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CORVUS STONE

Crossover Prog • Multi-National


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Corvus Stone biography
Multinational project CORVUS STONE more or less came to be in the spring of 2012 following a series of chance encounters between musicians on social networks, Facebook first and foremost. With a helping hand by dedicated music fan and musician friend Sonia Mota, a common denominator in the virtual friends lists of all the musicians and others involved in the project along the way.

The initial core of this project was Colin Tench, Petri Lemmy Lindström and Pasi Koivu however, with Colin Tench lending some guitar work to one of Pasi Koivu's compositions the first action that lead to a series of reactions that saw Lindström getting involved and the trio in a matter of a few weeks suddenly finalizing a handful of compositions for the sheer fun of it. It was about that time that they collectively realized that they all had a new band project going. Koivu is the main composer of the threesome. Lindström will make the occasional foray into these territories too, while Tench caters for production and arrangements.

As the project evolved a few more people got involved. Another chance encounter saw Blake Carpenter joining the ranks as vocalist and occasional lyricist. As he joined pretty late in the process his input was limited this time around. Another late addition to the band was drummer Robert Wolff, and while he managed to add a few details to the Corvus Stone debut album the majority of his contributions as a band member will be heard on future occasions.

Corvus Stone self-titled debut album was digitally released in the fall of 2012, with a CD edition following shortly after.

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CORVUS STONE discography


Ordered by release date | Showing ratings (top albums) | Help Progarchives.com to complete the discography and add albums

CORVUS STONE top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.84 | 150 ratings
Corvus Stone
2012
4.13 | 180 ratings
Corvus Stone II
2014

CORVUS STONE Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

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CORVUS STONE Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 Corvus Stone II by CORVUS STONE album cover Studio Album, 2014
4.13 | 180 ratings

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Corvus Stone II
Corvus Stone Crossover Prog

Review by FragileKings
Prog Reviewer

4 stars For a while there wasn't a day when I didn't see two or three reviews of this album on the PA home page. Deep in my own exploration of progressive rock, I felt almost annoyed by new releases that begged to be heard. IQ's "Road of Bones", Opeth's "Pale Communion", two of which I managed to acquire, and Iamthemorning's sophomore release and the latest and last Pink Floyd, neither of which I have gotten a hold of yet but will get there. With my CD budget blown again for another year, Corvus Stone would have to wait. Except that some kind soul (you know who you are) felt that this album would be right up my preferential alley and offered to send me a copy if I thought I might like it. Good gravy! Talk about the gift of music. This was indeed an album I could enjoy.

I swore I would avoid a track by track run down, but this album is rather rich in really good progressive ROCK with lots of special flavours and assorted delicacies carefully placed on the table so that one may eat to his filling of tasty musical morsels not too hot and not too peculiar. If you are a fan of Deep Purple, seventies Rainbow, The Flower Kings, and other bands, perhaps Camel, with some great emphasis on guitar and keyboard playing supported by an active bass and drummer with good breeding, then this album should appeal. These guys are out to enjoy making music first and foremost. This is their band and it's for them. If you want to ride along, jump aboard!

"The Simple Life" is a surprising opening song that leaps straight into the music. I can hardly place where I've heard something like that before when the vocals come in and I am reminded of Peter Banks era Yes. Keyboards and guitar grab my attention but listen to that bass rumble.

Now a waltz with "Early Morning Call". Organ and some guitar moments that utter the name Blackmore. And do I detect a touch of old Camel in there? Or is it the Flower Kings? Perhaps something else. The moment has passed. A very pleasing piece of work, this instrumental.

And now for a great rock guitar instrumental that plays through a couple of different moods before a haunting desert theme emerges. But wait! This is not an instrumental. "Boots for Hire" features vocalist Stef Flaming. I picture a black-clad, rugged, middle-aged frontiersman with a black Stetson. But hey, Ian Gillan could have sung this as well. Not the young Gillan. The present day Gillan. The instrumental section transforms into a heavy prog number with a quick tempo and organ, almost like some classic proto-metal bit from the early seventies before the music glides smoothly back into the eerie desert music. "Sun is gone and all is brown" might recall Zeppelin's "Kashmir". This epic track takes a long slow journey through a desert twilight atmosphere before closing with some spooky keyboard sounds.

