Header

MYRATH

Progressive Metal • Tunisia


From Progarchives.com, the ultimate progressive rock music website

Myrath picture
Myrath biography
MYRATH(which means Legacy) was formed in early 2001 under the name of XTAZY by guitarist Malek Ben Arbia (who was just 13 years old at the time) with two of his childhood friends,Fahmi Chakroun (drums)and Oualid Issaoui (guitar).The line up was shortly after completed by Zaher Ben Hamoudia (bass) andTarek Idouani (vocals).

For the first two years MYRATH played cover songs of blues ,heavy metal and death metal bands.

In 2003 Elyes Bouchoucha (keyboards and vocals),who just graduated from Tunis conservatory joined the band as replacements of Tarek Idouani while Oualid Issaoui (guitar) quit the band.
With this new line up MYRATH got into progressive metal and for almost 2 years they played in several concerts exclusively cover songs of SYMPHONY X which has become their favorite band at that time (and still is).

After several years of playing music written by others MYRATH gained enough experience and playing skills to start writing their own music The choice of music they decide to write reflected their oriental origin and their western influence (a combination of
progressive,oriental,heavy;thrash and melodic).

In the summer of 2004 Fahmi Chakroun (drums) and Zaher Hamoudia ( Bass) were replaced respectively by Saif Ouhibi and Yassine Belgith in an effort to get musicians fully dedicated to the band With this new line up MYRATH released their first self produced album ''Double Face '' in March 2005. Even though it was a first recording experience, this album (which was released in Tunisia only as the band was not signed yet) did however show encouraging signs of composing skills.

In September 2005 Malek Ben Arbia the band founding member and guitarist traveled to Nancy -France to enroll in the famous Guitar school, Music cademy International (M.A.I.) so as to improve his knowledge in music theory and improve and diversify his playing skills.

On March 24th 2006 Myrath opened for ADAGIO and ROBERT PLANT in the 3rd edition of the Mediterranean guitar festival which gave them the opportunity to meet Adagio band members and mainly their keyboard player Kevin Codfert who happened to be also a sound engineer and a producer.

After graduating from M.A.I. guitarist Malek Ben Arbia returned to Tunisia in late July 2007 with the firm intention to pursue an international music career with MYRATH. To this respect experienced bass player Anis Jouini joined the band in September 2006 in replacement of Zaher Hamoudi...
read more

Myrath official website

MYRATH MP3, Free Download (music stream)


Open extended player in a new pop-up window | Random Playlist (50) | How to submit new MP3s

MYRATH forum topics / tours, shows & news


MYRATH forum topics Create a topic now
MYRATH tours, shows & news
No topics found for : "myrath"
Post an entries now

MYRATH Videos (YouTube and more)


Showing only random 3 | Show all MYRATH videos (1) | Search and add more videos to MYRATH

