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JOHN HOLDEN

Neo-Prog • United Kingdom


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John Holden biography
Hailing from Cheshire, England, a multi-instrumentalist / composer John HOLDEN has had a strong emotional connection to music in his young age, especially progressive rock. Having played and composed for many years, John made the decision to commit to creating a full album of original material. In collaboration with lots of session musicians (see his album page) John has recorded and released "Capture Light" in 2018.

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JOHN HOLDEN discography


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JOHN HOLDEN top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.87 | 33 ratings
Capture Light
2018
3.73 | 66 ratings
Rise and Fall
2020
3.74 | 37 ratings
Circles in Time
2021

JOHN HOLDEN Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

JOHN HOLDEN Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

JOHN HOLDEN Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

4.50 | 2 ratings
Together Apart (Charity album)
2021

JOHN HOLDEN Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

JOHN HOLDEN Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 Circles in Time by HOLDEN, JOHN album cover Studio Album, 2021
3.74 | 37 ratings

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Circles in Time
John Holden Neo-Prog

Review by BrufordFreak
Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

3 stars I am always excited to see a new John Holden project; his compositions and productions are almost unparalleled in terms of quality and scholarly sincerity.

1. "Avalanche" (6:18) a very polished, professional YES/Neo Prog opening with some amazing drumming (thanks, Nick D'Virgilio!) and awesome guitar play lead into a very theatric Jean Pageau (MYSTERY) vocal set within a very stage-appropriate soundscape. In the fourth minute we get a little keyboard-centered interlude before returning to main vocal themes, but the at 4:25 we're off into another, more serious, instrumental passage. Nice soli all around from LA session guitarist Eric "Potz" Potapenko and John's keys. My favorite song on the album. (9/10)

2. "High Line" (6:58) led by an excellent, emotional vocal by prog journeyman and devotee, Peter Jones (Progzilla, The Colin Tench Project, Red Bazaar, Barock Project, Tiger Moth Tales, Cyan, Camel, etc.) A solid song; my second top three song. (13/15)

3. "The Secret of Chapel Field" (7:36) a spacious, simply constructed and arranged song created to accompany a father-daughter ballad as performed by Sally Minnear and Marc Atkinson (Mostly Autumn, Nine Stones Close, Riversea). Guitars, piano, violin, mandolin, double bass, and synth strings make sparse contributions to airily accompany the lovers tale. Very theatric. Marc's performance as the father feels much more invested, genuinely emotional, than that of Sally as the daughter. The music is quite lovely--especially in the passages that fill space between the vocals. My other top three song. (13.25/15)

4. "Dreams of Cadiz" (5:17) classical-sounding piano--sounding very much like the stage showy stuff that Liberace would perform--opens this before stepping out in lieu of Oliver Day's multiple tracks of Spanish guitars. Piano returns with guitar accompaniment, and the two take turns dancing with the lead, sometimes at the same time, while bass and hand drums lend intermittent support. Electric instruments and jazzy drum kit join in for the final 90 seconds. Impressive but, is this prog? (8.75/10)

5. "Circles" (5:47) piano and acoustic guitar accompany Sally Minnear (on multiple tracks supporting herself) for the first 90 seconds. Bass and incidental synth sounds joins in for the second verse and then programmed drums and percussion and more synths are added for an instrumental passage. Enter drums and the soundscape fills and broadens out a bit, but then we strip back down to bare bones for the third verse. At 4:20 drums, electric bass, and other synth-generated sounds fill more of the field as Sally sings the chorus. We end with a simple version, bringing us back to the beginning. Cute, enjoyable, and innocuous but nothing to write home about. (8.5/10)

6. "KV62" (19:23) a truly theatric epic about the discovery of the tomb of the Egyptian Pharoah Tuth-Ank-Amon. It's gorgeous and definitely ordered as a sequential narrative with great performances from vocalists Pete Jones and That Joe Payne, Vikram Shankar's piano, and John's keyboard orchestration. It is, however, in this latter department that the song falls short, I'm afraid, as either the computer keyboards John had access to during the recording were inferior to some of the modern sample/replicators or else he should have hired the real orchestra to perform the score as he tried to do on his computer keyboard. I appreciate the scoring and effort to carefully realize the orchestral parts on keyboard, but it just doesn't measure up to the real thing. Then there is the fact of so few emotional high points in the song--it seems to travel along at one and the same pace and energy level from start to finish--which is something no one would expect from a prog epic. And the talents of those enlisted within the 20- minute piece are sadly under-utilized. (32/40)

Total Time 51:19

I have to admit that I'm disappointed with this new release of John's. I'm not really sure that this is prog rock-- especially as rock drum kit, electric bass, electric guitar, and electric synths are absent over fully 50% of this music. While the quality of his compositions and engineering are top notch, I'm not as drawn back to the songs of this album as much as with his previous two albums.

