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LIFESIGNS

Neo-Prog • United Kingdom


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Lifesigns picture
Lifesigns biography
Founded in Leighton Buzzard, UK in 2008

Veteran keyboard player John YOUNG (The Strawbs, John Wetton, Bonnie Tyler, The Scorpions, Fish, Uli Jon Roth, others) realized in 2008 that he had never done a pure prog album. The band LIFESIGNS, is the direct result of that realization.

John started writing the music for the first LIFESIGNS album in 2008 working closely with sound engineer and next door neighbor Steve RISPIN. As John was often touring with one of the many projects that he was involved in, it took the better part of two years for the writing to have progressed enough to enlist a friend. In 2010, John recruited longtime friend Nick BEGGS (Kajagoogoo, Steve Hackett, Steven Wilson, Rick Wakeman, others) to play the bass and Chapman Stick and drummer Frosty BEEDLE (Cutting Crew) to round out the trio. Over the next two years the band completed their first album, enlisting the talents of prog luminaries Steve HACKETT (Genesis) , Jakko JAKSZYK (King Crimson), Thijs VAN LEER (Focus) and Robin BOULT (John Young).

The band has a modern sound with lush, multi layered keyboards and the distinctive sound of the Chapman stick. John and Nick blend their voices beautifully and frequently throughout their first album in higher pitched harmonies reminiscent of Yes.

With the list of musicians that had been compiled for their first album, "Lifesigns" was released with great anticipation in January of 2013.

: : : Tom Wright (Roland113), US : : :

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LIFESIGNS discography


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LIFESIGNS top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.86 | 245 ratings
Lifesigns
2013
3.83 | 115 ratings
Cardington
2017
4.01 | 72 ratings
Altitude
2021

LIFESIGNS Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

LIFESIGNS Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

4.71 | 17 ratings
Live in London - Under the Bridge
2015

LIFESIGNS Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

LIFESIGNS Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

LIFESIGNS Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 Altitude by LIFESIGNS album cover Studio Album, 2021
4.01 | 72 ratings

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Altitude
Lifesigns Neo-Prog

Review by PeterB

5 stars Lifesigns first self titled album saw them in full on prog mode with Nick Beggs onboard then the follow up Cardington showed their more AOR tenancies with Jon Poole replacing Beggs along with another assortment of guitarists. Now this third studio outing has the current line up of John Young, Jon Poole, Steve Rispin, Dave Bainbridge and Zoltan Csorsz giving the best of all worlds including AOR, prog and even a little jazz fusion. Whether it is on the 15 minute plus opening title track with its Strings and beautiful harmony vocals supplied by Lyndsey Ward (Exploring Birdsong) or on the punchy Gregarious there is plenty of depth to the song writing and each member of the band plays a vital roll in the overall feel of the album. Two songs are reworked from Young's earlier career with Ivory Tower getting keeping its twists and turns both lyrically and musically and even includes a special appearance from Robin Boult who appeared on the original John Young Band version. The second rework is Last One Home which is the tour de force of the album. Anybody who isn't in tears by the end of Bainbridges guitar solo has no heart. Along with all of this you also get the backbone of the album which is Shoreline and Fortitude both of which are sure to be fan favorites especially once the band can perform them on stage. This is defiantly the most complete album Lifesigns have released to date despite the lack of big name guests as on the previous releases and I'm sure it will see them reach a new level. John Young has a great ability to leave scope within the lyrics for the listener to interpret the songs in their own way and the five members of Lifesigns are definitely at the top of their game. An early contender for album of 2021.
 Altitude by LIFESIGNS album cover Studio Album, 2021
4.01 | 72 ratings

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Altitude
Lifesigns Neo-Prog

Review by lazland
Prog Reviewer

3 stars Altitude is the third studio album by Lifesigns, the progressive project started by John Young, the keyboardist and vocalist who has worked with a plethora of stellar prog artists, notably Jon Anderson, John Wetton, Fish, and The Strawbs. On this, he is once again joined by Dave Bainbridge on guitars and Jon Poole on bass/vocals, alongside new drumming recruit, Zoltán Csörsz.

