Progarchives, the progressive rock ultimate discography

TRIBAL TECH

Jazz Rock/Fusion • United States


From Progarchives.com, the ultimate progressive rock music website

Tribal Tech picture
Tribal Tech biography
This jazz-fusion band was formed in 1984 by guitarist Scott HENDERSON and bassist Gary WILLIS and released their debut album "Spears" a year later. Subsequently they released numerous jazz-fusion albums throughout the late 80's and 90's. After a short hiatus from 1995 to 1999 during which the band members pursued various solo projects they reunited to to record two more albums in 1999 and 2000 and have not released any albums since then.

Their style is hard to describe because they varied it a lot on their various albums. There are strong influences of free jazz and blues, and they're going about their music in a very laid back way. While they have some mellow tracks, the majority of their music is very light and uplifting, and quite funny at times.


Why this artist must be listed in www.progarchives.com :
Scott HENDERSON is an exceptional jazz/blues guitarist, and the interplay between the TRIBAL TECH musicians is simply amazing. HENDERSON has an unique understanding of jazz improvisation, and WILLIS and the various TRIBAL TECH drummers harmonize perfectly.


Discography:
Spears (1985)
Dr. Hee (1987)
Nomad (1990)
Tribal Tech (1991)
Illicit (1992)
Face First (1993)
Primal Tracks (1994)
Reality Check (1995)
Thick (1999)
Rocket Science (2000)

TRIBAL TECH forum topics / tours, shows & news


TRIBAL TECH forum topics
No topics found for : "tribal tech"
Create a topic now
TRIBAL TECH tours, shows & news
No topics found for : "tribal tech"
Post an entries now

TRIBAL TECH Videos (YouTube and more)


Showing only random 3 | Search and add more videos to TRIBAL TECH

Buy TRIBAL TECH Music



More places to buy TRIBAL TECH music online

TRIBAL TECH discography


Ordered by release date | Showing ratings (top albums) | Help Progarchives.com to complete the discography and add albums

TRIBAL TECH top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.53 | 15 ratings
Spears
1985
3.82 | 20 ratings
Dr. Hee
1987
3.81 | 16 ratings
Nomad
1990
3.86 | 26 ratings
Tribal Tech
1991
4.14 | 22 ratings
Illicit
1992
4.00 | 19 ratings
Face First
1993
3.81 | 16 ratings
Reality Check
1995
3.91 | 30 ratings
Thick
1999
3.86 | 23 ratings
Rocket Science
2000
3.96 | 48 ratings
X
2012

TRIBAL TECH Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

TRIBAL TECH Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

TRIBAL TECH Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.17 | 5 ratings
Primal Tracks
1994

TRIBAL TECH Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

TRIBAL TECH Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 Dr. Hee by TRIBAL TECH album cover Studio Album, 1987
3.82 | 20 ratings

BUY
Dr. Hee
Tribal Tech Jazz Rock/Fusion

Review by DangHeck

4 stars The guitar-great Scott HENDERSON's second studio release with Fusion project TRIBAL TECH, most notably featuring here bassist Gary WILLIS and reedsman Bob SHEPPARD.

The title track is a solid opener, with steady, straight-ahead rhythm and excellent playing. The keyboards are spacious and add nice flourishes to the otherwise intense "Fusions" on top. Scott and Bob riff off exceptionally.

Dr. Hee continues along in various flavors and feelings. I much like the cool "Mango Prom", with continued excellence atop a near lounge feel (at least at its start). [See also the very lovely "Twilight in the North Ridge," headed off by Willis and featuring acoustic/classical soloings by Henderson.]

It should be noted here that this album has a really great, fairly natural flow. Even from the thoughtful, short "Solemn" to the boisterous lilt of "Salsa Lastra", a very fun, exotic-sounding song featuring the varied percussion of Steve HOUGHTON and acoustic piano by, I presume, Pat COIL. The other keyboardist present (Brad DUTZ) is apparently predominantly the "mallets" player, a wonderful (and rarer) feature to hear in the context of Fusion. A welcomed rarity, indeed. [Ya like Jazz? Ya like GARY BURTON QUARTET's Duster, the 1967 early Fusion classic? Well, ya should! Lol]

At the end of the album, we have the interludinal "The Rain", a quirky, near-Ambient synthy number that really does call to mind the randomness of an evening rain. Very enjoyable, even if they didn't find a way to tie it tightly to the album closer(?!). And "Ominous" it is. The closing track is (inversely) a tightly organized cacophony of what this band really has to offer (Maximalists, rejoice!). And with that, I can confidently say, at the front and back, they certainly tied this album with a nice (complex) bow. Definitely check it out. In case you missed my true feelings, I've bolded my favorite tracks. Enjoy!

