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SUPAY

Prog Folk • Peru


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Supay biography
Like many other progressive bands from South America (old or current), SUPAY, an instrumental act from Peru, aimed from the very beginning at the forge of an artistically driven rock input enriched by the incorporation of abundant colours and nuances from Andean folk, in order to state and reaffirm a particular identity within the confines of symphonic prog. Guitarist Luis Proaño founded SUPAY in late 2000, together with drummer Neto Pérez and bassist Juan Roldán - former partners in previous bands - as a power trio. The band took their name from the Inca equivalent to Hades, the Greek God of the Underworld [later on, to the Devil in the Christian religion, as well]. Soon after the band's debut on stage, woodwind player Williams León entered the ranks in order to help SUPAY to properly enhance their Andean facet with a supply of traditional woodwinds. It wasn't until July 2003 that the band could take their repertoire to a recording studio; at the time, the band had been augmented as a sextet with the entry of keyboardist Gustavo Valverde and a second woodwind player, Alex Valenzuela, while newcomer Renzo Danuser was in charge of the bassist's role.

Eventually, their debut album "Confusión" was released the following year, an album full of magic and captivating beauty. While not really becoming a commercial success, it caught the attention of some music critics, as well as a small cult following in the 'underground' rock scene of Lima.

In 2006, Chilean label Mylodon records re-released "Confusión" with a remastered sound production. This gave Supay the opportunity to be known by prog fans worldwide, given the association of Mylodon with Musea. During that same year, under an irregular schedule and facing inconsistencies in its line-up, Supay managed to record new material. This material (now as a quintet after the departure of one windwood player) was partially released in the EP "El Viaje" in March 2007, and two months later, released completely in the namesake long-duration CD. This first edition, as it had happened for the band's debut album, is an independent local edition.

A long-duration CD equally titled "El Viaje" was released two months later. Both the EP and this sophomore album had been recorded in intermittent sessions all through 2006 and early 2007. Only one woodwind player remained from the line-up that had recorded "Confusión"; the original keyboardist left after the ultimate session; there were two people alternating ...
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El ViajeEl Viaje
Mylodon Records
Audio CD$24.29
ConfusionConfusion
Import
Musea 2003
Audio CD$17.37
$15.99 (used)

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SUPAY discography


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SUPAY top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

4.03 | 14 ratings
Confusión
2004
3.93 | 11 ratings
El Viaje
2007
0.00 | 0 ratings
Señales
2013

SUPAY Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

SUPAY Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

SUPAY Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

SUPAY Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

3.00 | 1 ratings
El Viaje (EP)
2007

SUPAY Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 Confusión by SUPAY album cover Studio Album, 2004
4.03 | 14 ratings

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Confusión
Supay Prog Folk

Review by Ivan_Melgar_M
Special Collaborator Symphonic Prog Specialist

5 stars Almost every time I listen from a South American Prog Folk band, I end being partially disappointed, because instead of a real Prog Fusion between Rock and Andean sounds, I end listening some watered Folksy tunes with a lot of Rock and very little of Prog, well guys, this is not the case of SUPAY's debut album "Confusión", the Andean essence is present in every tune and the Prog component is more than evident, IMO we are talking about the most promising band to follow the steps of LOS JAIVAS, this time from Perú, the heart and center of the Inca Empire.

But again I find a big problem in the categorization of this bands in Folk Rock, people expect to listen something similar to JETHRO TULL or STRAWBS, to the point that I already have read reviews talking about the TULL connection, please guys, if you expect that, you will probably be disappointed, there's no similarity with Celtic or British Pastoral music, this is pure Andean Ethnic music, radically different even when equally beautiful.

The album starts with "Pueblo Mio" (Town of Mine), a song which from the start presents us a real Andean atmosphere, with the quenas (Peruvian ancestral pentaphonic wood flute) and Zampoñas (Peruvian pan flute) and the folk styled percussion performing a native tune magisterially blended with the guitar and keyboards. The magical contrast between the Andean tune and the radical changes show us we are before a very skillful Progressive band.

"Avanzando" (Advancing) begins with another clear Andean introduction with guitar and quena reminding us of the music from the Peruvian "serranía", but almost immediately the keyboards change the dreamy atmosphere for a Symphonic solo, which is followed by another autochthonous passage, this time faster and cheerful. The changes come one after the other proving us the versatility of the band. An excellent guitar solo follows with a sound that has a distant reminiscence with Metal, but that's not all, vocoders, jazzy sections and more indigenous music performed with piano and quena come one after the other, nine minutes of pure Progressive Rock.