Buy MYRATH Music


Tales of the SandsTales of the Sands
Nightmare Records 2011
Audio CD$8.67
$13.88 (used)
Desert CallDesert Call
Nightmare Records 2010
Audio CD$8.44
$6.98 (used)
HopeHope
Import
Brennus / Nightmare Records 2010
Audio CD$12.79
$11.66 (used)
Myrath - Tales Of The Sands +Bonus [Japan CD] KICP-1601Myrath - Tales Of The Sands +Bonus [Japan CD] KICP-1601
King Record Japan
Audio CD$30.21
$25.83 (used)
Right Now on Ebay (logo)
Orphaned Land ( T-SHIRT ) Myrath Melechesh Amorphis Pain of Salvation Opeth US $27.99 Buy It Now 7h 26m
MYRATH-TALES OF THE SANDS-JAPAN CD BONUS TRACK F75 US $30.50 Buy It Now 1 day
MYRATH - DESERT CALL US $7.99 Buy It Now 2 days
Tales of the Sands * by Myrath (CD, Oct-2011, Nightmare Records) US $8.75 Buy It Now 2 days
Desert Call by Myrath (CD, Aug-2010, Nightmare Records) US $8.78 Buy It Now 2 days
YOSSI SASSI - DESERT BUTTERFLIES CD DIGI NEW orphaned land gus marty myrath US $14.99 Buy It Now 4 days
ALMANA SCHORA - PHANTOM PAIN CD ORPHANED SALEM BETZEFER ISRAELI MYRATH US $11.99 Buy It Now 4 days
Myrath - Desert Call [CD New] US $11.49 Buy It Now 5 days
TALES OF THE SANDS BY MYRATH (CD) US $19.75 Buy It Now 8 days
Myrath - Desert Call CD US $16.83 Buy It Now 8 days
ORPHANED LAND - THE BELOVEDS CRY CD DIGI NEW myrath moonspell tiamat nightfall US $9.99 Buy It Now 12 days
Tales Of The Sands - Myrath US $10.84 Buy It Now 12 days
~ MYRATH - DESERT CALL ~ MUSIC CD US $7.99 Buy It Now 13 days
Desert Call(Explicit Version) - Myrath US $11.56 Buy It Now 14 days
MYRATH-DESERT CALL CD NEW US $15.62 Buy It Now 15 days
Myrath - Tales Of The Sands CD US $16.09 Buy It Now 15 days
Myrath - Tales Of The Sands [CD New] US $11.70 Buy It Now 15 days
Tales of the Sands - Myrath New & Sealed CD Free Shipping US $17.36 Buy It Now 16 days
Myrath - Hope [CD New] US $25.98 Buy It Now 17 days
Orphaned Land-Sahara+3 RARE Digipak CD Myrath Arkan Melechesh style US $8.99 Buy It Now 19 days
MYRATH - HOPE NEW CD US $30.44 Buy It Now 19 days
MYRATH-TALES OF THE SANDS CD NEW US $14.90 Buy It Now 19 days
Myrath - Tales of the Sands (2011) CD US $16.56 Buy It Now 21 days
Hope - Myrath New & Sealed CD-JEWEL CASE Free Shipping US $28.67 Buy It Now 21 days
Desert Call - Myrath New & Sealed CD Free Shipping US $18.29 Buy It Now 25 days
MYRATH - DESERT CALL NEW CD US $20.84 Buy It Now 27 days
MYRATH - DESERT CALL [MYRATH] - NEW CD US $11.49 Buy It Now 27 days
MYRATH - TALES OF THE SANDS * [734923006411] - NEW CD US $8.75 Buy It Now 29 days

More places to buy MYRATH music online Buy MYRATH & Prog Rock Digital Music online:
  • AmazonMP3: Search for MYRATH DRM-Free MP3 Downloads @ AmazonMP3 (USA Only) | AmazonMP3 (UK Only)

MYRATH shows & tickets


MYRATH has no upcoming shows, according to LAST.FM syndicated events and shows feed

MYRATH discography


Ordered by release date | Showing ratings (top albums) | Help Progarchives.com to complete the discography and add albums

MYRATH top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

4.00 | 110 ratings
Hope
2007
3.79 | 117 ratings
Desert Call
2010
3.96 | 209 ratings
Tales Of The Sands
2011

MYRATH Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

MYRATH Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

MYRATH Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

MYRATH Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

MYRATH Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 Hope by MYRATH album cover Studio Album, 2007
4.00 | 110 ratings

BUY
Hope
Myrath Progressive Metal

Review by Warthur
Prog Reviewer

4 stars Review Myrath and the temptation to compare them to Symphony X is overwhelming, and this is particularly the case on their debut album. Playing down the influence of traditional Middle Eastern music on their sound a little in order to demonstrate that they can recapture the Symphony X power-progressive metal sound just as effectively as anyone, Hope might not be as strikingly original as later albums like Tales of the Sands, but it does demonstrate that even early on Myrath had a keen command of their chosen musical style. Yes, Symphony X listeners may find it very familiar, but I don't think it ever becomes outright derivative, with Myrath coming up with ingenious wrinkles to the Symphony X sound that the Symph-Xers themselves haven't cottoned to.