B-/3.5 stars; a collection of well-composed and impeccably-produced theatricities; just not up to proggy par of John's previous albums.

 Circles in Time by HOLDEN, JOHN album cover Studio Album, 2021
3.74 | 37 ratings

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Circles in Time
John Holden Neo-Prog

Review by alainPP

5 stars John HOLDEN is this english multi-instrumentalist, composer and producer who creates distinctive pastoral progressive sounds; he manages to bring in beautiful people for a condensed rock, folk, jazz, hard, flamenco and classical and is accompanied here by Vikram Shankar on keyboards. Stories of murder, madness and one about Egypt to travel to the universe of Chrisma or that of Lewis Caroll. A unique sound that will make you prick up (rabbit's) ears

"Avalanche" attacks hard with a riff on the edge of hard which drops deep; the mysterious voice of Jean Pageau mated to Nick's drums add pep; the harmonious instrumental part reminds me of the most beautiful moments of Asia or the Yes of the 80's "High Line" starts off with a jazzy track, Supertramp atmosphere for the sax; Steely Dan on one side too; it's Pete Jones who sings well here on a cotton cloud; Frank des Iona's violin amplifies this intimate and warm title and plays with the sax "The Secret of Chapel Field" for an Irish slap with violin, rhyme that goes off the beaten track; Sally of the Lords of Dance and Celestial Fire rather than for her father's name duels with Marc Atkinson of the Nine Stones Close and other Riversea to stop time; spleen violin on a sad story of lost love, sublime "Dreams of Cadiz" for a piano instrumental gently bringing the Andalusian guitar, flamenco style "leg to model" on the solo of Innuendo "in the background; a digression where the arpeggio is king, where the legs move on their own; a little synth to fill the space and a musical pearl has just passed "Circles" for a ballad narrating the unhealthy convolutions; Robin of the Cosmograf and Big Big Train accompanies Sally on a progressive air, a latent evolutionary crescendo more complicated than it seems; title that sends you out of time "KV62" for the concept slap on the discovery of Tutankhamun, dark and mystical oriental atmosphere in 7 scenes: Theban song by Jérémy Irons, percussions, choirs, everything is there to signify Death; New Orleans break with That Joe Payne and his divine voice speaking out about the soul reincarnated in a solar barge; discovery of the tomb with a well-paced afro sound bordering on grandiloquent orchestral and flamboyant with an obvious and well-managed progressive latency. It rises in a divine way on the addition of Peter, on instruments that assemble without thinking, we are amazed, we regress to the dantesque pieces of the dinos in their time; A melody across the Atlantic as a final reminder that leaves you doubtful, ecstasy comes at this price. A magnificent album which transcends style, genre, prog movement; there is The Enid, Alan Parsons, Yes, John Holden, of course of great quality; fantastic album which sets the prog record straight just for the track KV62.

 Capture Light by HOLDEN, JOHN album cover Studio Album, 2018
3.87 | 33 ratings

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Capture Light
John Holden Neo-Prog

Review by kev rowland
Special Collaborator Honorary Reviewer

5 stars Last year I was fortunate enough to hear John's second album, 'Rise and Fall', and it is safe to say I was blown away by what I was hearing. Here was a multi-instrumentalist who had brought together a group of singers and additional musicians to deliver an album that was simply epic. John and I got to talking afterwards, and that of course led to me wondering what was the debut like? Well, I can honestly say that it is another absolute delight. As well as providing all the material and producing the album, John also provides guitars, bass, keyboards, and programming, but he has also brought in a host of star names to assist including the likes of Emily Dolan Davies, Gary O'Toole, Billy Sherwood, Oliver Wakeman, Peter Jones etc. Then to cap it all he some wonderful singers in Joe Payne (The Enid), Jean Pageau (Mystery) and Julie Gater. Although the album is fairly split between male and female vocals, Julie had a huge part to play as she sang the vast majority of songs as they were being developed (John admits he is unable to sing) and provided guide vocals to the others so they knew what John required.