"Confusión" (Confusion) marks a radical change, this ime starts with a clasuic Rock guitar, but SUPAY never forgets their roots and comes back over and over to the native music, jumping from Andean to Hard Rock with amazing skills that allow the music to flow perfectly, as if this mixture was something natural.

"La Nueva" (The New) begins with an extremely beautiful one quena introduction that is joined by a second one and later by zampoñas with the unique percussion that can only be listened in Cuzco or Puno, all the native wind instruments start a contrapuntal section that leads to a melodic piano and winds section of incredible beauty while a lonely Rock guitar in the style of Carlos Santana gives the support the song requires, but never loosing the melancholic mood, again several changes make this track unforgettable.

Is Andean Jazz possible? Well, "En el Viento" (In the Wind) answers this question with an emphatic yes, first making some sort of well structured jamming and later with a clear Rock background, but always with the winds reminding us we are before a Folk band.

"Imperio" (Empire) is a much more pompous track with strong and loud guitars, lush keyboards that morph into a Metal song and later returns to the indigenous roots, that this time come o stay, several variations on the same theme reinforce the impression that SUPAY manages Rock, Jazz and Jazz Fusion perfectly, very interesting song.

The album is close with "Chicago Chico" (Little Chicago) a reference to a district in Lima that represents the fusion of the people from the mountains and the modern part of Perú, in the same way the music is a perfect blend of the native and Rock sounds describe perfectly the creole nature of this part of the country while recapitulating previous tracks.

Last time I rated a Peruvian album and to avoid chauvinism, decided to give only four stars despite I believed it could easily reach the perfect score, but this time I won't be unfair, SUPAY'S "Confusion" deserves not less than five stars, because it's the essential and perfect expression of Andean Ethnic Progressive Rock in the 21st Century.

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 El Viaje by SUPAY album cover Studio Album, 2007
3.93 | 11 ratings

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El Viaje
Supay Prog Folk

Review by Cesar Inca
Special Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

4 stars Welll, after the anticipation comprised in their "El Viaje" EP, now Supay delivers their proper sophomore album to the prog audiences: it bears the same title as the aforesaid EP and also bears the same cover image, although with a more refined coloring and a more stylish lettering. Here we have 10 tracks that comprise each individual asset of Supay's prog folk style in a nenhanced fashion, yet still all of them fused in a clear unity that cleverly measures the tandards of their mutual contrast. While the "Confusión" album brought the perfect melding between complex rock and the candid textures of Andean folk, "El Viaje" finds both elements growing in its own terms in order to redefine their own untouched marriage. In this way, the resulting tension gives a new dimension to the mysterious beauty of the melodic lines and teh robus tdevelopments of the jams. That's why guitarist Luis Proaño finds a bigger room to show his hard rocking influences (Blackmore, Satriani) together with his Gilmour-meets-Alquinta flourishes, plus a touch of blues-rock in places. On the other hand, despite the fact that the woodwinds feels sometimes a bit surpassed by the expansive forces of Proaño's guitar leads, you can still tell that the sounds of the diverse Andean pipes manifest a large part of the band's essence. The tighter overall sound finds a very appropriate foundation in the solid rhythm duo, while Valverde, with his inventive use of harmonies, ornaments and layers on keyboards (plus a couple of brief solos), stands out as a subtle protagonist within the ensemble. It comes as such a rare paradox that the band could actually reinforce their sonic energy when this material was recorded under an irregular schedule through the yer 2006, and with its line-up experiencing consistencies. The bassit's role was affected by the fact that the talented Renzo danuser had personal plans to develop in a foreign country and León remained as the sole woodwind player... and last but not least, Valverde was growing increaingly apart from his bandmates until he ultimately quit for good. Well, this album sure signifies a testament of his good taste and ability. Let's take a look at the material. The album kicks off with an ethnic prelude, similar in spirit to the opening track of Los Jaivas' "Alturas de Machu Picchu". Then comes 'Alma', a rockier number that remains very much rooted in the melancholy side of things until it tightens up for the latter half. On the other hand, the electrifying 'Supay' starts and ends in a very intense mood, with some softer cadences emerging in the middle. 'Lejanía' and 'Resurrección' are as intense as 'Supay' and remain highlights of the album. Although 'resurrección' a fave of mine, I wish it icnluded more woodwind input. Anyway, the namesake closer brings a more balances presence of guitar and woodwind with its two-part structure: first, a bossanova pace filled with eerie synth layers and flating quena lines, second a hard psychedelic rock coda that goes headlong for the bombastic side of prog. 'Karnavalito', 'Ñan Quiska' (a reprise of 'Ancestro') and 'Guerrero' show the softer side of Supay, with León assuming control of center stage. This is an excellent album: "El Viaje" shows the ability of Supay to revitalize their musical core while keeping it intact.

