Header

THE TEA CLUB

Crossover Prog • United States


From Progarchives.com, the ultimate progressive rock music website

The Tea Club picture
The Tea Club biography
The Tea Club is an independent rock band from New Jersey. They are known for writing songs of an epic nature, comparative to the early progressive rock bands of the 1960's and 70's. They also incorporate elements of post-rock, alternative rock, and space rock. A major part of the band's signature sound are the dual vocals and harmonies of Patrick and Dan McGowan, as well as their usage of unique guitar chords and chord patterns, often times played in alternate tunings. Patrick and Dan also draw nearly all of the band's album and promotional artwork. The band currently consists of Patrick McGowan, Dan McGowan, Joe Rizzolo, Jamie Wolff, and Renee Pestritto.

The Tea Club was formed in 2003. Between the inception and Fall 2006, they independently recorded four EP's, one of which attracted the attention of producer/ engineer Tim Gilles (Thursday and Taking Back Sunday). Tim produced, recorded and mixed their first full length album entitled "General Winter's Secret Museum", which was released in July 2008.

After briefly touring General Winter's Secret Museum along the East Coast, The Tea Club returned to Big Blue Meenie Studios to record their second album in the Fall of 2009. The album was again produced by Tim Gilles, and featured guest keyboardist Tom Brislin (Spiraling, Yes, Renaissance).

The Tea Club released their second album, "Rabbit", on October 9th 2010. They spent the rest of 2010 and the majority of 2011 playing many shows along the East Coast, including ProgDay, the world's longest running progressive music festival. Reviews and articles about the band were featured in publications such as Metro Philly, Indie Music Reviewer, Origivation, and JUMP. They ended the year 2011 by playing an acoustic show opening for Jimmy Gnecco of the band Ours at the North Star Bar in Philadelphia.

In early 2012, The Tea Club once again returned to Big Blue Meenie Studios to record their third album with producer Tim Gilles. Following the recording sessions, The Tea Club were asked to open for the Swedish progressive rock band Beardfish for their mini-tour of the United States in May 2012.

The Tea Club's third album, "Quickly Quickly Quickly", was released on November 15th, 2012 to overwhelmingly positive reviews.

-Bio by Dan McGowan, updated Mar. 2013

The Tea Club official website

THE TEA CLUB MP3, Free Download (music stream)


Open extended player in a new pop-up window | Random Playlist (50) | How to submit new MP3s

THE TEA CLUB forum topics / tours, shows & news


THE TEA CLUB forum topics Create a topic now
THE TEA CLUB tours, shows & news Post an entries now

THE TEA CLUB Videos (YouTube and more)


Showing only random 3 | Show all THE TEA CLUB videos (5) | Search and add more videos to THE TEA CLUB

Buy THE TEA CLUB Music


Quickly Quickly QuicklyQuickly Quickly Quickly
CD Baby 2012
Audio CD$8.94
$1.36 (used)
RabbitRabbit
CD BABY.COM/INDYS 2010
Audio CD$11.90
$11.90 (used)
Right Now on Ebay (logo)

More places to buy THE TEA CLUB music online Buy THE TEA CLUB & Prog Rock Digital Music online:
  • AmazonMP3: Search for THE TEA CLUB DRM-Free MP3 Downloads @ AmazonMP3 (USA Only) | AmazonMP3 (UK Only)

THE TEA CLUB shows & tickets


THE TEA CLUB has no upcoming shows, according to LAST.FM syndicated events and shows feed

THE TEA CLUB discography


Ordered by release date | Showing ratings (top albums) | Help Progarchives.com to complete the discography and add albums

THE TEA CLUB top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.77 | 26 ratings
General Winter's Secret Museum
2008
3.94 | 61 ratings
Rabbit
2010
4.16 | 174 ratings
Quickly Quickly Quickly
2012

THE TEA CLUB Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

THE TEA CLUB Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

THE TEA CLUB Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

THE TEA CLUB Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

5.00 | 1 ratings
Stehm-O
2004
5.00 | 1 ratings
Love Your Enemy
2005
5.00 | 1 ratings
Clouded Gloomy Beloved
2006
3.13 | 4 ratings
The Tea Club
2011

