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SUPERLUMINAL PACHYDERM

Eclectic Prog • United States


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Superluminal Pachyderm biography

SUPERLUMINAL PACHYDERM is a one-man project created by Ken Robinson of the State College area of Pennsylvania in 1999. The project is rather unusual in that Robinson rarely performs any instruments on his music, but instead composes them entirely of samples of real instruments using music sequencer software on his computer with the help of a sound editor and other music software.

Like many other independent artists at the time, Superluminal Pachyderm had its start on mp3.com and debuted its first album "Lexicographic Lint" in 2000. After having some success on mp3.com's charts, Robinson decided to continue his project by releasing three more albums and a compilation on mp3.com until that company met its demise in 2003. Releases included Oddities (later in 2000), Perpetual Insanity (2001), The Great Big Dog Biscuit (compilation in 2001) and Prum (2002). After 2003, Robinson reissued all of Superluminal Pachyderm's previous albums on his own label and in 2005 released Sea of Peas, his most ambitious creation to date. Since 2007, Superluminal Pachyderm has been working on an album called Unsalted Pants.

The music of SUPERLUMINAL PACHIDERM takes some getting used to. It has the humor and weirdness of Frank Zappa, Al Yankovic, and others of their kind, but the electronic aspects remind one of Thomas Dolby meets neo progressive rock with occasional bouts of psychedelic madness and dissonance. Since the music is entirely composed and created on a computer, it also has that "programmed" feel in places (like Magellan's programmed drums on their first two albums). Robinson's vocals are often spoken, often heavily processed, and full of echo and other effects. The subject matter of Robinson's songs are really odd with much of the material sounding like postmodern poetry, often making very little sense, with many references to food items, household appliances, and other inanimate objects. Occasionally some songs seem to deliver a message, often allegorically. Superluminal Pachyderm is hard to describe and usually leaves one wondering if this artist is out of his mind or some sort of mad genius.


Theodore Vrandt (progaeopteryx), 2008.

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Unsalted PantsUnsalted Pants
2013
Audio CD$10.49

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SUPERLUMINAL PACHYDERM discography


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SUPERLUMINAL PACHYDERM top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.00 | 1 ratings
Lexicographic Lint
2000
4.00 | 2 ratings
Oddities
2000
3.95 | 2 ratings
Perpetual Insanity
2001
3.00 | 1 ratings
Prum
2002
5.00 | 1 ratings
Sea of Peas
2005
0.00 | 0 ratings
Unsalted Pants
2013

SUPERLUMINAL PACHYDERM Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

SUPERLUMINAL PACHYDERM Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

SUPERLUMINAL PACHYDERM Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

2.00 | 1 ratings
The Great Big Dog Biscuit
2001

SUPERLUMINAL PACHYDERM Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

SUPERLUMINAL PACHYDERM Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 Sea of Peas by SUPERLUMINAL PACHYDERM album cover Studio Album, 2005
5.00 | 1 ratings

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Sea of Peas
Superluminal Pachyderm Eclectic Prog

Review by progaeopteryx
Prog Reviewer

— First review of this album —
5 stars After producing four albums in a three year period, Superluminal Pachyderm didn't release it's fifth album until 2005, the unusually named Sea of Peas with a suitable cover to boot. Superluminal Pachyderm was still a one-man project led by Ken Robinson, with guests appearing on two songs and one song containing a guest lyricist.

The wait for this album was well worth it after the slightly disappointing Prum album from 2002. The album immediately kicks off with a slowly chugging bass line. After a couple bars, the drums arrive and after a few more bars I'm awash with what sounds like duo Mellotrons on the left and right side of my headphones. Following this intro, we return to the warmly odd and eerie world of the Superluminal Pachyderm: a crazy dude singing a bunch of nonsensical lyrics with warped vocals atop an eerie soundscape chugging along like a machine. But there is something different about this album. The instrumentation is much more advanced and adventurous. Earlier albums had instrumentation that basically was an eerie backing soundscape for the crazy lyrics. Now the instrumentation is more front-and-center, sharing the stage with the odd combinations of nouns and verbs emanating from Robinson's mouth. I find the influences seem like a good mix of space rock and neo prog. The last two minutes of this almost 16-minute long title track return to the intro containing Mellotron and topping it off with a backing orchestra for a nice conclusion.

