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PLINI

Jazz Rock/Fusion • Australia


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Plini biography
Plini Roessler-Holgate - Born in 1992 (Sydney, Australia)

PLINI is a name under which a 21 year old guitarist and composer from Sydney releases music over multiple on-line outlets and physical releases. His releases are recommended to fans of guitar led instrumental rock with fusion influences bordering on metal.

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PLINI discography


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PLINI top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.92 | 62 ratings
Handmade Cities
2016
0.00 | 0 ratings
Impulse Voices
2020

PLINI Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

PLINI Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

PLINI Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.67 | 3 ratings
Singles (2012-2014) - EP
2017

PLINI Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

2.59 | 10 ratings
Moonflower
2012
3.42 | 22 ratings
Other Things
2013
3.30 | 28 ratings
Sweet Nothings
2013
3.47 | 13 ratings
I (with Sithu Aye)
2013
2.50 | 7 ratings
Cloudburst
2013
2.64 | 9 ratings
1745 7381 3265 2578
2013
2.72 | 10 ratings
Atlas
2014
2.52 | 6 ratings
Ko Ki
2014
4.15 | 25 ratings
The End Of Everything
2015
3.25 | 4 ratings
Every Piece Matters
2016
3.67 | 3 ratings
Salt + Charcoal
2018
3.92 | 16 ratings
Sunhead
2018
3.00 | 1 ratings
birds / surfers
2020

PLINI Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 Handmade Cities by PLINI album cover Studio Album, 2016
3.92 | 62 ratings

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Handmade Cities
Plini Jazz Rock/Fusion

Review by progtime1234567

4 stars I was introduced to PLINI by a friend a while back and I listened to this album. I thought it was just going to be Djent but what I got was great instrumental jazz rock with just a little bit of djent at certain parts. The number one thing you notice about the album is Plini's very excellent guitar playing. The album only has guitar, bass, and drums with some keyboards in the background, which makes it sound very jazz-fusion like since it only has 4 instruments max.

If you like instrumental jazz rock with some prog rock and metal thrown in, chances are you will enjoy this album.

 Handmade Cities by PLINI album cover Studio Album, 2016
3.92 | 62 ratings

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Handmade Cities
Plini Jazz Rock/Fusion

Review by ThirstyFajita

4 stars The first full outing from Australian guitar virtuoso Plini. Its a pretty run of the mill instrumental-only tech/extreme jazz record, with some songs like Every Piece Matters being on the jazzier side and Cascade being on the heavier djentier side. It can feel somewhat bland and overdone at some points, but the guitar work here is honestly so clean and flawless throughout that its hard not to not give it 4 stars. Definitely a heavier Jazz-fusion record, so if you're into some of the bands like Cynic but maybe can't digest the vocals or the more death metal aspects of that band than this can be a great bridge album, as it is fairly listener friendly and as I mentioned, contains phenomenal guitar work. 3.51 stars
 Sunhead by PLINI album cover Singles/EPs/Fan Club/Promo, 2018
3.92 | 16 ratings

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Sunhead
Plini Jazz Rock/Fusion

Review by Sunburst

4 stars "Sunhead" is Plini's latest release, as of this review, and a foray into the jazzy side of Fusion. As a result, it is quite different from his previous efforts and, in particular, less centered on the guitar, but excellent nonetheless. All told, "Sunhead" demonstrates Plini is as versatile a composer as he is a guitarist.

"Kind" foreshadows what the listener is about to witness: unexpected alternations between laidback sections and intense bursts of sound and an emphasis in an impeccable and unpredictable rhytm section, and the creative melodies and playing Plini usually offers. All of that in four minutes!

"Salt + Charcoal" is my favourite and absolutely unrelenting. The intro is quick paced, but subdued; about thirty seconds in, Simon Grove bursts into it with a tone as sharp as a knife. Both he and Chris Allison then pull off meticulously tight offbeats to great effect; meanwhile, Plini returns to the fold and leads to the next section with a blazing fast scale. After a brief climax, without missing a beat, the song becomes quieter and Plini presents the listener with a brief (and of course great) solo. After that, Simon Grove once again takes charge, lush keyboards join him to wrap the song in an orgasmic conclusion. (For some reason the last thirty seconds are filled with what appears to be a rehearsal recording.)