THE TEA CLUB Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 Quickly Quickly Quickly by TEA CLUB, THE album cover Studio Album, 2012
4.16 | 174 ratings

BUY
Quickly Quickly Quickly
The Tea Club Crossover Prog

Review by Epignosis
Special Collaborator Eclectic Prog Team

4 stars A sonic kaleidoscope, The Tea Club presents a quartet of songs that appealed to me from the start. Energetically tasteful, Quickly Quickly Quickly never fumbles under its own vigor, keeping the listener engaged throughout with a variety of interwoven sounds and a decidedly symphonic panache.

"Firebears" I knew I would like this as soon as that driven opening blasted through my speakers. The drumming throughout is a highlight, offering enough texture and variety by itself to compete with the tightly woven fibers of sound presented by the guitars and keyboards. Midway through, we're treated to a shimmery, jazz-tinged section with wandering bass and hushed vocals. The enigmatically beautiful vocal melody that closes out the piece is so satisfying.

"The Eternal German Infant" Alternating between hard-hitting incursions and a certain Echolyn-like whimsy, this second song demonstrates the broadness of style The Tea Club is capable of, all while maintaining a respectable coherence.

"Mister Freeze" Temporarily abandoning the motley soundscape for a quiet acoustic song, this contains both mellow and darker passages. It is the album's "breather," but that does not make it any less admirable.

"I Shall Consume Everything" Pairing heavy progressive rock with a bit of a country shuffle and smooth harmonies, this song has the angst-ridden edge of a band like The Dear Hunter, as it gradually adopts more symphonic elegances.

MEMBERS LOGIN ZONE

As a registered member (register here if not), you can post rating/reviews (& edit later), comments reviews and submit new albums.

You are not logged, please complete authentication before continuing (use forum credentials).

 Quickly Quickly Quickly by TEA CLUB, THE album cover Studio Album, 2012
4.16 | 174 ratings

BUY
Quickly Quickly Quickly
The Tea Club Crossover Prog

Review by Warthur
Prog Reviewer

4 stars One of those bands who, like Birds and Buildings, have a distinctly modern sound which feels like a logical continuation of the experiments of underground prog bands past rather than mere mimicry of it, The Tea Club offer an excellent collection of tracks on Quickly Quickly Quickly. Think of any progressive band from King Crimson to Radiohead and if you listen carefully you could probably find echoes of them somewhere deep in here, whether it's one of the many surprises concealed in the bizarre epic Firebears or the bombastic tantrum of the Eternal German Infant or the sinister netherworld of Mr Freeze. In a year not short on excellent prog albums, Quickly Quickly Quickly stands out as an album which will hopefully gain more widespread appreciation over time.

MEMBERS LOGIN ZONE

As a registered member (register here if not), you can post rating/reviews (& edit later), comments reviews and submit new albums.

You are not logged, please complete authentication before continuing (use forum credentials).

 Quickly Quickly Quickly by TEA CLUB, THE album cover Studio Album, 2012
4.16 | 174 ratings

BUY
Quickly Quickly Quickly
The Tea Club Crossover Prog

Review by Orsaeth

5 stars The Tea Club are a progressive rock band from New Jersey, USA, started by brother tandem Patrick and Daniel McGowan. After honing their sound, and releasing several EPs and a couple full length albums, The Tea Club (TTC) dropped their third full length album, titled Quickly Quickly Quickly, on November 27th. Had I stumbled upon this sooner, it easily would have made my Top Albums of 2012 list, as it is absolutely a prog rock masterpiece. It is complex when it needs to be without being at all difficult to listen to, and it knows when to back down and let gentle waves wash over the listener.