There is quite an eclectic mix of styles and composition here, but the honourable mention must go to what must be one of the finest ballads ever put to disc, Last One Home, a quite gorgeous paean to the power of nature, and man's mastery of it. This features precisely the kind of lush melodies, a beautifully understated at first, rising and peaking in intensity as it progresses, guitar solo by Bainbridge which should appeal to admirers of Latimer in particular, and atmosphere which ticks every single box for me. Sumptuous and a standout for the year, the closing passage in particular is deeply moving.

And what of the rest? The title track opens proceedings, and is also the longest at 17 minutes if one includes the reprise at the close. Young is a master of his keys, and the piano especially is rather lovely. There are some haunting backing vocals by Lynsey Ward before the track segues into its major passage. All four play as a really tight unit, and Csörsz in particular stands out for a rather excellent drumming performance. The track includes some nice violin and cello solos by guest artists, and altogether this is a sublime atmospheric piece of music, perhaps let down a little bit by some out of place forays into more jazzy territory in the second third, although this is perhaps a matter of personal taste on my part, because the thoughtful soundscape reasserts itself very strongly to close, including the triumphant return of the strings at the denouement.

Gregarious reminds me so much of Alan Parsons Project that I had to check whether it was, in fact, a cover. It isn't, and the comparison is in no way meant to be disparaging, because they are responsible for some fine music, and this is an extremely pleasant track in the main, although the keyboard noodling prior to the closing section again, I am afraid, is rather out of place with all around it. I don't object to a bit of noodling, but I do like it to fit into the work I am listening to. As elsewhere throughout, Bainbridge produces some lovely guitar riffs.

Another exalted guest, Robin Boult, plays some lovely acoustic guitar on Ivory Tower, with gentle keys as a backdrop, and yearning vocals create an intelligent piece dealing with love and betrayal. On this piece, the move from thoughtful to more charged and pacy music works better. There is some fine fret work from Poole on bass in particular.

Lifesigns are categorised as neo-prog on our site, and the start of Shoreline with its signatures and feel is perhaps the most "neo" as we understand it on the album. Perhaps it is indicative of how my musical tastes have progressed over the years when I state that I find this section unconvincing, but the overall sense of the album reasserts itself from the "Take me to the shoreline" middle section before Young first with a synth solo, and then Bainbridge with his riffs, take us back again. Those of you who think that Marillion were far better with that big Scottish bloke, and Pendragon should never have progressed beyond Kowtow, will get a lot out of this track, but it is the weakest track of the album for me, I am afraid.

The other ten minute plus track is Fortitude. Bainbridge shines again on this piece, which is a very wordy track. I do wish we could have had more than the final two or so minutes of the closing instrumental passage, a wonderful keyboard led section which soars, and is, to me, perhaps an indication that this album, as good as it is, could have been so much more.

At less than one minute, the instrumental Arkhangelsk is too short to really pass judgement on, but I get the impression that the dark mood it suggests could have been extended into something quite interesting.

In parts, this is a really fine album, but my overall impression after many listens now is that these are not sufficient to make this something really special as a whole, which is a shame. If I had rated this after the initial couple of listens, then my rating would have been higher, but, with familiarity, I have no hesitation in recommending it to readers of this review, but with the knowledge that it really could have been so much more.