The second and jazzier half of the EP begins with "Flâneur". It kicks off with a slow groove and acoustic piano, which might surprise those familiar with Plini's previous releases. Soon enough, however, Plini enters and another quick, unexpected swell takes place. In another surprising twist, the song slows down and a synth solo - with a vague resemblance to Weather Report - follows and segues into a sax solo. Both work very well, even though they might, once again, sound a bit jarring to a Plini fan listening to "Sunhead" for the first time. At any rate, Plini returns with great fanfare to deliver an intense solo. It surprises the listener for a last time with another sudden dynamic change, this time into a laidback sax and piano section followed by a whimsical end.

At last, the title track starts off like a Wes Montgomery tune, with a solitary guitar playing the theme - a sequence of tasty, jazzy chords; drums and other instruments soon follow; then everything bursts into a wall of sound, and the theme is stated more aggressively. Sudenly, it becomes gentle again; Simon Grove, who was providing the bold, synchopated rhytm in the previous tracks, plays a surprisingly lyrical bass solo; Tim Miller's solo, in turn, is reminiscent of the late Allan Holdsworth. At last, the song builds once again into a wailing coda.

I do not believe my description did enough justice to this EP - indeed, words fail me. What I can do is strongly recommend "Sunhead" to Fusion fans and whoever enjoys well crafted songwriting combined with great musicianship.

 Other Things by PLINI album cover Singles/EPs/Fan Club/Promo, 2013
3.42 | 22 ratings

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Other Things
Plini Jazz Rock/Fusion

Review by Kempokid
Collaborator Prog Metal Team

4 stars While I haven't listened to Plini's full length album Handmade Cities at this point in time, I'm looking on getting around to it, since I find his EPs to be of extremely high quality, blending a modern Animals As Leaders inspired sound, with some djent elements, and then throwing in some jazz. While not revolutionary by any means, Other Things is an absolutely lovely album, and likely my favourite out of his EPs that I've checked out so far, being the most memorable of them and having my personal favourite song by him as well.

Heart is a nice, restrained song that sounds very similar to Toe, with a strong indie rock sound and a lot of notes being played, yet it all sounding extremely relaxing nonetheless, just an all around pleasant song. The title track has a much jazzier sound to it, and the style reminds me vaguely of Guthrie Goven, once again being able to put a lot of feeling into the instrumentals, despite the relatively fast speed of some of the solos. The piano and especially the saxophone both add another layer of beauty to the song, making it even better than the last. Selenium Forest is undoubtedly the highest point on the album, filled with melodic complexity, with riffs that will remain in your head for days, everything still managing to be incredibly beautiful and pleasant, yet still displaying some amount of technicality. I appreciate how despite the fact that this track is clearly complex in its composition, Plini doesn't spend the entire song demonstrating his ability to shred, instead writing the song in a fashion where it constantly progresses, being able to perfectly rise and fall, continuously returning to its main motif, all around being an excellently composed song.

While some of Plini's other EPs can be put down as simply pleasant, this one to me stands above the rest, having an excellent variety to it, each song being the perfect length, all coming together to make an amazing 12 minutes of music.

Best tracks: All are great, but Selenium Forest is definitely the highlight

Weakest tracks: None of them

Verdict: I'd definitely recommend that anyone interested in progressive metal to any degree should listen to this album, as I find it to be very high quality, and the 12 minute runtime makes it extremely easy to just throw on and conventiently listen through.