Consisting of only four tracks, and starting with the sprawling, near-18 minute long epic, "Firebears", this is not an album for those not initiated into progressive rock fair. The musicianship is inventive, layered, and perfectly executed. The drumming on just the opening track is enough to make a name for drummer Joe Rizzolo. It is very Gavin Harrison- esque, using subtlety and skill to create stunning fills and passages as well as having a few oddly timed rhythms, which end up sounding very satisfactory in the general mix of the music. The guitar parts are fluid and melodic, resulting in some very comforting sounding lead melodies, even when the music ramps up the intensity. Occasional nods to classic prog bands such as Yes, Genesis, and Camel as well as more post rock influences are heard, but TTC manage to sound very unique and fresh. The keyboards are sparse and gentle, but are woven nicely into the guitar parts to build wonderful textures in both the softer and more intense moments. The McGowan brothers share vocal duties, and both acquit themselves excellently. Their harmonies are beautiful, and their individual passages showcase brilliant, soulful singing from both. It is easy to tell they really feel passionate about their music and the lyrics that they write.

Lyrically, QQQ is quite complex, with one song, "The Eternal German Infant", using acrostic poetry for its refrain. The song seems to tell some sort of fairy tale, in a style similar to that of Magical Mystery Tour-era Beatles. The language is strange, vibrant, and pleasing to the ear. The music fits the words, floaty and happy, but not afraid to turn up the tension and intensity. "Mister Freeze" is by far the calmest song on the album. It has a few moments that are almost post rock in between serene acoustic passages interspersed with keyboard swells, and a few darker sounding sections.

The Tea Club are a fantastic prog rock band, and Quickly Quickly Quickly is certainly one of the top prog records of the last few years. It is modern sounding, without forgetting where its roots are. Utilizing magnificent musicianship, skillful songwriting, and a brilliant lyrical mind, this album is a unique musical journey into a strange, peaceful landscape, and stands as one of the top albums released in 2012.

Score: 87

MEMBERS LOGIN ZONE

As a registered member (register here if not), you can post rating/reviews (& edit later), comments reviews and submit new albums.

You are not logged, please complete authentication before continuing (use forum credentials).

 Quickly Quickly Quickly by TEA CLUB, THE album cover Studio Album, 2012
4.16 | 174 ratings

BUY
Quickly Quickly Quickly
The Tea Club Crossover Prog

Review by robbob

3 stars Well my first experience listening The Tea Club

Very good crossover prog .Very good musicians..innovators ..creative...

This is good modern prog rock.

The first song Firebears my most likeable :a song with many delightful changes of styles .It reminds me sometimes old Genesis (PG era)...the The Mars Volta...sometimes Big Big Train.

The other 3 mostly in the level of the first one.

I can,t deny this is very good but is not so original :This is a perfect mix between the Mars Volta and Big Big Train ...with some Genesis drops...

I like this innovative crossover prog rock but the front line is in TMV and BBT.

3,5 stars for me.

MEMBERS LOGIN ZONE

As a registered member (register here if not), you can post rating/reviews (& edit later), comments reviews and submit new albums.

You are not logged, please complete authentication before continuing (use forum credentials).

 Quickly Quickly Quickly by TEA CLUB, THE album cover Studio Album, 2012
4.16 | 174 ratings

BUY
Quickly Quickly Quickly
The Tea Club Crossover Prog

Review by Angelo
Special Collaborator Honorary Collaborator / Retired Admin

5 stars

Promises promises promises kept

Before this album came out, Dan asked me to have a listen to some premixed tracks, and see if I could do a review. At the time, I was quite busy, so despite playing the tracks a few time, I never got around to doing that review. Now, finally, I do have the time, so it's time to live up to the promise.

This album definitely takes some time to grow on you - at least in my case. There is so much to hear, and so much going on that it's easy to get lost, this is not for people who like verse-chorus-verse-chorus-chorus-verse-yeah style music.

Fire Bears explodes in your face straight away, with a great instrumental intro. The band members surely have the skill to hang on to their instruments in what may sound to the casual listener as chaos. If you sit down for it, you hear an intricate piece of music, that can compete with classics by Genesis, Pink Floyd or Van der Graaf Generator, while at the same time not forgetting the fact that this is the 21st Century.