"Sneaky Entrance in to Lisa" is a short instrumental with a Spanish guitar feel and piano. It's pretty and it's over pretty quick. We'll have to wait to later to hear more of where that was going.

A revving engine, the screech of tires, and a Deep Purple salute. "Purple Stone" gets the Purple references on the table. "Yes, we like Deep Purple." And in case you are still in doubt, check out the artwork on the back of the CD booklet. It's four purple crow heads carved out of Mount Rushmore! Corvus Stone. Purple Stone. There you go. Two singers here, and my guess it's Blake Carpenter whose voice is the one I don't care too much for. The music rocks and rolls and there's organ and wah-wah guitar. A very cool and busy bass-line comes in twice. The lyric "Will I make it round the bend" has such potential for referencing insanity but instead concludes with, "or will I die?" Wait. Is this referencing "Trashed" by Black Sabbath? And then the Deep Purple tribute line, quoting a favourite classic also about a car. I have to admit that this is the first track that doesn't warm up to me like the rest of the album has. But it's shorter than my review of it.

Now another instrumental with "A stoned Crow meets the Rusty Wolff Ral" and a beautiful intro with acoustic guitar and gentle waves of synthesizer chords. It moves into a mid-tempo rock number that brings about some surprising time signature changes and some delightful snippets of weirdness. There's a flute-like synthesizer, heavy guitar, and organ. This piece will keep you guessing which way its going to turn for the first couple of minutes before the pattern establishes itself. A showcase mostly for guitar and keyboard but don't ignore the rhythm section.

"Lisa has a cigar" has me at a loss to describe the music. Something European. It's very nice and then it's over. And then there's "Mr. Cha Cha" which has a 1974 rock rhythm feel and has me thinking this could be Deep Purple meets Nektar. This could also be a salute to Rainbow Ritchie Blackmore, late seventies? Nice organ. And a change of pace with a strong mid to late seventies rhythm and synthesizer. That bass doesn't want to stay in the background. I'm suddenly reminded of "Son of Alerik", the bonus track on the "Perfect Strangers" reissue.

Tinkling piano, bass, guitar wails, and string synthesizer. Vocals come in. Strangely, this music brings to mind the band Iona for some reason. Interesting and a surprising sudden close. Such is "Dark Tower".

The much lauded "Scandinavians in Mexico" is not the Sonoran party track I had come to expect. The Mexican groove is modest and more like what a Mexican rock band might have striven for. Instead, just enjoy the lively rhythm and the synthesizer and guitar lead work. A great fun piece of music nonetheless.

Oh, look! A bass intro with a bit of mystery, accompanied by acoustic guitar and synthesizer. "Mystery Man" begins and the keyboards and guitar take turns trading quick exchanges. I find the lyrics a little obvious but the vocals are strong. The music takes us through various changes with slow acoustic parts and some harder heavier sections.

I wondered if this next song "Camelus Bactrianus (Tuolla tuonnempana)" would bear any resemblance to the music of the band Camel but it doesn't match what I know. It's sung in Finnish and the exotic language sits well with me because it suits the slow and sombre music at the start. Are we witnessing a march to a funeral? Then there's a change a we get a cool switch to an upbeat rock groove. I love how the song winds down, too.

"Uncle Schunkle" might just get my vote for coolest instrumental in the album. While we get lots of Colin Tench's master rock guitar, the rhythm in this track moves very coolly. The bass is really in there! And there are these abrupt changes in the groove of the rhythm that almost don't get noticed until after the change has occurred. Yes, this is a great piece but it ends too soon. Or is that a timely end after all?

