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THE OCEAN

Experimental/Post Metal • Germany


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The Ocean picture
The Ocean biography
Founded in Berlin, Germany in 2000

THE OCEAN also known as THE OCEAN COLLECTIVE is a German post metal started by guitarist Robin Staps in 2000. During the first 2 years of its formation the band went through a constant change in lineup, having about 40 musicians joining and leaving the band before finding a more stable lineup. In July 2002 the band played their first concert at Berlin's Eimer's Club, followed by the self-release of their eponymous debut album entitled "Island/Tides".

After a short tour alongside Swedish band COMA in early 2003 the band signed with Make My Day Records and thus releasing the "Fogdiver" EP consisting only of 5 instrumental tracks though they had vocals when played live. "Fogdiver" was well received by critics unlike their previous album.

In early 2004 the band headed back to the studio to record two studio albums entitled "Fluxion" and "Aeolian". "Fluxion" was released through Make My Day Records and Throne Records in August 2004. The album featured a more calm and atmospheric sound and the incorporation of vocals and thus causing critics to consider the album "a step backwards in terms of innovation and originality". In 2005 the band changed their record label to Metal Blade Records. The remaining songs from their previous sessions would become "Aeolian". The album was released in March 2006 through their new label and featured a more metal sound and did not included classical instruments and electronic sounds like on previous albums. The album featured several vocalists instead of one like in Fluxion, which included Nate Newton (CONVERGE), Sean Ingram (COALESCE) and Tomas Hallbom (BREACH).

The release was followed by 5 months of touring to support the album. At the end of the year the band began working on their next album entitled "Precambrian" which was released in November 2007. The album contained 2 discs: the first one featured a heavier and raw influence similar to their previous album Aeolian while the second was more post metal influenced with the inclusion of classical instruments and electronic elements like the ones found in "Fluxion".

- Sebastian Maldonado (burritounit) -

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THE OCEAN discography


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THE OCEAN top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.84 | 43 ratings
Fluxion
2004
3.79 | 42 ratings
Aeolian
2006
4.05 | 96 ratings
Precambrian
2007
3.66 | 57 ratings
Heliocentric
2010
3.96 | 90 ratings
Anthropocentric
2010
3.94 | 136 ratings
Pelagial
2013
4.11 | 73 ratings
Phanerozoic I - Palaeozoic
2018
4.04 | 56 ratings
Phanerozoic II: Mesozoic | Cenozoic
2020

THE OCEAN Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

THE OCEAN Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

THE OCEAN Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

4.43 | 7 ratings
Fluxion/Aeolian
2005

THE OCEAN Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

3.20 | 6 ratings
Islands/Tides
2001
5.00 | 3 ratings
2nd Demo
2002
3.71 | 13 ratings
Fogdiver
2003
5.00 | 3 ratings
Queen of the Food-Chain/Inertia
2005
4.40 | 5 ratings
Transcendental
2015

THE OCEAN Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 Phanerozoic II: Mesozoic | Cenozoic by OCEAN, THE album cover Studio Album, 2020
4.04 | 56 ratings

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Phanerozoic II: Mesozoic | Cenozoic
The Ocean Experimental/Post Metal

Review by ssmarcus

4 stars The Ocean have spent the last two decades firmly establishing themselves as one of the most prominent and respected progressive metal acts of the 2000's. Their lean but nearly flawless discography has pushed their brand of adventurous post-metal, sludge, and groove into progressive metal's inner sanctum of stylistic variations. The ground covered by their music literally spans eons all while managing to address itself to man's frail existential condition.

Take their latest record, Phanerozoic II: Mesozoic | Cenozoic, for example. The third and ostensibly final installment of a trilogy of albums, the first being 2007's Precambrian and the second being 2018's Phanerozoic I, completes the band's ambitious attempt to cover, via their music, the entire natural history of planet earth from its fiery inception, its multiple dramatic and tragic extermination events, and all the way through to the present geological age. Of course, the geological history functions, on all three records, as a mediation and, at times, extended metaphor for man's place in the entirely incomprehensible and cyclic vastness of creation.

While Phanerozoic II is a decent record and arguably fitting closure to the geological saga, I think longer time fans like myself are likely to find it a tad underwhelming. The record covers no new ground not already explored in previous releases and, most damningly, has far fewer memorable riffs and melodies. Still, I think the record is an excellent way for newer fans to get introduced and it still holds up as one of 2020's stronger releases.