 Rocket Science by TRIBAL TECH album cover Studio Album, 2000
3.86 | 23 ratings

BUY
Rocket Science
Tribal Tech Jazz Rock/Fusion

Review by JazzFusionGuy

3 stars Okay, it's time for me to "coin a phrase", to pull a genre rabbit outta ma hat, and try to pin this T Tech release down, (tho' it be a'rigglin' madly), and be done with this weirdling of jazz-ish fusionid birthings. Hunh? Henderson et al have gone off da deep end on dis one folks. It is so full of whacko riffs and bizarro moments that you would think T Tech hath gone mad. But herein lieth genius . . . Ah yes, that moniker I was seeking, hmm . . . let's try funk-bop- cubist-surrealoid-jazz-rock-blues-world-fusion, or FBCSJRBWF. You catch my drift? T Tech has stretched out into netherworlds of jazz and fusion that seem a hard pill to swallow in a first listen, nearly grating at times -- a gut-wrenching challenge. I still can't decide if I like this release as it makes me feel different each listen. Technical prowess is there, utter uniqueness, and serious quirkville as well. So is this an enjoyable listen for most jazzers? Probably not -- oops, I said it. What I mean is, you need to be in a certain mood to dig this trip. Imagine Weather Report on steroids running a smooth jazz tour bus off the road then careening into the Jimi Hendrix alternate universe wormhole and Henderson and Hendrix trade riffology but 22nd century style. Hunh? I dunno, this CD is one heck of a ride folks -- ergo my mental gymnastics. I can hear Miles whispering hoarsely from the other side in T Tech's ear, "Go deeper, get out there." Then Jaco mumbles, "Gary, reach for the funk slide avalanche." Jimi screams, "Burn it up Scott!" And Joe Z seems to soul travelin' into Kinsey's keys. God help poor Kirk doing his level best to interpret this madness! If you need funk, bop, surrealism in sound, rock fusion jamz, and effects too many to list, where mutation of sound is your norm, then per your therapist's orders -- grab this release. If however you lean towards the straight and narrow in jazz, rock or fusion -- avoid this or you might get a neuronal path or two burned slam out! Ciao baby! (Scott and Scott, you guys are nuts!)
 Thick by TRIBAL TECH album cover Studio Album, 1999
3.91 | 30 ratings

BUY
Thick
Tribal Tech Jazz Rock/Fusion

Review by JazzFusionGuy

4 stars Scott Henderson is a benchmark in the jazz fusion guitar world. He can just as easily lay down a mean blues lick or rock you hard burning the frets like a wildman. Standing shoulder- to-shoulder we have the creative genius and frenetic bounce of Gary Willis on bass with Scott Kinsey's inventive keyboards magic. Confidently, Kirk Covington pulls a polyrhythmic mixer out and drums away any doubts you may have about the power and grace of Tribal Tech. These guys are always a fun ride with novel compositions and improvs that never cease to surprise the listener. A solid foundation of great jazz is obvious in Tribal Tech. You will clearly pick out strains of Chick Corea and Weather Report in all their releases. This band is never afraid to stretch, to totter along the edge, to wander into bizarre fugues, and then come rushing back at ya, head-on, 90 mph, with tight, intricate, jazz fusion solidity. Dynamic is the word here. And now with Thick they have gone a step further and decided to abandon the charts, the maps, and the guidelines. This is their chance to have a good time, to do what musicians enjoy most -- to spontaneously create in 100% freedom, seizing the moment, to let the chemistry of who they are come through. Thick is essentially an in-studio jam session where four skilled guys let it all hang out. It is a treat to experience such an endeavor, even secondhand, through a recording. My hat is off to Tribal Tech for having the courage to offer themselves to us like this. I have followed Henderson et al since the Corea days to the Nomad release, into Reality Check, and elsewhere. You will find traces of Tribal Tech's whole sonic spectrum in Thick. A couple short tracks are laidback with a "just goofin' around" quality but the predominant weight of this release has things going on that are downright awesome. Henderson has so many extended fiery solos you'd think a Hendrixian "Machine Gun" had jammed. On the 11:15, title track, you'll hear JIMI, Jeff Beck, SRV, and even a titch of Steve Vai's wah-wah, orgiastic abandon. I swear Kinsey sounded like Jan Hammer on "Sheik of Encino" but evoked that Weather Report Zawinul moreso elsewhere. An abundance of great keys is interlaced everywhere in Thick. Willis is, of course, bass-ic perfection and inspiration. Check Willis out on "Slick" and "What Has He Had?" Whew! Covington drums his way around all the Thickness with ease and enduring strength. Nuff said. Jazz rock fusion, blues rock, jazz, avant garde, live jamming fun, high energy, introspection, and freeform phat magic are all resident here. Those of you wanting to hear Henderson "tear it up, stomp it flat, and push it over the edge" will not be disappointed with Thick. I need say no more. It's your turn to check it out. A highly recommended offering. (Mystery track included!)
 Thick by TRIBAL TECH album cover Studio Album, 1999
3.91 | 30 ratings