MEMBERS LOGIN ZONE

As a registered member (register here if not), you can post rating/reviews (& edit later), comments reviews and submit new albums.

You are not logged, please complete authentication before continuing (use forum credentials).

 Hope by MYRATH album cover Studio Album, 2007
4.00 | 110 ratings

BUY
Hope
Myrath Progressive Metal

Review by siLLy puPPy

4 stars The debut album from this band from Tunisia proved that in the brave new world, great bands can emerge from the nooks and crannies of previously unthinkable places where little attention had been paid to before. MYRATH not only emerged from an unexpected country with no history of prog nor metal but little history of any famous bands whatsoever. It's really great to finally hear this debut album after hearing their excellent third album TALES OF THE SANDS.

There's no doubt that MYRATH are the Symphony X of the Sahara with some Dream Theater influences as well. At least the prog metal half of the equation. The Middle Eastern folk part which is what really sets them apart from the previously mentioned bands is woven into the tapestry of the music very well. The album begins with some exotic sounding North African music before the metal kicks in and the result is that I was instantly sucked into it. These guys really know how to craft well written and catchy tunes that leave you wanting more.

In a way they have usurped the Symphony X sound and are now doing it better then that band does. I would give this 5 stars if it was completely original but since it is so derivative no matter how good it is I'll go with 4

MEMBERS LOGIN ZONE

As a registered member (register here if not), you can post rating/reviews (& edit later), comments reviews and submit new albums.

You are not logged, please complete authentication before continuing (use forum credentials).

 Desert Call by MYRATH album cover Studio Album, 2010
3.79 | 117 ratings

BUY
Desert Call
Myrath Progressive Metal

Review by siLLy puPPy

4 stars A decent sophomore effort from this talented band from Tunisia. They succeed in not making a cookie cutter copy of their debut. I do think I prefer the debut slightly over this as the Middle Eastern fusion effects have been subdued here a bit as well as the prog metal having been revved up. At the same time, this sounds a little less derivative of Symphony X, so all in all it is pretty even for me.

Not all of the songs are as catchy on this one but the ones that are can be extremely addictive with 'Shockwave' being at the top of the list. Something is lacking on this release for me to really love it like I do their follow-up to this, TALES OF THE SANDS. Overrall a very good second effort from this band showing the world that a great prog metal release from Africa is no flash in the pan. After hearing the next release it's obvious that they will push their sound even further and hone their musical sound into something even more interesting.

MEMBERS LOGIN ZONE

As a registered member (register here if not), you can post rating/reviews (& edit later), comments reviews and submit new albums.

You are not logged, please complete authentication before continuing (use forum credentials).

 Tales Of The Sands by MYRATH album cover Studio Album, 2011
3.96 | 209 ratings

BUY
Tales Of The Sands
Myrath Progressive Metal

Review by siLLy puPPy

5 stars Now THIS is some seriously good Middle Eastern / Metal fusion. I can't think of a more successful hijacking of a sound, meaning they sound like the Symphony X of the Sahara with their seriously delicious brand of prog metal blended perfectly with the Middle Eastern rhythms, scales and harmonies of their native Tunisia. The songs are seriously catchy, original, entertaining, melodic and powerful.

This band is quite talented knowing just how to mix it up. They really have a knack for the prog metal element which puts newer long established acts to shame. Moments when they choose to drop the metal and just let the accompanying congas and female vocals shine in the light for a while are part of the compositional brilliance that this band delivers consistantly. Both guitar and keyboard solos are found that add virtuosic outbursts at times.

This album really adds to their already rich fusion formula. I really look forward to their hearing future releases. If they can shed the blatant Symphony X sound and find their own then this band will surely earn the crown of top prog metal act. 4.5 rounded up

MEMBERS LOGIN ZONE

As a registered member (register here if not), you can post rating/reviews (& edit later), comments reviews and submit new albums.