 Phanerozoic II: Mesozoic | Cenozoic by OCEAN, THE album cover Studio Album, 2020
4.04 | 56 ratings

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Phanerozoic II: Mesozoic | Cenozoic
The Ocean Experimental/Post Metal

Review by BrufordFreak
Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

4 stars My introduction to this eclectic prog metal band from Germany. You'll want to hear this one for yourselves. It's good!

1. "Triassic" (8:31) slow, spaced out electric guitar strums accompanied by flutey-trumpet sound are soon joined by bass, low synths, stick percussion, and drums. Very cool development and build as chunky goes into an early, pre- singing solo. Singing doesn't even begin until the third minute as sticks, strums and chugging GENESIS Duke-like rhythm guitar back robotic multi-voice vocals. Very cool! Brief growled chorus before moving back into the same motif for the second verse. The second time through the chorus sees a drawing out of the growls--this time being antiphoned by the robotic choir--before we trans into an instrumental section for two-tracks of guitars soloing. Near the six-minute mark we move back into the chorus--version II with robot voices answering/alternating with growler. Then the growler gets complete lead for the 7:00 mark until finally being rejoined by the robot voices and then returning to a repeat of the two-guitar instrumental section. Brilliant song! (19/20)

2. "Jurassic | Cretaceous" (13:24) Part TOOL, part LEPROUS, big part OPETH, there is enough refreshing creativity here to make me want to listen and like this music, but, in the end, aside from its lyrics and despite it's awesome intro, it is 80% rehashing what other Death Metal bands have done before. (26.25/30)

3. "Palaeocene" (4:00) standard growl death metal. Aside from the lyrics, there's nothing new here. (7.75/10)

4. "Eocene" (3:57) using a different singer with a more melodic, gentle, KEVIN MOORE/CHROMA KEY-like approach-- until the chorus, then it turns more like Bath/Leaving Your Body Map-era MAUDLIN OF THE WELL. The second verse sounds more like French band KLONE. Well done, if lacking any real climax. (9/10)

5. "Oligocene" (4:00) ANATHEMA or VOTUM-like atmospheric opening has me tuned in. Completely. Now this is a band I could follow! (9.5/10)

6. "Miocene | Pliocene" (4:40) steady psych/kosmische music over which vocalist growl-screams his message. I like the fact that he's singing slowly enough that I can understand his lyrics. (They're in English). The chorus is interestingly in a multi-track vocal format that sounds incredibly similar to LINKIN PARK. For music/songs like this I can tolerate the growling vocal deliveries. (9/10)

7. "Pleistocene" (6:40) more KEVIN MOORE/OSI like pulsing music over which the LINKIN PARK voice sings plaintively (or like a human Einar Solberg (LEPROUS). Growls scream the chorus. Second verse has high-pitched upper octave background singer mirroring the lyrics and lead vocalist's melody. After the second verse the music amps up and shifts into a slightly higher gear (third and, later, fourth)) while growler likewise increases the emotion behind his rant. It's effective! The chord play around the 6:00 mark is straight out of the LEPROUS/PROGHMA-C handbook. Nice ending and, though interesting and creative, overall it somehow falls a little short of great. (8.75/10)

8. "Holocene" (5:47) a steady, pleasurable song that has an OSI, TONY PATTERSON, or LUNATIC SOUL feel and sound to it. It keeps me engaged but disappoints in its failure to intensify and/or climax or resolve. (8.75/10)

Total Time 50:59

B+/4.5 stars; a near-masterpiece of creative, inventive heavy progressive rock or experimental/post metal music. Definitely highly recommended for every prog lover to to check out.

 Phanerozoic II: Mesozoic | Cenozoic by OCEAN, THE album cover Studio Album, 2020
4.04 | 56 ratings

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Phanerozoic II: Mesozoic | Cenozoic
The Ocean Experimental/Post Metal

Review by javajeff

5 stars The Ocean knocked this one out of the park. It is seriously an instant classic that is even better than the first one. Incredible musicianship like their other releases, and this just starts off swinging. The first two tracks Triassic and Jurassic | Cretaceous are easily two of their best songs in their entire discography and it keeps going after that. With non stop perfection, this may even be their best album to date. They have really developed a grasp of composing in layers, and adding those jazzy interludes at the right moments. Then they know how to just flat out rock. Phanerozoic II: Mesozoic has it all for fans of this genre. It is highly progressive, extreme metal with very memorable tracks. It shows a ton of growth, and incorporates everything from alternative rock to jazz, extreme metal, and progressive rock. The mix is aural candy, the drums by Paul Seidel pop, growl and clean vocals are fantastic, and the guitar riffs are stellar. Add a little synth and keyboard magic by Peter Voigtmann, and this is a serious album of the year contender.
 Precambrian by OCEAN, THE album cover Studio Album, 2007
4.05 | 96 ratings

