way even Godspeed You! Black Emperor, is the best album I have ever heard. I don't want to repeat this too many times but this truly brings up so many emotions that you just have to hear it to believe it. Yet again a five star review for yet again what is truly an amazing post rock album.

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 Take Care, Take Care, Take Care by EXPLOSIONS IN THE SKY album cover Studio Album, 2011
3.61 | 68 ratings

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Take Care, Take Care, Take Care
Explosions In The Sky Post Rock/Math rock

Review by Earendil

4 stars The latest album from Explosions in the Sky is nice collection of post-rock music. The album is brief for its genre (just over 45 min), and it stays rather safe during that time. The track that stands out most to me is Trembling Hands, with its energetic drumming pushing forward the music. Although the album is certainly sweeping in its scope, there is neither much experimentation nor buildup, and at times it feels more like indie rock with a slight post-rock influence. In any case, the music is relaxing and well-put together. A great album for any post rock fan.

Rating: 7/10

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 The Earth Is Not a Cold Dead Place by EXPLOSIONS IN THE SKY album cover Studio Album, 2003
3.90 | 191 ratings

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The Earth Is Not a Cold Dead Place
Explosions In The Sky Post Rock/Math rock

Review by izquemia

4 stars First of all i want to say thank you to explosions in the sky for having done this album that changed my life the first time that i heard it in 2006.

"The earth is not a cold dead place" is a very different to any other work of the band, the sound are the cleanest of the history of the band. the whole disc are a package of mini-operas which begins with a masterpiece called "first breath after coma" , guys, this song are unbelievable, is simply hypnotizing since their first chords and it is the perfect example of which this kind of post rock is not about sadness,in fact is a little bit about melancholy and hope.

Another songs that have this feeling is "Six days at the bottom of the ocean" and "The only moment we were alone" both songs are a great opportunity to enter a very relaxing trip. The rest of the songs continue with the essence of the disc, and i refeer to "Memorial" and "You hand in mine"

"Earth is not a cold dead place" is the perfect example to understand that the music not necessarily needs lyrics, only two guitars, a bass and drums, not more for a musical journey across the space and time!

explosions in the sky is totally different to GYBE (for example) and i don´t think that the prog fans must compare them, even with Sigur ros or tortoise or Mono, maybe with A silver mount zion in essence, and this disc demonstrates it in my opinion

Finally, maybe this disc is not the culminant point of the post rock, but if of explosions in the sky

4 Unforgettable stars

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