The second track is a six-part 20+ minute long suite called Wrinkle the Eyebrows on the First Dog. Lord knows what this one is about. The music goes through a mix of calm and peaceful parts with cacophonic, chaotic pieces. All of that on top of a foundation of weird. Yeah, I don't know what genre you could place this one in. Some of the parts have a psychedelic feel to them, some are more avant rock. It's a killer song that doesn't sound like anything I ever heard before, sort of a "Supper's Ready" for the insane.

The third track is a neo prog number called Dezincification featuring Duane Tate on vocals. Again it isn't clear what this song is about, but Mr. Tate is clearly capable of singing this nonsense, partly playing multiple characters throughout the piece. The song also has a darkness to it thanks to the deep bass lines.

Track four is about a carnivorous cow that eats burgers and was penned by guest lyricist Jaime Jamison. Not only is Robinson weird, but so are his guests. This song has a kind of funky side to it, has lots of mooing (including some through a vocoder?), a Mellotron-washed chorus, and a wall-of- sound ending. It's sort of a nod to Pink Floyd's Animals in a way.

Following this is a short interlude called Pseudodesks and Fleas from the Atmosphere, a short instrumental featuring a nice cello line, spacey electronics, a short horn section. All timing in at under two minutes! This might have made a nice song if it was expanded. It's slightly comparable to ELO's first album.

The sixth track is a more song-based number called An E-mail from Franklin D. Roosevelt. It's basically about spam e-mails and covers the usual topics like viruses, Viagra ads, Nigeria, and pyramid schemes. The subject is still applicable nine years later. A nice fast-moving number that seems more like older SP songs.

The final track is a five-part, almost 17 minute long suite called Of the Ferric Oxides in the Old Toilets. This one features guest musician Jeff Edmunds on Stick and guitars and also providing effects and vocals. The first part has a really neat Stick groove with vocodor-ized vocals. Following this is a long section of what can best be described as a "psychedelic wipeout" filled with voices saying all kinds of nonsense, laughing, sound effects, electronics, and the kitchen sink. Eventually this madness leads to another part like the first one, but with a more driving, but complicated rhythm. A guest vocalist simply called Miriam sings this part in a rather weird, sort of muffled style. The final part of the song sounds like a repeating phone sound and footsteps walking. It's a spoken part about if a vacuum cleaner bag should be eaten with a fork or a spoon. A fitting ending to another crazy album by this obscure artist.

No, this isn't the same as Yes' Close to the Edge, or Pink Floyd's Dark Side of the Moon, or Genesis' Selling England by the Pound. No, there really isn't any other masterpiece I could conceivably compare this to, but it's still a masterpiece and a very unique, weird, almost unworldly experience. Take a trip on the Sea of Peas, a journey that's like to cause brain damage. And hey, it's free on Bandcamp!

Five stars for one of the most unique albums I've had the pleasure of listening to.

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 The Great Big Dog Biscuit by SUPERLUMINAL PACHYDERM album cover Boxset/Compilation, 2001
2.00 | 1 ratings

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The Great Big Dog Biscuit
Superluminal Pachyderm Eclectic Prog

Review by progaeopteryx
Prog Reviewer

— First review of this album —
2 stars This is the only compilation listed in Superluminal Pachyderm's discography and basically contains a collection of this project's shorter pieces. As far as I know, it was only issued on the former mp3.com that featured countless unsigned bands and amateur musicians and has been out of print since about 2002 or 2003.

I believe a lot of these tracks climbed kind of high on the prog rock charts on mp3.com, so this might be a "greatest hits" album in a sense, though very few of these songs have been exposed to the general public at large. The song Dementia is a "concise edition," cut from its original 18 minutes down to 7 1/2 minutes. Three of the songs were extracted from the multi-part title track of the Perpetual Insanity album. The only song on there that did not appear on the original track listings of the S.P. discography is Epitome of an Eidolon, but even that song is now available as a bonus track on the Perpetual Insanity album.