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 Confusión by SUPAY album cover Studio Album, 2004
4.03 | 14 ratings

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Confusión
Supay Prog Folk

Review by Finnforest
Special Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

3 stars Well this is a tasty morsel. I bought this CD on the strength of the streamed track on this site and was very pleased. Supay's amazing "Confusion" is not confused at all. This is some of the most lively, spicy instrumental prog I've heard from a band that is totally new to me. I've been playing it constantly.

They employ these traditional local woodwind instruments that sound like altered-states flutes, and lay them over blazing electric guitar and bass. The music has much color and vibrancy, full of life and joy. Imagine Tullish flutes blended with Santana guitar but with more urgency and drive. There's some stereo affects with the woodwinds that sound very nice on headphones. Vocals are not missed as all musicians are playing in a highly expressive manner. My CD has a different cover than the one imaged here so don't let that throw you off. I think this band will have wide appeal once they are discovered by more proggers. Not essential by any means but a decent starting point for someone wishing to check out the Peruvian scene. 6/10

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 El Viaje (EP) by SUPAY album cover Singles/EPs/Fan Club/Promo, 2007
3.00 | 1 ratings

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El Viaje (EP)
Supay Prog Folk

Review by Cesar Inca
Special Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

— First review of this album —
3 stars While currently experiencing a (hopefully) momentary line-up crisis. Supay managed to release an EP containing five tracks from what should be their forthcoming second album. I remember a conversation I had with guitarist Luis Proaño regarding the overall sound of Supay's new material: he said that the rocking parts were intended to be rockier than ever before and the folkish parts, intended to be more enhanced than ever before. That is, Supay's renewed strategy would be one of reinforcing the contrasts between the vibrating sense or rock and the candid colors of Andean folk in a united progressive context. That was the idea and the "El Viaje" EP is the result, a coherent result, may I add. One formal problem I have with this recording is its short duration (less than 25 minutes), since the quality and intensity comprised in the repertoire leaves me wanting more, but that's what there is so far. The opener 'Ancestro' is an eerie sonic display of Andean woodwinds and percussion, not unlike the opening track to Los Jaivas' "Alturas de Machu Picchu". Once this brief telluric intro is ended, 'Almas' sets a pace that makes perfect sense with the overall description already stated above. The blues-oriented initial motif and the thematic expansions simultaneously built up by the guitar and the synth are well-connected to the differentiated folkish sections, graciously led by the woodwinds. 'Karnavaloide' is a more standardized exercise on world music with an Andean basis (no other deal can be made with Supay, of course), which serves as a proper relaxing interlude before the arrival of the EP's most explosive numbers - those are 'Supay' and 'El Viaje'. 'Supay' pretty much portrays its inheritances from early 70s Jethro Tull and mid-70s Pink Floyd. On the other hand, 'El Viaje' kicks off with a bossanova-like section fluidly set by the marriage of the rhythm section and the lush keyboard layers, while the woodwind goes soloing through, effortlessly creating dreamy evocations in the listener's mind. Once the rocky section arrives, the ambience turns into a powerful vibe of sound that steadily goes headlong for a splendid climax. The final moments almost border on prog metal, with a fabulously psychedelic synth solo that completes the allusions made by the guitar riffs. A great ending for a very good effort. 3 ½ stars for this recording - alter all, this is only an anticipation of a more complete work to come. The wait for that second album is already feeling too long.

