Progarchives, the progressive rock ultimate discography

BATTLESTATIONS

Post Rock/Math rock • Belgium


From Progarchives.com, the ultimate progressive rock music website

Battlestations picture
Battlestations biography
Formed in Brussels, Belgium in 2009

They currently have one album (out June 2011), consisting of material developed between 2009 and 2011.

BATTLESTATIONS play a very eclectic and original music that could be called atmospheric rock for convenience purposes. Space rock sonic-scapes create a playground for ambiental / industrial-ambient explorations, beautiful piano lines, eerie spoken samples or noises, sensible guitar playing that reminds of Robert Fripp and Steve Hackett, and even orchestral/chamber music hints. The moods developed in the process are always warm and melancholic, conveying a particular sense of redeeming aesthetic beauty.

Some of the bands and artists that could be referenced to pin down a few of the music's many facets are PINK FLOYD, FRIPP & ENO, MIKE OLDFIELD, SIGUR ROS, ALCEST, ANATHEMA or early PORCUPINE TREE. Progressive electronic, shoegaze and post-rock are genres touched in passing, but overall BATTLESTATIONS do not sound like any of them and have rather created a category of their own.

Bio by Alex (harmonium.ro)

See also: HERE

BATTLESTATIONS forum topics / tours, shows & news


BATTLESTATIONS forum topics Create a topic now
BATTLESTATIONS tours, shows & news Post an entries now

BATTLESTATIONS Videos (YouTube and more)


Showing only random 3 | Show all BATTLESTATIONS videos (1) | Search and add more videos to BATTLESTATIONS

Buy BATTLESTATIONS Music



More places to buy BATTLESTATIONS music online

BATTLESTATIONS discography


Ordered by release date | Showing ratings (top albums) | Help Progarchives.com to complete the discography and add albums

BATTLESTATIONS top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.75 | 27 ratings
Battlestations
2011
3.97 | 140 ratings
In a Cold Embrace
2012
4.04 | 89 ratings
The Extent of Damage
2015
4.09 | 50 ratings
Vixit
2017
3.93 | 35 ratings
Inform
2020
3.95 | 6 ratings
Splinters, Vol. I: Tremor
2021
0.00 | 0 ratings
Splinters, Vol. II: Bruise
2021

BATTLESTATIONS Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

BATTLESTATIONS Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

BATTLESTATIONS Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

4.67 | 3 ratings
The Death of the Day (2020 Extended Remaster)
2020

BATTLESTATIONS Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

3.94 | 8 ratings
Return / Mr. Abject
2011
4.15 | 13 ratings
The Death of the Day
2013

BATTLESTATIONS Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 Splinters, Vol. I: Tremor by BATTLESTATIONS album cover Studio Album, 2021
3.95 | 6 ratings

BUY
Splinters, Vol. I: Tremor
Battlestations Post Rock/Math rock

Review by Lewian
Prog Reviewer

5 stars This is the first prog album I have bought from 2021, and as such obviously up to now the best. Furthermore it tops all I have heard from 2019 and 2020 and would ultimately be a very worthy winner of the year.

The Battlestations are listed as Post Rock because of their history but are for some time on a journey to progressive electronic, which on this album they have properly completed. There are no drums on this album and no guitar that sounds like one, it's all electronic including some samples, so based on this album hardly anyone would classify the as post/math rock.

Not only is the album electronic, it is excellent at that. It has the same experimental spirit that can be found in the early work of the pioneers of the genre, think of Tangerine Dream's masterpieces Zeit and Phaedra. I mention these two because from Zeit to Phaedra TD introduced the rhythmic sequencer, and Battlestations here balance more ambient soundscapes and rhythmic, more structured parts in a masterful way. Post rock sensitivity can be heard to some extent in the relaxed approach and the pleasant tonal motifs that make the album more accessible than more radical experimental electronic work, still avoiding anything like clear melodies or a traditional song structure.