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Precambrian
The Ocean Experimental/Post Metal

Review by ssmarcus

5 stars Germany's The Ocean have established themselves in the upper echelons of modern progressive metal right alongside the likes of Haken and Between the Buried and Me. Their (very) slow ascent to greatness was kicked off with the release of this very record,Precambrian, a sprawling 2-disc epic concept album that establishes many of the musical and lyrical elements that The Ocean would continue to employ in later releases.

Despite formally being a post metal act, The Ocean always had a punchier and groovier edge to their riffs, much in the vein of Lamb of God or Meshuggah but with a sludgy gloss. While the first disc takes this tendency to its brutal and oh so primal extreme, the second disc sees group truly explore their experimental and progressive side with the inclusion of chamber instruments and more ambient passages. Like many of the group's future releases, the record is disguised as a concept album about some high-brow scientific topic when, in reality, the science merely serves as a metaphor for a much deeper explorations of man's nature.

Precambrian deserves its perfect score but, in hind sight, its hard not to see how it could have been even better. At this stage in their development, The Ocean still functioned as a 'collective' with a heavy reliance on guest and revolving door musicians. As such, vocalist Loic Rossetti and his signature blend of heavy, clean, and distorted vocals was not yet apart of group's sound. There is little doubt that side 2's melodic passages would have been significantly enhanced with Loic's contributions.

 Aeolian by OCEAN, THE album cover Studio Album, 2006
3.79 | 42 ratings

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Aeolian
The Ocean Experimental/Post Metal

Review by UMUR
Special Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

4 stars "Aeolian" is the 2nd full-length studio album by German sludge/post metal/hardcore act The Ocean (sometimes referred to as The Ocean Collective). The album was released through Metal Blade Records in November 2005. "Aeolian" is the second part of a two album project that started with "Fluxion (2004)". As far as I understand the tracks for the two albums were written and recorded during the same sessions, but the band (or the label?) decided to release the most atmospheric and orchestral material on "Fluxion" and the more aggressive and direct material on "Aeolian".

...it's definitely an interesting approach and to my ears "Fluxion" started the project pretty successfully. "Aeolian" is definitely the harder edged ugly monster sibling. The level of aggression and the amount of chugging riffs are much higher on "Aeolian" than the case was on "Fluxion", and "Aeolian" is not at all as atmospheric or as sophisticated as "Fluxion" either (although not completely devoid of atmospheric moments). We're still dealing with fairly technical playing and complex compositions, but the emphasis is on aggression and heavy riffing. The vocals are predominantly raw and shouting type sludge/hardcore vocals. There are as many as 6 different vocalists who contribute to the album, so the vocal style also changes from deep semi-growling, to harsh hardcore screaming, to aggressive barking.

While all material on the 10 track, 55:32 minutes long album is well written and performed, there is a slight identity crisis heard throughout the album, and it's like The Ocean can't decide if they want to play metal or hardcore (there are several predominantly hardcore oriented tracks on the album). There's even a wiff of metalcore/melodic death metal featured at one point, so it's not a stylistically consistent release. Wether that's a weakness or a strength is up for discussion, but personally I found the band's adventurous approach to musical styles relatively intriguing, albeit not always equally successful. Highlights include "The City in the Sea" and "Inertia", which are the two tracks that bookends the album. Especially the latter is a great track, but all material on the album is of a good quality.

"Aeolian" features a well sounding and powerful production, which suits the material well and the musicianship is on a high level on all posts. So upon conclusion "Aeolian" is through and through a high quality release. Compared to it's sister release "Fluxion", "Aeolian" is slightly less interesting though, but a 3.5 - 4 star (75%) rating is still deserved.