 The End Of Everything by PLINI album cover Singles/EPs/Fan Club/Promo, 2015
4.15 | 25 ratings

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The End Of Everything
Plini Jazz Rock/Fusion

Review by Cylli Kat (0fficial)

5 stars The music of Plini in my opinion deserves much, much higher review points than are evidenced here at progarchives... This young man is truly a gifted, well-practiced guitarist and a really strong composer. Every release is such a treasure to my ears! My only "complaint" mirrors that of fellow progarchiver memowakeman, which is that I wish Plini would release a full-length album.

"The End Of Everything" is well played, well composed, & well produced, and fer cripessakes, it's obvious this kid has got something going for him as the always exceptional Marco Minnemann is playing drums and the equally exceptional talents of guitarist Jakub Zytecki are once again in evidence. This cadre of musicians that occasionally find themselves working together including Plini, Jakub Zytecki, Widek, David Maxim Micic, Sithu Aye, Gru (Piotrek Gruszka), etc. are really well worth investing your time into discovering and exploring. Hopefully, you'll come away as amazed and thrilled by this new crop of gifted artists as I have been.

This is 5 stars for me.

As always, your actual mileage may vary...

Grace and peace to you all, Cylli Kat

(Re-load of my original review, originally posted on October14, 2015)

 Handmade Cities by PLINI album cover Studio Album, 2016
3.92 | 62 ratings

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Handmade Cities
Plini Jazz Rock/Fusion

Review by BrufordFreak
Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

4 stars

PLINI Handmade Cities

Wonderful atmospheric and sometimes-djenty instrumental jazz-prog fusion from Down Under--composed and performed by Aussie legend and multi-instrumentalist, Plini, with some tremendous help on drums and bass from virtuosi Troy Wright and Simon Grove, respectively. Listening to this work repeatedly never seems to shake my tendency to compare this music to that of Canadian father-son fusion artists, Dean and Taylor Watson: the album starts and ends with more metal-influenced music like Taylor, and is filled with fine jazz-rock fusion in the middle.

1. "Electric Sunrise" (5:05) opens with layers of acoustic guitars strumming slowly on layers, which are then joined at the 1:10 mark by several electric guitars and bass. What an opening! At 1:44 the music shifts drastically into singular djenty guitar and space. That's it! But then the full number of tracks previously layered together join in for a melodic 'chorus' hook, but then it's back to sparse djenty guitar with a little electric jazz-fusion lead accompaniment (and then takeover). The song gets toward the end it gets a little heavy-handed walls of sound-ish but then it ends with the same opening soundscape. (9/10)

2. "Handmade Cities" (4:45) sounds like an extension/variation on the themes, sounds and styles of the opening song. In the second minute things shift more into 'it's own' territory with some awesome lead guitar soloing. Then, at 2:15, things quiet down temporarily with some slow guitar chord strums, but then the rest of the tracks slowly build up from heavy potential to loud kinetic energy to full-blown djent by 3:15. Lead guitar melody hook keeps it all together in this slightly confusing, cacophonous section. Still, a great song. (9/10)

3. "Inhale" (4:57) a very atmospheric song that immediately won me over and remains my favorite song on the album. Kind of reminds me of ANTOINE FAFARD's great recent stuff. (9/10)

4. "Every Piece Matters" (3:40) more laid back musical foundation with some astounding guitar and keyboard (MIDI- ed?) leads and including some chorale vocalise toward the end. Another top three song. (9/10)

5. "Pastures" (7:34) solid jazz-fusion composition in the style and sound of some of Dean Watson's beautiful music. (9/10)

6. "Here We Are, Again" (2:37) opens as a cute little effected guitar and keyboard duet before keyboard-generated orchestra and choir brings it into a Post Rock-like crescendo. (9/10)

7. Cascade (6:00) is certainly a song that showcases Plini's guitar prowess, but it also satisfies in the way that it fits modern prog soundscapes and constructs. Great piece! (9/10)

Total Time 34:38

A near-masterpiece of progressive rock music, (that I've rated down slightly for it's EP-like brevity). Definitely an album I recommend all prog rockers to check out for the wonderful production and multi-track layering accomplished here.