Splinters Vol. I is just a single piece of 43 minutes. Sound generation amd sampling of course is done using twenty-first century standards, distinguishing the album from early electronic work. It is an atmospheric, slow developing work that features sound experimentation, meditative parts, but also sequencer-like repetitive rhythms and some harmonic material. It is richer in ideas than much of this genre; although the music takes its time to transform from one part to the next, there is plenty to discover. Something that sets this album apart is the musicality by which the different parts have been woven together; everything feels organic and smooth, but it is far from minimalism or drone. People may call it "ambient", but to listen to it like ambient music would mean missing much of what's going on. It is basically a more friendly and warm version of experimental electronic which in other work can come over as quite intellectual and cold.

Different motifs and structures come and go, held together by an overarching approach to sounds, always reminding us that happiness and sadness and all the often strange and unexpected but at some point familiar things in life are only a small and transient part of something bigger that was before we were and will still be after we have gone.

Approach with caution if you're not into electronic and experimental stuff, but I say 5 stars hands down.

 Splinters, Vol. I: Tremor by BATTLESTATIONS album cover Studio Album, 2021
3.95 | 6 ratings

BUY
Splinters, Vol. I: Tremor
Battlestations Post Rock/Math rock

Review by DamoXt7942
Forum & Site Admin Group Avant/Cross/Neo/Post Teams

3 stars This "Tremor" gives me a tremor.

2021 has opened the theatre curtain with BATTLESTATIONS' latest release whilst we expect another dawn under such a terrible pandemic situation. We are also amazed at their album "Splinters, Vol. I: Tremor" featuring only one suite "Tremor" because they have occupied Post Rock fans' inner mind for a decade. This long suite "Tremor" has slow and steady movements in the whole aspect like a kind of traditional Chinese exercise aka tai chi, and therefore it would be tough for some 'rock' fans to digest and absorb as music nutrition soon. In this sense every progressive electronic mania can accept this sensitive creek easily, I imagine.

Synthesizer-oriented keen soundpoints that sometimes prick our mind are also mystic. Repetitive surrealistic melody pillows drive us into a dreamy dream. The development of vibes and movements sounds like a feel flows. We would be immersed in the last phase filled with calm but unsettled tuning balance. Their soundscape in this creation is mysterious but aggressive. The electronic atmosphere around them is quiet but energetic. Their ambient expression, especially brilliant beautiful synthesizer works based on echoic monotone in the middle part, reminds me of the similarity to "Une Belle Journée" by a French electronic artist Nicolas Dick.

Not straightly recommended for every post 'rock' fan but good for progressive electronic followers, let me say. Ah of course, I love this album. ;)

 Inform by BATTLESTATIONS album cover Studio Album, 2020
3.93 | 35 ratings

BUY
Inform
Battlestations Post Rock/Math rock

Review by BrufordFreak
Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

5 stars A wonderful surprise from Belgium: Battlestations is not kaput! The band reincarnates to produce this Post Rock charmer.

1. "Silencer" (7:48) surprising Berlin School sequencing and lush strings "orchestration" over the first half is then replaced by a more industrial groove for the final three minutes. With Battlestation's usual heart-wrenching chord progressions . . . the "strings" and synth washes in the background are incredible. (13.75/15)

2. "Steeper Angles" (5:35) is like an industrial ambient wash of Brian Eno's "and Julie with"--but then it goes all Blade Runner! Awesome! (9/10)

3. "Carbon" (5:10) sounds as if the first half of Genesis's song "Duchess" had been taken through a meat grinder and turned inside out--and then, in the second half of the song, it turns Gymnopedienne (+ meat grinder). Beautiful! (9.5/10)

4. "Relapse" (6:46) is a kind of play or variation on one of the beautiful motifs from Vixit. Considering its source material, this can never be a bad idea. (13/15)

5. "Wavering" (6:26) opens with an introductory section of more futuristic, Vangelis-like, industrial sounds (non-percussive). After the 90-second mark, this switches to a steadily-driving juggernaut of multiple threads woven together gorgeously. At the end of the fourth minute a harp-like arpeggio joins in just before a powerful trip-hoppy drum program takes us into outer space. Awesome keyboard work on all layers here. Song ends with central chord progression of synth washes slowly fading out. Excellent! Maybe my favorite songs on this album. (10/10)