A rather scarce album that appears to be rather unavailable at this time. Although it certainly has a neat title, it's really only for collectors and fans of the group. Besides, Superluminal Pachyderm's strengths are in its lengthier numbers, almost completely lacking on this compilation.

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 Prum by SUPERLUMINAL PACHYDERM album cover Studio Album, 2002
3.00 | 1 ratings

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Prum
Superluminal Pachyderm Eclectic Prog

Review by progaeopteryx
Prog Reviewer

— First review of this album —
3 stars In only three years, Superluminal Pachyderm, the one-man band created by Ken Robinson, released its fourth album under the strangely titled Prum. To give you an idea of the strangeness of Robinson's project, consider that one of the photographs in the insert is that of a can of mandarin oranges being dumped into a toilet. Interestingly enough, this is the first album from this project to feature guests, vocalist Kim Novak, and guitarist Miles Walsh (of Milo Black and Osiris the Rebirth fame), who both perform on the song Hippopotamus.

The album starts off with The Screen Door Collector, which is basically the mutterings of a man who collects screen doors atop a quriky programmed drum beat and dark, spacey keys. In the middle part is a series of what seem like endless "woo-woos" made famous by Jerome "Curly" Howard of Three Stooges fame. A weird song that should put a smile on the faces of those with an odd sense of humor.

Reactive Shampoo follows this, with another odd programmed drum beat where both the bass and snare are echoed. A quirky guitar riff kicks in followed by Robinson's odd processed and distorted, almost spoken vocals evoking images of Popeye, camels, shampoo, cheese-liking Ross Perot and Glenn Seaborg. What?

Next is the first part of Punctuation of the Universe. This one has a very spacey feel to it. The vocals on this one are very crisp, but greatly processed with what seems like random pitch shifts. It's kind of a neat effect.

Another spacey, psychedelic number follows in Hollow Chocolate Bunnies. The piano has an eerie processed feel to it with an industrial drum pattern over top. Overall the song is reminiscent of the eerieness of SP's previous album, Perpetual Insanity. It seems to be about an imbalance in an Easter basket ecosystem where the hollow chocolate bunnies have disappeared. This song is sandwiched in between the first and second parts of Punctuation of the Universe. The second part of this song is in an unusual time signature. It has a catchy rhythm and sounds harder and more energetic than the usual plodding songs SP is known for. An interesting number.

The highlight of the album is the 10-minute song Hippopotamus with Kim Novak taking over on vocals and Miles Walsh providing some excellent guitar work. This one is a really catchy mix of neo prog and space rock. Novak's vocals are both powerful and beautiful (and needless to say, significantly better than Robinson's). As usual, the lyrics make no sense, but the chorus line "hippo, hippoptamus, I know you're out there somewhere, roaming around in my backyard" is priceless. You have to hear this one to believe it.

After the amazing Hippopotamus, the album falls flat on its face as it seems the ideas ran out and the Superluminal Pachyderm ran out of steam. The third part of Punctuation of the Universe seems as if both the music and lyrics were thrown together at the last minute. Admittedly, nonsense lyrics seem like they can be thrown together at any time, but somehow I think the songs preceding this one were carefully thought out. This one seems like a bad idea to fill out the album. This is followed by a short one-minute track where it seems Robinson actually admits that the last song was dumb. I admire an artist that realizes he's wasting his time.

Two Rolls on the Floor has a very quirky beat with an accompanying quirky guitar and bass riff. The vocals are overly processed and seem to overwhlem the song. After awhile this song really starts to get on my nerves. The 15-minute long The Great Big Hug of Life also seems to wear itself out with repetitiveness and very little in variety, generally being a quirky neo prog number. The chorus section sounds like a neo prog band at a country jam. If this song were shorter, it might have been better. It has way too many lyrics in my opinion. The odd psychedelic guitar noodlings during the ending fadeout are much too late to save this song.

Prum is pretty weird, but its not as eerie as the previous two SP albums. It has a more neo prog feel, mixed in with psychedelic/space rock and some industrial leanings and a few symphonic prog moments. I love the first two-thirds of this album, the latter third makes me want to put something else in my CD player.