You are not logged, please complete authentication before continuing (use forum credentials).

 Tales Of The Sands by MYRATH album cover Studio Album, 2011
3.96 | 209 ratings

BUY
Tales Of The Sands
Myrath Progressive Metal

Review by Warthur
Prog Reviewer

4 stars Myrath play a style of prog metal inspired by Symphony X and mmmmaybe a little Dream Theater, but enrich this with influences from the music of their Tunisian homeland. Whereas some bands might slip in music from North Africa or the Middle East for flavour, Myrath are no tourists - these are musical traditions they know inside and out and they are able to truly integrate them into the structure of their songs rather than toss these cultural allusions in as an empty affectation. On top of that, their mastery of progressive metal is also laudable, throwing in just enough bombast to get their point across without getting tediously heavy- handed. On the whole, this is a mature album which will hopefully give a higher profile to this hard-working unit.

MEMBERS LOGIN ZONE

As a registered member (register here if not), you can post rating/reviews (& edit later), comments reviews and submit new albums.

You are not logged, please complete authentication before continuing (use forum credentials).

 Hope by MYRATH album cover Studio Album, 2007
4.00 | 110 ratings

BUY
Hope
Myrath Progressive Metal

Review by kluseba

4 stars I discovered this exotic band from Tunisia with a song from their second album last year on a sampler included in the normally pretty weak British Metal Hammer magazine but I forgot to check them out. With the release of their new third record, I remembered this talented band and decided to take my time and check their discography out. Obviously, I started with the band's first strike called "Hope". The five young men from Tunisia didn't disappoint me indeed and deliver a strong first record somewhere between progressive metal, power metal, thrash metal and some folk influences.

The only negative thing I could see is that some instrumental sections are sometimes too long and pointless. I must also admit that the albums has a little down with the mediocre half ballad "Fade Away" and "All my Fears" that gets lost in overwhelming instrumental wankery.

The rest of the album is of the grandest kind and in the end one of the most convincing progressive metal releases of the year 2007. A great introduction with a gracious folk mood leads perfectly to the true opener which is "Confession". I must confess that this is an amazing opener that varies from a great thrash riff in the beginning to some power metal or even neoclassical metal and shred passages in the middle parts to a more and more elaborated progressive style with haunting melodies, some citations of the classic music genre and a couple of orchestral Maghreb folk influences. There are so many influences and details in this song that I could listen to it over and over again and still discover something new each time I do so. This is not just amazing, it is perfect because the song still sounds coherent and logical within a running time of six and a half minutes.

The next songs are all amazing but not perfect. The only reason for this statement is that Myrath sometimes sound too much like their American influences Dream Theater or Symphony X. The title track "Hope" still convinces with some unusual riffs and a few exotic folk vibes but the middle part sounds too traditional. The epic "Seven Sins" has the same problem. If someone has told me that this was a song from some old Symphony X record of the nineties, I would have believed this without a doubt. Still, the song itself is great and features some amazing piano melodies. What I really like about the song is the fact that all instruments have an important role and get their time to shine. The amazing album closer "My Inner War" has the same approach but it pleases more to me because it sounds more coherent and focussed.

An exceptional track might be "Last Breath" that convinces with stunning drum patterns and orchestral folk sounds with a fresh breath of thrashing heaviness. This track reminds me a little bit of "Acrassicauda" from Iraq and this track here could have been an excellent single choice.

After all, this debut album is very promising and the band already has a perfect song on this album plus many great moments. The only thing I feel they need to improve is to find their own style and have the courage to get away from the American progressive and thrash sounds and European power metal sounds. If they ever succeed to do so, they might become the leaders of a wave of African metal in the world, maybe with the help of their colleagues from Arkan who are living in France but mostly come from Maghreb countries or even Threatening from Ouganda which would be really interesting. Anyway, give this album a couple of spins if you like well made diversified progressive metal. Meanwhile, I will check out the band's next two records pretty soon.

Originally published on www.metal-archives.com on September 28th of the year 2011.