A slow acoustic piece that sounds very early seventies in approach. Not quite Yes this time for "Eternal Universe" but with some good vocal parts. There's that sweet flute keyboard sound. At the close it sounds like the song will change gears and really get moving. Perhaps an Andean flute and guitar bit? But no. It just ends. Perhaps there was an opportunity missed here?

"Moaning Lisa" is actually a ballad in the original sense of the word about a woman whose father drowned at sea. As a result of her heartbreak she becomes a target for lustful men and eventually she joins her father, leaving her ghost to haunt the sea winds. The song features a blend of acoustic and electric with a hint of Spanish flavour, though there is more to this than my musical background can describe. The vocals have an accent which adds to the foreign feel. Surely though, even with all its non-traditional elements, this song can't help but dropping into a heavy rock passage that reminds me a bit of the band Armageddon, who cut one album in '75. This is a well-developed epic piece that keeps taking the listener into new territory. Catch the flowers-in-the-hair hippy folky passage before it returns to a Spanish ballad and then moves into an almost dance-able folk rock conclusion. Great music!

The final song is another Finnish one and a pleasant folky acoustic number, a suitable conclusion for an album that has given us plenty of rock and Spanish-flavoured acoustic music as well.

This album has proven to be a pleasant journey worth repeating anytime. No, I was not dancing in the aisles from the start. This is not an album for pulling off a few great tracks and whistling them in the shower and then getting back to the rest later. Like a hot spring spa, this is an album to sit back and soak up in order to appreciate. The person who sent me this was right in guessing this was my groove. It is an album I enjoy listening to from start to finish, and though there are a couple (only a couple) of tracks that I feel are just alright, I don't feel like skipping them.

Someone said the album was eclectic but I don't think so. Corvus Stone is a rock band with a strong seventies feel in the most positive way, and that can be heard in almost every track. The colour comes from the Spanish or other sounds and styles they merge so nicely with their music, meaning it's more than just a 70's tribute band. This is really good upper level rock with a flair for blending in folk and ethnic music.

I'm not giving this five stars for the simple reason that I am really now looking forward to their third album, hopefully to come in two year's time. I have yet to hear the debut, but based on the reviews and what I have heard here I strongly believe that Corvus a Stone will be one of those bands that really hit their mark on the third album. Many great bands produce their most historic work on either their third album or their third with key new members (Deep Purple, Yes, and Genesis for example). Corvus Stone are on the right path to producing one of the most phenomenal albums of the decade. If this was close to that then I have especially high expectations for Corvus Stone III!

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 Corvus Stone II by CORVUS STONE album cover Studio Album, 2014
4.13 | 180 ratings

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Corvus Stone II
Corvus Stone Crossover Prog

Review by zravkapt
Special Collaborator Post/Math Rock Team

4 stars The second album from this multi-national/studio only band is more consistent than the debut. However, the highs here are not as high as on the previous album. At the same time the lows here are not as low either. A lot of this album sure sounds like the work of the crew who came up with the last album, but there are also some new ideas here which are welcome. Like the debut this is made up of a lot of instrumental material. There seems to be a bit more vocals this time due to all the guest vocalists (the most well-known of the bunch probably being Big Big Train's Sean Filkins).

"The Simple Life" is a great opener. A short symphonic poppy tune. "Early Morning Call" is an easy-going bluesy symphonic rock instrumental. "Boots For Hire" is a very bluesy, almost Floydian track. Gets 'darker' and heavier sounding after the vocals arrive. After an almost jam like section gets more spacey sounding. "Purple Stone" is an obvious homage to Deep Purple. Includes a lyric from "Highway Star" (the same way a song from the debut briefly flirted with the riff to "Smoke On The Water"). "A Stoned Crow Meets the Rusty Wolff Rat" opens with some Spanish/classical acoustic guitar playing with symphonic keyboard backing. Then it goes into bluesy symph prog territory.