 Altitude by LIFESIGNS album cover Studio Album, 2021
4.01 | 72 ratings

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Altitude
Lifesigns Neo-Prog

Review by Dclews

5 stars I've known Lifesigns since around 2015 when I stumbled upon their debut album 'Lifesigns'. Well, I'd actually owned it for about a year but only had one listen through in a busy year for me. One evening I played it again, this time more attentive and Wow! I played it again and loved the rock/jazz fusion, the Yes overtones in 'Fridge Full of Stars', and the racing finale of 'End of the World'. Next step was seeing them 'live' and meeting some wonderful fans of theirs. Through them, I've made new friends and met John Young himself who is about the most genuine and personable rock god you could ever meet! So by now you may think this is not entirely an unbiased review. You could be right. 
With another brilliant album 'Cardington' in 2017 (reviewed elsewhere), Lifesigns started to lay down their credentials and strengthen their music with the addition of Dave Bainbridge, guitar extraordinaire (and another most personable guy). Ripples along the grapevine caused their fanbase to grow and soon their gigs were becoming family reunions and community events. Their Facebook fan page (Esprit De Corps) has become a great meeting place in these difficult times. When John Young (leader and keyboard player) announced 'Altitude' as their next album, a crowdfunding campaign was launched and within days had reached its target - -such is the support, loyalty and enthusiasm of their fans. And so the great day arrived this March (2021) for its launch. After all the hype and build-up, would we be disappointed? Would it become a musical step too far? How would the new drummer adapt? Would the remote recording of this album in these difficult times prove to be technically too stretched? Answers to all four questions: - No! In fact, we were all blown out by the album. Lifesigns have truly gone up a level. Never had I known a fanbase react so positively, genuinely and emotionally. There are tracks on this album that evoke emotion and bring people to tears - me included. There are guitar solos by David Bainbridge that Mr Gilmour would be proud of. John Young's keyboarding towards the end of 'Fortitude' against a phenomenal and powerful layer of bass always brings a tear. The songwriting, the amazing bass lines by Jon Poole, the genius and complex drumming of new drummer Zoltán Csörsz (ex-Flower Kings) make this, for me at least, a classic album which I haven't yet tired of playing. As someone once said to John Young - "you were born too late". Had Lifesigns produced this in the 70s, they'd be rivalling Yes, Genesis etc etc. But now people are starting to talk about them as this year's big discovery in Prog.
 I will admit that in my 50 years of loving Prog Rock, listening and seeing hundreds of bands, there have only been 4 bands that have made a huge impact on me - Yes, Genesis, Pink Floyd, Pendragon and now a 5th band has joined that elite ?. Lifesigns. I won't go into a track by track analysis of 'Altitude' because, in my opinion, they're all amazing but it's you that need to discover them for yourselves. The songwriting, the musicality, the quality of the production - you discover something new with each listening. My personal favourites amongst all these great tracks are 'Fortitude,' and 'The Last One Home'. The 15 minute epic 'Altitude' kicks the album off and many fans are citing this as their favourite track and this doesn't surprise me. The songwriting on it, the guest musicians and singers, bring another superb layer to this Lifesigns' production. Which gives me the opportunity to introduce the 5th member of the band, Steve Rispin, master sound engineer and musician who tirelessly and doggedly put this classic album together and boy!, does it show! Even though I'm a fan myself, I like to be genuine and sincere in my recommendations. I also considered carefully the Star rating I should give but the emotion and pleasure that this album gives me made it a no-brainer. 'Altitude' is simply a Prog album you must have in your collection and all reputable radio stations should be playing tracks from it. So, if you want to discover a massive contender for Album of the Year, buy this CD or get the download from the Lifesigns website. Then go and see the band 'live' and join a wonderful family. You won't regret it.
 Cardington by LIFESIGNS album cover Studio Album, 2017
3.83 | 115 ratings

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Cardington
Lifesigns Neo-Prog

Review by Rivertree
Special Collaborator PSIKE Team & Band Submissions

4 stars In await of the announced new release 'Altitude' I rather coincidentally came back to this album. Released in 2017, but more or less ignored by me (so far). What a nice production! Not sure if they are able to top such compositions (time will tell?). Actually mastermind and keyboarder John Young has worked for non prog artists more or less. But this is his project aiming to create progressive rock music with an accessible highly melodic signature. Hereby he has Iona co-founder and guitarist Dave Bainbridge at his side, as well as Cardiac Jon Poole on the bass, finally drummer Martin 'Frosty' Beedle. He once worked with Cutting Crew amongst others, and also convinces here all over the place.

'Cardington' comes like a very solid string made of compelling song pearls, without exception. Where the particular end each turns out to be a sonic highlight. Both songs are crossing the ten minute border, are also provided with a broader complex nature and more symphonic styled as the rest, which occasionally is going to tend to Art Pop Rock. John Young pulls the strings with his keyboards, furthermore provides a superb singing voice. 50 minutes of heartwarming rock music. A current comparism would lead to the Perfect Storm debut album No Air maybe. When you are underway preferring mellow accessible prog stuff this is a definite must have.