MEMBERS LOGIN ZONE

As a registered member (register here if not), you can post rating/reviews (& edit later), comments reviews and submit new albums.

You are not logged, please complete authentication before continuing (use forum credentials).

 Tales Of The Sands by MYRATH album cover Studio Album, 2011
3.96 | 209 ratings

BUY
Tales Of The Sands
Myrath Progressive Metal

Review by J-Man
Prog Reviewer

4 stars Although it's a fairly established fact that Africa does not have the world's most abundant metal scene, an increasingly global economy has allowed plenty of excellent bands from exotic parts of the Earth to see greater commercial success than ever before. One band that has benefited from the modern age of internet communication and economic globalization is Tunisian progressive metal act Myrath. Though their country is currently in political turmoil, they've managed to see an impressive amount of recognition from metal fans worldwide with their third album, Tales of the Sands. And well-deserved recognition it is, indeed. Myrath's unique blend of melodic heavy metal, progressive metal, and traditional Arabic soundscapes immediately sets them apart from other prog metal acts on the scene today, and the fact that they have plenty of technical chops to back it up makes their music all the more worthwhile. Tales of the Sands is a highly successful effort that is both adventurous and professional; fans of progressive metal who are willing to hear the genre convincingly mixed with Arab influences are going to find lots to love on this record.

At the surface, Myrath's root sound can appear to be roughly similar to bands like Symphony X, Royal Hunt, Anubis Gate, and Kamelot with a few Arabic tendencies thrown in, but this is actually a rather false speculation. Rather than taking the established progressive metal formula and sprinkling Middle Eastern flavorings on top, Myrath instead takes both styles and puts them in a blender, thus allowing the two radically different genres to be thoroughly integrated into a style that can only be described as the band's own. Tales of the Sands is also a very heavy album, especially by your 'traditional non-growling' prog metal standards. The riffs chug along with a clear influence from more extreme variants of metal, the vocals are dynamic and powerful, and the drums frequently veer into fast double-kick sections. In spite of the distinctly modern brand of heaviness displayed by Myrath, they never lose sight of melody throughout Tales of the Sands - most of the songs are rather straightforward from a structural standpoint, but the melodic and catchy choruses keeps the band's 'formula' from ever growing stale. Of course, the spellbinding riffs will have an irresistibly headbanging effect on most metalheads, but I think it's the way these spectacular riffs are melded with memorable, yet entirely cheese-free, choruses is what will truly make this a memorable album for years to come. As nice as it would be to see Myrath venture beyond the five-minute songwriting format, they have obtained such a level of mastery on this style of composition that it's tough to complain.

Tales of the Sands is also incredibly well executed from all fronts, and the sleek production is probably what will immediately jump out to many listeners. The powerful, meaty sound perfectly complements the masculine metal riffs and progressive arrangements, and whilst it may be a bit too polished for some listeners, the quality of the sound is objectively spectacular. The musicians in Myrath are clearly quite experienced, and the tight rhythm section is arguably the band's finest asset - the downtuned, chugging riffs set the backbone for all of the tunes here, and they are simply hypnotizing. Zaher Zorgati's melodic and powerful vocals deliver every melody with precision and emotion, and his mid-ranged singing style consistently suits the mood of the music. His voice bears resemblance to more 'masculine' power metal vocalists like Russell Allen or Ralf Scheepers, but he still manages to sound like himself throughout the full album.

This is a memorable and professionally executed observation from Myrath, and there's really not too much to complain about when we're talking about an album with this level of quality. Tales of the Sands shows a creative young band with the ambition and ability to succeed in the crowded progressive metal climate, and I'm sure their heavy, melodic, and eclectic take on the genre will please many fans of the style. This is a truly excellent album, and I'll play it safe right now with a big 4 star rating. I may raise it even higher sometime in the future, but as of now Tales of the Sands still stands as a near-mandatory purchase. This is one of the most recommendable progressive metal albums from 2011.

