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Roz Vitalis - The Hidden Man Of The Heart CD (album) cover

THE HIDDEN MAN OF THE HEART

Roz Vitalis

 

RIO/Avant-Prog

4.14 | 162 ratings

From Progarchives.com, the ultimate progressive rock music website

Great1703
5 stars A very interesting album with beautiful and various music. The album is very well arranged as a classical symphony. But sometimes there is a similarity with a rock symphony. Several main themes "initiated" at the beginning of the album are developed further. The album combines, in my opinion, very well, several styles. The album is conceptual, filled with mysticism, which is amplified from beginning to end. The first track, "Someone Passed Over", which opens the album, is a dedication to classical music. This is the first track in a series of tracks in the style of classics. The second track "Passing Over (LP Version)" refers us to the 60s of the past century, it is like a small "symphony". The composition has an "introduction", then the theme "unfolds", a large set of solo instruments is used: an electric guitar, keyboards, wind instruments, and then a slow "disappearing" ending and again return to the main theme. Wind instruments add romanticism to the composition. The third composition, "Rhapsody of Refugees," probably refers us to the 70s. It sounds interesting electric organ and winds. The fourth song "Blurred" is romantic. Beautiful passages of solo guitar and winds. The theme, which at the beginning of the "romantic" guitar was picked up and developed by winds, the guitar returns in the epilogue. In the fifth piece "Trampled by the Lion And Adder" - a sad melody performed by stringed instruments sounds. Very "lyrical" violin. In the sixth composition "Thou Shalt Tread Upon the Lion and Adder" in the first part - rock sketch, then - keyboards and winds slightly change the initial theme, then rock guitar, space effects, and return to the rock theme, culmination again. In the seventh track "Passing on the Line" first solo the lyrical piano, then the melody loses its lyrical hue, it becomes more "hard" The eighth song "Disturbed by Jungle" continues the keyboard solo theme begun in the seventh, and the sound is slightly more uneven than in the previous song. The ninth song "Jungle Waltz" will justify its name - it is a waltz, but played in a modern musical interpretation, more technical, sounds like a technical melody. The tenth work "Wounded by the Lion and Adder" repeats and develops the theme begun in the fifth one. The violin is also lonely and magnificent. The eleventh composition "Fret Not Thyself Because of Evildoers" is an excellent development of instrumental rock works of famous groups of the late 60s and early 70s. The twelfth work "The Hidden Man of the Heart", which gave the name to the entire album, is an album in 1 composition: here the main theme of the symphony album is used, the beginning with an acoustic guitar, a romantic electric guitar replacing wind and keyboard. The thirteenth track "Some Refugee Passed Over" is the final track of several tracks in the style of classical music. The fourteenth song "Psalm 6 (LP Version)" is the culmination and epilogue of the entire album. All the main themes of the album are woven in it. The first part is rock, the second is romantic "organ", the third is winds and guitars, and the final part of the composition and album is again a romantic solo, then slightly changed by the distortion effect, rhythm change and the ending!
Great1703 | 5/5 |

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