6. "L'abîme" (6:08) opens with a lot of "pond water"--music that sets up a mood, maybe an image, but doesn't seem to be going anywhere. (How does one do this?) It's not until the 2:30 mark that the camera begins a slow walk through the park. It's beautiful--even if my fever and dizziness is making everything shimmery and unsteady. "If you listen for long enough, you don't know whether what you're hearing is silence, or whether there's some kind of underlying sound, in the distance..." speaks the garbled gravelly voice as the song nears its end. The abysm. (8.5/10)

A-/five stars; a minor masterpiece of ambient Post Rock progressive rock music.

 Battlestations by BATTLESTATIONS album cover Studio Album, 2011
3.75 | 27 ratings

BUY
Battlestations
Battlestations Post Rock/Math rock

Review by siLLy puPPy
Collaborator PSIKE, JR/F/Canterbury & Eclectic Teams

4 stars The Brussels, Belgium based post-rock act BATTLESTATIONS is one of those shy bands that chooses to remain mysterious and work behind closed doors to bring the artistic visions to the world. Little is known about the band except that they formed in 2009 and that they are from Brussels. While i've seen the name Reivilo Enoignor floating around as keyboardist and this very well could be a solo project, i've yet never seen any other names attached to actually play in this band and all the better since BATTLESTATIONS' mysterious demeanor has created a dark brooding and constantly shapeshifting form of post-rock that takes more than clue from the enigmatic sounds of Godspeed! You Black Emperor and teases them out into new atmospheric objectivity.

The band has released so far four full-length albums but it all began with this 2011 eponymously titled debut album that contains three tracks with a running time of nearly 46 minutes. This one so far has only available as a digital download. The three tracks are beautifully complex which sprawl out into epic journeys with two tracks exceeding the 18 minute run and one just shy of 8. The tracks all have proper titles but are broken down into sub-titles which delineate the shapeshifting effects into completely new musical motifs. In fact, these tracks are more like stitched together assemblages of sounds rather than actual songs and included various instrumental sections punctuated by field samplings and spoken word vocals.

This BATTLESTATIONS debut exhibits an icy cold ethereal post-rock style that mixes classical piano runs with dirty guitar distortion that provides an ever changing instrumental narrative that symbolizes the struggle between dystopia and hope. Cheerful piano melodies give way to apocalyptic bleakness created by a slow to mid-tempo beat with layers of guitar and what sounds like a string section only muddied into an extension of the sonic brume that persists while weaving a startling tapestry of the placidity with the dramatic and the textural sublime with the climatic. The album succeeds in the mission of the post-rock paradigm by taking the listener on a sonic journey that is utterly alien and exclusively focused on the emotional reactions rather than technicality.

I would say that BATTLESTATIONS closest musical relative is without a doubt Godspeed! The tempestuous tones and timbres resonate to rouse the living and portend a future that is ruled by the dead but finds resolution in the ultimate cosmic dance between the polarization. The difference between this band and others is that it takes a more liberal approach to creating a patchwork effect of musical motifs rather than the simple subtleties of ratcheting up the tension of a repetitive cyclical loop that accrues ever more variations and effects. While the dramatic atmospheric gloominess clearly emulates the great Godspeed!, the approach is quite different and for that BATTLESTATIONS succeeds in creating a dynamic display of post-rock prowess. Each work that this band crafts is different from the previous so this is defiantly a recommended band to explore beyond a mere release.