 Altitude by LIFESIGNS album cover Studio Album, 2021
4.01 | 72 ratings

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Altitude
Lifesigns Neo-Prog

Review by MINDFIELDS

4 stars And here it is...

The brand new album "Altitude" of the amazing superproject "Lifesigns". They came in our world, to stay for good. Precious souldrops everyone needs, is given as a gift to all of us. Detailed production with sensible melodies, strong rythm and feeling, and deep , very deep sentimental journey. What we have here , is a bottle of a very rare good wine. Enjoy the full album , not one or two songs. This journey will be a big satisfaction for your ears...

Many thanks, to John Young, Dave Bainbridge, Jon Poole, and Zoltán Csörsz , for their beautiful soul vehicle. We are lucky, in difficult times we leaving, to have so good musicians. We need them, very much...

 Altitude by LIFESIGNS album cover Studio Album, 2021
4.01 | 72 ratings

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Altitude
Lifesigns Neo-Prog

Review by TenYearsAfter

4 stars Website info. "Veteran keyboard player John Young (The Strawbs, John Wetton, Bonnie Tyler, The Scorpions, Fish, Uli Jon Roth, and others) realized in 2008 that he had never done a pure prog album. The band Lifesigns is the direct result of that realization. In 2010, John recruited longtime friend Nick Beggs (Kajagoogoo, Steve Hackett, Steven Wilson, Rick Wakeman, others) to play the bass and Chapman Stick and drummer Frosty Beedle (Cutting Crew) to complete the trio. Their first album, Lifesigns was released in February 2013, featuring guests musicians Steve Hackett (Genesis), Robin Boult (Fish) and Thijs van Leer (Focus). The band started touring the following year with Jon Poole joining to replace Nick Beggs who had other commitments. The line up was completed by former Steven Wilson guitarist Niko Tsonev. Fifty shows were played over the next year with highlights being appearances at Cruise To The Edge in the USA and Night of the Prog at Lorelei in Germany as well as the Ramblin' Man and Cropredy festivals in the UK. In addition to this Live In London a DVD and double audio CD were released. In 2017 a new album entitled Cardington was released, it was funded via a pledge music campaign that met its target in just 48 hours. The album features guest appearances from Robin Boult (Fish), Dave Bainbridge (Iona) and Menno Gootjes (Focus). Niko decided to pursue his own solo career after having played on the album, and he in turn was replaced in the band by Dave Bainbridge on guitar and second keyboards. February 2020 saw the release of the single Impossible, a radio friendly edit of the track from Cardington, which brought the band to a new audience. June 2020 marked the end of Frosty's time with the band and the arrival of Zolt'n Cs'rsz, and in January 2021 Lifesigns released its new album Altitude which was crowd funded via this website."

This is my first musical encounter with Lifesigns, the new album (close to 55 minutes) is highly recommended by many of my prog friends so I was very curious to Lifesigns its music. Well, after a few listening sessions I am impressed: outstanding musicians, an excellent recording sound, melodic, harmonic and very accessible music, and well crafted compositions, I would like to pigeonhole it as 'radio friendly modern progressive rock'. Especially the tracks Gregarious (catchy beat, pleasant vocals and awesome work on keyboards and guitar), Shoreline (swinging mid-tempo with swirling violin and fiery guitar) and Fortitude (tight beat with flashy synthesizer flights, swirling violin and powerful guitar). Other (more shorter) tracks are dreamy: Ivory Tower (mellow romantic first part, finally rock guitar), Arkhangelsk (soaring keyboards) and Altitude ' Reprise (dreamy vocals and violin).