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 Perpetual Insanity by SUPERLUMINAL PACHYDERM album cover Studio Album, 2001
3.95 | 2 ratings

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Perpetual Insanity
Superluminal Pachyderm Eclectic Prog

Review by progaeopteryx
Prog Reviewer

4 stars Ken Robinson, using the artist moniker Superluminal Pachyderm, released his third album in two years in 2001, under the title Perpetual Insanity. The title seems fitting for this weird music, with lyrics of abstract post-modern poetry layered on top of computer-generated compositions with influences ranging from neo prog, space rock, up to the silliness of Thomas Dolby and other oddball characters.

The album actually starts off with a song that actually seems to have some sort of meaning. The Möbius Strip seems to be about the whole history of humanity endlessly repeating itself in a long loop, much like a möbius strip. The song sounds a lot like neo prog, with spacey keys in the background. The machine-programmed drums can get to you after awhile, as the song plods along for over 14 minutes. There is a really neat instrumental interlude on piano around the 8 minute mark that is highly complex and reminiscent of Gentle Giant. If this had been used more regularly throughout the song, it would have been much more interesting. Instead, the song is overly repetitive. The psychedelic guitar solo at the end is a nice highlight.

Following this is a short track called Sork, basically a bunch of weird sound effects. This leads into a more radio friendly number called Bumblebee, featuring an echoing guitar riff. The effects in the vocals in the chorus are really neat. A bit repetitive, but a rather nice, almost hummable song with an overlying shroud of weirdness.

Next is the almost 18-minute long Dementia. This song has an eerie feeling througout on top of a driving rhythm almost like Pink Floyd's One of These Days. I haven't got a clue as to what this is about as it references dog biscuits, shoes looking out windows, bananas watching TV, dirty dishes, decaying sandwiches in a subway, vacuum cleaners (with sound effects), and toilets (also with sound effects!). The vocals on this piece are also particulary eerie sounding. I don't know if I should call this guy a genius or a nut. Whatever medication he's on, I want some too!

The Moment of Clarity starts off with an odd, slow and dark sounding piano riff. The song sounds sort of like a ballad, but it's just as weird as the last song. Filled with nonsensical lyrics and Robinson's trademark echoed and slightly distorted vocals, the song eventually peaks at the end with a psychedelic guitar solo to fade out the song. Although sloppily constructed, the solo seems to fit the song perfectly in it's overwhelming weirdness.

After a short track reprising the Bumblebee chorus, the seven-part, 13-minute long title track follows. Again, this is another weird and eerie number. To drive the point home, it starts with backmasked lyrics that basically say, "if you think about ladders, you will be dual." Some of my favorites lines in this song include "I sit around and collect jars of sneeze," "Another form of hypnosis, just like boiling water," "The butter is melting all over my table, I just sit there and roll marbles through it," and the vague "numbers can't compare to pipes." Wow.

After the last track is a bonus track that was shelved because there wasn't enough room on the original release of this album on the former defunct mp3.com. It found its way back on this album in a re-release. Again, it's another eerie and weird piece filled with lots of big words that make little sense when strung together in Robinson's lyrics. The lyrics are read out like a beat poetry reading with accompanying music and deep growling sounds in the background (no, nothing like death metal).

This is one of those albums you put on for a bunch of friends and watch them sit there for an hour staring into space with their mouths wide open. Don't forget to give them buckets for the drool.

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 Oddities by SUPERLUMINAL PACHYDERM album cover Studio Album, 2000
4.00 | 2 ratings

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Oddities
Superluminal Pachyderm Eclectic Prog

Review by progaeopteryx
Prog Reviewer

4 stars Superluminal Pachyderm, the one-man project created by Ken Robinson, spent no time twiddling his thumbs, and released his sophomore release, Oddities, a mere four months after releasing his debut album, Lexicographic Lint. With such a short time span, one would expect Oddities to sound much like its predecessor. In some ways it does, but there are remarkable production improvements in mixing and recording. Robinson composes all his music for Superluminal Pachyderm on a computer using Making Waves sequencer software and Goldwave sound editing software, which at the time were mid-priced software alternatives to Cakewalk and others.