MEMBERS LOGIN ZONE

As a registered member (register here if not), you can post rating/reviews (& edit later), comments reviews and submit new albums.

You are not logged, please complete authentication before continuing (use forum credentials).

 Desert Call by MYRATH album cover Studio Album, 2010
3.79 | 117 ratings

BUY
Desert Call
Myrath Progressive Metal

Review by Conor Fynes
Prog Reviewer

4 stars 'Desert Call' - Myrath (7/10)

Barring Antarctica and the Lovecraftian horrors that live there, Africa is the least prolific continent when in comes to heavy metal and progressive music. To most, this will come as an established fact rather than speculation; despite a wealth of culture, modern strife has kept Africa back from letting its voice out. There are exceptions however, as Myrath proudly indicates. Hailing from Tunisia, Myrath plays a polished style of progressive metal, in the style of Dream Theater and Symphony X. What sets Myrath apart- and thus makes them worthy of mention- is that they use sound of traditional Arabic music and fuse it into the metal sound. Similar in this respect to the more established Orphaned Land, Myrath has an exciting and epic sound, and 'Desert Call' will appeal to anyone looking for a progressive metal curveball.

Although metal is a community which often prides itself on being progressively-thinking and open-minded, too much metal gives the sense of deja vu; that it's already been done before, and will be done again. Ironically, progressive metal is a central offender for this, as it sometimes feels every band calling themselves 'prog metal' these days is either a Dream Theater clone, or a melodic hard rock group looking for an added edge in their marketing. Myrath fits the glove with the sound of current progressive metal, but they are made memorable by their defining trait; that is, there is a strong sound of Middle-Eastern music running in tandem with metal. Much like the bands Kamelot or Nightwish merge their metal elements with Western classical music, Myrath does the same with their own culture, and the outcome is impressive. Myrath are a very capable prog-power band regardless of the Middle-Eastern sounds, but without this new angle, I would not have such a vivid memory of them.

Importantly, 'Desert Call' does not use these traditional Arabic sounds as a gimmick, but beefs them up so that they're an integral part of the music and sound. Malek Ben Arbia's guitar playing is firmly rooted in the school of John Petrucci and Michael Romeo, but Zaher Zorguatti's vocals are keen to switch between acrobatic power metal wails and a signature Islamic holler, often within the course of a single vocal line. Seif Ouhibi's drums find the balance as well, at times delivering the powerful metal pummel, but also occasionally conjuring a beat that sounds like it could score a cinematic chase through Baghdad. The songwriting's greatest strength is their near-seamless ability to work the Middle-Eastern sounds into the music, but the more power metal-oriented aspects can exert a certain level of cheese. Many of these songs have memorable melodies and song structures, but I often felt that by the end of most tracks, I had heard a run-through of the chorus one, or two too many times. Bring into focus a lackluster sense of flow and possibly overdone length, and 'Desert Call' begins to lose its status as the 'metal revelation' it could have been.

Myrath's signature style was born with their debut 'Hope', and it continues to run strong in the blood of 'Desert Call'. Although the current trends of progressive metal are starting to die out, Myrath's ambitious pledge to bring the sounds of their home culture to metal gives a refreshing new perspective on a style that has rarely managed to hold my attention in recent years. Its cheesy power metal theatrics aside, 'Desert Call' is worth an easy recommendation.

MEMBERS LOGIN ZONE

As a registered member (register here if not), you can post rating/reviews (& edit later), comments reviews and submit new albums.

You are not logged, please complete authentication before continuing (use forum credentials).

 Tales Of The Sands by MYRATH album cover Studio Album, 2011
3.96 | 209 ratings

BUY
Tales Of The Sands
Myrath Progressive Metal

Review by Menswear
Prog Reviewer

5 stars Out of Africa...into my heart.

This could be the most exciting record of 2011, don't you think? The (almost perfect) blend of prog, metal and oriental music into a supersonic record blew my mind on the first listen. Yes, it's been a while since a metal prog album did that.

