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LA MASCHERA DI CERA

Rock Progressivo Italiano • Italy


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La Maschera Di Cera picture
La Maschera Di Cera biography
Founded in Genova, Italy in 2001

Hello, fans of genuine 70's Italian Prog... Rejoice! Fabio ZUFFANTI (FINISTERRE) just came out with his new side project, LA MASCHERA DI CERA. The music mounts back to the best Mellotron / Moog driven symphonic prog performed by bands like MUSEO ROSENBACH or IL BALLETO DI BRONZO. All the ingredients are in place: distorted basses, accoustic guitars, an excellent vocalist and very inspired flute passages complete the set. The result is a nostalgic flash-back to the roots of the italian prog. A must for fans of this country's very best!

See also: WiKi

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LA MASCHERA DI CERA discography


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LA MASCHERA DI CERA top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.99 | 159 ratings
La Maschera Di Cera
2002
4.08 | 170 ratings
Il Grande Labirinto
2003
4.01 | 166 ratings
LuxAde
2006
3.58 | 117 ratings
Petali Di Fuoco
2009
4.03 | 313 ratings
Le Porte Del Domani
2013
3.82 | 95 ratings
The Gates Of Tomorrow
2013
4.20 | 76 ratings
S.E.I.
2020

LA MASCHERA DI CERA Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.18 | 15 ratings
In Concerto
2004

LA MASCHERA DI CERA Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

LA MASCHERA DI CERA Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

4.00 | 5 ratings
Le Porte del Domani (2CD+LP Collector's Box Set)
2013

LA MASCHERA DI CERA Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

LA MASCHERA DI CERA Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 S.E.I. by MASCHERA DI CERA, LA album cover Studio Album, 2020
4.20 | 76 ratings

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S.E.I.
La Maschera Di Cera Rock Progressivo Italiano

Review by *ChristianRO*

5 stars Rock Progressivo Italiano is my favourite prog rock genre and La Maschera Di Cera is my favourite RPI band. So when I have heard about this new album from them I was more excited than ever. And my expectation were highly rewarded. Although this new release is very different from their last release (Le Porte Del Domani) in terms of structure, SEI is equally good and rewarding. There are only three songs but epic ones, regarding the lenght, the shorter one being 10 minutes long and the first is about 22 minutes long. As you can guess, the album is full of grandiose vintage keyboards, great vocals and a perfect bass. Of course the italian language is compulsory for a RPI release. Separazione / Egolatria / Inganno is by far my favourite album of 2020 and it can be my favourite La Maschera Di Cera album. Time will tell. Strong five stars album!!
 S.E.I. by MASCHERA DI CERA, LA album cover Studio Album, 2020
4.20 | 76 ratings

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S.E.I.
La Maschera Di Cera Rock Progressivo Italiano

Review by BrufordFreak
Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

4 stars Fabio Zuffanti is back with another release from his most successful prog project. While the band's previous release, 2013's La Porto di domini was, to my ears, a flop (especially for being the successor to LE ORME's highly acclaimed 1973 release, Felona e Sorona), the compositions, recording, and performances here are fairly strong.

