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TALES OF CANTERBURY: THE WILDE FLOWERS STORY

The Wilde Flowers

Canterbury Scene


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The Wilde Flowers Tales Of Canterbury: The Wilde Flowers Story album cover
2.41 | 16 ratings | 5 reviews | 12% 5 stars

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Boxset/Compilation, released in 1994

Songs / Tracks Listing

1. Impotence (2:10)
2. Those Words They Say (2:40)
3. Memories (1:35)
4. Don't Try To Change Me (2:26)
5. Parchman Farm (2:18)
6. Almost Grown (2:50)
7. She's Gone (2:13)
8. Slow Walkin' Talk (2:26)
9. He's Bad For You (2:49)
10. It's What I Feel (A Certain Kind) (2:19)
11. Memories (Instrumental ) (2:08)
12. Never Leave Me (2:36)
13. Time After Time (2:45)
14. Just Where I Want (2:10)
15. No Game When You Lose (2:53)
16. Impotence (1:16)
17. Why Do You Care (Zobe) (3:13)
18. The Pieman Cometh (Zobe) (3:15)
19. Summer Spirit (Zobe) (3:28)
20. She Loves To Hurt (3:12)
21. The Big Show (4:12)
22. Memories (3:03)

Total Time: 57:59

Lyrics

Search THE WILDE FLOWERS Tales Of Canterbury: The Wilde Flowers Story lyrics

Music tabs (tablatures)

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Line-up / Musicians

- Robert Wyatt / drums, voice (1-16, 20-22)
- Hugh Hopper / bass (1-16, 20-22)
- Brian Hopper / guitar, backing vocals (2-19, 21)
- Kevin Ayers / vocals (5-7)
- Richard Coughlan / drums (2, 3, 12-16)
- Graham Flight / vocals (1 & 9)
- Richard Sinclair / guitar (4, 5, 7-11)
- Pye Hastings / guitar (1 & 20)

Line-up Zobe (tracks 17-19):
- Dave Lawrence / voice, bass
- Bob Gilleson / drums
- John Lawrence / guitar, backing vocals

Releases information

CD Blueprint / Voiceprint BP 123CD (1994)

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  • Parchman Farm Tales Of Canterbury: The Wilde Flowers Story, 1994

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Import
Blueprint UK 1998
Audio CD$12.64
$7.94 (used)


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THE WILDE FLOWERS Tales Of Canterbury: The Wilde Flowers Story ratings distribution


2.41
(16 ratings)
Essential: a masterpiece of progressive rock music(12%)
12%
Excellent addition to any prog rock music collection(0%)
0%
Good, but non-essential (31%)
31%
Collectors/fans only (56%)
56%
Poor. Only for completionists (0%)
0%

THE WILDE FLOWERS Tales Of Canterbury: The Wilde Flowers Story reviews


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Collaborators/Experts Reviews

Review by obiter
PROG REVIEWER
2 stars It's a who's who of the canterbury scene but this ain't prog. You would not be suprised if Van the Man was singing. there's even bluesy twangs:

Booker White's Parchman Farm:... i'm going to be here for the rest of my life, but all i did was shoot my wife ... Chuch Berry .. Almost Grown

Some of the recording is truly dreadful: the pieman cometh sticks out as a particularly awful recording: think worst bootleg recording made on a mobile you've heard and you're coming close.

I'm a fan of the Canterbury scene so it's interesting to listen to so many of the main players in one group at an early stage. If I wasn't a fan then this would hold no interest for me, so it fits perfectly into the 2 star category.

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Send comments to obiter (BETA) | Report this review (#137405) | Review Permalink
Posted Sunday, September 09, 2007

Review by siLLy puPPy
PROG REVIEWER
3 stars This is an interesting listen. Although this is the beginning of the Canterbury scene it is not the place to begin to explore that subgenre. This is simply the stomping ground for the who's who of that scene that would go on to produce the awesomeness of Soft Machine and Caravan.

Despite the negative reviews that depict this as naïve British pop, I have to say that it's not bad for what it is. I actually like pop music and I really like the British pop of the 60s. It's not even close to the standards of the greats of the era but there is certainly some decent pop tunes to be had here.

Although THE WILDE FLOWERS never actually recorded an album we get to hear this historic gem as an archival artefact. Not exactly a masterpiece it is however an essential listen for those who like to hear how the evolution of certain sounds took place although there is little if any sounds of what is to come from any of these guys.

Thankfully Hugh Hopper, Robert Wyatt and Kevin Ayers would go on to form Soft Machine. And the same for the fact that Richard Sinclair, David Sinclair, Pye Hastings and Richard Coughlan would go on to form Caravan. An intriguing listen but don't feel like you're missing out if you skip it.

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Send comments to siLLy puPPy (BETA) | Report this review (#1094294) | Review Permalink
Posted Saturday, December 21, 2013

Latest members reviews

3 stars The Canterbury Sound is a special subgenre, little but very interesting. Its mixture of jazz and pop made a soft and easy listened form of progressive rock. The genre originated from this band "The Wilde Flowers" which existed in the sixties but never released anything then. This is a collecti ... (read more)

Report this review (#1226612) | Posted by DrömmarenAdrian | Wednesday, July 30, 2014 | Review Permanlink

2 stars The band that spawned Kevin Ayers, Hugh Hopper, Robert Wyatt, Pye Hastings, Soft Machine and Caravan. The grandfather of the Canterbury Scene, in other words. Musicwise, this is nowhere near the Canterbury Scene. Rockabilly, naive pop, rock, blues and everything that went around in the 1960s ... (read more)

Report this review (#242179) | Posted by toroddfuglesteg | Wednesday, September 30, 2009 | Review Permanlink

2 stars A historically important collection, but I'm afraid that's really all it is. The Wilde Flowers could easily be described as The Yardbirds of the Canterbury Scene. Most of the famous Canterbury musicians played here at one time or another; including Robert Wyatt, Hugh Hopper, and Kevin Ayers of So ... (read more)

Report this review (#117731) | Posted by Speesh | Monday, April 09, 2007 | Review Permanlink

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