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MONARCH TRAIL

Neo-Prog • Canada


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Monarch Trail picture
Monarch Trail biography
Founded in Dundas, Ontario, Canada in 2014

Mostly known for his works as a solo artist, Canadian keyboardist and composer Ken BAIRD would expand his activities after no less than five solo albums and come up with the trio of Monarch Trail, a project formed out of the need of Baird to produce music in a more teamwork status.Bassist Dino Verginella and drummer Chris Lamont, who completed the line-up, were both featured in Baird's previous albums. As guitars were also part of Monarch Trail's compositions, they were helped during the sessions of their debut by John Mamone, Kelly Kereliuk and Steve Cochrane.The first work of the band ''Skye'' was partly inspired by the drawings of Annette Roche, so naturally some of them became part of the album's artwork, a record eventually released in April 2014 and based on the principles of the Neo Prog/Symphonic Rock genres.

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MONARCH TRAIL top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.91 | 158 ratings
Skye
2014
3.94 | 176 ratings
Sand
2017
3.92 | 57 ratings
Wither Down
2021
4.28 | 30 ratings
Four Sides
2023

MONARCH TRAIL Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

MONARCH TRAIL Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

MONARCH TRAIL Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

MONARCH TRAIL Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

MONARCH TRAIL Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 Four Sides by MONARCH TRAIL album cover Studio Album, 2023
4.28 | 30 ratings

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Four Sides
Monarch Trail Neo-Prog

Review by Mellotron Storm
Prog Reviewer

4 stars "Four Sides" turned out to be a surprising journey at times and that was especially evident on "Eris" that almost 20 minute second track. It's the only one without guitar on it and man I have never heard stuff like this on a Ken Baird album before. Ken being the composer/singer/keyboardist and more of the trio and add a bass player and drummer. Two return guests add guitar each on one track while Ken plays guitar on two other songs.

I have to mention not only the cover art but all the pictures inside all done by Annette Roche who is also back thankfully. Artwork of the year right here. You almost need sunglasses on one of those pictures in the liner notes it's so vivid and bright but all are beautiful. A gorgeous package and I was saying the same thing about their previous album "Wither Down" which is still my favourite MONARCH TRAIL record.

Oh back to "Eris" and the surprising thing about this one is the spacey soundscape that lasts 6 minutes. It just sounds so cool but not something you hear on a MONARCH TRAIL record. It's almost apocalyptic but not quite. Church organ I believe brings us out of that or at least eventually takes over. It then settles into a blissful state before a sudden change after 11 minutes with pulsating Banks-like keys and a full sound. Piano leads after 14 minutes before synths take us to the end. Such a cool track.

This is a long album at over 73 minutes and that opener at almost 23 minutes might be my favourite. I like the lyrics and have always enjoyed Ken's somewhat fragile vocals. I like that line that is repeated "stairs and halls... ahhh ahhh ahhh". For some reason Ken's vocals at 11 minutes remind me of his solo stuff. I'm such a fan of "Martin Road" and "Further Out". Synths and light beats end this track. There is a fair amount of piano on those last three tracks, especially the last two.

A very solid 4 stars for this 2023 release and I am already excited about the next adventure.

 Four Sides by MONARCH TRAIL album cover Studio Album, 2023
4.28 | 30 ratings

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Four Sides
Monarch Trail Neo-Prog

Review by TenYearsAfter

4 stars This is studio album #4 since 2014 by the Canadian keyboard driven trio Monarch Trail, led by multi-instrumentalist Ken Baird (piano, keyboards, vocals, guitars, recorder and Penny whistle). I am only familiar with his previous effort entitled Wither Down, I rated it with 3,5 star so I am curious to this new CD (with 2 guest guitarplayers), also due to the high rating here on PA.

1. The Oldest of Trees (22:39) : This long epic composition features the distinctive Monarch Trail sound, obviously inspired by 76-78 Genesis (organ, synthesizers and piano), it contains lots of changing atmospheres. The one moment bombastic with pitchbend driven synthesizers and majestic Mellotron choirs, or an accellaration with Banks-like Hammond organ runs. The other moment dreamy with soaring strings and tender vocals, or Mellotron choirs and slow synthesizer runs. The vocals sound pleasant but lack a bit power in the more sumptuous parts.