1. "Il tempo millenario" (21:43) opens with a very familiar heavy feel and sound á la their previous album, La porto di domini. At 1:20 it moves into a prettier, more laid-back pastoral flute-centric passage before reverting to bare bones for the vocal section to begin at the end of the third minute. The vocals are pretty good! At 4:00 we move back into an up tempo, rather ominous section until 4:30 when everything takes a surprising turn into a pulsing, PINK FLOYD-like jazz-rock passage--with even the saxophone and organ perpetuating the PF vibe. The toned down section beginning in the seventh minute is pretty with its sparsely populated drawn out instrumental spaciousness. I like this very much. Imagine a pregnant GENESIS passage with Peter Gabriel performing his theatric storytelling and then the instruments bursting out from their hiding places to punctuate the drama of PG's epic story. Piano and harpsichord lay out a new and different (more Il Balletto di Bronzo-like) motif in the twelfth minute before we move into a clavichord-supported and Mellotron-drenched vocal section. I don't care for these heavily affected vocals--but they quickly withdraw from these for a spell before shifting at 13:30 into high speed romp into Hammond and sax rock and roll. The power vocals here try to be theatric but feel a little over top (as the music is a bit under-the-top). Just weird Hammond play and solo (more like a Halloween parody). Even when the pace and sax redouble at the 16:00 mark I am distracted by the weird, almost comical Hammond--which, unfortunately, detracts from the power and force being attempted in the vocal in the early eighteenth minute. The pensive passage that follows is better--great drums and sax help to almost drown out the Hammond. At 18:27, then, we downshift into a floating soundscape that lends itself to the sensitivity of Alessandro's vocal--but then once again it breaks into a kind of triumphant celebratory passage at 18:20--very RPI and Genesisian (think La Coscienza di Zeno and Supper's Ready's As Sure as Eggs Is Eggs). There are definitely some great parts to this song--and a mastery of "classic" prog and RPI forms and palettes here--but not enough to make the whole stand out on its own as a new classic. (35.25/40): - i. L'anima in Rovina - ii. Nuvole Gonfie - iii. La Mia Condanna - iv. Scparazione - v. Del tempo sprecato

2. "Il cerchio del comando" (9:57) a very strong, stereotypic RPI song whose good quality and appeal, unfortunately, for me, drop significantly once the vocal joins in; the melody and performances in the choruses are just weak. The TULL-like passage around the 6:00 mark is its only saving grace. (17.25/20)

3. "Vacuo senso" (13:30) (27.25/30): - i. Prologo (3:35) (8.5/10) - ii. Dialogo (1:50) - gorgeous slow section with one of Alessandro's best vocals. (5/5) - iii. Nella rete dell'Inganno (3:05) - RENAISSANCE meets & plays COLTRANE's "My Favorite Things" (literally) and then turns into TRAFFIC jazz! Don Pullen! (4.75/5) - iv. Il risueglio di S (1:30) - some powerful IL BALLETTO bravura. (4.5/5) - v. Ascensione (3:10) all bass & 'tron Neo Prog cheese. Bring it home, boys! (even though it's been done a hundred times before). (4.5/5)

Total Time 42:41

Trying to overcome my usual biases against this band due to their past inconsistencies is a challenge--especially when the music on this album only serves to reinforce those biases. One GREAT song, two okay, all three long playing, two epic suites (my bandcamp version of "Vacuo senso" is 13:30.) Still, I have to agree with other reviewers that this band keeps getting better.

An excellent addition to any prog lover's music collection.

 S.E.I. by MASCHERA DI CERA, LA album cover Studio Album, 2020
4.20 | 76 ratings

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S.E.I.
La Maschera Di Cera Rock Progressivo Italiano

Review by emisan

5 stars It seems that 2020 is a very good year for Italy. At least regarding the prog rock and more precisely, Rock Progressivo Italiano. Earlier this year we had the amazing "Sadako e le mille gru di carta" by LogoS and now it's time for S.E.I. to shine. La Maschera Di Cera gets better and better with every release and the latter one contains the band's most polished work. Astounding keyboards, delicate flute sounds, amazing vocals and the immortal mellotron are the key to success in RPI. And of course let's not forget about the ending of the album. When I first listened to "Il Grande Labirinto" I thought myself that you simply cannot have a better end for a great album. But hey, you can! S.E.I. ends equally impressive and it forces you to play the album again and again. Great album released in a great year for prog rock. Highly recommended 5-star album.
 S.E.I. by MASCHERA DI CERA, LA album cover Studio Album, 2020
4.20 | 76 ratings

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S.E.I.
La Maschera Di Cera Rock Progressivo Italiano

Review by Squire Jaco

5 stars This'll be a quick review, but MAN! these guys are actually getting better and better!