In the liner notes, Robinson claims inspiration from ironing boards, microfiche readers, and clothes hampers. If I were to sum up Oddities in seven words or less, those would be good choices. So welcome to Superluminal Pachyderm's world, a Carrollian land of strangeness and oddities...

Oddities begins with a variety of echoing human sounds (pops, wahs, the word "start") and leads into a spoken poem called Bags of Pens. No, this is not like the spoken poetry the Moody Blues scattered across their albums. It is more in the realm of a weird postmodernism. Following this strange intro is The Soliloquy, an almost psychedelic pop number with some really strange distorted guitar work, echoing pianos, and odd lyrics lacking any meaning. There is a bit of backmasking in the middle section and the drums are a simple, programmed beat, but not a distraction.

The title track is next and has a drum machine feel very similar to Genesis' Mama, except it is slower. It almost seems like a ripoff, but the song sounds nothing like Genesis, so I'll label this as an inspiration. It isn't in anyway as dark as Mama was, but seems more attune to the previous song, The Soliloquy. Parts of it have a real spacey feel with spacey synth atmospheres and echoing vocals. Other than the similarities to Genesis' Mama, I found this to be an enjoyable listen.

The next track is another spoken poem called End of an Era. The voice is distorted and echoed and the theme is the demise of the dinosaurs. This is followed by The Leviathan and I wondered if it was about a dinosaur based on the poem lead-in, but the lyrics just don't make sense. A recurring theme in the song is the brushing of teeth. Musically, The Leviathan fits the neo-progressive genre, but the nonsensical lyrics are so unordinary for this genre. There is a middle section with French lyrics, and these also make no sense at all. There are lots of eerie synths scattered throughout the song. About the only downside to this song is that the programmed drums are too repetitive and could use some more drum rolls to mix it up a bit. A strange piece, and one of the better ones Robinson has made.

I'm having difficulties at finding words to describe the next song called Cliff of Cotton. It's mostly noise, but there's structure to this noise. It's very eerie and every now and then you here someone saying "what?" There are many distorted voices but most of them are inaudible. Experimental indeed. Another spoken poem with echoed vocals follows called The Pants Treaty of 1707 where I guess a country used popcorn as a defense and lost. Okay.

Idiot! is in a neo-prog/radio-friendly vein, except no radio station on earth would call this mainstream. There is another lyric in this song about popcorn freezing the oncoming revolution, but no mention of a pants treaty. I suppose one could loosely assume that this "idiot" was a member of the aforementioned nation in the previous poem, but as I have noticed, you can't really assume anything with Superluminal Pachyderm. It's just one long weird ride of eerie, computerized music, with some really strange guy singing about who knows what.

The next track, Pre-Potholes and Pre-Peas is an intro the the following song, aptly called Potholes and Peas. It is an assortment of sound effects and eerie synths. It then leads into a conversation between a high-pitched voice and low-pitched voice. The high-pitched voice wants a bouncy top-ten hit and I assume the low-pitched voice is Robinson being himself and eventually giving in leading to the following dance-like number.

Potholes and Peas is the only song on this album that makes sense in that it is a cohesive story about someone in a supermarket who hits a pothole with his shopping cart causing its contents of toothpaste, tea, and peas to fly into a lady's hair. Musically the song begins in an almost Mike & The Mechanics fashion then sounds like something Al Yankovic and Thomas Dolby might come up with. Very little in progressive terms, but a hilarious track well worth the listen.

From pop rock, Superluminal Pachyderm, goes completely progressive with the next seven-part, 15+ minute epic called Ghonk. Again, we're back into some eerie synths and weird, nonsensical, echoed vocals. Robinson actually has an interview on the Superluminal Pachyderm web site that covers what this song is about and it makes no sense at all. Apparently there is something called Ghonks which prevent odd things from happening in the universe and cause it to balance. In Robinson's universe, I can't imagine anything is balanced. It's just strange, followed by more strange, and then even more strange, ad infinitum. And that's what this song is. I'm not even sure what subgenre it could be classified in. It's sort of like a combination of psychedelic, neo-progressive, and even a small part metal. The eerie echoing piano that runs throughout the song is simply beautiful. There is one lyric that sticks out in my mind: "We will drop little tori into your bowl of milk, there is nothing you can do." Cheerios anyone?