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 Confusión by SUPAY album cover Studio Album, 2004
4.03 | 14 ratings

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Confusión
Supay Prog Folk

Review by erik neuteboom
Prog Reviewer

4 stars When I was a young boy, my father taught me that it was important to meet other cultures. So we often went to musea about native Indians and he used to play LP's with music from Greece, Russia, Roumania, Spain and often Latin-America, especially the Andean flute sound like Los Paraguayos, Los Incas and Los Calchakis. When I got in touch with progrock I was very pleased with Los Jaivas, the wonderful blend of ethnic and symphonic prog. Last week I was advised to buy Peruvian band Supay, I am very grateful (thanks Hans) because their blend of Andean folk and Western prog/rock is amazing! Supay is a new band that consists of six members, four are playing the 'quena' (an often used Andean flute) and two of those also play the 'zampona', a double panpipe from the Incas. Most of you will know these instruments from the Andean street musicians playing in Europe.

The CD is from 2004 but re-released in 2006 by the French label Musea and the Chilean label Mylodon Records. It contains seven pleasant and melodic compositions that sound like a progressive blend of Andean folk and rock music. In general the songs deliver fluent rhythms with an adventurous rhythm-section with the focus on the flutes and electric guitar. This results in a great tension between the cheerful 'quena' sound, the melancholic 'zampona' sound and the fiery and harder-edged guitarwork, in my opinion inspired by Hendrix and Blackmore. The guitarplayer makes impression with his frequent soli, often biting and howling and the duels with the flutes are great like on the first track when he uses wah-wah while the flute sounds like a nightingale! The keyboard player sounds a bit subdued: in Avanzado he delivers a bit jazzy organ solo, in La Nueva he plays a fine duet with a flute and in most of the other songs he accompanies on organ in a very tasteful way. That is also the strong point of Supay: the band sounds like a band despite the frequent soli and instrumental adventures.

If you like a musical encounter between two different worlds, this is an excellent CD!



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 Confusión by SUPAY album cover Studio Album, 2004
4.03 | 14 ratings

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Confusión
Supay Prog Folk

Review by Cesar Inca
Special Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

4 stars From the very initial passages of this album's opening track you can tell that Supay's music portrays a special kind of magic, a magic that can only arise from the heartland of Inca folklore. And that's what Supay's prog offering is all about: the creation of a symphonic prog sound that is enriched and recycled by the incorporation of various colours from Andean folklore, something that is not only provided by the two woodwind players, but also by a number of melodic lines performed on lead guitar and harmonic bases laid by the keyboards. The rhythm section, simultaneously, lays a solid ground for the overall sound, allowing it to flow cohesively through all the motif variations and tempo shifts, which get linked to each other with a most delicate fluency. The statement so majestically incarnated in 'Pueblo Mío' is later reinforced in the title track, as well as in 'En el Viento' and 'Imperio' - the latter two are perhaps the most vivacious numbers in the album, and they could be loosely described as Jethro Tull's "Songs from the Wood"-meets-Los Jaivas' "Alturas de Machu Picchu". A special mention goes to bassist Danuser, whose melodic lines flow powerfully beneath the keyboard layers and guitar/woodwind solos, especially on the last three tracks. The almost 9-minute long "Avanzando" is one of the longest tracks in the album, and also the one with the most complex structure: it includes some occasional jazzy flavours, as well as a higher level of energy during the rockier sections. Proaño's guitar shines here and in 'Confusión' like it won't in any of the remaining pieces. "La Nueva" (almost 9-minute long, too) is the track with the most overtly mystical feel to it: starting with a tellurian motif played on three woodwind instruments on a martial rhythm pattern, the track soon moves to the central motif, which is mostly a well-sustained exercise on textures displayed across a meditative atmosphere, especially featuring Reaño's lead guitar. Picture the spirit of PF's 'Shine On You Crazy Diamond' seasoned with some Agitation Free spices, and cooked in an Andean kermesse. If "Avanzando" shows Supay at their most intense and colourful, "La Nueva" finds the band heading for the realms of introspection. 'Chicago Chico' closes down the album as a sort of recapitulation of the first two tracks, combining the full frontal Andean magic of 'Pueblo Mío' and the varied sophistication of 'Avanzando'. Even though this is the band's first album, you can notice a solid mark of maturity and clear artistic vision: this mark has certainly allowed them to exploit the nuances of their compositional ideas with enough proficiency as to make a completely excellent album out of them. "Confusión" is one of the most pleasant surprises to emerge from current South American prog folk: therefore, Supay reveals itself as a musical force worth checking out.

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Thanks to Cesar Inca for the artist addition.

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