(Originally posted on Metal Music Archives)

 Phanerozoic I - Palaeozoic by OCEAN, THE album cover Studio Album, 2018
4.11 | 73 ratings

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Phanerozoic I - Palaeozoic
The Ocean Experimental/Post Metal

Review by ssmarcus

5 stars With such inspiring album names like 'Pre-Cambrian,' 'Heliocentric,' and, most recently, 'Phanerozoic,' casual prog metal fans could be forgiven for assuming The Ocean specializes in some form of insufferable overly technical high-brow prog metal. But as fans of the German prog and post metal veterans can attest, The Ocean's use of textbook scientific imagery simply provides the metaphorical foundations for the band's exploration of man's essential nature, the quality of his relationships, and his place in the universe. 'Phanerozoic' continues this tradition by offering up a heavy but genuinely moving meditation on the cyclical nature of life going in and out of existence across an unfathomably long length of time across the Earth's history. The album's finisher 'Permian: The Great Dying' may be one of the best songs I have heard in the 2010's.
 Phanerozoic I - Palaeozoic by OCEAN, THE album cover Studio Album, 2018
4.11 | 73 ratings

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Phanerozoic I - Palaeozoic
The Ocean Experimental/Post Metal

Review by rogerthat
Prog Reviewer

5 stars A few months back, I had the privilege of watching this band in concert. It truly was a privilege. I have seen Iron Maiden, Scorpions and Satyricon apart from a bunch of Indian metal/rock bands in concert. The Iron Maiden show in particular was unforgettable as over 30,000 fans had gathered for what was Maiden's first show in India and we screamed out the lyrics along with Bruce Dickinson all the way till the end. The Ocean show I attended was in a small performing area attached to a pub and was attended by 100 fans tops in a venue that could have accommodated. And it was hands down the best rock/metal show I have attended. Nothing else has ever come close. This is doubtless also a product of the limited opportunities I get to watch top notch international acts. But it is equally a tribute to the incredible musicianship of Ocean, be it their energy or their precision or their eclecticism.

Yes, Rossetti's vocals ARE effective both when he's doing those growled screams and when he's singing clean. They performed this whole album and he can keep it up song after song without a drop in intensity. If he lost pitch ever, I didn't hear it. And he crowdsurfed while still singing, yes! He also came up with jaw dropping sustained screams. Needless to say, he does everything in the studio too that he does live.

Stags and Hagerstrand double up to form a super-heavy rhythm section. Man, are those riffs crushing. They mount a wall of heaviness so formidable and imposing you just watch and listen in astonishment without complaining about the lack of solos. Or the fact that the music largely stays in a mid range tempo. There are ebbs and crests but rarely do they play at thrash/death metal tempos. You THINK song after song of despairing, slow/mid tempo sludge metal is gonna get boring fast but the heaviness by itself is so awesome to behold you are gasping for breath instead.

The other reason it doesn't get boring is the drummer Paul Seidel. Bespectacled and genial (like a metal version of John Weathers), he is incredibly creative with his fills whilst also possessing the chops to pull off those intense, brutal metal breakdowns. He keeps changing up things just enough to nip any signs of monotony in the bud.

It is hard for me to describe the tracks very specifically on an individual basis. Ocean specialises in concept albums and the songs are deeply related and do run together. It is NOT a bad thing if you think of it as a sort of metal symphony as opposed to requiring lots of variety from one track to another. Don't get me wrong, there is a lot of variation in here but the songwriting is cohesive to the point that it gets hard to separate one track from the other. It is best heard in one go from start to finish and the terrific production doesn't hurt at all.

The one possible flipside is that if for some reason, this kind of music isn't really your thing, NOTHING on here is going to work. But I can't imagine why that would be. If you read this up to this point, you are a metal listener aware of where metal is at these days without nostalgic yearning for the days when metal bands were slotted in very specific genres and made the same album again and again in service of genre purity.

As is the case with these awesome 21st century metal bands, Ocean is a hybrid that draws from metal through the ages to come up with something that is undeniably and unabashedly metal and yet doesn't sound like a rehash of metal classics like, I don't know, Altars of Madness, Obscura, Transcendence, None So Vile, etc. And they have done it again and again through the course of a long career. It's a wonder they aren't better known than they are. This album is as good an introduction to their work as any.

