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DRIFTING SUN

Neo-Prog • Multi-National


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Drifting Sun picture
Drifting Sun biography
Founded in Chesham, UK circa 1994 - Hiatus between 1999-2013 - Reformed in 2014

DRIFTING SUN were formed sometime during early-90's (originally named Drama), after French natives Pat Sanders (keyboards) and Manu Sibona (bass) left their homecountry and landed in the UK. There they met American singer Rafe Pomeroy and four pieces were recorded in a London-based studio, then sent to Musea for evaluation. The French label decided to sign the band on their branch-label Brennus and in 1996 the self-titled debut of the band sees the light with Karl Groom participating on one track.

Drifting Sun decided to move on as an independent group, the line-up was expanded with the addition of Tobin Bryant and Bryant's friend, guitarist John Spearman, while Pomerey was replaced by another American vocalist, Chris Martini.By the end of the year 1998 the band had launched the sophomore effort "On the Rebound".

What followed was a very long break, but recently Sanders gave his band another chance, gathering a new line-up with singer Peter Falconer, drummer Will Jones and bassist/guitarist Dan Storey. The third work of DRIFTING SUN "Trip the Life Fantastic" was released in early 2015, a digital album, available via several online digital stores.

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DRIFTING SUN discography


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DRIFTING SUN top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.25 | 29 ratings
Drifting Sun
1996
3.92 | 53 ratings
On The Rebound
1999
3.84 | 154 ratings
Trip The Life Fantastic
2015
3.86 | 148 ratings
Safe Asylum
2016
3.92 | 113 ratings
Twilight
2017
3.87 | 105 ratings
Planet Junkie
2019

DRIFTING SUN Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

DRIFTING SUN Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

DRIFTING SUN Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

5.00 | 4 ratings
From the Vault: Demos & Drafts
2015
4.50 | 2 ratings
On the Rebound
2016
4.02 | 5 ratings
Singled Out
2019

DRIFTING SUN Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

4.40 | 5 ratings
Piano Works
2015
4.13 | 8 ratings
Lady Night
2015
4.00 | 6 ratings
Alice
2015
4.00 | 3 ratings
The Hidden Truth
2016
4.50 | 4 ratings
A Year In Black
2016
4.04 | 6 ratings
Eternal Cycle
2017
4.50 | 2 ratings
Remedy
2018
0.00 | 0 ratings
Closure
2018
0.00 | 0 ratings
Cascading Tears
2018
0.00 | 0 ratings
Life
2018
4.50 | 4 ratings
Missing
2019
4.50 | 2 ratings
Stay With Me
2019
5.00 | 1 ratings
Everlasting Creed
2019

DRIFTING SUN Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 Singled Out by DRIFTING SUN album cover Boxset/Compilation, 2019
4.02 | 5 ratings

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Singled Out
Drifting Sun Neo-Prog

Review by tszirmay
Special Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

4 stars The artist will always be one step ahead of the fans and the critics (gosh, I hate that word), they create and then, decide what to keep working on and what to release. As a purely stylistic rule, I am rarely fond of compilations and even less so of 'greatest hits' (ugh!). But in some rare cases, the material that has aged in casks like fine wine, used as B-sides to singles, has leaped out to become classics. Drifting Sun has made a career of putting out exciting and vibrant albums that have pleased fans worldwide. After releasing Planet Junkie, their latest studio effort, Pat Sanders has decided to repackage and release some of those vintage pieces from the past, namely the earlier years with Pete Falconer on vocals. It is a fine proof of quality when your 'left-overs' are as delicious as the freshly cooked material, often fussed on, set aside only to be revisited because of some glittering spark that needed some added ventilation. The musical talent is unimpeachably obvious, and this impromptu recording has a feeling of intimacy that is quite unique to any artistic career. In some cases, the sketches have remained honed little gems that needed only a bit of polishing, perhaps a brief and fascinating window into how musicians construct their often-meticulous craft. Pat always composes on the piano, and that template for creation is abundantly clear on all of tracks. Here are some highlights:' Vagabond' was originally released on the majestic Safe Asylum album and has a blistering guitar solo that is gut-wrenching, courtesy of David Storey. Particularly loved 'Eternal Cycle', with the patented lively piano leading the way, great vocals as the norm, both lead and backing, with an added spoken whisper, dotted with fabulous recurrent orchestrations and a sense of release that is Drifting Sun's raison d'etre. The extended axe solo from Matthieu Spaeter is phenomenal, intricate yet accessible.