Oddities is a remarkable improvement over Lexicographic Lint, especially since there were only four months between releases. Even the almost-spoken vocals have improved considerably, though the use of echoes are constant throughout the album and maybe a bit overdone. The programmed drums are done well, with mostly military precision, but often lack the variety a real drummer would have provided. A lot more progressive than Superluminal Pachyderm's debut, but still needing a good kick in the pants in energy. If you like weird, plodding albums that make absolutely no sense, this one should be a must-have. For the rest of you, Superluminal Pachyderm could take a bit getting used to, is an acquired taste, and may give off an amateurish vibe because of the way it was made entirely on computer with sound samples. I ranked Lexicographic Lint with a rounded-up 2.75. Oddities gets a rounded-up four stars from a 3.5, with the caveat that this isn't for everyone. Oddities is quite odd indeed.

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 Lexicographic Lint by SUPERLUMINAL PACHYDERM album cover Studio Album, 2000
3.00 | 1 ratings

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Lexicographic Lint
Superluminal Pachyderm Eclectic Prog

Review by progaeopteryx
Prog Reviewer

— First review of this album —
3 stars Does anyone remember mp3.com? Not the current one, but the one that existed in the late 1990s up to 2003 that would allow anyone to sign up and load their musical creations onto the Internet? I spent many hours combing that site looking for prog rock and of course the unusual. Often there were many bar bands that stayed bar bands simply because they couldn't cut it with their original stuff. Then there were the amateurs making electronica and ambient new age stuff, and even some people making music in their home with keyboards, pots and pans, and even one artist I recall that used cardboard boxes as drums!

But if you took the time, that old mp3.com had some real gems on it, including some really unusual artists. One of them I discovered was called Superluminal Pachyderm, a one-man project that composed progressive rock music on the computer using samples, a keyboard, a guitar, and music sequencing and editing software. That description in itself was enough to catch my attention. When I first heard the few mp3s that were available, I knew there was something really different about this one. It reeked of the weird and strange.

The sole driving force behind the Superluminal Pachyderm is one Ken Robinson, who apparently does this in his spare time. He released Superluminal Pachyderm's first album, Lexicographic Lint, in March 2000 on mp3.com. I have no idea what lexicographic lint is. There doesn't seem to be any theme having to do with dictionaries, or lexicographers, or lint for that matter. My guess is, and you can sort of pick up on it when you analyze the lyrics, that juxtaposition of unusual words together is one of the driving forces behind the lyrics. Or, the guy is out of his mind. Take your pick.

Prologue starts off the album with a gentle repeating synthesizer line and leads into an endless series of noises and people talking, layered about on the left and right sides of my headphones. The voices make little sense at all giving a prelude of what's to come. I hear ramblings about toilets, toilet paper, waking up between mattresses, and other assorted weirdness. This leads into a spoken poem with highly distorted vocals sounding much like a robot. More voices from the beginning return. Again, this seems to go nowhere. After this, a drum machine kicks in continuing the same theme with the repeating keyboard line. During this stage of the song the second verse of spoken poetry continues. The song segues into an instrumental section. The drums are mixed too high and it kind of ruins the whole song as the keyboard work seems rather interesting in this part, including some effective use of Moog samples. A strange, somewhat interesting, though flawed beginning.

The title track is next. This is a little more interesting, blending pop rock and neo prog, yet not sounding like anything I've ever heard before. It kind of sounds like Thomas Dolby meets early 1980s Saga, but with lyrics that make no sense at all. It's as if Robinson were pulling words out of the air. The programmed drums might be a bit of a distraction during drum rolls, but otherwise blends in with military precision throughout the song.

Can't Get Nothing kicks in with a rather disjointed melody that leads into what I can best describe as dance music. There are endless amounts of highly distorted voices and backmasking throughout the song. The weird vocals significantly distract the listener from the simple, yet effective, dance-style rhythm of this song. Apparently, the whole meaning of this song was an inability to get anything at a store. Simple, silly, a bit fun, but hardly intellectually engaging. Prog meets pop dance, if you can imagine it.