2. Eris (19:46) : And now for something completely different, a long, very mellow intro, between ambient and spacey electronic music, I consider it as a boring musical idea. Halfway a mid-tempo with powerful bass, sparkling Hammond organ runs (evoking Supper's Ready Part 6), blended with synthesizer flights. Then a part with classical piano and tight drum beats, fuelled by a propulsive bass. Gradually the music turns into more bombastic, in a compelling atmosphere, a strong part. Finally a slow rhythm with pleasant synthesizer flights.

3. Twenty K (17:06) : It starts mellow with tender vocals and a mid-Genesis sound, gradually a build-up to more lush with moving guitar runs, blended with Mellotron and piano play, wonderful. Then mellow piano play in slow rhythm, halfway shifting to a spectacular synthesizer solo with pitchbend and a harder-edged guitar solo, the band in its full splendor. Finally a slow rhythm with the distinctive Genesis keyboard sound.

4. Moon to Follow (9:37) : First a dreamy atmosphere featuring romantic vocals and sparkling piano, joined by a moving guitar solo, the interplay between the piano and vocals is beautiful. Halfway a swinging part with jazzy piano solo, Keith Emerson comes to my mind. In the end a slow rhythm turning into more bombastic, the vocals tend to drown in the lush sound, I love the delicate work on the Penny whistle, a nice musical idea.

5. Afterthought (4:21) : The final track is a short one but after a few sessions it has turned into my favorite piece on this new Monarch Trail CD, what a wonderful combination of classically inspired piano, the sound of the Mellotron, and the Minimoog, fuelled by a strong and dynamic rhythm-section. This elaborate and captivating composition sound as a 'lost track' of an early Rick Wakeman solo album, wow!

I am sure this new Monarch Trail album will please many progheads, especially the vintage keyboard aficionados.

 Four Sides by MONARCH TRAIL album cover Studio Album, 2023
4.28 | 30 ratings

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Four Sides
Monarch Trail Neo-Prog

Review by alainPP

4 stars Monarch Trail 4th opus.

'The Oldest of Trees' fat synth, the sound is there; a warm voice is added, a slow tempo, a bass and Ken's keyboards start up; direction Genesis second version; drawers, staircases of sounds that eye Elp, Camel, Clepsydra, the voices of BJH; it swirls with syrupy enthusiasm, a modern sound like this break halfway through, whirring then soaring, symphonic and aerial; drawers with batteries and keyboard breaks from the time when we took our time; in short, no real progressive structure, ambient-melodic music. 'Eris' surprises with its breezy, atmospheric intro; electronic, latent, aerial, S-F music, on Tangerine Dream of yesteryear; 6 minutes and this breathtaking rise of the church organ, a surge of notes and it sets off on a very linear, swirling and symphonic trip!

'Twenty K' 3rd and final long track; well-orchestrated and consensual verse-chorus title before the eternal progressive drift, Kelly's guitar solo which played on Negus combining admirably with Ken's keyboards; a musical epic title which reeks of bucolic freshness and quality of orchestration. 'Moon to Follow' for one of the two short tracks; very good melodic and symphonic prog, sound reminiscent of the melodies of Genesis, piano drift of immersive counter jazz then piano, keyboard rise, hop two Genesisian notes which smell good, I'll let you guess which ones. 'Afterthought' for the instrumental, a grandiloquent neo-classical bucolic reverie, a great lyrical epic transcending the piano, ending the album by putting them forward. (3.75)

 Four Sides by MONARCH TRAIL album cover Studio Album, 2023
4.28 | 30 ratings

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Four Sides
Monarch Trail Neo-Prog

Review by tszirmay
Special Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

5 stars Canadian artist Ken Baird has sent another new prog butterfly into our progressive path, an always most appreciated gift for fans of melodic excursions that are forging forever forward, carrying all the classic tendencies that has crowned so many legendary albums. He would never claim himself as some experimental innovator but much more importantly, he is rather a truly dedicated fan of our beloved genre, with the added attribute of being a consummate musician who remains devoted to the cause. His output is deeply immersed in his own style having dragged along the same core of local and loyal musicians since his early days as a solo artist back in 1996.