'Atlantis' is utterly sublime, surely a DS classic, crushing softness and raw courage emanate from the notes, the mood is serene and yet vivid. Piano and vocal duet. Vividly serene I guess ... (silly laughter). Keeping the piano on the forefront, 'Bubble' is just a sterling piano etude there to applaud. I could close me eyes and imagine seeing this in concert, a candle on the keyboard as the only illumination. The dexterity and rhythmic ability are there to behold, in sheer splendor. Last of the solo piano pieces, 'A Year in Black' is equally awe inspiring, as pain often does, surely more than bliss.

Huge change of pace, 'The Blond Ghost' has an almost Ultravox feel to it, very progressive synth-pop, but oozing class and orchestral sound, an unexpected moment of revelation, as I remain a big fan of this style (John Foxx happens to be one of my idols).Well done little jewel.

And now the epic 10 minute 'Cascading Tears' that is quite the scream for release, equally vivacious and emotional, a bellow for catharsis, even soothing. The vocal work is astounding, the slippery synths in tune with the pulse. Top that off with a killer guitar solo (Spaeter), that just goes on and on in a furious rampage and you get to the glittering prize! Masterpiece.

The audacity to flash some shimmering organ as on 'Last Supper'! Another DS classic. Need I go on? 'Closure' a piano finale: Its all just brilliant music.

This might just be my favorite DS release, uniquely private glimpse into a fine band that just keeps on drifting towards the sun.

4.5 Solar picks

 Singled Out by DRIFTING SUN album cover Boxset/Compilation, 2019
4.02 | 5 ratings

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Singled Out
Drifting Sun Neo-Prog

Review by kev rowland
Special Collaborator Honorary Reviewer

4 stars In 2015, after a gap of some sixteen years, Drifting Sun returned with their third album. Keyboard player Pat Sanders had decided it was time, and created a brand-new version of the band, with himself being the only person who had appeared on the two albums in the Nineties. Making up for lost time they have released four acclaimed albums since then, as well as a number of singles which have often included bonus songs which were not available on a physical CD and were only available as downloads. So, a decision was taken towards the end of 2019 to release a physical album (and download of course), containing 12 songs ranging from solo piano pieces to full-blown band numbers, plus some interesting demos and various outtakes. Full details of where each track originally appeared is included in a 6-panel Digipak along with a full-colour 12-page booklet.

In my humble opinion Drifting Sun's last album, 'Planet Junkie', is their best album to date and one of the few to get full marks from me, and I am sure many people have discovered the band because of that release and hopefully they will be looking back through the catalogue. But there are distinct and different areas of the band, and this collection only includes rarities from the time when Peter Falconer was singing with Drifting Sun, who appeared on the albums 'Trip The Life Fantastic'. 'Safe Asylum' and 'Twilight'. Having played this a lot now, one has to wonder just how so many of these songs did not make it onto a full album yet given their release rate they are already putting many other bands to shame. Yes, some of them are solo pieces, and to my ears there is probably more piano than normal, but there are some real delights on here. It is a nice bookend to Falconer's time with the band, as he is a wonderful singer, melodic and emotional, and while there have been a few line-up changes even during that short time, there is a restrained beauty as everyone comes together.

Musically it is often based on piano, with those lush vocals, and then the other guys coming in and out as the need arises. Sometimes their contribution to the music is by not taking part at all. Take for example 'Atlantis' which originally featured on the 'Remedy' single: this song is basically Peter and Pat who provides piano (plus there are some strings) and is simply stunning. Harmonies abound and I fall into the music headlong, immersing myself in the emotions. I really enjoyed the solo piano pieces such as 'Bubble' ' I could listen to a whole album of music like that (Pat ' are you reading this?) ' and although the album is slightly more fractured due to coming together from different musicians and time periods the overall result is something which is a delight from start to end. There are some gems on here to be discovered, and it is great they have not been 'lost' in the world of digital downloads but are available in a physical form all in one place. More crossover to my ears these days then neo prog, this is a rarities compilation worth discovering for the quality of the music and not just the scarcity of the material.