 The End Of Everything by PLINI album cover Singles/EPs/Fan Club/Promo, 2015
4.15 | 25 ratings

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The End Of Everything
Plini Jazz Rock/Fusion

Review by Cylli Kat

5 stars The music of Plini in my opinion deserves much, much higher review points than are evidenced here at progarchives... This young man is truly a gifted, well-practiced guitarist and a really strong composer. Every release is such a treasure to my ears! My only "complaint" mirrors that of fellow progarchiver memowakeman, which is that I wish Plini would release a full-length album. "The End Of Everything" is well played, well composed, & well produced, and fer cripessakes, it's obvious this kid has got something going for him as the always exceptional Marco Minnemann is playing drums and the equally exceptional talents of guitarist Jakub Zytecki are once again in evidence. This cadre of musicians that occasionally find themselves working together including Plini, Jakub Zytecki, Widek, David Maxim Micic, Sithu Aye, Gru (Piotrek Gruszka), etc. are really well worth investing your time into discovering and exploring. Hopefully, you'll come away as amazed and thrilled by this new crop of gifted artists as I have been. This is 5 stars for me.

As always, your actual mileage may vary... Grace and peace to you all, Cylli Kat

 The End Of Everything by PLINI album cover Singles/EPs/Fan Club/Promo, 2015
4.15 | 25 ratings

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The End Of Everything
Plini Jazz Rock/Fusion

Review by memowakeman
Special Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

3 stars This is the latest release from Australian genius Plini whose music has fortunately arrived to my ears and senses for the last month. So far he has released only singles and a EP-trilogy, this one, entitled The End of Everything is the final one from that trilogy, and I hope this leads him to his first full-length album, which I am very keen to listen because he is really a talented guy whose music touches the prog metal, djent, jazz and post rock realms. No matter in which realm you are listening to, he will delight you.

It opens with "The End of Everything", whose sound is fast and powerful, totally in the progressive metal vein. Since the first seconds, you will notice that Plini might be a young project, but never an amateur one, because the music is really challenging, interesting and complex, truly mature for such a young man. Seconds later it changes, slows down and a new structure and atmosphere are being built up. The metal essence prevails, but a jazzy tune is added, drums are great but guitar is by far the most important element here.

"Wombat Astronaut" totally contrasts with the opener. Here we listen to soft and kind rock, much slower, with less intensity but with a wonderful composition. Here what I love is the inclusion of piano, Luke Martin is the guilty here and in the other two EPs. The sound is jazzy, delicious, truly enjoyable. By the way, the drums here are played by Marco Minnemann, so go figure. After three minutes the song becomes much slower and quieter, gentler if you want, the jazz presence is even more evident. So as I mentioned before, no matter if Plini gives you metal, jazz or another genre, you will be delighted.

The final track is "Paper Moon", which happens to be the longest composition from Plini, not only here, but in all his releases (I think). And this one returns to the bombastic scene, to the virtuosity, to the obvious enormous technique of this guitar man, and also to the metal oriented side of Plini. After two minutes and a half it makes a change, the music slows down so we can take a deep breath and start again. Electronic elements are added and a kind of post-rock feel briefly appears. Then after the fifth minute the intensity increases, guitar takes the leadership and the prog metal ambient returns, now with a more emotional atmosphere. Fabulous track!

Well, I am really enthusiastic about Plini's music, and thank you man for creating this music and sharing it via Bandcamp, so I could reach your tunes. I am eagerly waiting for your first full-length album.

Now don't pay attention to my rating, because as a reviewer I have my "own rules" which don't allow me to rate releases under 20 minutes with more than 2 stars, unless it is the EP or single of my life, or unless I want to give a symbolic rate. This time I'll give it 3 stars, because I've reviewed his 9 releases and I've enjoyed them all.

Enjoy it!