"Mr. Cha Cha" has a great rhythm section backed by soaring and emotional guitar playing. Nice symphonic keyboard work as well. Some good unison playing in spots. One of the highlights for sure. Another highlight is "Scandinavians In Mexico" (which has a cute animated video for it). Somewhat Santana-esque (especially the guitar soloing), the repeated harmony vocals (in Spanish I'm assuming) are catchy. Nice playful synth work. Interesting drumming/percussion at times as well. "Camelus Bactrianus (Tuolla tuonnempana)" is sung in Finnish. When I first heard the beginning of this song I was reminded of Boards Of Canada; it sounded so electronic and ambient compared to what I was expecting.

The track starts off mellow and moody with some drum rolls and tympani(?). Gets more rocking and upbeat later. Mellows out and gets more bluesy later still. "Eternal Universe" is a nice and pleasant ballad type song. Seems like single material and an album highlight to some, but to me it does very little. "Moaning Lisa" is the 14 minute epic which I didn't think much of when I first heard it but it grew on me. Starts out very classical sounding then gets more folky sounding. Generally, the whole thing comes off as 'prog folk'. Halfway through we get some interesting drumming and harmonica. Some Spanish at the end.

"Campfire (Tulen Luona)" is another song sung in Finnish. Mostly acoustic and folky sounding; no drums or percussion here. Nice way to end the album. Like the debut, the music here is diverse. Perhaps too diverse at times. If you enjoyed the first Corvus Stone you most likely will like this as well (maybe even more so). My final verdict will be a 3.5 but I'll round it up to 4 stars.

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 Corvus Stone II by CORVUS STONE album cover Studio Album, 2014
4.13 | 180 ratings

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Corvus Stone II
Corvus Stone Crossover Prog

Review by lazland
Prog Reviewer

4 stars Corvus Stone II. What is one to make of this lot, eh? If the Prog Archives reviews are to be believed, they have come up with a true masterpiece, one of the finest Prog albums ever to be set to record. Actually, some of the rather more obvious fan and family tributes made me swear not to have any part of the whole business, until guitarist Colin Tench (someone who I admire a great deal, and would love to meet and have a drink with) contacted me, and kindly posted a cd for me to review.

So, a masterpiece? No, but it is a mighty fine piece of work, which deserves to sit up there with the Premier League of modern Progressive Rock artists, and that is no small praise at all.

The album is such a massive contrast of styles that it is really difficult to pin it all down, and that, of course, is clearly the point. It is eclectic wrought fine. We begin with lovely late 60's type psych/pop on openers The Simple Life and the sunny Early Morning Call, two of the brightest and most cheerful album openers in many a year.

What to make of Boots For Hire? Some delicious guitar work, especially, with lyrics from a dystopian screenplay chucked in for good measure. Here, the music moves in a huge contrast from the opening sunshine. Far darker, and heavier, in tone and scope. It's good (very good, actually, especially for fans of classic rock), but the Iistener is somewhat unprepared for such a contrast.

So, now, your reviewer is at a similar stage to when he was preparing to write his review about the debut album. Do you (politely) mention, and imply criticism of, the lack of "consistency", or style, or do you just go with the flow, and merely accept what this band are, and are about, and sit back, listen, and enjoy, soaking it all in. I am glad to say I have opted for the latter course this time around.

Because, when this lot are good, they are very good. Take the closing two tracks, which are the stunning Moaning Lisa (featuring a true star on vocals in Sean Filkins, and a marvellous South American, German Vergara, who should be), the longest track here, and a true prog fan's delight, and the much needed come down track, Campfire. They are two of the finest pieces of music I have heard all year and are, in truth, worth the admission price alone. Pure excellence in modern prog. For good measure, we also have a huge nod to classic Prog, flutes an' all, in Eternal Universe.

Blake Carpenter, one of my favourite modern era artists, features strongly on vocals (maintaining a positive link with the Corvus Stone regulars, and strong enough to make me look forward more to the planned Minstrel's Ghost album), although I could well have done without the silly Purple Stone, a Deep Purple "tribute", even including original lyrics, which is just, to my mind, "different" for the sake of being different. It certainly adds nothing to some of the beauty which surrounds it. Contrast this with the far too short Dark Tower, which is thoughtful, intelligent, and could have been an album story in itself. I just love Blake's contribution on this, and his final effort, the lovely prog ballad, Mystery Man.