 Planet Junkie by DRIFTING SUN album cover Studio Album, 2019
3.87 | 105 ratings

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Planet Junkie
Drifting Sun Neo-Prog

Review by alainPP

3 stars Known with "safe asylum" that gave a good slap to the neo-prog genre with a guitarist aware of its form, I expected the last album with avidity. Here, after a few well-taken tracks, the record lacks a bit of character, the songs being listened to without too much connection and lacking a little juice. The album is not bad, but well below its predecessors. In fact, it is with the two biggest pieces that we manage here to take off more than usual, but it is a little fair given the performances already listened to; a good record but unfortunately not finished.
 Planet Junkie by DRIFTING SUN album cover Studio Album, 2019
3.87 | 105 ratings

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Planet Junkie
Drifting Sun Neo-Prog

Review by kev rowland
Special Collaborator Honorary Reviewer

5 stars According to the Bible (as described by Record Collector), 'The Progressive Underground Vol. 1', I first reviewed Drifting Sun in January 1997 when they were a very different beast indeed to what I am listening to now. Pat Sanders (keyboards, drum programming, composer and producer) and bassist Manu Michael are of course still there, as they have always been, but while drummer Will Jones has been around since the band started their second phase in 2015 and guitarist Mathieu Spaeter has also been there for a few albums, they appear to have misplaced singer Peter Falconer who has been with the band in recent years, and instead they have brought in three new vocalists. Step forward Marc Atkinson, Colin Mold and Joshua Corum who each get three songs. I really appreciate the album has been constructed so we have a singer for. The first three songs (Marc), an intervening instrumental, another three from the next singer (Colin), instrumental, and then the final three (Josh). It allows the ears to adjust to the new voice and provides far more continuity than one might expect.

I really enjoyed 'Twilight', and Pat Sanders and I have been in contact quite a lot since then, so I knew something of what to expect with this album, but I must confess I was somewhat surprised to hear the major step change as this is a huge step forwards in every direction. To my ears this is easily the finest Drifting Sun album I have heard so far, as they take their neo prog and crossover influences and create something which is incredibly polished, dynamic and simply beautiful. All three singers add real polish to the album, but there is one song which absolutely stands out for me, namely "Born of a Dream" which is primarily Pat on piano with Josh Corum (Head With Wings) on vocals along with some gentle acoustic guitar. Pat wrote the song for Josh as he knew what he could do with the material, then asked Eric Bouillette (The Room, Nine Skies) to also become involved with it, and his response was that he was too busy but as the song made him cry he would do it! When I first heard it, I felt so moved that when it ended, I felt quite empty, so I had to play it again as it was the only thing which would fill the void.

This is a sublime release, modern and progressive with pop tendencies here and there, wonderful songs performed by strong musicians with three amazing singers at the front. Complex, complicated, yet somehow simple all at the same time, this is certainly an album which is highly accessible yet also repays repeat listenings. Absolutely essential.

 Planet Junkie by DRIFTING SUN album cover Studio Album, 2019
3.87 | 105 ratings

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Planet Junkie
Drifting Sun Neo-Prog

Review by Warthur
Prog Reviewer

3 stars The latest Drifting Sun album, Planet Junkie, feels like a bit of a transitional release for the resurgent neo-proggers. From their comeback album (Trip the Life Fantastic) to 2017's Twilight, which I consider to be the band's masterpiece, Drifting Sun enjoyed the services of Peter Falconer on lead vocals, but he is absent from this release.

In interviews, Pat Sanders (the band's keyboardist and sole consistent member lynchpin over all its incarnations) has explained that this was due to Peter's commitments to his PhD studies making it impossible for him to devote sufficient time to the band, though to my knowledge Falconer himself has not made any public comment to confirm or deny this. Either way, Falconer's departure presents Drifting Sun with a problem; his obvious vocal talents were a significant ingredient in the band's revival, and in addition as lyricist he also helped tie the albums together thematically (with Twilight being a masterful example of this).

Whilst many bands would make recruiting a new permanent lead singer a top priority under such circumstances, holding off on an album release until someone had been recruited, Drifting Sun have adopted a novel strategy here: Planet Junkie is an album of three sections of three songs each (with the instrumentals Life and I Will Be King as palette-cleansers between the sections), and each section has a different vocalist performing songs in a somewhat different style. Marc Atkinson kicks us off with some harder, heavier tracks, Colin Mold takes the second act in a more gentle and haunting direction, whilst Joshua Corum wraps things up with some more whimsical numbers, with album closer Everlasting Creed having a pinch of theatricality to it.