When I first started getting into the band LA MASCHERA DI CERA about 10 years or so ago, I liked their style of Italian Prog, and have gotten every album from them since. I used to rate their early albums in the 3-1/2 to 4 star range. Then they took a little break before coming back with "Le Port Del Domani" in 2013, and I thought it was their best album yet; gave it 4-1/2 stars.

Then they took ANOTHER break and come back with this new album "S.E.I." (acronym for "Separazione / Egolatria / Inganno" or Separation / Self-worship / Deception). Phenomenal comeback album!! Better than ever, I say... This has everything any RPI lover could be looking for - warm Italian vocals, classic symphonic prog passages with plenty of mellotron and flute, melodic bass, absolutely fantastic keyboards, unique compositions. Just 3 long tracks over 42 minutes, but believe me, it is worth every minute they invest.

The ending to the album really struck me. I only had a digital version with no song titles while listening through the first time, but the fade out to the last track just reminded me of sort of a death march, but a hopeful and inspiring one, like up the steps to heaven or something. Lo and behold, I see now that the last section of that suite is called "Ascensione" - nailed it, gents!

Excellent, excellent album. I'm throwing 5 stars at this one, though my own early feelings are that this is 4-1/2... I'm rounding UP this time.

 Il Grande Labirinto by MASCHERA DI CERA, LA album cover Studio Album, 2003
4.08 | 170 ratings

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Il Grande Labirinto
La Maschera Di Cera Rock Progressivo Italiano

Review by Warthur
Prog Reviewer

3 stars On this album La Maschera di Cera really set out their stall in terms of offering a distinctive, retro-progish take on the 1970s Italian prog sound. It obviously sounded authentic - they got the nod to do Le Porte del Domani as an official sequel to Felona e Sorona, after all - but in subsequent years I feel like this has been overshadowed by superior works from La Maschera. As well as the aforementioned Le Porte, this was followed by the masterful LuxAde, which remains my favourite album of theirs, and whereas that also ran to over an hour that managed to hold my interest much better than this piece, which in many ways is a dry run for LuxAde and doesn't quite fill its running time. There's a solid 40 minute album in here padded out just a little too long.
 LuxAde by MASCHERA DI CERA, LA album cover Studio Album, 2006
4.01 | 166 ratings

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LuxAde
La Maschera Di Cera Rock Progressivo Italiano

Review by Warthur
Prog Reviewer

4 stars La Maschera di Cera may be only one of many projects by Finisterre bassist Fabio Zuffanti, but it should be the first port of call for anyone seeking to find new music in the classic Italian prog style of the 1970s. Zuffanti and his colleagues assemble a grand collection of vintage gear (just look at Agostino Macor's range of keyboards, synths, and other electronic toys - there's even a theremin!) and put out an album which, if they'd told me it had been left in a vault for 30 years, I could easily be fooled.

Which isn't to say that this is a pure nostalgia trip, mind - LuxAde interweaves dark majesty approached only, perhaps, by the most thunderous moments of Banco del Mutuo Soccorso with strands of great beauty in a mixture which is the band's own. Very much worth it for all Rock Progressivo Italiano fans.

 Il Grande Labirinto by MASCHERA DI CERA, LA album cover Studio Album, 2003
4.08 | 170 ratings

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Il Grande Labirinto
La Maschera Di Cera Rock Progressivo Italiano

Review by BrufordFreak
Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

4 stars Coming one year after their excellent debut, Fabio Zuffaniti's side project produces another fine and true contribution to the RPI collection. The maestro has done quite a marvellous job of collecting the perfect cast with which to create his retro-sound.