We have some almost stoner meanderings in the heavily classic rock influenced A Stoned Crow Meets The Rusty Wolff Rat (no contest, chaps, song title of the decade is yours), Lisa Has a Cigar, and Mr Cha Cha (just love those Jon Lord Hammond keys on the latter). The meanderings do, though, grate somewhat on the disappointing chants of Scandinavians In Mexico.

And, as if all of the above were not enough for you all to be getting on with, we have a fantastic Finnish contribution on vocals from Timo Rautianen, in his native language. I don't understand a word of Camelus Bactrianus, but I sure do appreciate the darkness contained within. Did I say darkness? It could, I feel, be easily compared with the inside of a duck's anus, but, by God, it is damned good stuff with its rhythmic drums, swirling keys, and brooding atmosphere.

So, pop psych, to classic rock, to stoner meanderings, to classic Prog rock. Confused? Well, you will be, but don't worry about it. This is a band for whom it is impossible to categorise, and I finally get it. They don't want to be categorised. They just want to play, go where the music takes them, and invite you, the listener, to share a fun, if strange, journey. Join them. You will, I promise, enjoy.

Lastly, here, a mention for the lovely Sonia Mota's (Kati of this parish's forum) staggering artwork, which is standout incredible. Hugs, indeed!

Four stars. An excellent album which comes highly recommended.

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 Corvus Stone II by CORVUS STONE album cover Studio Album, 2014
4.13 | 180 ratings

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Corvus Stone II
Corvus Stone Crossover Prog

Review by Evolver
Special Collaborator Crossover & JazzRock/Fusion Teams

5 stars I don't know about the rest of you prog fans out there, but I have learned to look forward to every new album that features Colin Tench (and there are quite a few of them each year). His guitar never ceases to delight me. It's not that he dazzles with speed and technicality, although he does seem to be a master at many styles, it's that he always seems to know the right notes to play to make me want to listen more. And with Corvus Stone, he has found a band of equals in that respect.

Corvus Stone has managed to improve upon their wonderful debut album by just playing what they like. And what they like is sometimes psychedelic, or smoky art-blues, or Santana-ish jams, fusion, or even a prog-folk epic. There is not a bad track to be found here.

Each track intrigues as full-band arrangements, but also remains interesting when, as I often do, one listens to each instrument individually. I particularly enjoy Tench's David-Torn-like string pops and bends, and his and keyboardist Pasi Koivu's work on the track "Mystery Man". Petri Lemmy Lindström and Robert Wolff's intentionally stumbling rhythm on "Uncle Schunkle" gives me eargasms, and the aforementioned prog-folk epic, "Moaning Lisa" should not be missed.

I honestly cannot put into words just how much this album has lifted my spirits (at a time when I really needed it. Many thanks to the band and all the guest artists for this one.

And on a side note, Sonia Mota's ("Kati" here at Progarchives.com) cover is a sexy masterpiece, a perfect adornment for this album.

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 Corvus Stone II by CORVUS STONE album cover Studio Album, 2014
4.13 | 180 ratings

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Corvus Stone II
Corvus Stone Crossover Prog

Review by Guillermo
Prog Reviewer

4 stars I was asked recently to listen to this album and to write a review about it.