It would perhaps be better to think of Planet Junkie as a triptych of EPs than a single album in its own right; each section is decent enough in its own way, and the album certainly gives Drifting Sun an opportunity to exercise the full range of their talents. At the same time, it's questionable whether this format presents a long-term solution to the departure of Falconer; it very much feels like Drifting Sun are pondering which direction to take their work in next, and are doing us the favour of letting us listen in to their sketches of where they might take things in future.

In short, Planet Junkie might be the weakest album at least since Drifting Sun's 2015 return to action, and might even be the weakest album in their discography. That sounds damning, but given the high standard they have maintained so far, it really isn't: in fact, the album's pretty good for what it is. At the same time, I can't put hand on heart and say that the troubled circumstances surrounding the lineup don't hamper the album in terms of it being a cohesive release.

 Twilight by DRIFTING SUN album cover Studio Album, 2017
3.92 | 113 ratings

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Twilight
Drifting Sun Neo-Prog

Review by Warthur
Prog Reviewer

5 stars Drifting Sun are one of a number of neo-prog bands who, having perhaps not gained that much attention during their original runs, have found both renewed audience interest during their recent reformations and, arguably, are even better than they were first time around.

Take Drifting Sun, who started off in the 1990s playing a style reminiscent of what might have happened had Marillion developed their Fish-era sound in a different direction as opposed to graduating to a new sound under Steve Hogarth, with the On the Rebound album perhaps being the best of their original incarnation. However, since the Trip the Life Fantastic album which revived the project, Drifting Sun's time truly seems to have come, with the band releasing more new albums to greater commercial attention and critical acclaim than they ever enjoyed back in the 1990s.

In particular, I have to give applause to Twilight, representing perhaps the first time that the band's 2010s run has produced an album which not merely matches the high bar set by 1998's classic On the Rebound, but exceeds it. With an appropriately haunting atmosphere, the album resembles what might have happened had Clutching At Straws-era Marillion went in a Victorian Gothic direction. More or less every song on the album has a full on shivers-up-your-spine moment.

Compared to its predecessor, Safe Asylum, the album finds the band diallling down on the heavy rock moments in favour of focusing more on haunting, melancholy atmospheres, and it works a charm. With this, Drifting Sun establish themselves as perhaps the most interesting neo-prog act of the present era.

 Twilight by DRIFTING SUN album cover Studio Album, 2017
3.92 | 113 ratings

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Twilight
Drifting Sun Neo-Prog

Review by javajeff

4 stars This is my favorite Drifting Sun album for the amazing melodies. It is an instant classic, and songs like Twilight, Summer Skies, and Remedy are perfect. Twilight features Peter Falconer on vocals, and he has never sounded better. There are times when I feel like I am listening to Supertramp or something from the 70s. The compositions and lyrics are just fantastic. I give Pat Sanders a ton of credit for pulling off Twilight. It is a work of art that should be in every progressive rock collection. Twilight features no fillers, and every track follows a consistent theme and familiarity that flows through the album. Highly recommended.
 Planet Junkie by DRIFTING SUN album cover Studio Album, 2019
3.87 | 105 ratings

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Planet Junkie
Drifting Sun Neo-Prog

Review by javajeff

4 stars I love Safe Asylum, Twilight, and Trip The Life Fantastic. They are the three excellent Drifting Sun albums, and the heart of the catalog. Planet Junkie is another outstanding album, but I do miss the vocals of Peter Falconer. He has a style that sets Drifting Sun apart from other groups in the genre. While On The Rebound is an excellent album without Peter, I consider the albums following it to be the signature sound of Drifting Sun. With that being said, Planet Junkie is another fantastic release even if it lacks the cohesion of one singer. It is broken up into three parts, and while I do not know two of the singers, Marc Atkinson is one that I really enjoy from other projects like Riversea and Nine Stones Close. However, all three vocalists do an excellent job, and keep the album flowing. To Tame A Star is likely my favorite track if I had to pick one, so I am impressed with the offerings from Colin Mold. Planet Junkie has many great melodies, and a couple instrumentals that divide up the three parts. Planet Junkie is another brilliant addition to a fantastic catalog of albums that should keep most listeners entertained. Pat Sanders and company put out quality stuff, and this is no exception. Highly recommended.
 Planet Junkie by DRIFTING SUN album cover Studio Album, 2019
3.87 | 105 ratings

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Planet Junkie
Drifting Sun Neo-Prog

Review by The Jester

5 stars Review # 108. I discovered Drifting Sun with the release of Trip the Life Fantastic, and I have been following their releases since then. I don't know how they do that, but with every new release, they become better and better.