In another illustration of a recurring theme noticed in 2023 releases, this album kicks off with a monstrous epic, a nearly 23-minute rampage called "The Oldest of Trees", a mythical melange of symphonic grandiloquence and contrasting moods that encompass a wide variety of internal prog styles, from pastoral and melancholic, to apostolic instrumental flurries on the church organ as well as a plaintive vocal passages full of fragility. Ken displays a dizzying proficiency on the various ivories at his disposal, ably propelled by the rhythmic duo of Dino Verginella on bass and drummer Chris Lamont. Baird also infuses guitars as well as recorder, thus the pace is maintained at all times, balancing extended vocal parts with vibrant instrumental excursions. Like a fog bound journey through the feudal Teutonic countryside, even mentioning the town of Bremen in the lyrics, the musical narrative maintains the appropriate soundtrack, with endless adaptation and cinematographic vision. Yes, there is a stout Wind and Wuthering feel here, as Ken does have a Tony Banks influence which cannot be denied, especially when the piano, organ and synthesizer work get the spotlight shining on them, most notably when they interplay with each other. He certainly 'took us to a place where we could witness anything' on this eventful journey. The mellotronic outro by itself, is worthy of rousing applause. A magnificent blockbuster that should rate very highly among fans of elongated progressive vehicles.

You want more? "Eris" enters the discussion with another nearly 20 minutes of instrumental prog experimentation, taking the restrained, not-in-a-hurry route with a lengthy yet gentle electronic snowstorm that evolves like a winter blizzard, somehow unnerving and portentous. At the 6-minute mark, a glowing church organ rafale illuminates the aural space, as if some celestial being arrives to provide deliverance. Its Eris, the second largest (and recently discovered) dwarf planet in the Solar System! Ken goes from Banks to Vangelis on a whim, selecting a further orbit in his search for deep space. Halfway through, the churning organ, snarly bass and shuffling drums combine to playfully assess the new horizons, channeling some ELP/Greenslade in the process. The repetitive piano coda is mesmerizing, as the hard bass carves a rough furrow, liberating the supernatural synth to take a lavish flight into the deeper recesses of the galaxy. Very old school and I like it!

Hey! More? "Twenty K" adds a 17-minute job to the set list, showcasing the persistent as well as ornate piano technique that Ken masters with obvious impunity, which leads me to hear hints of classic Supertramp in the arrangement, the lively hushed vocals full of drama only accentuating the overall feel. Add some synth work that emulates horns, solid bass and drum work and a series of Kelly Kereliuk lead guitar solos and it just may be the crime of the century. The mid-section orchestral blowout and extended piano recital elevates this piece to the loftiest heights, lush with vibrancy and creativity, perhaps the finest piece yet penned by the Butterfly Road man. The haunting vocal is hugely celebratory, a crowning voice that pushes the buttons with newfound glory as the theme veers into a new vista. The powerful finale is expressed in another realm altogether, warmly symphonic, and extraordinarily expressive, an ode to joy of the highest order, a glory drenched vocal to finish off 'the time has come to head home'. Speechless.

Just under 10 minutes short (LOL), "Moon to Follow" swerves into a more melody driven environment with a sorrowful hushed vocal, elegant piano as well as dreamy atmosphere, vaporously romantic and highly infectious. Steve Cochrane guest on electric guitar, giving the track luminosity and injecting well warranted passion. The inventive piano shifts the arrangement into a lounge-like jazzy shuffle that is wholly unexpected, eliciting smiles I am sure, continuing on with a pastoral Wakemen-esque ivory outbreak, that serves to reignite the heartfelt vocalizings within an angelic finale.

A beautiful keyboard exercise if offered on "Afterthought", rippling piano and whistling synth combining with unfettered passion. A prefect 'au revoir', as an afterthought, of course! What is truly remarkable about this album is how within each composition, there is a continuation, as well as a sonic progression that just keeps evolving without going into any extremes, the layers perfectly sown into each tapestry, lovingly displayed for all to hear. Its perhaps titled 4 sides but it has 5 tracks.

5 postscripts

 Four Sides by MONARCH TRAIL album cover Studio Album, 2023
4.28 | 30 ratings

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Four Sides
Monarch Trail Neo-Prog

Review by BrufordFreak
Collaborator Heavy Prog & JR/F/Canterbury Teams

4 stars The fourth studio album release from Canadian Ken Baird (and company) since 2013.