My highlight on this new album is the epic titletrack, the most varied and dynamic one. It starts dreamy with warm piano and vocals. Then an accellaration featuring a tight beat and sparkling synthesizer flights, followed by a harder-edged guitar solo and topped with pleasant vocals. Now back to a mellow atmosphere with tender keyboards, a violin joins, I am blown away, what a wonderful sound, very intense! The musis turns into a tight beat with organ and harder-edged electric guitar, Kansas comes to my mind. Halfway more dreamy with a high pitched female choir sound, blended with slide guitar and warm vocals. The second part delivers a beautiful guitar solo, sensitive with howling runs, goose bumps. Finally dreamy with spacey synthesizer flights and melancholical violin work, what a strong and alternating composition.

Another good song is Last One Home, build around a long guitar solo, reminding me of Andy Latimer with the mindblowing instrumental Ice, very moving and compelling, Guitar Heaven!

I am sure this excellent and accessible new Lifesigns album will appeal to a wide audience!

 Altitude by LIFESIGNS album cover Studio Album, 2021
4.01 | 72 ratings

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Altitude
Lifesigns Neo-Prog

Review by tmay102436

5 stars There have been some wonderful releases so far in 2021 from some awesome progressive rock groups. But, for me, Lifesigns "Altitude" - this is my favorite.

Lifesigns are one of those sort of "super groups" for sure. But the difference is; it no longer sounds like "a project" - it now sounds like a solid Rock Band. One direction, one thought, oneness. This release is one of those very few and far between releases, that is both complex - lengthy songs, but also, memorable melodies. I found myself on just the second listening of this, singing along, already having memorized some of the passages and melodies. That doesn't happen too much in the progressive rock element.

I'm sure others will write about each song, so I won't - except, "Last One Home." The entire song is fantastic, but the guitar solo had me shedding tears of joy, even on the first listening. Subsequent listening's have brought the same response. It is glorious and up there with the gods of the genre's guitar solo's. Dave Bainbridge should be very proud.

John Young should also be very proud of the entire bands performance in this magnificent release.

As I said earlier, John Young's "project" has turned into a fabulous Rock Band. Thank you guys, and thanks to great production to bring this altogether.

 Cardington by LIFESIGNS album cover Studio Album, 2017
3.83 | 115 ratings

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Cardington
Lifesigns Neo-Prog

Review by kev rowland
Special Collaborator Honorary Reviewer

4 stars One of the problems in living at the end of the world, is that unless one has enough money to purchase overseas magazines at exorbitant rates, or spends valuable reviewing time searching out new bands, then I can often be late when it comes to discovering acts. So this is why in 2019 I am reviewing the 2017 second album of a band who released their debut four years earlier. It is the project of John Young, a musician I have reviewed multiple times before in other bands (Greenslade, Qango etc), and it is only he and drummer Martin Beedle (Cutting Crew, and principle drummer for "Mamma Mia!") who made it through to the second. Here they have been joined by Dave Bainbridge (Iona and others, one of my favourite musicians) and Jon Poole (Cardiacs, The Wildhearts ? if you ever see a copy of his solo Zappa tribute album 'What's The Ugliest Part Of Your Body?' then grab it, it is brilliant). So even before putting this on I had very high hopes indeed.

I certainly wasn't disappointed. John is known as a side man of some repute (he is touring as part of Bonnie Tyler's band as I write this), but it is something of a surprise that he isn't more widely known in his own right and as this is a beautiful album, with very strong vocals. It is delicate, temporal, and far more in keeping with Dave's band than Jon's, with vocals at the front and centre with superb arrangements keeping everything moving. All these guys have been around, all know what they are doing, and have relaxed into an album that is a sheer delight from start to end. There are again some guest guitarists on the album in the likes of Robin Boult (Fish), Menno Gootjes (Focus) and Niko Tsonev, and their solos are used with care, providing additional nuances and dynamics when required. This is a very songs-based progressive rock album, and can be played repeatedly, and bring a smile to the face each and every time. The guys are all playing with each other and for each other, as opposed to showing off their musical skill and dexterity, which they all have in spades. The only advantage of coming across an album a few years after it was released is that hopefully it will soon be time for the next one! Please!