BUY
Thick
Tribal Tech Jazz Rock/Fusion

Review by Mellotron Storm
Prog Reviewer

3 stars 3.5 stars. TRIBAL TECH have released 10 studio albums over the years and I have two of them, this one called "Thick" from 1999 and the followup called "Rocket Science" from 2000 which I feel is the better album. "Thick" is a good one though with plenty of variety. Gary Willis the bass player gets equal billing with guitarist Scott Henderson on the album cover as he had been getting for a few albums after starting out "Scott Henderson and Tribal Tech". Technical stuff here with Scott's unique style although he changes his style up often on here. Synths are okay but I much prefer when Kinsey plays piano, unless he's adding spacey synths as atmosphere. These guys are players so it's hard not to be impressed here.

Highlights for me usually involve Scott's guitar work but the bass is awesome too and I mentioned in my review of "Rocket Science" that this same drummer impressed me more than anyone so... yeah if your into complex playing without vocals check this band out. Scott plays in the bluesy style at times, even that country/folk style. Funk is on here too. No vocals but some freaky vocal expressions on the over 11 minute title track along with that funky and folky style. A light show from Henderson later on here which we also get on one of my favourites called "Slick". More of that on my other favourite "Jalapeno". Some misses in my opinion like "Somewhat Later", "Party At Kinsey's" and "Clinic Troll" but that's just my tastes.

A step down from "Rocket Science" in my opinion but many seem to disagree with this.

 Rocket Science by TRIBAL TECH album cover Studio Album, 2000
3.86 | 23 ratings

BUY
Rocket Science
Tribal Tech Jazz Rock/Fusion

Review by Mellotron Storm
Prog Reviewer

4 stars A really strong album from this four piece band led by guitarist Scott Henderson. Released in 2000 we get close to an hour of instrumental Jazz Fusion music. I usually find stuff that annoys me on these records but not here to my surprise. I really like the keyboardist how he can cook up atmosphere including the spacey synths on "Cap'n Kirk" not so surprisingly and also "Sojlevska". But he also plays keyboards in a variety of ways. Scott is all about layering sounds and creating different textures but he also solos thankfully. Great upfront bass and the drummer might be my favourite musician on here. Top three would include the title track along with "Mini Me" a song where the keyboards and guitar sound like they are battling each other as the drums and bass impress. And the closer "The Econoline" clocking in at 10 minutes leaves us on a high. Scott solos here old school plus we get some sections of just intricate and punchy sounds all meshed together. Easily 4 stars an enjoyable listen.
 X by TRIBAL TECH album cover Studio Album, 2012
3.96 | 48 ratings

BUY
X
Tribal Tech Jazz Rock/Fusion

Review by darkshade
Collaborator Jazz Rock/Fusion Team

4 stars Tribal Tech return after an 11 year hiatus with "X". Not the most original album name, but whatever. I'm not Tribal Tech expert, I only have a few of their albums from the late 80s/early90s, and only heard a couple of tunes from their later albums, but I can tell you without a doubt---this is their most original album in a while. This album is hard, experimental in places, and funky in others.

The only thing you know you can expect is virtuoso playing from these guys, of course. After that, X sees the band playing around with song structures. Apparently, in 2010 they recorded most of the rough tracks for this album, lots of improvisation and so on. Then they spent the year and half before this album came out adding overdubs and structuring the jams, making much of this music seem composed; and in a way it is.