Track listing and breakdowns:

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Segment 1: No Survivors (18:57)

Segment 1 No Survivors - Life In The 21st Century - ADX Florence 23/24 Lullaby - This Empty Crowd - Caterpillar Strategy - The Useless Space - Dead End - After You Were Here - Fragile Failure - Dead End Reprise - The Autumnal Context

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Segment 2: The Taste Of The Kill (7:56)

Segment 2 The Tast Of The Kill - Harmful Layers - Memories Of Silent Response

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Segment 3: Accidents Of Ideals (18:36)

Segment 3 Accidents Of Ideals / Marked Passenger - Gone Passenger - Uninvited Memorial - The Needle In Your Eye - Death In The 21st Century

 Vixit by BATTLESTATIONS album cover Studio Album, 2017
4.09 | 50 ratings

BUY
Vixit
Battlestations Post Rock/Math rock

Review by Cylli Kat (0fficial)

5 stars Obviously, Battlestations is not necessarily going to be palatable to everyone's tastes. (What is?!?!?)

Post Rock/Math Rock is not normally a genre that I'm super incredibly familiar with and is a bit "outside of the wheelhouse" in regards to my own playing and writing.

But from my first exposure to Return/Mr. Abject, I've been in absolute awe of this project. The phenomenal level of craftsmanship evidenced on all their releases is certainly impressive. To me, there are some certain touchpoints to some of the more ambient portions of David Sylvian's music, but Battlestations most certainly have their own thing going on here...

As an aside, there are moments that I'm thoroughly convinced that this is some mystery project from Kevin Moore and Jim Matheos, and then I'm equally, absolutely convinced that it's not... (TNK: Tomorrow Never Knows) [If this turns out to be Steven Wilson, won't I be embarrassed?!?!?]

VIXIT:

This is indescribably beautiful, almost unearthly music. Layer upon layer of ideas executed flawlessly, engineered and produced magnificently. The playing and writing, the music theory formulas of the melodic/harmonic sections and the chord structures, specifically with regard to their movement(s) both complementary and contrapuntal are exceptional.

And that CHOIR!!! Whether these are synthetic or real voices (or some combination thereof), the choral portions of this release are so well written, constructed and performed, so movingly beautiful, and startlingly original. I've never heard anything quite like it. (And as with fellow PA reviewer Mellotron Storm, I also hear "Holy, Holy, Holy" repeated throughout the choral sections).

With Battlestations, (to my ears) there always seems to be an undercurrent of menace running throughout their compositions, sometimes overt, other times so incredibly subtle. And this remains true on Vixit. However, to me this is a positive thing as it keeps me engaged with what I'm hearing.

For some, this would be nothing more than background music, and it's okay if you hear it like that. But I've found whether through speakers or headphones, Battlestations will keep you very interested if you give the music the chance to unfold at its own pace, and allow yourself to become a part of it by your listening (somewhat akin to a variation of the Observer Effect: In physics, the observer effect is the theory that simply observing a situation or phenomenon necessarily changes that phenomenon).

I really am impressed with and genuinely love this. So wonderfully interesting and unique.

For its sheer originality and ingenuity in its writing, performance, engineering & production, Vixit is a 5 star release.

As always, your actual mileage may vary.

Grace and peace, Cylli (Jim)

 Vixit by BATTLESTATIONS album cover Studio Album, 2017
4.09 | 50 ratings

BUY
Vixit
Battlestations Post Rock/Math rock

Review by Mellotron Storm
Prog Reviewer

3 stars BATTLESTATIONS are a mysterious band out of Belgium who purposely keep a lot of information to themselves about the music. I'm pretty sure they are fans of Horror movies judging from the album covers of "In A Cold Embrace" and "The Extent Of Damage" and this is especially true of that video link that some got with "The Extent Of Damage". I am so not into disturbing images or videos. Anyway the music on both of those albums didn't come across as being as creepy or evil as the album covers and video would suggest.

So they really threw me a curve with this their latest album 'Vixit". The music sounds like something you'd hear in a centuries old church in Europe somewhere. We get mostly synths and orchestration(usually in the form of strings) plus real choirs. There's also some piano, percussion and maybe electronics at one point and maybe some guitar. The Latin word "Vixit" means "lived" and the Romans often used this when referring to someone who died not wanting to focus on the loss but on the fact the person did live. Of course the album cover shows a person who is clearly dead floating upwards to the sky and the music here would seem to be the soundtrack to this event. Yes this record comes across heavily as being a soundtrack album in my opinion.