Next comes the song that lifts this album from the doldrums, Trail to Grytvikken, an 18+ minute long adventure into the depths of insanity. It starts off with some deep bass sounds, weird voices, and then kicks into a simple repeating piano/keyboard melody in the neo prog vein. This leads into a ghostly keyboard line with waves crashing, radio noises, and other unidentified sounds. The third section of this song is an amalgam of progressive pop styles, but the strangeness of the vocals makes it feel like something completely different. I sense some 1980s Genesis in some of this, but it's just a hint. The beginning section of the song returns during the fourth section. This song actually effectively repeats themes in a nice way. More weird lyrics, more repeating themes, then the ending section is an instrumental that incorporates all of the preceding musical themes together for a long three-minute fade out. Considering the technique Robinson uses to construct these songs, I'm kind of amazed at this one.

Turn Another Page is another piece that I'm having a hard time labeling. Nonsense layered over a neo prog/pop prog foundation, but that description hardly does it justice. The piano plays a big part of the overall sound of this piece. The chorus sections make the song seem like it dropped off a cliff into silliness, with overtones of amateurism. Still, even so, there is something appealing to me here.

This Is Nonsense is sort of like an electro-pop number with laughing, woo-woos (like Curly Howard, seriiously!), and idiotic, nonsensical lyrics. The nice background soundscape is it's only connection to prog in any possible way. The singing is pretty bland and sounds like someone getting up in the morning. This is definitely nonsense, but not the good kind.

All the Cream Cheese in the World, although a pretty neat title, is actually a repeat of the second section of Trail to Grytvikken containing a ghostly, repeating keyboard line, crashing waves, distorted vocals, radio noises, and other unidentified sounds. I swear I hear an echoed, distorted flushing toilet somewhere in that mess. The song continues in this manner for sometime before programmed drums kick in. It's sort of like a reprisal of Trail to Grytvikken, but part of me thinks it is just filler for a project that has run out of ideas.

The final song of the album is Epilogue. This simply repeats the themes introduced in the album's Prologue, but in a more condensed form. It has more spoken poetry in a robotized voice and what sounds like various radio sound effects. It then builds up with a lot of laughing and lines from previous songs all mixed together. It ends with the word "stop" being repeated over and over and a popping sound.

The later versions of this album, including the one currently available include a bonus track called Clothespin Bag. This was apparently an instrumental section that was to be a part of Trail to Grytvikken. This is probably the most progressive song on the album. Funny how some of the best songs some artists make turn out to be bonus tracks. For programmed drums, it almost sounds like a real drummer is in this, as it is rather complex. Again, I can't think of anyone I could compare this with, but the keyboard work, underlaid with piano, is quite eerie sounding. A lost gem that fortunately found its way into reality as a bonus track.

As one might suspect with completely computer-generated music, it is precise, almost machine-like. This is particularly noticeable on the drums. This is kind of similar to Magellan's first two albums that featured programmed drums, but these don't sound as corny. However, they could use a little work. The vocals are often echoed and tend to be dissonant. Still, they seem to fit this music nicely. Robinson generates a lot of strange sounds and there is a sort of eerieness to the whole thing. Like I said before, the lyrics are nonsense. They might make an interesting subject of a literary thesis someday, but for most of you, it might be a bit difficult to get through. There is also a sense of amateurism throughout the album, as the production could use a little work. But that kind of expectation from someone who does this as a hobby might be unfair, but is worth bringing out.

The best way I can describe this is to imagine yourself sitting in a comfortable chair with your mouth hanging open for an entire hour. At least that's the effect I think Robinson was aiming for. If so, he succeeded. This is not for everyone. Those of you interested in weird stuff might want to consider this album, otherwise I would start with Superluminal Pachyderm's Sea of Peas album first, which is just as weird, but better musically and production-wise. I like this enough to give it three stars (probably 2.75 would be more appropriate). Partly good, partly flawed, definitely weird.

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Thanks to clarke2001 for the artist addition. and to progaeopteryx for the last updates

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