 Cardington by LIFESIGNS album cover Studio Album, 2017
3.83 | 115 ratings

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Cardington
Lifesigns Neo-Prog

Review by proghaven

4 stars A front page news: Galadriel's Calibrated Collision Course has laid a delayed egg. That studio album from 2008 was heavily criticized by special collaborators, prog reviewers and ordinary members (here at Prog Archives, on the respective page, you can see how it was criticized and how lowly it was rated). I nevertheless dared suppose that it could announce a new paradigm for prog music, and now, with the release of a new studio album from Lifesigns, I see that this may be true. The opening track, lapidary entitled N (sic!), shows the band's approach to building the relationships between musical sounds following... no, not Galadriel's 2008 prescriptions but Galadriel's 2008 algorithm for making up a prescription. It sounds very unusual and fresh.

Another possible musical analogy is, perhaps unexpectedly, Haken. Early Haken, not fussy and clamorous The Mountain or glum and insipid Affinity, but magnificent Aquarius and intricate Visions. According to most of sources, Haken is 'heavy prog' while Lifesigns is 'neo- prog', but Martin Orford hates the term 'neo-prog' not without reason. Sometimes strict definitions produce confusions, and there's no reason to pay too much attention to tags. I can find a number of musical parallels between N and, exempli gratia, The Point Of No Return (the opening track from Aquarius) in melody making and arrangement techniques.

But with the track two, Voice In My Head, any hints of Galadriel and Haken disappear, and - quel passage! - we hear another Telephone. Do you remember? It's the second track of the previous (self-titled) album from Lifesigns. Now, four years later, the band exploits the same structure: track one is epic, long and complex, while track two has simple melody and simple rhythm and sounds almost dance-like. Okay, okay. The next track, Chasing Rainbows, is an excellent short song in the vein of Pendragon, Jadis or IQ... and then - quelle surprise! - the third Telephone begins! Hey guys, maybe enough? (Just to be clear: I do like Telephone. I like it very much, it's one of my faves from the band's debut!) But no, far from enough, the next track is again a reincarnation of Telephone! And only the closing track, Cardington, restores the initial atmosphere, it's a long epic suite with a lot of innovative moments, and the shade of Calibrated Collision Course is again here.

So, the album includes two amazing, absolutely incomparable epics, one beautiful short song and four Telephones. That's why I am so base and spiteful to give it only four stars. Otherwise, if the entire album was sustained at the level of its opening and closing track, even a five-star rating would be too low for it.

 Lifesigns by LIFESIGNS album cover Studio Album, 2013
3.86 | 245 ratings

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Lifesigns
Lifesigns Neo-Prog

Review by chopper
Special Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

5 stars I have to thanks Amazon for initially alerting me to this CD which stood out thanks to the wonderful cover photo (apparently taken at speed on the M6). I was then also sent details of it on Facebook by John Young himself.

At first listen, this is an album that appears to contain nice, melodic if slightly "easy listening" prog music, however it's unlike most prog albums I've ever heard in that it slowly reveals itself to you over time as you begin to appreciate the vocal harmonies, the intricate melodies, the standard of musicianship and the wonderful songs. I've been playing this regularly over the last 18 months or so and I'm still hearing new bits.

The band consists of John Young (who wrote all the songs), prog bassist de jour Nick Beggs, ex-Cutting Crew drummer Frosty Beedle as well as guest musicians Steve Hackett, Jakko Jakszyk and Thijs van Leer (who contributes some wonderful flute).

Highlights? There are many - the thundering bass riff of "Fridge Full of Stars", the flute solo in the same song, the Chapman Stick on "Telephone", the blistering guitar at the start of "Carousel" and the wonderful riff played simultaneously on flute, bass and guitar that pops up at regular intervals throughout the same song.

So this is an album to listen to and cherish as it slows reveals itself to you throughout repeated listens. There are no obvious reference points although some of it has an It Bites feel to it. If you like melodic prog but want something with depth to it, then you need this album. I saw the band perform it live last night - I did wonder if they would be able to reproduce it live but they managed it brilliantly. If you can catch them live, don't miss them!

5 stars all the way, best prog album of the last 5 years.

Thanks to Roland113 for the artist addition. and to Quinino for the last updates

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