First things first: I've never heard something like that before. The Arabic singing both male and female, the great conga codas, the oriental melodies blended with (quite) heavy music is surprisingly original. Yes I use this word with parcimony. Originality scores big time with Tales of The Sand. We are submerged with the same old same old, and 2011 didn't skip it's turn. So rejoice people of the World, you'll have a great (underline great) time with this record, it's so entertaining you'll feel like dancing. I'm not joking, you actually can dance on Merciless Times!

If you like A.C.T and Muse's cross of short songs and catchy choruses with a punch around every corner, you have a winner. 100% growling-free, you'll be far away from the darkness and moodyness of regular metal. Myrath is not a 'despair' band, on the contrary!

When Myrath says dance you dance!

MEMBERS LOGIN ZONE

As a registered member (register here if not), you can post rating/reviews (& edit later), comments reviews and submit new albums.

You are not logged, please complete authentication before continuing (use forum credentials).

 Tales Of The Sands by MYRATH album cover Studio Album, 2011
3.96 | 209 ratings

BUY
Tales Of The Sands
Myrath Progressive Metal

Review by Tarek

5 stars Simply, Myrath new album "Tales of the sand" is initially the top-notch album of 2011 for me but I prefer to wait a tad till the end of the year in desire of shunning hastiness...

Myrath created here the perfect combination of oriental atmospheres and Prog metal so far, and since I'm living in this part of the world it touches me like no one before due to the old and continuous disappointments with Arab's and oriental music scene, I think Myrath paved the way for a whole new music prospective in Arab countries and we will notice a bunch of bands doing similarly and influenced by them in the near future.

The album is highly melodic with rich, lush arrangements and stellar production created by THE Kevin Codfert, And regardless the five standard instruments, violins dominate Myrath's identity playing a big role by creating catchy melodic oriental phrases, and with the assist of "earthen hand drum" that resonates from time to time a tale of the sand image is completed.

The influence of Michael Romeo is clearly spotted in the guitarist riffage, stunning, powerful and versatile and even though the solos are not as good as the riffs in my opinion, still it fits the songs in general.

To highlight the album, all tracks are spectacular especially "Under Siege" "Merciless Times" "Sour Sigh" while track 9 "Beyond the Stars" contains one of the most devilish and head banging riffage i've ever heard while the Arabic chorus with Tunisian accent enrich the surprising moments of the track followed by an oriental phrase that reminded with the masters Laco tayfa a great band from turkey.

Overall the drummer is doing a good performance with a large variety of rhythms and rolls And the bassist is adding the salt to these savory meal especially in track 4 "Tales of the Sands" where he did a powerful -right in place- bassline.

Regarding the vocalist, I think Zaher will have a place beside the masters of Prog scene in the future, he succeeded in impressing with his dramatic versatile performance both in Arabic and English singing to the extent that he appended a new entertaining part to me which is "Arabic singing" (actually I forgot when I last sang in Arabic while listening to music!!!)

Finally and Literally I don't give full mark unless I'm pretty sure of what I'm reviewing, and in "Tales of the sand" case I couldn't find a particular reason for not giving a 5 stars, every single moment of the album is fantastic in its own right and I urge all Prog metal fans to give them an ear because Myrath is like putting symphony x, adagio and kamelot in a mixer creating a delicious irresistible cocktail, and I'm one hundred percent sure that it will carry you in a spanking new trip.

cheers.

MEMBERS LOGIN ZONE

As a registered member (register here if not), you can post rating/reviews (& edit later), comments reviews and submit new albums.

You are not logged, please complete authentication before continuing (use forum credentials).

Thanks to TheProgtologist for the artist addition.

Copyright Prog Archives, All rights reserved. | Legal Notice | Privacy Policy | Advertise | GeoIP Services by MaxMind | RSS + syndications

Other sites in the MAC network: JazzMusicArchives.com — the ultimate jazz music virtual community | MetalMusicArchives.com — the ultimate metal music virtual community


Server processing time: 1.49 seconds