It is hard for me to try to place this band in only one musical style category, because this album shows them playing several musical styles: some Hard Rock with some influences from DEEP PURPLE; some Jazz-Rock music influences; some Latin Rock music influences; some Symphonic Prog music influences, particularly from YES; some World Music influences (Arabian, Flamenco, English and Spanish Folk music). All played with energy almost all the time and with good arrangements. The band is a multi-national quartet which consists of Colin Tench (guitars ), Petri Lemmy Lindström (bass), Pasi Koivu (keyboards) and Robert Wolff (drums & percussion), assisted by several lead singers and one percussionist. They also have the contributions from Sonia Mota for the album artwork and for the making of some videos for their songs. All the musical influences make an interesting musical mixture for my taste. Unfortunately, I could not understand the lyrics of the songs because, not being a native English language speaker, I could not listen to them very clearly in the album, and also I realized that some of the lyrics were not sung in the English language, and being a digital download, unfortunately I could not find the lyrics in the web. There is the name "Lisa" listed in three of the titles of the songs, but I could not understand who the "Lisa" character is and if there is a lyrical and musical concept connection between the songs of the album and even with the cover artwork. Anyway, all the musicians who are members of this band and the other contributors to this album are very good. The recording and mixing are very good too, and I also like the cover artwork. The most accessible songs for my taste are "Scandinavians in Mexico" (a Latin Music song which sounds to me a bit influenced by SANTANA and by the song "Mozambique" from TRAFFIC`s "Far From Home " album) which also has a funny video made by Sonia Mota that is available in youtube; "Eternal Universe" (with good musical atmospheres), and "Moaning Lisa".

This is an interesting album from CORVUS STONE, very well played and produced. Maybe a bit long in length (with a duration of almost 80 minutes, the equivalent to the duration of a double LP album), but very good anyway.

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 Corvus Stone II by CORVUS STONE album cover Studio Album, 2014
4.13 | 180 ratings

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Corvus Stone II
Corvus Stone Crossover Prog

Review by Deathangel

2 stars After reading all the glowing reviews on this release I was intrigued so I took a look at their website to find out more - turns out you can listen to the whole album there, which was a nice surprise.

Let me come right out with this from the get go: I don't get it. I'm just not understanding all the 5 star hyperbole for this album. Sounds to me like Corvus Stone are trying very hard to sound like Zappa, but just don't have the grooves, the licks or the style. The standard of musicianship is, I would say, a bit above average. Normally I wouldn't comment on that. Normally it should be the tunes that do the talking rather than the virtuosity of the players, but the emphasis here is very much on the playing, with the 'tune' taking second place. For this kind of music to work you really have to shine, and on the basis of this recording, well, they just don't.

One thing you could always say about Zappa albums was that they sounded great, but this production is, again, adequate for the most part, but in some places it leaves a lot to be desired IMHO. Most of it was sort of OK, but here and there I was cringing at the sloppy timing and overall lack of finesse.

This may sound a bit harsh, I've definitely heard worse, but it just comes across as slightly knowing, self congratulatory showing off which after a while I found intensely annoying. Yes, I get that its supposed to be humorous, but it's falling way short of the mark for me.

OK, after that I should think the last thing Corvus Stone would want is my advice on the way forward, but whatever. If I was to be asked, it would be: ditch the attempt at humour and concentrate on the tunes, and tighten up on the playing if you really want to be taken seriously in the same arena as the might Frank. And finally, what's with that awful cover artwork? I like the female form as much as the next guy, but in 2014 do we really need that to sell music?

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 Corvus Stone II by CORVUS STONE album cover Studio Album, 2014
4.13 | 180 ratings

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Corvus Stone II
Corvus Stone Crossover Prog

Review by Ier

5 stars I was already blown away by the first album. When I heard Corvus Stone I was thinking "These guys must be probably on 3 different kinds of drugs". So much energy, so much chaos, and much awesomeness!! Now, listening to their second album, I need to rephrase my thoughts, these guys are not on 3 different kinds of drugs, but on 7, at least!

The track "Early Morning Call" reminds me of the The Doors. Not only the organ, but the complete ambiance and the waltzing melodies. "Scandinavians in Mexico" makes me want to dance until my feet starts to hurt!

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 Corvus Stone II by CORVUS STONE album cover Studio Album, 2014
4.13 | 180 ratings

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Corvus Stone II
Corvus Stone Crossover Prog

Review by friso
Prog Reviewer

2 stars Corvus Stone - II (2014)

This album has made quite a name in a short time on progarchives, so I wass excited to have a chance to listen to it. The music of Corvus Stone was offered to me for free with a kind request to write a review on PA.