 I (with Sithu Aye) by PLINI album cover Singles/EPs/Fan Club/Promo, 2013
3.47 | 13 ratings

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I (with Sithu Aye)
Plini Jazz Rock/Fusion

Review by memowakeman
Special Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

3 stars This is an EP, more precisely a split-EP made by two young and talented musicians that are creating and sharing great music in the vein of prog metal, djent and jazz music. They are Plini from Australia and Sithu Aye from Scotland and in this release you will listen to four songs that make a total time of 20 minutes. The first two are from Plini and the last two from Aye, however, both musicians are guest guitar soloists in one of the two tracks from the other one.

It opens with "Orm" whose first seconds are powerful, totally induced to the metal scene, later it slows down a little bit but only for a brief moment because then it explodes again and becomes a song full of energy, where of course, guitar is the guide. The softer moments bring that inherent jazz influence Plini has, so it is a nice jazz- metal track. Later it comes "Rupture" which enters again with a lot of energy, after 20 seconds it slows down and guitar start making some figures, but then where drums and bass enter again, the two guitars appear, making a powerful combo. This time is Ayu making a guitar solo, as a guest. The technique and virtuosity of these guys is really evident. I think instrumental metal lovers will love this.

The second part opens with "Solstice", and though there are similar elements between both musician's compositions, we note a change, I mean, one can recognize Plini's tracks from Aye's ones. This Solstice has a great start with a kind of post-rock feeling and nice keyboards, but later it changes and becomes much more powerful for some passages. After two minutes there is a short stop and we can take a breath, but then drums appear and a new structure is being built. In this track, there is Plini making a guest guitar solo. "Moonrise" has a brief atmospheric start, but then all of a sudden it explodes and becomes fast and powerful, showing us the virtuosity of these musicians. The music is totally in the prog metal vein, but also could be categorized as djent. This Ayu's part does not have the jazzy side of the Plini's one. And again, this is a great offering for instrumental metal lovers.

An excellent split, it is always a pleasure to discover and listen to musicians this great, though I am not a metal fan, I know when music is well done.

Enjoy it!

 Sweet Nothings by PLINI album cover Singles/EPs/Fan Club/Promo, 2013
3.30 | 28 ratings

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Sweet Nothings
Plini Jazz Rock/Fusion

Review by memowakeman
Special Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

2 stars Australian majestic musician Plini has released so far a trilogy of EPs, being 'Sweet Nothings', launched in 2013, the second one of those. For those who don't know, this young man has been creating extraordinary music in this decade, but all of them spread in singles or EPs, not in full-length albums yet, something I hope he consider in the near future because I am sure that his quality and creativity will surprise us with a memorable album.

Meanwhile, it is possible to enjoy his music in the diverse online platforms such as bandcamp, where I particularly listen to his releases. Plini composes and practically plays everything here, though there are a couple of guitar players as guest musicians, along a piano guy on the final track. Well, Sweet Nothings has four compositions that make a total time of 16 minutes. It starts with 'Opening', whose jazzy flavor appears since the first seconds, however, later when that virtuoso guitar enters it adds a djent sound for a brief moment. The song prevails in that jazzy realm, delighting me a lot.

With 'Tarred & Feathered' Plini shows off again his amazing skills as composer and performer; the music has now a tendency to post-rock but also a bit of djent lives there as well. Besides guitars, which are evidently the main element, here I like a lot the atmosphere created by keyboards, which is more evident after 2 minutes where the song becomes more emotional. 'Away' starts with a lot of technique and string-complexity, again post-rock meets djent but in this track the guitar is played faster and with endless notes, so I think the best way to describe it would be math rock.

The final song is 'Sweet Nothings' which is another great composition. The melody is great, progressive jazz with some post rock hints, a constant piano and wonderful guitar riffs. It has several time changes, and after three minutes it becomes heavier, more in the metal vein. So it is a challenging composition that once again let us know about the fascinating skills of Plini, a musician that has kept me mesmerized in the last couple of weeks.

Now don't pay attention to my rating, because as a reviewer I have my "own rules" which don't allow me to rate releases under 20 minutes with more than 2 stars, unless it is the EP or single of my life.

Enjoy it!

Thanks to historian9 for the artist addition. and to Quinino for the last updates

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