 Precambrian by OCEAN, THE album cover Studio Album, 2007
4.05 | 96 ratings

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Precambrian
The Ocean Experimental/Post Metal

Review by Warthur
Prog Reviewer

4 stars Precambrian offers up two distinct musical trips, with an overarching theme concerning the earliest phases of Earth's formation. Hadean/Archaean offers about 20 minutes of direct aggression; Proterozoic offers an hour of more contemplative atmospheric sludge metal veering into progressive rock or New Age music at points. The full 80 minute package is, to be honest, a bit of a chore to listen to - but break it up into its two component parts and select the piece which suits your current mood better, and the overall package is substantially improved. Let's say it's a three star album packaged with a four star album - but which is which will hinge on the tastes of the individual listener.
 Phanerozoic I - Palaeozoic by OCEAN, THE album cover Studio Album, 2018
4.11 | 73 ratings

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Phanerozoic I - Palaeozoic
The Ocean Experimental/Post Metal

Review by siLLy puPPy
Collaborator PSIKE, JR/F/Canterbury & Eclectic Teams

4 stars Metal is dead they say! But is it? Of course not but the naysayers seem to think that since there is no unifying metal band such as a Led Zeppelin, a Metallica or an Iron Maiden to rally around in the 21st century that the grandiose nature of the genre surely must be just a pathetic shadow of its former glory. Au contraire! The metal universe has never been so large and seen so many torches carried from the past masters and an even greater number of new torches being lit seemingly every single day. The big bang that began in the late 60s with proto-metal bands like Gun, Jimi Hendrix Experience and Iron Butterfly just to name a few, quickly led to the first metal oriented bands like Led Zeppelin, Deep Purple and Black Sabbath. While it would take a decade or so for the genre to branch off from the parent trunk, once the process began, it splintered off into a million directions and well into the 21st century we are treated to a genre that can seemingly adapt to any disparate musical style and inspiration that has ever been proposed.

Bands like THE OCEAN remind me of exactly how far the metal genre has evolved since its humble nascency that was a mere angsty reaction to the blues oriented rock. This German band while starting out in their own state of sludge metal disquietude has continually ratcheted up the complexity of their albums as they went from a chaotically noisy punk infused sludge metal band to a bona fide progressive behemoth that tamed their aggressive tendencies and funneled them into a more post-metal paradigm that implemented the incredibly diverse classical music elements and electronic sounds that have placed them in a rather unique niche of the progressive metal universe. Led by founder and guitarist Robin Staps, this band that is also known as THE OCEAN COLLECTIVE found a more stable lineup beginning with their album "Heliocentric" and has continued to awe and amaze the world with a series of sophisticated albums that uniquely incorporate Earth's geologic history into the compositional process and while the geologic themes presented in all their nerdiness may seem a tad eccentric, the fact is that this band is absolutely brilliant in how they adapt the geological themes to the more personal human level of reality.

The title of THE OCEAN's 7th studio album (not counting re-recordings, EPs or demos) is officially PHANEROZOIC I - PALAEOZOIC, so first of all we need a few definitions of the title so that the lyrical content makes a lot more sense. The PHANEROZOIC eon is the current geologic eon in the time scale which hosts the most abundant eon for all flora and fauna that has ever existed and began 541 million years ago with the Cambrian period when a huge diversity of hard-shelled animals made their debut onto life's stage. The PALAEOZOIC era (also spelled PALEOZOIC) is the earliest of three geologic eras (the others being the Mesozoic and the Cenozoic) of the PHANEROZOIC era and lasted from 541 to 251 millions ago. THE OCEAN is serious about their scientific terminology and the seven mostly lengthy tracks tackle the unthinkable task of narrating the geological periods that the PALAEOZOIC era is divided into. There are only six periods, however the beginning Cambrian is divided into two tracks with the other periods following, the Ordovician, Silurian, Devonian, Carboniferous (if you're really a nerd you'd know this period is divided into two sub-periods, the Pennsylvanian and Mississippian!) and last but not least the Permian whose ending saw one of planet Earth's largest mass extinctions in its entire history. That's your geology lesson for the day, so how about the music?

As i've already stated, THE OCEAN may insinuate that the lyrical content comes right out of a university text book but in fact, the lyrics are quite nebulous and have double meanings while relating to the geologic narrative, they also incorporate the personal aspects of life. THE OCEAN seems to get more ambitious with each release and this latest endeavor is certainly no exception to that trend. While it's true that THE OCEAN do not deviate from what came before and stick to their carved out niche like a scuba diver to an air tank, what THE OCEAN does accomplish on PHANEROZOIC is a nice mix of their early heavy chunky guitar riffs of sludge metal with frantic screamed vocals mixed with the sensual amorphous classical meanderings that showcase tender clean vocals with supplemental instrumentation that includes cello, trumpet, trombone, piano and symphonic atmospheres that find the band pulling a Jekyll & Hyde for much of the album.