What I also like about this album is the "usual fusion" sound is gone, you know, that late 80s/early 90s fusion sound, like Chick Corea Elektric Band, Dave Weckl Band, or Zawinul Syndicate (minus the world fusion aspect); THAT sound. It's gone here. And it's good, because otherwise it would date this record horribly. No, the band is trying new things on this album. A little electronic beats here and there, different keyboard sounds, etc. This record is more earthly. There are moments of intense electric post-bop, some more soulful, contemplative playing by Scott Henderson, and a variety of other different moods.

It's not the most progressive album, but it's a fun record, and one of the more original albums by the band. And it's nice to see Tribal Tech not stuck in the same sound, experimenting with different things.

A pretty good fusion album. If you like modern fusion, you'll probably enjoy this. If you're a Tribal Tech fan, you'll enjoy the different feel this album has.

 Thick by TRIBAL TECH album cover Studio Album, 1999
3.91 | 30 ratings

BUY
Thick
Tribal Tech Jazz Rock/Fusion

Review by wbiphoto

5 stars I'm also surprised, as the other reviewer, that this amazing recording by Tribal Tech has not been lauded and reviewed at least fifty times.

I will begin by saying that I am not a big fan of the blues. I have a low tolerance level for repetitive lines, licks and chord progressions that have been heard ten thousand times before. However, this is one of those exceptions where the playing, although grounded in blues and jazz-blues, is so outstanding that it raises the bar beyond most anything that's being done today.

If you need structure, themes, choruses and predictability in your music, then this album is not for you. But if you'd like to challenge yourself and taste and absolute masterpiece of jazz and blues improvisation then I highly encourage you to buy this album and listen to it carefully. The interplay between the musicians and their ability to accent and highlight each others' lines are reminiscent of classics like Miles' Bitches Brew and Herbie's Crossings and other "ambient jazz fusion" records from the early 1970s.

What differentiates this TT record from the aforementioned is the guitar, which was mostly non-existent on those 70s sessions. On Thick you have Scott Henderson on guitar, displaying a blend of virtuosity, inventiveness and inspiration seldom heard in today's overly abundant power-chord and shred-heavy affairs.

Thick is one of those rare records that's able to get nasty, heavy, electric and downright mind-blowing technical, yet retain an organic feel throughout its entirety. The title track has to be one of the best examples of cosmic blues guitar I have ever heard with a slow ambient build-up that climaxes on one of THE BEST solos I have ever heard. I am big fan of using wah pedals tastefully, to add emotion and tension, and Scott raises the bar on wah soloing to unprecedented heights.

(If you're a tone junkie, then you will get your fix with Thick. Henderson's tone is so THICK, creamy, soulful, clean yet dirty, and able to pierce through the mix without sounding overbearing; not an easy thing to do in the studio).

Yes, there are other musicians on this record aside from Scott; even though the guitarist steals the spotlight. The rest of the band is amazing, as well, and maintains an airy, spacey foundation without losing the groove; and there are plenty of grooves. But, the grooves never last too long for the music to get repetitive or boring. First and foremost this a jazz record and the accompaniment adheres to that premise.

On the track What Has He Had the band goes into a King Crimson-like drum and bass syncopation that ends with voices laughing and clapping behind dissonance and chaos. An absolute surprise, yet seamlessly fitting right in with everything else on the record.

Sheik Of Encino starts out sounding a lot like the smoother jazz fusion of the late 80s and ends up rising to a frenzy worthy of challenging the very best of Weather Report or the Mahvishnu Orchestra. Of course, to keep up with the overall theme of the record, there is an obligatory ambient section in the middle with some keyboards and cymbal work that doesn't disappoint.

In conclusion, this is easily a five star recording, but not of "progressive rock music", but of ambient-jazz-blues-rock-fusion. A masterpiece is a masterpiece and it doesn't have to be Anglo-European-classically influenced for it to be considered "essential"; nor does it have to have a story line like The Lamb on Broadway for it to be deep and thoughtful.

If you're ready to step out of your comfort zone and take a break from the predictable metal power chords or the old and tired symphonic prog, Thick presents and opportunity to engage some of THE BEST improvised jazz-rock that you will ever find.

FIVE STARS for Thick.