The Eternal German Infant is not much different in quality, although it is a completely different track. The intro is even more 'bombastic', although using that word seems unfair. Not because bombast is bad, but because although the keyboards are clearly in the lead here, in no way does the band attempt to mimic a band like ELP. It's fresh, energetic and modern, with a hint to classic prog. Half way through the track, I can't help but being reminded of some of the tracks on Van der Graaf Generators Trisector album - and the darkness and power equal that of old VDGG.

With Mr. Freeze, in comes a completely different beast - musically speaking. The comparatively mellow track, with a prominent roll for a very modestly played bass changes the atmosphere completely. Again, it's dark as an old mansion at night with all fuses blown - but this time almost hypnotically so. A masterpiece in painting atmospheres with sound, as far as I'm concerned.

After awaking from hypnosis (even without someone snapping their fingers), I shall Consume Everything takes us to yet another galaxy. One that brings to mind waterfalls and green valleys, mainly due to the way the keyboards and guitar interact - a bit like the effect the acoustic guitar has in Rush' masterpiece 2112. The build up from their to a magical prog rock track, which once again combines power and darkness in a VDGG like manner is implemented perfectly.

When I heard General Winter's... the first time, I was impressed a lot, and I gave it four stars because I felt it had to prove itself over time. It did. With Rabbit I needed time to let the album grow on me, and I gave four stars again, because I felt there was more to come. I was right... and more has come. This time, all the good parts of the other two albums, and more, are combined. This album does not need to prove itself, it already has proven itself over the past three months.

A solid master piece, the first in many years.

As usual, thanks to Dan, for allowing me to pre-listen - and apologies for not writing this earlier

MEMBERS LOGIN ZONE

As a registered member (register here if not), you can post rating/reviews (& edit later), comments reviews and submit new albums.

You are not logged, please complete authentication before continuing (use forum credentials).

 Quickly Quickly Quickly by TEA CLUB, THE album cover Studio Album, 2012
4.16 | 174 ratings

BUY
Quickly Quickly Quickly
The Tea Club Crossover Prog

Review by Norman Kiddie

3 stars After having read some of these rather overwhelming reviews it seemed only right to go and explore for myself. Amazon kindly obliged and within 10 minutes I had the album sitting on my hard drive. Having wanted the best sound I converted the mp3 into a wave file and copied the whole album to a cd. Ready to run on a very large and powerful system, time on my hands and THE TEA CLUB not to be mistaken for THE TEA PARTY had their chance to prove the critics, in this case right. Well I'm still waiting for the impact. The fall over with glee type feeling, tell all your mates what you've discovered type feeling. Unfortunately the album does very little for me other than join the ranks of the "well done lads you show great promise" and move on to better things. It is not for me to pass judgement other my own opinion and am convinced that there is undoubtedly talent on show here, furthermore if they are able to appeal to so many other listeners then it can't be anything other than positive. Keep on progging!

MEMBERS LOGIN ZONE

As a registered member (register here if not), you can post rating/reviews (& edit later), comments reviews and submit new albums.

You are not logged, please complete authentication before continuing (use forum credentials).

 Quickly Quickly Quickly by TEA CLUB, THE album cover Studio Album, 2012
4.16 | 174 ratings

BUY
Quickly Quickly Quickly
The Tea Club Crossover Prog

Review by Ivan_Melgar_M
Special Collaborator Symphonic Prog Specialist

5 stars Excellent, Excellent, Excellent

I can still remember the day when THE TEA CLUB was suggested to the Symphonic team, and we had to say no, simply because they are not Symphonic. But since Dan Mc'Gowan had sent me a copy, of their debut called General Winter's Secret Museum, listened it with interest and was very impressed with the birth of a good band.

Two years later Dan sent me a copy of Rabbit and found that the band had matured a lot. But nothing can compare with what happened this Christmas evening when the postman brought me a copy of their third album Quickly, Quickly, Quickly.

It was a complete shock to find that this guys have grown incredibly and now they embrace a new kind of Progressive Rock that blends Symphonic, Heavy Prog and some sort of inspired Eclectic that left me asking for more, if they keep improving at this rate, the sky is the limit.