One uniting factor is the progressive workouts that permeate both aggressive and placid aspects of the band as irregular time signature rich cadences jitter by with the accompaniment of jazzy drum gymnastics and hypnotizing post-metal meanderings that find repetitious riffing slowly transmogrify into a larger picture much like the geologic eras that change so slowly that we cannot perceive them. While the previous album "Pelagial" was in danger of exterminating the sludge metal aspects of THE OCEAN's own musical history, PHANEROZOIC unapologetically brings back the harsher aspects of the band's earliest recordings without sacrificing the progressive and atmospheric accomplishments they've accrued since their 2007 landmark album "Precambrian." Suffice it to say, THE OCEAN strike a mean balance between their harshest moments of albums like "Aeolian" and the post-rock serenity of "Pelagial." PHANEROZOIC finds the perfect balance between these two worlds and best of all this wider sonic spectrum is brilliantly mixed with a production value that perfectly balances the distorted metal outbursts with the exquisitely divine orchestral moments. While the final track is titled "Permian: The Great Dying," it seems safe to bet that THE OCEAN won't go extinct anytime soon. This phenomenal work is by far one of 2018's most ambitious metal projects even if it hasn't exactly expanded the elements that they are known for.

 Phanerozoic I - Palaeozoic by OCEAN, THE album cover Studio Album, 2018
4.11 | 73 ratings

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Phanerozoic I - Palaeozoic
The Ocean Experimental/Post Metal

Review by Antonis Kalamoutsos

5 stars The 8th album of German act The Ocean Collective entitled Phanerozoic I: Palaeozoic (part II will be released in 2020), doesn't add any new elements to their previous discography and carries no innovation with it. It is not the first album that tries to achieve a perfect, natural balance between an enormous mid-tempo post/sludge style and the most progressive aspects of metal sound. Clearly, we have listened to myriads of albums that include huge riffs, extended atmospheric ambiences and great production. Of course, it's not the first metal album that combines its high dynamics with piano, cello and electronic sounds and, no discussion about it, we have listened to countless albums sang by phenomenal singers ? though I believe it is time to acknowledge Loic Rossetti as one of the best singers of our time. And despite the fact that Katatonia' s Jonas Renske can make even stones weep when he sings, we have listened to many collaborations in the past, as important as this one in ''Devonian: Nascent''.

Phanerozoic I: Palaeozoic is not the first album that narrates stories regarding the powers of the earth, surrendering itself to nature-centric visions. It is not the first scientific or instructive album, neither the first one that makes us suspect that its lyrics hide essentially a great allegory ? the disasters, reconstructions and rebirths of the Phanerozoic era as geological symbols of human insignificance and of the little deaths and rebirths we experience in our everyday lives. The Ocean is not the first band to evoke feelings of ultimate decay or ultimate uplifting and this is not the first album to include dramatic or epic elements of this intensity. Many times in the past we have listened to music that created powerful imaginary images of seas that rise as mountains and of earthquakes that tear the land in pieces.

Analysing its characteristics, Phanerozoic I: Palaeozoic should be just another good album, so how is it possible to feel so much more than that?

There is no reasonable explanation. It seems that the only one responsible for the creation of an album of this calibre is that vagabond, untamed lady that never marries or belongs to anyone, that never gets abused by anyone. That lady that ignores the begging of the great and answers to no prayers and, if she feels like it, she sits next to the ''small'' and ''humble'' of her choosing, uninvited and then departs again like a shadow, without any warning. The ancients called her Muse, we call her inspiration today but no matter how you call her, it seems that this wild entity fell in love with Robin Staps and his Berlin-based collective and obviously she didn't leave him alone not even for a moment while this album was being created. It's the only way to explain the fact that every note of this album seems to fulfill its causality and completely serve the purpose it was born for. And as the Milky Way's spiral can be compared with the spiral of a snail's shell, so the less than 50 minutes of this record compete with the 500 million years and the 5 mass extinctions of the Phanerozoic era, claiming the same root causes.

The Ocean Collective is not the first band that metal music ? with its modern, post-2000 aesthetic context ? should owe gratitude for the kiss of life it offers. Yet, until an album of that quality appears again, there is the possibility to be the last.

Thanks to burritounit for the artist addition. and to Quinino for the last updates

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