1. "The Oldest of Trees" (22:39) what starts out as a kind Prog Lite I AND THOU-like piece turns into something that sounds like an early-form of an ELP song before turning TONY BANKS-GENESIS in the tenth minute and beyond. Too bad the lead vocalist isn't more developed/adept cuz some of the constructs of the song's motifs are quite nice (though some are fairly weak for their simplicity). The seventeenth minute bursts into a passage that sounds as if it comes off of one of IQ's 1980s releases. Again: too bad about the weak vocal. (39.25/45)

2. "Eris" (19:46) opening with three minutes of wind, followed by three full minutes of spacey synths before Vangelis-like organ takes over in the seventh minute. Finally, it's showing some promise--even as the synth-organ becomes the lone instrument in the soundscape. Reminds me a lot of 1970s VANGELIS. At the 11-minute mark Ken's concerto for a Space Age is usurped by a fast-paced passage full of bass and drums to go with the Emersonian barrage of keyboards (organs, mostly). The music slows down in the fifteenth minute--maybe to make room for the piano that enters to become the dominant keyboard. The music builds to a proggy crescendo before slipping into a calmer synth-directed motif at the 16-minute mark. Nice transition with some really nicely synched drum and bass work to accompany the synth lead work. Unfortunately, this lead melody work gets a bit stale after the second or third run through. (34.75/40)

3. "Twenty K" (17:06) Sounds like practice/demo sessions or outtakes from Wind and Wuthering. (30.5/35)

4. "Moon to Follow" (9:37) a nice song that feels as if it bridges the individual styles of Mike Rutherford and Tony Banks. (17.75/20)

5. "Afterthought" (4:21) almost classical piano played alone at first before being joined by electric bass and drums and then full complement of synths. This reminds me of some of the earliest New Age artists of the 1980s like Michael Jones and David Lantz (and even Vangelis). Nice composition despite sounding a bit dated and New Age-y. (8.75/10)

Total Time 73:29

Gentle, pleasant, melodic, simple second-tier NeoProg. Sounds like practice/demo sessions or outtakes from Wind and Wuthering. I will say that Ken and his band are improving in all aspects of music making: sophistication, composition, recording and sound engineering, as well as creating songs that are interesting and engaging from all perspectives.

B/four stars; many prog lover's are going to love this; to my mind, I still see a lot of room for improvement for this band--in multiple areas--though I will admit this is a great improvement over the band's first two albums (2014's Skye and 2017's Sand.)

P.S. Finally: Some album art that I find attractive.

 Four Sides by MONARCH TRAIL album cover Studio Album, 2023
4.28 | 30 ratings

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Four Sides
Monarch Trail Neo-Prog

Review by daisy1

5 stars I've been a big fan of Ken Baird / Monarch Trail since Skye was released in 2014 -followed by Sand in 2017 and when I thought there was no more,Wither Down was a pleasant surprise in 2021. Four Sides is released in time to be considered one of the albums of the year.Three tracks at 17 minutes plus,and 2 shorter ones make the 'Four Sides' which may be a double vinyl later. Ken's keyboards as always are amazing and are to the fore on all tracks,especially piano and synths.Those who enjoy comparisons maybe to Glass Hammer and Tony Banks "selling England..' era. Track 1 is over 22 minutes and began with vocals which blindsighted me,but it goes through many phases and passes quickly. Track 2 is more synth led and amazing on headphones -I really enjoyed this one -a mere 19 minutes. Track 3 was initially my favourite and more band orientated with guitar from Kelly featured well.It feels like a band composition and is really enjoyable.The 2 shorter tracks are not throwaways and make for an excellent addition to anyone's collection. Ken's keyboard playing equals anyone out there and is amazing.
 Wither Down by MONARCH TRAIL album cover Studio Album, 2021
3.92 | 57 ratings

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Wither Down
Monarch Trail Neo-Prog

Review by Kjarks

5 stars Monarch Trail is part of a symphonic tradition close to the subtle and sensitive climates of the first Genesis, rather than the virtuoso and grandiose abundance of Yes or ELP. The predominant keyboards are often reminiscent of those of Tony Banks with a more modern sound of course. The music can thus be compared to that of Willow Grass or Cirrhus Bay in a way.

In this regard, the splendid "Waves of sound" is particularly revealing, with its keyboards introduction worthy of "Fountain of Salmacis" and its final instrumental parts which recall "One for the vine" in "Wind and wutherings ". But we will also find, here and there, other influences, like this piano flirting with jazz for a minute or two at the beginning of "Megalopolitana", before the music takes ever changing directions but always carried by the waves of keyboards. which sometimes serve as a springboard for Kelly Keliriuk's guitar.