1. "Il Viaggio Nell' Oceano Capovolto (parte 1)" (13:45) opens with reversed tracks before giving way to spacious bass & guitar harmonics. Singer and then organ join in, then Mellotron and piano. At 2:25 we finally get the full wall of sound, but then it is quickly extinguished to revert back to the soft, spacious stuff. The two extremes alternate back and forth for a while until we get a switch into a more pastoral, yet crazed section in the fifth minute. The tension builds and builds until there is a release at 5:45. A pretty though eerie section begins with male and female singer singing together until full band enters and Alessandro takes full lead. Nice power section. for the next four and a half minutes before a jazzy-psychedelic 'tron and weird jazzy guitar section takes over to almost the end. Interesting. (25.5/30)

2. "Il Grande Labirinto" (9:43) classy and classic but nothing really new here, more of a rehashing of old music from the 1970s--though done very well. (17.75/20)

3. "Il Canto Dell'inverno" (3:00) piano. Goblin-esque! (9/10)

4. "Ai Confini Del Mondo" (12:41) with the funk! Again, the 1970s are conjured up by the clavichord and Hammond, chunky bass and flute. I must admit that keyboardist Agostino Macor is quite talented. So is vocalist, Alessandro Corvaglia. The instrumental section beginning at the halfway point is my favorite--the whole second half is so much more to my liking. I totally respect the amazing job Fabio and crew have done to re-create the sounds and styles of the RPI masterpieces of the 1970s. Unfortunately, this style of 70s RPI was never my favorite. (21.75/25)

5. "Il Viaggio Nell' Oceano Capovolto (parte 2)" (22:35) This vocalist does SUCH an amazing job at bringing the power and theatricity of the legends of the Italian 70s! (42.5/45)

While I agree with my fellow reviewer MellotronStorm that "every song on this album is of the highest calibure [sp]", I must put my hand up at the lack of originality: all of these songs and styles--even the instruments and voices--are (I take it) intended to re-create specific sounds, songs, and styles of the Italian scene of progressive rock of the 1970s.

B+/4.5 stars; though a true masterpiece of retro-prog/prog homage with some of the best instrumental performances you'll ever hear, this is only not a masterpiece of original, modern progressive rock.

 Petali Di Fuoco by MASCHERA DI CERA, LA album cover Studio Album, 2009
3.58 | 117 ratings

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Petali Di Fuoco
La Maschera Di Cera Rock Progressivo Italiano

Review by ZowieZiggy
Prog Reviewer

4 stars "La Maschera Di Cera" is probably one of my most beloved Italian bands. But most overall, one of my preferred band all styles. I could witness one of their gigs at the "Spirit of 66" (the only prog rock scene in Belgium) during a prog conference in 2005. That was a great day since "Knight Area" and "Riverside" were completing the bill.

Each of their previous albums was an enchantment and this one is no deception. But as you might have read: I am biased and pleased to tell so.

All the melody of the great RPI genre is here. The charming vocals from Alessandro, the sweet fluting from Andrea, the skilled drumming from Maurizio and not to forget the fantastic job on the keys from Agostino: they are all very much present.

The passion of the vocals is still the same than before and the whole band is in full symbiosis. Let's not forget that the man behind this project (and many, many others) is no less than Fabio Zuffanti. If you are orphan of the great seventies (being Italian or overall symphonic), this album is an excellent starting point (but each of the Maschera one will do the job, believe me).

There are some jazzy influences (like in each of their work), but scarcely developed ("Discesa"). Most of the music played is pure harmony, melody and full of talent. My fave is "L'Inganno", which is full of tact and features convincing vocals again. And what to say about the great flute play? A pure jewel indeed.

In terms of genuine beauty, I can only recommend you to listen to the superb "Phoenix" which is such a delicate piece of symphonic prog. Vocals are so passionate! Piano and flutes are so wonderful. It is another highlight for sure.

The only reproach is probably that the band doesn't offer any epic like before. An evolution of time maybe? Anyway, this is a very good album again; with no weak songs at all. The closing number also allows Matteo on the guitar to display all his skills. The finale is absolutely wonderful.