The band's new album is Planet Junkie, which, in my ears sound different than their previous works. Maybe one of the reasons for that is the absence of Peter Falconer, the band's singer. I don't know why, but suddenly Drifting Sun left without a lead singer. Pat Sanders, the band's leader, decided to invite some singers he already knew, in order to participate in Falconer's place. Three of them accepted the invitation, so Planet Junkie includes three lead singers instead of one; which add a lot in the album's dynamic.

The album is separated into 3 major parts, and on each part, there is a different lead singer. These 3 parts are divided with an instrumental piece. So, Planet Junkie includes 9 songs and 2 instrumental pieces.

As far as I know, Pat Sanders faced many difficult situations in his personal life lately, and many of those situations are reflected in Planet Junkie. The album is filled with wonderful and melancholic melodies, which, in my opinion, has always been the strong point in their music. Pat is a skilled composer and musician, and he is able to write some heartbreaking melodies which I adore, and this album is not an exception.

But the album is not only about melancholy and drama. It also includes some uplifting songs, like Planet Junkie and Within Your Bones for example, which are excellent.

I'm sure that the fans of Drifting Sun will enjoy this album a lot, but because this is not a typical Drifting Sun album, I would recommend it to everybody. Even if you never liked the music of Drifting Sun before, you should listen to Planet Junkie. Maybe you will be pleasantly surprised by its quality. I don't think there is anything else to say. Listen to the album and you will form your own opinion.

Favorite songs so far: Within Your Bones, Missing, Night Time Sorrow, Planet Junkie, Stay with Me.

My Rating: 4.5 stars.

 Planet Junkie by DRIFTING SUN album cover Studio Album, 2019
3.87 | 105 ratings

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Planet Junkie
Drifting Sun Neo-Prog

Review by tszirmay
Special Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

5 stars I have been left with no choice but to come out of reviewing retirement as there are musicians out there who have asked me to continue to write about their most recent accomplishments. First up are my old friends Drifting Sun, a much maligned Neo-prog band with a solid history of releasing thrilling albums that hit the spot each and every time. Leader and keyboardist Pat Sanders has been a FB friend for quite a while and after losing his lead vocalist Peter Falconer last year to health complications , he was in need of finding suitable lead lungs to adorn his ornate compositions , having already enlisted Joshua Corum of Head with Wings, so I recommended 2 of , in my view, the top British vocalists out there, namely Marc Atkinson of Nine Stones Close, Riversea, Moon Halo as well as Colin Mold (Kara, Karnataka and solo). Pat promptly checked them out, felt that they would be perfect fits and presto, the channels of communication kicked into gear! ''Planet Junkie'' comes on the heels of the brilliant ''Twilight '', a neo-prog masterpiece that transcends the label by offering passionate, romantic and intense music, showcasing more and more of Pat's piano mastery. Could this new album be even better? In fact, the setlist is very interestingly set up with each vocalist given three consecutive tracks to express their craft, with Pat doing intermezzos in between , a brilliant chapter-like experience that only enhances the enjoyment of the magnificently constructed songs.

We are introduced to the Marc Atkinson trio of songs, featuring this tremendous vocalist who has adorned a slew of progressive albums that have earned high marks for quality, a voice that transcends any genre, full of romance and passion . ''Within Your Bones'' kicks off this masterpiece with a moody opener, synths and voice propulsing the band ever forward, Marc's hushed voice easily morphing into more powerful exuberance when called upon, sealed by a Andy Mackay-like sax solo from Sarah Skinner and a sizzling Matthieu Spaeter guitar solo that has a little Phil Manzanera feel to it. Pat tortures his synth for good fortune. The title track holds nothing back, a rollicking effort that chugs along at breakneck speed, ushered along by their veteran, well-oiled and manic rhythm section of bassist Manu Michael and drummer Will Jones . Pat and Matthieu combine to put some melodic meat onto the arrangement , the later slapping a wicked propulsive solo to boot, before Marc does some vocal gymnastics that few could reproduce, imitated by a whistling synthesizer for good measure. The crowning achievement is the melancholic ''Missing'', a gorgeous melody that showcases Marc's voluptuous voice, in delicate agony, ballads don't get much better than this! Curling guitar arpeggios and a delicate organ humming in the background serve as the initial platform for a typical Atkinson delivery, where the instrumental intensity is matched by the booming vocals. Matthieu lets loose on his axe, explosive and feathered , enough to send shivers down one's spine.