Not only does this beautiful music take us on a journey through varied and subtle landscapes and speaks to the depths of our capacity for emotion, but, in addition, Ken takes the time to write us a nice little note when we order the CD on Bandcamp. What more ? This opus diserves 4,5 stars to my mind.

 Wither Down by MONARCH TRAIL album cover Studio Album, 2021
3.92 | 57 ratings

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Wither Down
Monarch Trail Neo-Prog

Review by memowakeman
Special Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

4 stars A great journey!

One of the pros of being involved into the prog realm is to know talented musicians around the world who share their music in a personal way, this happened to me some years ago when I online met Canadian talent Ken Baird, he kindly shared his latest solo album, and later he introduced me to Monarch Trail, a great project in the neo/symphonic prog vein whose first two albums entered to my ears on a regular basis.

And in 2021 after pandemic times, the band released their third studio album entitled 'Wither Down' which besides having a beautiful cover art, comprises of six solid tracks that make a total time of 56 minutes. It starts with the title- track, 'Wither Down' and of course the first notes had to be piano/keyboards, it's like the band's signature. Several layers and textures are offered through Baird's hands, however, they would not succeed without Dino Verginella's bass and Chris Lamont's drums. The song has several passages, it constantly changes and we can listen to some classic prog bands reminiscences such as Yes, which immediately came to my mind when Baird's vocals started. Then the piece goes through some shiny and peaceful passages, it has a bright vibe and even some relaxing atmospheric moments. There's also an instrumental passage I liked a lot around 8:30 minute, where bass and drums go a bit faster and all together create a charming episode.

'Echo' has a bombastic start, then it slows down and all the musicians show up their skills in a great way, including Kelly Kereliuk's guitar, and later the energy returns with lush keyboards and that powerful sound. This song has several tempo changes and when Baird's solo appear at 3:30, I bet the name of Genesis will appear in your mind. This is a great track!

With 'Canyon Song' we experience a wonderful contrast, because first a gentle sound surrounds us, delicate, soft, charming, led by Ken's voice and piano, and then little by little some drums figures appear, opening the gates to a new structure and a diversity of elements, having the boiling point when the guitar solo starts. Yes-like vocals and harmonies appear here as well. The contrast comes after 3:30 minute, arpeggio, nice bass lines, drums and keyboards create a celestial moment.

'Waves of Sound' is a great track, as usual it has several changes, showing the great compositional skills of the band. This time at the beginning they surprise us with some French vocals, alternating with English ones. And after some 2 or 3 minutes they even bring a touch of jazz and folk due to the guitar and a pastoral sound. Later we are once again taken to heaven, where a beautiful combination of mellotron and piano appear, while bass and drums keep the constantly interesting base. But wait, at minute five a darker sound appears, changing our mood for a brief moment, while some new age-like keys appear, reminding me a bit of Mr. Wakeman.

The longest epic comes with 'Megalopolitana', whose 15-minute length is a feast of prog rock and its diversity. A classical and pastoral introduction, then after a couple of minutes vocals enter for the first time and the rhythm changes, here the name of Yes came to my mind once again, which is nice. As you can imagine in such a long track, there are several time changes, most of them marked by Baird's great keyboard skills, but there is one I like a lot after minute 5, led by Kereliuk's guitar, it is captivating and even addictive, emotional, and it lasts for several minutes, so it is a great journey. Then it slows down and seconds later vocals return. So the music goes and flows, giving us more changes, like small episodes of a novel.

And the album finishes with 'All Kinds of Futures' which is a wonderful keyboard-driven track that blends classical music, neo prog and symphonic prog, and I don't know if I'm wrong, but I think here we can perceive some of Baird's main influences such as Rick Wakeman or Tony Banks. Great closer!

Congrats to Monarch Trail, it was worth the wait, and hope they keep creating music this good.

Enjoy it!

 Wither Down by MONARCH TRAIL album cover Studio Album, 2021
3.92 | 57 ratings

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Wither Down
Monarch Trail Neo-Prog

Review by Aussie-Byrd-Brother
Special Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

4 stars Keyboardist Ken Baird's band project alter-ego Monarch Trail is a Canadian group enhanced by superior session players, with 2021's `Wither Down' being their third release to date. The trio, completed by bassist Dino Verginella and drummer Chris Lamont bridge the gaps between the defining symphonic prog masters of the Seventies, the sleekness of the Eighties acts that came to be aligned with the `Neo-Prog' tag and the modern retro revival. This means that at any time, they call to mind anything from classic period Genesis (just without the theatrical vocals), Pendragon, the earlier Glass Hammer discs and even the colours of the numerous Karfagen works.