The album opens with Firebears, an almost 18 minutes epic that really blows your mind even if you are prepared. After a frenetic intro where the band attacks with a violence and intensity that can only be compared to Relayer, even when more melodic. After the first two minutes the vocals join and then you can expect anything, I listen hints of KING CRIMSON, YES, VDGG, GENESIS and even RADIOHEAD, mixed with such delicacy that nothing seems out of place. The wonderful dissonance between voice, keys and guitar is breathtaking while Charles Batdorf in the bass and specially Joe Rizzolo in the drums, are the ones who are responsible to glue all the individual efforts........Simply amazing.

The Eternal German Infant is slightly different, even when they don't lose that fascination with dissonances, the song tends to be more melodic and dramatic. In some parts reminds of Derek Shulman in Advent of Panurgis but with a great difference, while GENTLE GIANT seem to search complexity as their ultimate goal creating a divorce between vocals and the random sounds they create with the instruments, the music of THE TEA CLUB becomes complex when required by the natural evolution of the song, with a perfect synchronicity between the vocalist and the rest of the band.

When I thought I had enough surprises, the dark and mysterious Mister Freeze begins with something I never expected, while the obscure and almost depressive vocals (Hey depressive is good) are enhanced by a mysterious keyboard and bass, an acoustic guitar plays a tune that reminds me of A TRICK OF THE TILE. But this is only momentary, because after a minute or so, they return to the original tune, but the fascinating thing is that if you pay close attention, you can feel the delicate variations, another delightful song.

The album is closed by the incredibly beautiful I Shall Consume Everything, but the listener needs to be ready, because the changes are constant and radical, taking us from the mellow acoustic guitar and flute (Guess synthesized) to the frenetic sections where the band attacks us with all the heavy artillery creating an intense collision of sounds and moods that any Progressive Rock fan will appreciate. In seconds they take us from calm and peace to aggression and anguish, in other words, they can transmit strong feelings which in my opinion is one of the greatest achievements of any band. Obviously my favorite song.

Normally when i reach this point in a review I'm full of doubts and asking myself what rating will be less unfair, being that a number can't summarize the music, but today I have no problems, being that THE TEA CLUB has crossed the line that divides good from extraordinaire bands who are able to release a masterpiece like Quickly, Quickly, Quickly , so without hesitation, will go with 5 solid stars.

MEMBERS LOGIN ZONE

As a registered member (register here if not), you can post rating/reviews (& edit later), comments reviews and submit new albums.

You are not logged, please complete authentication before continuing (use forum credentials).

 Quickly Quickly Quickly by TEA CLUB, THE album cover Studio Album, 2012
4.16 | 174 ratings

BUY
Quickly Quickly Quickly
The Tea Club Crossover Prog

Review by epseja

4 stars Upon initially listening to this album (which was my first encounter with The Tea Club) I was not sure what to make of it. The music had moments of "classic" prog, but didn't rely on old formulas for its signature sound. What it did have in droves was an unmistakable sense of drama and urgency, and a conspicuous disregard for conventionality. There are hard rock, pop, grunge, folk and alternative moments -- all delivered with meticulous finesse, even when just about to go off the rails.

Without diminishing the excellent performances by all the band members, I would like to note that one of the standout aspects of this album is Joe Rizzolo's flavorful drumming. I would even go so far as to say there is *melody* in so many of the fills. In places where simple rollouts would suffice, Joe instead pulls off inventive, well articulated patterns that fit the moment but without the unnecessary "look at how technical I am" showiness.

This album is definitely one that grows on you over time (like most complex albums do), and fully blossoms when enjoyed end-to-end through headphones.

MEMBERS LOGIN ZONE

As a registered member (register here if not), you can post rating/reviews (& edit later), comments reviews and submit new albums.

You are not logged, please complete authentication before continuing (use forum credentials).