Four stars.

 La Maschera Di Cera by MASCHERA DI CERA, LA album cover Studio Album, 2002
3.99 | 159 ratings

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La Maschera Di Cera
La Maschera Di Cera Rock Progressivo Italiano

Review by BrufordFreak
Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

4 stars A side project of Fabio Zuffanti, in my opinion, La Maschera di Cera has produced the best music Zuffanti has made. The songs are lushly created with lots of classically-influenced forms and structures using the sounds and instruments the electronic age has given us. Keyboard artist Agostino Macor is a true master of his trade, incorporating piano, Mellotron, organ, Moog, harpsicord, VCS 3, and "prepared piano" like a junior Wakeman or Banks. Vocalists Alessandro Corvaglia and Nadia Girardi do a wonderful job while not being mixed too far forward so as to dominate the music. Most of the time there is so much going on, so many layers in the songs' tapestries, that repeated listens reveal many, many nuances that are difficult to pick up upon first or cursory listens. This is good: the weaves are all beautifully orchestrated; I am never put off or overwhelmed by them. If there are weaknesses to the album they are 1) in the odd mix of individually-recorded sounds (a problem I find common with other Zuffanti projects) and 2) in the bass play: it's either cheezie pseudo-jazzy or over-the-top loud, distorted, and chunky.

1. "La maschera di Cera" (19:21) is a six-part suite introducing the band and its old-instrument symphonic approach to prog. Italian, retro/neo, but really classic RPI. At 1:30 a gentle piano and acoustic guitar section supports Alessandro's gentle, passionate vocal. At the four minute mark a chunky bass and organ-led upbeat psychedelic section ensues (kind of like a STEPPENWOLF/ BLOOD, SWEAT & Tears sound) over which synthesizer and flute trade solos. Alessandro and piano get into the mix in the seventh minute. At 7:12 we fall into a little musical 'waiting room' in which the world seems at a standstill. At 8:16 strummed guitar and organ lead us back into a forward direction. Synthesizer and piano mirror their pretty playing while Alessandro begins a new section, new theme of his story. Flutes and synth posit some nice soli in this section. Then, at the 12 minute mark, things slow and soften again before Alessandro's big voice leads us into a heavier, more dynamic section--which becomes taken over by the repetition of a plodding distorted bass riff. Then at 13:54 another STEPPENWOLF kind of section with organ and flute screaming away takes us away. The shifts toward softer, gentler melody at the end is predictable and a little anti-climactic. The song is good, polished and straightforward, but nothing very extraordinary. (32/40)

2. "Del mio mondo che crolla" (6:00) opens with some very ehavy, distorted bass and clear, precise drumming before flutes and keys join in. The first keyboard soli are from "older" keyboard sounds (Casiotone?). The instrumentalists each sound like they are in their own recording studio, in their own worlds. Finally at the two minute mark things gel before a pause after which Alessio and Hammond organ take over. The slight shift back at 4:40 brings the music into solo-support mode--in which several brief soli take their turns. If I have one serious complaint with this song it's with the way the drums were recorded and mixed so that they feel totally 'isolated' from the rest of the song. They feel compressed or digitized while the rest feel 70s analog. Weird. Otherwise it's a cool little song. (9/10)

3. "Del mio abisso e del vuoto" (9:41) opens with some flute being supported by some drums and cheezy bass playing. Piano and guitar join in to continue the soft jazzy flow. Once Alessandro's voice joins in it is melodic but a little too gritty-scratchy-gravelly to add beauty to this beautiful music. Nadia Girardi's layers of floating, soaring wordless vocals in the seventh minute are an awesome touch. Kind of a cross between Clare Torey's "Great Gig in the Sky" and Irene Pappas' contributions to APHRODITE'S CHILD's 666. The final two minutes have some great Mellotron, flute, bass and vocal cohesion--maybe the best on the album--before chaos and cacophony become the ending of choice. Cool song. (18/20)