This is quite obviously a band with talented musicians with a great love for the progressive rock genre. Most of the material is instrumental and loaded with solo's of guitar and keyboard. The band has a down to earth sound, keeping the symphonic elements in check. There's a list of guest vocalists, but all sound dull and uninspired to my ears. On Corvus Stone's best moments the compositions remind me a bit of the better work of neoprog group Arena (a personal favorite), exciting symphonic landscapes with heavy rockguitars.

Yet there is a key difference; the composions of Corvus Stone are never more then the sum of the parts. I can't find one single moment of musical storytelling or a shot at song- or epicbuilding. Perhaps the song 'Eternal Earth' counts as the only exception. So many great musical ideas, but I can't find a vision or a concept whatsoever. Furthermore, on many moments the almost chaotich musical landscapes are made up of elements that don't always fit together that well stylisticly and melodicly. Sometimes parts of compositions sound like the product of computerised randomness. The question just keeps arising, what are these guys trying to achieve? What does it mean?

Conclusion. There isn't a single track I really liked on this album, which is confusing because there's a lot to like about this second Corvus Stone record. I guess this band could make a masterpiece in the future if they would find an extra bandmember with a musical vision and oversight. This second record is however pretty meaningless, so I'll give it two stars.

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 Corvus Stone II by CORVUS STONE album cover Studio Album, 2014
4.13 | 180 ratings

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Corvus Stone II
Corvus Stone Crossover Prog

Review by rdtprog
Special Collaborator Heavy Prog Team

4 stars To give a better idea of what is Corvus Stone's music here, i would have to do a track by track review, because the songs are very different from one to the other and covers a lot of musical style. The use of the Hammond organ and the classic rock style of songs with some psychedelic tones give a retro sound feeling to the music, but the way the band succeed to shape every song with some nice melodies and many progressive twists is very unique. The instrumentation is rich and the numerous vocals style in every songs add something new to the whole music. "Scandinavians in Mexico" show some exotic influence taken from Santana's book. "Purple Stone" show a more straightforward classic rock influence with a 5 seconds copy of song from some artist you'll recognize. There is some instrumental and interlude songs that reveals some nice atmosphere like the classical arrangement with the flute and the piano in the song "Lisa has a Cigar". And some of those funny or peculiar title songs make me think that this band has a sense of humor, or want to tell the world that you can't label their music. The longest track with Sean Filkins "Moaning Lisa" would make you think instantly to the music of Big Big Train, which is not a bad thing. I really enjoy the crescendo build in the song "Mystery Man" that start with in a light symphonic mood and switch to a heavier and darker ending. I am sure many will enjoy this album, because it covers a lot of influences from the past into something new that only this band can do.

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 Corvus Stone II by CORVUS STONE album cover Studio Album, 2014
4.13 | 180 ratings

BUY
Corvus Stone II
Corvus Stone Crossover Prog

Review by Yolanda

5 stars If you like singalong songs, don't read further. You won't find it on this album. But if you'd like to be surprised and expect the unexpected, go ahead. I will guide you through the album, not with name droppings (although there will be a few), but by telling you which feelings every song give to me. And maybe you will feel the same. Because isn't it that why we love music? If you can't feel anything when you hear a track, it isn't worth for me listening to it.

The Simple Life: Good morning to everyone: the only thing that I miss is toast and eggs. This is a song you would like to hear every morning! It brings you in such a good mood! Great opener of a stunning album.

Early Morning Call: epic! Not easy to describe which feelings it gives, because it's a blend of so many sensations. I picture myself dancing in a big dance hall surrounded by elves. I see majestic mountains and flying eagles. Heavenly beautiful, and it gets peppered by the undeniable Tench guitar sound.

Boots For Hire: this is a cover from Murky Red's track on their album 'Time Doesn't Matter', sung by the Murky Red frontman himself, Stef Flaming. He also plays guitar on it. That dark melody brings a sinister atmosphere, makes your heart beating much faster, crawls on your back, and is brilliantly performed by the Corvus Stoners. One of my favorites on this album for sure.