 Quickly Quickly Quickly by TEA CLUB, THE album cover Studio Album, 2012
4.16 | 174 ratings

BUY
Quickly Quickly Quickly
The Tea Club Crossover Prog

Review by IcedPorcupine

5 stars The Tea Club "Quickly Quickly Quickly" 9/10

Upon hearing this incredible piece of art, I very quickly quickly found myself online buying more of their music. Such a fantastic effect this album had on me. I have been stunned by the sheer brilliance these gentlemen have put into Quickly Quickly Quickly (Here on, QQQ). I have let myself listen to this album at least a dozen times in various situations to let myself really soak it up, before writing down my thoughts. Even now, listening to it again, amazement flows through me as my mind attempts to understand how such a fine piece of awesome can simply exist.

Beginning with the epic "Firebears", QQQ contains elements of truly fantastic progressive music. Easily a new favourite of mine, and definitely ranking among the talents like Porcupine Tree, The Mars Volta and Yes, anticipation for a next release has already begun. "Firebears" does what it is well; "Firebears" hits off a stunning beginning to this incredible album, and sets up just how awesome QQQ is. Yet it is more awesome than that even. The astonishing sound that comes from The Tea Club and their QQQ brings forth wishes of knowing of them years earlier. The then 5-piece, Patrick and Dan McGowan, Becky Osenenko, Charles Batdorf and Joe Rizzolo, clearly know how to write music and compose true art.

Following "Firebears" is the track that really got me hooked on this album; QQQ's second track, "The Eternal German Infant" contains some truly mind melting melodies and astounding and enjoyably lyrical work. This is not to say that the rest of QQQ lacks these elements in comparison, I simply fell in love with "The Eternal German Infant" first. The lines "P is for Pink Wood House/O is for Orange Moon Cakes/I is for Ivory's key/N is for Number Nine/(Strawberry Number Nine)/T is for a Triumphee!" and others like it, I find are delivered so fantastically well I could cry. The sound and tone these lines add to the music are way beyond brilliant. If someone were to tell me that the group were not actually human, I might believe them. A divine creation they have set upon the earth, and I shall pray to The Tea Club every night in hopes of a new album and to see them live.

Throughout the album, the vocals and guitar work is harmonized so fantastically beautifully well by Dan and Patrick McGowan, a sound that I will never forget in my lifetime. Considered their signature sound, it certainly adds a definite mood and element to the music that is already done so very well. The melodies carried by these two are found in the dictionary definition of "Awesome", and I don't mean the simple, every day awesome. I am talking about see-the-earth-from-space kind of awesome, which I am sure The Tea Club has done, being the divine beings they are.

The drumming. Oh man the drumming. Rizzolo is able to capture the perfect blend of simplistic and technical drumming in QQQ. Knowing the perfect time to step it up a few notches to 12/10 incredibleness, and then humble it down to a slower, less complicated pace. Additionally, the sound of his DW Collectors Series is amazing, and recorded in perfection. Nothing at all to hate here, such brilliance has been created.

Wrapping up, it is unbelievable that such an album as this exists. It is unbelievable that The Tea Club exists in all their excellent skill. Something so amazing has been hidden (from me) for too long, and their masterpiece Quickly Quickly Quickly demonstrates that they are more than able to show the world some real talent. I am honoured to have given my ears the chance to enjoy the awe-inspiring sounds that come from such a beautiful package, simply titled "Quickly Quickly Quickly" written and recorded by the magnificent Tea Club. When is the day I can die peacefully? Never, as long as The Tea Club exists... M is for Masterpiece...

MEMBERS LOGIN ZONE

As a registered member (register here if not), you can post rating/reviews (& edit later), comments reviews and submit new albums.

You are not logged, please complete authentication before continuing (use forum credentials).

 Quickly Quickly Quickly by TEA CLUB, THE album cover Studio Album, 2012
4.16 | 174 ratings

BUY
Quickly Quickly Quickly
The Tea Club Crossover Prog

Review by Conor Fynes
Prog Reviewer

5 stars 'Quickly Quickly Quickly' - The Tea Club (9/10)

Porcupine Tree frontman Steven Wilson once stated in an interview that "...the Mars Volta, Tool, and Radiohead. . .are the future of progressive music." I would like to add The Tea Club to that list. Although these US proggers make a customary nod in the direction of the prog classics, much of their sound is drawn from the well of the current rock scene. Since 2010 with their second album "Rabbit", The Tea Club have been on the radar, and it's tantamount to criminal that I'm only first hearing them on this, their third album. To put it simply; "Quickly Quickly Quickly" is the sort of album that will only grow on the listener and the progressive community at large as time goes by. It's a wonderful fusion of post-rock aesthetic, progressive song structure and the loose-reined vigour of punk rock. Although 2012 was a year host to output of impressive records from some of progressive rock's finest, The Tea Club just may have topped them all.