The album is divided into three passages or songs ranging from the 24 minute opener to the 3 1/2 middle section to the 14 minute closer. The music sounds samey so it could easily have been one seamless piece but the divisions are there for a reason. There's so much atmosphere usually in the form of synths or strings and the choirs I swear at some points cry "Holy" over and over. This is pretty cool but maybe for me it's just me and my beliefs that when I die it will be all about light and love with no darkness to be found.

I have played this many times and it's just not appealing to me at all even though I think it should. Two reviewers on here who I respect gave it 5 stars but I can't even give it 4 stars as I really have no desire to spin this again. I was glad of course to hear this and this new direction they have taken. Clearly I'm in the minority looking around the internet at some other reviews. Check it out!

 Vixit by BATTLESTATIONS album cover Studio Album, 2017
4.09 | 50 ratings

BUY
Vixit
Battlestations Post Rock/Math rock

Review by BrufordFreak
Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

5 stars These guys have come so far! From the almost-cheezy computer sounds and mis-timed instrumental performances of their flawed (but brilliant) debut, In a Cold Embrance, in 2012, the band has developed a stronghold in cinematic music-making far beyond anyone that I know of who is not doing film or television scores. Seriously, this may be the best "score"-that's-not-a-score or liturgical-piece-that's-not-meant-for-church (or maybe it is meant for church--a requiem or elegy) that I've ever heard. Period. James Newton Howard, Howard Shore, Hans Zimmer, Ennio Morricone, John Williams, James Horner, Rachel Portman, Danny Elfman, Alexandre Desplat have got nothing on these guys. Don't know if you still want to consider this prog since there are no drums or seering electric guitars, but it is definitely musical perfection, musical

1. "Vixit I" (24:02) As majestic and beautiful as the most beautiful Beethoven, Górecki, or Samuel Barber work. Broad washes of slowly moving strings with big choral sounds make this truly a spiritually moving experience. (10/10)

2. "Vixit II (3:21) piano, sparse, distant synth sounds, occasional noise from some kind of unidentified stringed instrument (the same one used in the first song of their debut album, "Prologue: Nature Morte / You're Not Welcome Here"), floating, panning synth washes. This must be Heaven. (9.5/10)

3. "Vixit III" (14:05) opens with the most electronica sounding passages on the album: panning synth, poppy voice choir, Mellotron and other synth washes, Very New Age-like--though the synths in the sixth and seventh minute sound like I'm YES heaven (the end section of "Awaken"). Love the return to old themes at 7:20! And then church choir rejoins with a FOCUS (Tommy Barlage) "Tommy" melody until the eleventh minute when it shifts dominant notes with the strings, bass, and tuned percussives giving it a little The Gathering If_then_else feel and sound to it. The final vocal section has an individual-sounding female alto voice carrying the lead--though this is still heavily mixed within the thick syrupy walls of synthesized sounds. This one is far more nostalgic and segmented yet it flows as well as any symphonic piece. (9.5/10)

Five stars; a shining masterpiece of progressive electronic music.

 The Extent of Damage by BATTLESTATIONS album cover Studio Album, 2015
4.04 | 89 ratings

BUY
The Extent of Damage
Battlestations Post Rock/Math rock

Review by Windhawk
Special Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

4 stars Belgium band BATTLESTATIONS first appeared as recording artists back in 2011, and the project was apparently instigated two years prior to that. They are also one of those bands that prefer the names of the people involved to be unknown, presumably due to a philosophy about the music being main point and the creators of it not all that important. "The Extent of Damage" is their third studio production, and was released in 2015.

While I regard this album by Battlestations to be a well made and rather strong production in it's own right, my main impression is also that this is an album with something of a niche audience. This is music that demands patience and immersion for it's qualities to be revealed, as well as a taste for music exploring what one might describe as your inner darkness. For those who find such a description alluring in general, or otherwise know that post-rock of this kind tends to appeal, this is a CD that should be found to be a rewarding experience.