Most of the pieces found on `Wither Down' are framed with vocal bookends that give way to lengthy and dramatic instrumental flights of power peppered with a gentle elegance. Ken has an earnest and wistful voice, whose lyrics are vague and cryptic yet rife with surreal imagery, but it's in the constant keyboard-dominated instrumental runs where the album sails to its greatest heights. Baird can turn atmospheres between light and dark so effortlessly, and the combined musicians here cram the disc with endless memorable and melodic themes.

The eleven-minute album titled opener offers lengthy instrumental passages of light prettiness with darker flourishes laced with unease, all carefully balanced despite unpredictable jumps in tempo back and forth. Ken's sparkling piano is a constantly joyful highlight throughout (almost channelling the grand pomp of Renaissance, both here and really throughout the entire disc), Dino's darkly murmuring bass purrs invitingly and Chris' drums stride purposefully. Pay close attention to the blissful sighing outro too!

The Jadis flavoured `Echo' delivers several fleeting heroic synth themes, darting between slowly unfolding drama and sprinting bursts of energy. `Canyon Song's vocal driven beginnings are introspective and softly melancholic, but the second instrumental half of dreamy keyboard soloing lifts the piece into glorious symphonic skies.

`Waves of Sound' reveals subtle drama and careful restraint with a fleeting New-Age gentleness (there's almost a fairytale- like quality in parts), as well as some of the most elegant and serene Mellotron caresses heard in years. While there's teases of folk and jazz touches sprinkled throughout the dreamy Moog runs of symphonic epic `Megalopolitana', it's Kelly Kereliuk's electric guitar soloing that ripples with tension and spectacle. Final instrumental `All Kinds of Futures' is then a classy closer, a Rick Wakeman-esque fanfare of fuzzy danger from looming organ and sparklingly pretty piano.

Careful listens reveal each piece on `Wither Down' to be so carefully jammed full of a dizzying variety of fancy instrumental touches from highly skilled musicians, and the constantly uplifting qualities that emerge from all the compositions are hugely appealing. The disc may be a little meek for some, but lovers of unashamedly romantic and symphonic progressive rock of the vintage variety will adore so much of this winning third release from Monarch Trail.

Four stars.

 Wither Down by MONARCH TRAIL album cover Studio Album, 2021
3.92 | 57 ratings

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Wither Down
Monarch Trail Neo-Prog

Review by BrufordFreak
Collaborator Heavy Prog & JR/F/Canterbury Teams

3 stars Canadian Ken Baird making his third attempt to broadcast to the world his reverence for all-things Tony Banks.

1. "Wither Down" (10:53) like something from Tony Banks' first solo album (though perhaps a bit better). The vocals are near-unlistenable--reminding me of Chris Squire's pitchy, strained, solo attempts. (15.5/20)

2. "Echo" (5:59) a little more complexity here. (8/10)

3. "Canyon Song" (6:32) Not seeing any above-average quality or creativity here. (7.75/10)

4. "Waves of Sound" (11:00) pretty but seems to exist solely for the purpose of placing the listener into a Mellotron coma (which can be a very pleasant place to be). Love the treated vocal, French lyrics, and free-walking bass. (16.75/20)

5. "Megalopolitana" (15:18) Kudos for Ken's sidemen for doing their best to breathe some life into this one. Some of the instrumental activity is rather interesting. The vocals (and lyrics) weigh it down (again). (24.25/30)

6. "All Kinds of Futures" (6:47) To give Ken some credit: He is one of the more gifted Tony Banks imitators--as well as one of the more spot-on Genesis re-creators. (12.25/15)

Total Time 56:29

A collection of very pretty music that sounds exactly like most of the TONY BNAKS/GENESIS-worshipping Neo Prog coming out in the late 1970s and early 1980s. Competent, rich in full keyboard sound, and pleasantly melodic but, ultimately, too derivative/imitative--and poor sound quality.

C/three stars; a nice collection of pretty exhibitions of Tony Banks worship that could be relegated to the "collectors only" pile were it not for their competency in Genesis recreation.

Thanks to apps79 for the artist addition. and to Quinino for the last updates

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