 X by TRIBAL TECH album cover Studio Album, 2012
3.96 | 48 ratings

BUY
X
Tribal Tech Jazz Rock/Fusion

Review by Ovidiu

5 stars 12 years after the last TRIBAL TECH studio album-the phenomenal and innovative ROCKET SCIENCE-our dearest fusion masters are back in business with this amazing new album called X!Well-12 years is an amazingly long period of silence-and this too long musical hiatus for TRIBAL TECH-has come to an end ,the new masterpiece called X-will plenty satisfy even the most pretentious Scott Henderson fan-or TRIBAL TECH fan-or-generally speaking-any modern fusion fan!Definitely-the alchemy between the musicians is still present-technically speaking-all 4 guys are fantastic-and the compositions are the expression of what instrumental fusion should be in 2012!I've always admired the fact that TRIBAL TECH were all time an avant gardistic band in a way ,trying all the time to discover and explore new musical territories-and this album is the prove that the guys in the band still have something to tell in this eltistic musical style!Most of the songs are midtempo orientated-and the element oif surprise is present on each track too!The sound,the production is perfect-crystal clear sound-and each instrument sounds sensational!Henderson is pushing some unbelievebly complicated solos-and he's a monster technician,maybee the most technically advanced from all fusion guitar players-ALLAN HOLDSWORTH included here!HENDERSON is a fantastic vibrato master-and the way how he is making the guitar sound-is breathtaking!Absolutely fantastic!GARY WILLIS is equal to himself-great technician,fantastic sound aswell-pure perfection!KIRK COVINGTON is literally killing the drums,he is offering some mathematic and complicated rhythms-totally awesome!Finally-the 4-th wheel of the perfect machine-MR SCOTT KINSEY-WOW!Great keys solos and wonderful interventions-magnificent!In my humble opinion-TRIBAL TECH is the best fusion group ever!All 4 musicians are aces and the fruit of the musical alchemy that exists among them is fabulous!In the end-our endless respect for another stellar album and the hope that we won't have to wait another 12 years to have a new TRIBAL TECH album,isn't it?5 STARS for a perfect album,without any weak track!
 Primal Tracks by TRIBAL TECH album cover Boxset/Compilation, 1994
3.17 | 5 ratings

BUY
Primal Tracks
Tribal Tech Jazz Rock/Fusion

Review by Evolver
Special Collaborator Crossover & JR/F/Canterbury Teams

3 stars This album is a collection from Tribal Tech, mostly taken from their second, third and fourth albums. Since I do not own, nor have heard those albums, I can't tell you if it represents a good cross section of their music. What I can tell you is that Scott Henderson and Gary Willis are excellent musicians. What they lack in songwriting, they make up for in some fiery fusion guitar and bass playing, respectively.

And yes, that last statement indicates that the songwriting is somewhat lacking. Mostly, we get some mandering chord progressions, with blips and blaps from the synths. But Henderson's soaring guitar and Willi's adept bass transcend every piece, and make them a joy to listen to.

Special mention should be made for Ominous. This piece, with some fine electronic tuned percussion, sounds very much like Bill Bruford's Earthworks band.

 Rocket Science by TRIBAL TECH album cover Studio Album, 2000
3.86 | 23 ratings

BUY
Rocket Science
Tribal Tech Jazz Rock/Fusion

Review by snobb
Special Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

4 stars Quite often nowadays metal fusion means instrumental rock with some jazz-rock elements (often - not too many). There is a different case with Tribal Tech. Their last to time album is jazz-fusion under the skin.

This album is fully improvisational jam played by very technical musicians. Even if pure-electric and very energetic, you can easily feel their jazz-roots. Guitar solos are based in Holdsworth tradition, rich bass is often very funky. All music sound technically very strong, any listener will be attracted excellent interplays.

The main this album's problem is composition. Being a great musicians in sense of improv technique and musicianship, the band recorded unfocused jam, which hardly can attract regular listener for repeating listening. Electric fusion fans could be more interested however.

Still really strong album, around 3,5.

Thanks to MikeEnRegalia for the artist addition. and to The Bearded Bard for the last updates

Copyright Prog Archives, All rights reserved. | Legal Notice | Privacy Policy | Advertise | RSS + syndications

Other sites in the MAC network: JazzMusicArchives.com — jazz music reviews and archives | MetalMusicArchives.com — metal music reviews and archives

Donate monthly and keep PA fast-loading and ad-free forever.