In memoriam to his father, Pat created this touchingly brief instrumental called ''Life'', a brilliant piano etude that transcends time and space, evocative and sublime.

Colin Mold is one of the most underrated musicians in progland, a terrific multi-instrumentalist who can shine on guitars, bass and violin but its his haunting voice that really hits the mark, a surreal blend of Peter Gabriel and Justin Hayward (talk about icons). His 3 solo albums are absolute must-haves in my opinion, surely an accomplished artist that fully deserves wider recognition and reverential accolades. His work here should entice more than one listener to explore his craft as he does justice to the three allotted tracks that bear his stamp. Truth is both Pat and Colin seemed to coalesce as one in creating these pieces, kindred spirits in so many ways, definitely far from being rock stars but most assuredly dedicated musicians. Just listen to the crushingly timeless ''Night Time Sorrow'' , a masterful duet with Pat on piano and Colin's vaporous vocals and the light will shine brightly into your soul! The epic symphonic nature of ''Stay With Me'' is utterly beguiling, Colin putting on quite the performance, aided by a lead guitar-led chorus that will drop the jaw of any music fan, a level of unmatched passion that gives this band its credentials and its credibility. The extended acoustic guitar solo is liquid beauty, the voice spectacular and the overall impression, indelible. Beauty shines on ''To Tame a Star'', contrasting voices as Colin emotes vividly while his whispered hush occasionally enters the fray , the instrumentalists showing off their considerable skills, Matthieu ripping his electric guitar unashamedly while guest Eric Bouillette shines on violin, then giving the spotlight over to Pat to deliver quite the synth solo, short, sweet and killer! Colin's trio of tracks are simply majestic, coming across as a complete gorgeous whole.

If anyone doubts these guys have the chops, the thrilling ''I Will Be King'' settles the case quite convincingly, as the musicians display a furious bravado that pulls no punches, throwing in Ben Bell into a delirious organ solo, as well a series of exciting solos from the lead instruments. Wow!

Joshua Corum was previously unknown to me but Pat's choice was clearly dead on, as he has a different voice with a higher-pitched, more modern slightly American tone that suits the material just fine. The trio of songs selected for him are laden with altering complexity, moodier and perhaps more eccentric. Pat's piano introduces ''Born of a Dream'' , a seductive fragility emanating from Joshua's pained vocal, acoustic guitar adding to the frailty. A weeping violin courtesy of Eric Bouillette adds drama, while the rhythm section takes a well-deserved break at some nearby pub. ''Diogenes'' is pure prog delight, naming Plato, Socrates, Diogenes and the 'Academy' as influences, while the music salts and peppers dissonance with hints of Gentle Giant, as Joshua navigates the lyrics with steadfast passion and insistence, Matthieu's gripping axe shredding mercilessly, as Manu and Will keep the brisk pace with zest and gusto. He ends the album on a fabulous 10 minute romp, that is both explosive, humorous, breathtaking, at times shrill and excitable and ultimately intoxicating. ''Everlasting Creed'' delivers all the proggy goods, combining manic , breakneck instrumentation, colossal vocals and profound lyrics , as well as infusing a unexpected clarinet spot (Conrad Cheng) , another wicked guitar solo (man, can Matthieu play!) .

Drifting Sun continues its meteoric path and to Pat's credit , he has always displayed the uncanny ability to entertain by keeping predictability locked up in some Safe Asylum (sic), which makes the band so unique among prog outfits. Never boring or safe, Drifting is certainly far from their twilight (sic) , as their future cannot be brighter . Pat gambled on a new course and with a little help from his friends, the result is clearly spectacular. Massive, rapturous and continuous applause to all those who participated in this splendid cosmic adventure! I encourage all fans to travel to ''Planet Junkie'' and be ready for quite the discovery.

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