 Vixit by BATTLESTATIONS album cover Studio Album, 2017
4.09 | 50 ratings

BUY
Vixit
Battlestations Post Rock/Math rock

Review by memowakeman
Special Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

5 stars A needed overdose of tranquility and introspection!

Battlestations is a Belgian act that has given me so many precious moments since 2011, when I was lucky enough to be introduced by themselves to their wonderful music. Since then, I've been a huge fan of their style, a style that might be labeled as post/atmospheric/melancholic/experimental-rock, but that has a sound that at least to me, is near to unique.

In this 2017 they have just released a new and beautiful record entitled "Vixit", a 3-song album that has touched me every single time I listened to it. It is impressive how Battlestations manage to create profound music, atmospheres that hit you in your most hidden emotions and that will make you see things in a different way. Sorry If it seems that I am exaggerating a little bit, but Vixit has been with me in these past two months when I needed music the most. The experience while I listen to it is beyond words, very special and moving, so it is like a therapy when I want to see a new dawn in my daily basis.

The first part is the longest of them all. Entitled simply "I", this 24-minute piece seems to have only black and white colors, but while the time pass you will realize it is a colorful theme that creates countless images, it depends on the listener, but man, I sort of have times of introspection while listen to it, and better, I foresee a bright future in my life. When music hits you like this, it means it has succeeded. I love the use of the multi-layered synths and of course, the wonderful addition of the choirs, so in moments it seems to be taking us to a blend of Mediaeval with current technological times. It is impressive that every time I listen to it, the 24 minutes pass naturally and fast, it doesn't happen that often, I mean, with some other music the 15, even 10 minute-tracks can be tedious or difficult to enjoy, but this one flows and produces on me a high feeling of satisfaction. Beautiful and disarming!

"II" is the short song, a 3-minute piece based on piano that produces a melancholic sound in a classical way, surrounded by those atmospheric backgrounds made by synths. It leads to "III", the final track that is another long one, a 14-minute piece that is like the reborn of new hopes, is like witnessing a new life, a brand new day. Ambient music combined with some beautiful orchestrations and electronic sounds that might even remind us of some older musicians/bands such as Brian Eno or Popol Vuh. Be careful because this track might also give you lots of emotions, you will feel at peace but maybe, you will cry before reaching peace. Its depth can be better appreciated with decent headphones but most of all, with an open mind and the will to receive a solid musical concept, a extremely beautiful whole.

Thank you for this music, it has come to my life in the perfect moment. Enjoy it!

 The Extent of Damage by BATTLESTATIONS album cover Studio Album, 2015
4.04 | 89 ratings

BUY
The Extent of Damage
Battlestations Post Rock/Math rock

Review by Warthur
Prog Reviewer

4 stars Battlestations continue their sad, melancholy, and hauntingly beautiful style of post-rock on this latest album of theirs. Generously made available on a pay-what-you-want basis via their bandcamp, it is structurally extremely similar to their previous albums, with a marked tendency towards longer compositions with one briefer piece rounding things out, but if (like many post-rock bands) Battlestations could be accused of following a formula, at least they seem to have put together a reasonably compelling formula, and the coldly pessimistic atmosphere they evoke beats out even the legendarily mopey Godspeed You Black Emperor! for sheer hopelessness. Those averse to post-rock in general probably won't be won over by it, but those who like a little Silver Mt. Zion in their step would be well-advised to look into this one.
Thanks to harmonium.ro for the artist addition. and to Quinino for the last updates

Copyright Prog Archives, All rights reserved. | Legal Notice | Privacy Policy | Advertise | RSS + syndications

Other sites in the MAC network: JazzMusicArchives.com — jazz music reviews and archives | MetalMusicArchives.com — metal music reviews and archives

Donate monthly and keep PA fast-loading and ad-free forever.