4. "Del mio volo" (7:07) opens as a gentle ballad with flute playing counterpoint to Alessandro's vocal. In the second minute a synth gets a chance to solo before the second verse takes over. The Mellotron play really hits some great chords at the beginning of the fourth minute and proceeds to play nicely beneath the ensuing longer synth solo. At 4:15 all instruments save for a gently picked acoustic guitar drop out while Alessandro slowly sings an emotional passage. Then an organ-led full band passage jumps into the fore, playing out a Dylan-esque dirge to the end. Nice song. (13.5/15)

The music and instrumentation are actually rather simple but effective--no wasted notes or noises and plenty of great melodies and chord progressions.

B/four stars; an excellent contribution to the world of progressive rock music.

 Le Porte Del Domani by MASCHERA DI CERA, LA album cover Studio Album, 2013
4.03 | 313 ratings

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Le Porte Del Domani
La Maschera Di Cera Rock Progressivo Italiano

Review by MELNIBONÉ

5 stars

Prequels and sequels are common features in movies and novels, particularly within the science-fiction, fantasy and action genres (often subtitled "epic" trilogies, sagas or series). But even though science-fiction and fantasy share a lot with Prog, prequel or sequel albums are almost the exception rather than the rule. Usually, when Prog bands have a lot of material to offer (because the concept underlining and/or structuring their work was quite inspiring and thus thoroughly exploited), they'll release a double album (Yes' "Tales From Topographic Oceans", Genesis' "The Lamb Lies Down On Broadway", Pink Floyd's "The Wall", Harmonium's "L'Heptade" or Crippled Black Phoenix's "[Mankind] The Crafty Ape", among others), or the even rarer triple album, such as XII Alfonso's "Darwin". Once in a while, some bands will split the body of work between two different albums : e.g. ELP's "Works Vol. 1" and "Vol. 2", Big Big Train's "English Electric (Part One)" and "(Part Two)", Steve Hackett's "Watcher Of The Skies ? Genesis Revisited" and "Genesis Revisited II".

That said, with "Le Porte Del Domani", La Maschera Di Cera has done something quite different from the examples above. Their album isn't simply a sequel, but one to an album from another band, and an iconic RPI band at that. Within the usual parameters of the Prog realm, it may seem "a bold idea", "a huge risk" and "a bold attempt" as some previous reviewers have written, but it's not so uncommon in other musical genres. Many classical composers (Beethoven, Brahms, Britten, Chopin, Rachmaninov, etc.) wrote series of "Variations on a Theme by?" other composers, which were either their predecessors or their contemporaries.

In view of that, I would venture to say that, in "Le Porte Del Domani", Fabio Zuffanti was not bold or risky, but rather conservative in his approach. After all, we should bear in mind that, under the guise of Hostsonaten (another side-project of said Zuffanti), he had previously released his own brilliant version and/or reinterpretation (in no less than four separate albums) of Antonio Vivaldi's "The Four Seasons", an iconic masterpiece of Italian baroque music that is known worldwide. This time around, Zuffanti is less ambitious, if only because, even though "Felona E Sorona" is an inescapable Prog masterpiece, Prog isn't such a big thing compared to classical music (especially in Italy). Less ambitious, but surely not less talented : Zuffanti has succeeded to compose and deliver a masterpiece sequel to an iconic masterpiece. Not a common feat by any standards !

From the outset, I have to point out that, in both cases, my review is based upon the original version of each album? and not at all because my knowledge of Italian would enable me to understand what they're singing about (in fact, I really rank below kindergarden level in that respect). It's simply because the Italian language has always been music to my ears and, thus, I can listen to the singer's voice purely as an instrument, without being distracted by (or wanting to access) the meaning of the words.