Comparisons to The Mars Volta or The Dear Hunter are inevitable; besides each of these bands' names starting with everyone's favourite definite article, The Tea Club take aspects of the oft-recycled progressive formula and successfully translate them to a 21st century context. Although most of these 'nu-progressive' (or 'modern prog'- what's the term I'm supposed to use here?) artists tend to get first compared to Porcupine Tree, The Tea Club go for a much more sporadic sound. "Quickly Quickly Quickly" demonstrates this from the very start; the eighteen minute "Firebears" opens with an appropriately fiery instrumental passage that incorporates all the best elements of jazz fusion, punk, and vintage progressive rock. Of course, like all the best, The Tea Club exercise moderation in their music. "Firebears" ultimately settles down into a mellowed-out midsection with a sublime balance between soft instrumentation and captivating vocal melodies. Later on and throughout the album, The Tea Club showcase the emotive and energetic in relatively equal proportions. "The Eternal German Infant" represents this binary effect to wonderful results: it successfully pairs melodic catchiness and harmony with the sort of chaotic riffs and distortion you would normally hear in math rock.

Although certain passages (particularly the mellowed midsection of "Firebears" and the filmscore-worthy album climax) stole my heart from the first listen, "Quickly Quickly Quickly" is- contrary to the album's title- an album that took its time to grow and ferment. There aren't too many albums that manage to be instantly gratifying and long-lasting simultaneously, but the band's mixed approach ensures that the album retains its flair and poignance throughout many a listen. Possibly the most accessible and inviting aspect of The Tea Club's sound are the vocals, offered here by the brothers McGowan, Patrick and Dan. Although at times they hit the higher notes and bombast of The Dear Hunter's Casey Crescenzo (or Coheed & Cambria's Claudio Sanchez), both vocalists' strength lay in the more laid-back, mid-range vocals. If proof is needed, I refer once again to the midsection on "Firebears"- "I watched as you spun your web..." . The vocals do much more for less. On the other side of the spectrum, there are a few times when the vocals try to reach out of their regular zone, occasionally hitting 'scream' territory. Although it could have potentially worked in this sort of music, the brothers McGowan's more aggressive passages aren't as impressive as the rest of the vocal passage. Regardless, there's not a note here that leaves a bitter taste- The Tea Club have made a near-perfect album here, and still, I'm left feeling they'll be able to hit even greater heights in time.

Although "Quickly (x3)" never reaches the sort of chaotic energy that a band like The Mars Volta typically hit, the balance between musical disciplines insures that the album never feels monotonous. Even on the epic-worthy, eighteen minute opener, The Tea Club never extend themselves past what is tasteful. It's this willpower to keep themselves from exercising the 'ultra-prog' aspect of their sound that makes The Tea Club such an attractive prospect in a scene that often values technical showmanship over emotive profundity. The album's relatively brief length keeps it from ever wearing out its welcome or encroaching on dinner time, but most importantly, it's left me wanting more from the band. Check them out- by the gods- I implore thee!

MEMBERS LOGIN ZONE

As a registered member (register here if not), you can post rating/reviews (& edit later), comments reviews and submit new albums.

You are not logged, please complete authentication before continuing (use forum credentials).

Thanks to micky for the artist addition. and to Finnforest for the last updates

Copyright Prog Archives, All rights reserved. | Legal Notice | Privacy Policy | Advertise | GeoIP Services by MaxMind | RSS + syndications

Other sites in the MAC network: JazzMusicArchives.com — the ultimate jazz music virtual community | MetalMusicArchives.com — the ultimate metal music virtual community


Server processing time: 0.67 seconds