Sneaky Entrance Into Lisa: too short. But that's their purpose. Corvus Stone likes to tease. This band is known for their use of humour, and doing the opposite of what people expect. You get draged into this beautiful music piece and then it stops. You only have the time to think: 'Who is Lisa and where is her entrance?'

Purple Stone: fasten your seatbelts! It starts with the sound of an engine followed by screech of wheels, and then it gets launched into a fast forward track. Wolff's drumwork thunders throughout the song. Suddenly you hear 'Nobody's gonna take my car'; did I already mention that they use lots of humour?

A Stoned Crow Meets The Rusty Wolff Rat: I bow for Petri, their brilliant bassist. Many rhythm changes. Normally such track would drive me mad. This one doesn't. The Stoners play with boundaries and go far. And when you think 'no way' they change it to 'yes please'. Many small but significant details make that you want to hear it over and over again. Imagine that you would miss one detail!

Lisa Has A Cigar: correct me if I'm wrong, but I immediately make the liaison between a cigar and Lisa's entrance. Or I have a dirty mind. Also too short. The baroque influences make me think of a Lady and Lord entering the big hall of a royal palace, bending their heads towards the other guests. Skilful piano work from Pasi. More of this!

Mr Cha Cha: Tench's guitar calls you, leads you to a place where no man has gone before. Majestic solos, killing Wolff's drum hits, a track with balls, and also one of my favorites. Many many influences but such a unique sound. I take my hat off for these musicians!

Dark Tower: the intro has such a lovely piano tingle from Mr. Jingle known as Pasi. Corvus Stone love the use of strange noises, and they use it a lot in here. Melancholic sound of Tench's guitar. When you hear Blake Carpenter singing 'It's in his final hour' with such a persuasion, you truly hope that the worst ain't going to happen and that the Black Tower won't be this person's final destiny.

Scandinavians in Mexico: Yeah, I love the percussion from Victor Tassone and Sean Filkins. Come on, let's go to Mexico! Grab your sombrero and don't forget the tequila. This song gives me such a holiday - Miami Vice feeling, which has nothing to do with Mexico, but so do Scandinavians. Everything is possible, just use your imagination.

Mystery Man: The intro could be a topper as movie sound track. And then it changes. Short flashes of a man on a mule, shaking up and down in the sun. Some Latin sounds. Then a Led Zeppelin feeling. Or Deep Purple? You'll get everything on your plate.

Camelus Bactrianus: this title! I had an incredible laugh when I read this for the first time. Genius! Nutty! It still makes me laugh. I won't write the Finnish version of the title, because I would make a fool of myself. The lyrics are in Finnish too, I don't understand one word of it, but I don't care. They fit the song as a glove. This track makes me think on the dark middle ages. Vikings (although they were/are not from Finland). Again one of my favorites!

Uncle Shunkle: strange rhythm changes, but Corvus Stone are known for that. I don't have an uncle who would be compatible with this track. But if I had such one, he probably would be stoned as hell. The Stoners are again brilliant in their own, contrary way.

Eternal Universe: majestic use of voices, accompanied and alternated with awesome instrumental pieces of music.

Moaning Lisa: Here's Lisa again. Finally passed the entrance, and a landscape unfolds before my eyes. Passing green fields and grey dunes to arrive at the sea. It rains slightly. When I think on Lisa's entrance and cigar I didn't expect this outcome, this big melancholic feeling. This track reminds me on Blackmore's Night, although that baroque sound is definitely Corvus Stone.

Campfire: very suitable title. The onliest thing I understand from the lyrics in fact. But it's not just a track such as when you were 14, sitting with your friends around the campfire and singing Halli Hallo. The track reminds you on campfire, but is so much more. Simply beautiful.

To end this long review: I didn't mention all the guest singers, because there are at least 7 different voices, but kudos to all of them!

I rated this album with five stars. Why? Well, if music has so much originality, humour, skilful instrumentals and wayward approach, it deserves this rating.

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