Other than one being the sequel to the other, there are some interesting similarities between Le Orme's 1973 album and La Maschera Di Cera's 2013 release. Even though 40 years have elapsed between them, their cover art is both from paintings by Lanfranco, the only differences being dominant red vs dominant blue and the couple looking younger in 2013 than it seemingly was in 1973 (a visual twist that is not without charming irony) . Both albums feature nine tracks ; they were numbered from 1 to 9 on "Felona E Sorona", whereas they're "lettered" from a to i on "Le Porte Del Domani". "Sospesi Nell'Incredibile", the first track on "Felona E Sorona", lasts 8:43, while "Ritorno Dal Nulla", which is the first track on "Le Porte Del Domani", clocks at 8:40. And that same track bridges the time gap between the two albums, as its title answers to that of "Ritorno Al Nulla", the last track on "Felona E Sorona". This last track on "Felona E Sorona" is also the only true instrumental on the album, but the number 7, "Ritratto Di Un Matino", might also be considered an instrumental piece, as its lyrics consists of a single sentence. On "Le Porte Del Domani", there is also only one true instrumental piece : it's the title-track, and it's the last one on the album. Also, echoing Le Orme's album, there are two songs that we can almost label instrumentals, as song f, "Viaggio Metafisico", and song g, "Alba Nel Tempio", both feature only nine verses each. Finally, while the total length of each release is different (Le Orme's clocks at 33:39 against La Maschera's 45:14), both fit in the usual short time slot of RPI albums.

The main differences stand in the line-up of each band. Le Orme are a trio and they've always favored an economy of means : keyboards (Pagliuca), vocals, bass and guitar (Tagliapietra), drums and percussion (Dei Rossi). La Maschera Di Cera is somewhat the opposite, lining up five members with a sizeable amount of instruments between them : acoustic guitar and electric 12-strings (Corvaglia, who is also the singer), drums and a whole array of percussion (Di Tollo), piano, Fender Rhodes, Hammond, Mellotron, Birotron and Chamberlin, to name but a few of the keyboards displayed (Macor), flute (Monetti), bass and bell (Zuffanti) ; and their two guest musicians play flute and sax (Grice), and electric guitar (Marsano).

I've pointed out these similarities and differences to give an idea of the study of Le Orme's masterpiece Zuffanti must have gone through to compose his sequel. "Le Porte Del Domani" is not simply the work of someone who admires an iconic album of the early '70s and tries to emulate it. It's much more than that : it's a work of passion and respect, and a testimony to the discipline, restraint and finesse of Zuffanti as a composer. Here and there, he uses motifs and melodies from the original work (just like classical composers did in their time), but to build upon them, to go further, to loop the loop, to knot the strands left untied by Le Orme in 1973. Zuffanti didn't try to better his model, but rather to reach the same level of excellence. "Le Porte Del Domani" is an opus of love.

Usually, for an album to be bestowed a masterpiece, it has to stand to test of time. But then, there are exceptions. As another reviewer suggested, treat yourself to listening to the albums back to back and you'll hear, and feel, and understand that "Felona E Sorona" called for a sequel and that "Le Porte Del Domani" couldn't have been different than what it is. A masterpiece following another masterpiece. Music for and from the heart couldn't be any better.

5 stellar conclusions

PS As mentioned above according to the liner notes, Agostino Macor plays the Birotron on "Le Porte Del Domani". For those unaware of what a Birotron is, it's an analog instrument developed to improve on the Chamberlin and the Mellotron, built by a company funded by Rick Wakeman in the late '70s. Only a few dozens at most were manufactured and it is believed that less than half a dozen would still be operational as of this writing. Wakeman used it on Yes' "Tormato" and "Yesshows", and on his own solo album, "Criminal Record". So, if ever you need another good reason to buy and cherish "Le Porte Del Domani", this is it, as the Birotron is arguably the "world's rarest musical instrument" around.

Thanks to ProgLucky for the artist addition. and to Quinino for the last updates

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