This is one of those albums where it is difficult to describe what is the most important aspect of the overall. All performances are wonderful, with complex arrangements, the vocal melodies are sublime, while the lyrics are often thought-provoking. Take for example "One Race" which is all about Jesse Owens, not only that race itself at the 1936 Olympics but his return to the States. It actually got me thinking about the man who was famous for setting four world records on the same day and defeating the myth of Aryan supremacy in front of Hitler, so much so that I undertook some research and discovered that not only did Hitler actually shake his hand, but that in many ways he was disowned by his home country on his return due to the colour of his skin. It reminded me of the story of Muhammed Ali returning from the Rome Olympics and then throwing his gold medal into the Ohio River after he and a friend were refused service at a restaurant.

One of my favourites is "Dreamcatching", which is mostly instrumental, featuring some wonderful flute, saxophone, and fretless bass, along with some spoken words about where dreamcatchers hail from and the significance of the different elements. Interestingly, Peter Jones added the flute and saxophone as he was undertaking some backing vocals, and then presented them to John to use if he wished, yet they are an integral part of the overall sound. There is no real theme to the album, and each song is quite different to the rest, yet it is always the strength of the arrangements combined with complexity and simplicity which makes this such a compelling piece of work. That it is a debut from an "unknown" is just incredible, as it is polished and refined in a way that convinces the listener they are playing an album by someone who has been at the very top of their game for a great many years. This is polished progressive rock that is commercial, yet also refined and combing both elements of the Seventies and today to combine in one album that is simply essential for anyone who enjoys this style of music. Check out John's informative website for more details on his albums, all the musicians involved, and then buy them. Simply superb from beginning to the very end.

 Circles in Time by HOLDEN, JOHN album cover Studio Album, 2021
3.74 | 37 ratings

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Circles in Time
John Holden Neo-Prog

Review by Theo Verstrael

5 stars Another excellent release from John Holden, just shortly after his great second album Rise and Fall. Musically he goes a few steps further in the six songs that form the album. The musical styles range from quite heavy prog (Avalanche, quite a strong opener), laid-back jazziness (The high line, very Steely- Dan like with an great 'Í'm living in the big city but seek some quietness and comfort'-feel), sheer beauty of Celtic folk (the unbelievable ballad The secret of Chapel Hill, what a song!) through to traditional Andalusian foklore (the instrumental Dreams of Cadiz) and a honest, open and personal song about despair and hope (Circles). The epic is based on the true but sad story of the real discovery of the worldfamous sarcofage of Egypts best-known pharaoh, Tuth-Ank-Amon. Inthat epic Holden takes the listener again through many different moods in a flowing, ever-changing song that is captivating and beautiful. Add to this a really beautiful booklet that is complete and very informative on the inspiration of all the songs and you'll come to the conclusion that John Holden is a more than welcome addition to the prog world. That he is supported by some very fine musicians like Vikram Shankar, Nick D'Virgilio, Michel St. Pere, Frank Van Essen and Oliver Wakeman and has some of the finest vocalists such as Sally Minnear, Marc Atkinson and That Joe Payne has certainlky helped to make this a stand-out album for everyone who likes real melodies and a varied yet consistent diet of musical styles. No doubt this is a five star.
 Rise and Fall by HOLDEN, JOHN album cover Studio Album, 2020
3.73 | 66 ratings

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Rise and Fall
John Holden Neo-Prog

Review by tszirmay
Special Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

4 stars John Holden, a name to remember and a prime candidate for an upcoming "I told you so", unleashed his debut album "Capture Light" which not only captured my interest but also shed light on a composer of great talent, with a unique style that is nevertheless firmly entrenched in classic symphonic prog mold. His primary skill is composing melodies that stand the test of effort and time, highly adventurous and creative, encompassing all the recipes of similarly successful British artists (The Enid, Oldfield, Hackett, Bainbridge etc?). His second massively successful attribute is to surround himself with some pretty impressive talents in their own right: Sally Minnear and Dave Fitzgerald from Celestial Fire, Jean Pageau and Michel St-Pere of Mystery, Joe Payne (the Enid), Peter Jones with Camel, Red Bazar and Tiger Moth Tales, Jon Camp (Renaissance) and other names like Oliver Wakeman, Billy Sherwood and Nick D'Virgilio as well as many others. His third proficiency is being a multi-instrumentalist who can handle the Big Four (gt, k, b, drs). Add some fabulous cover art and Presto! A star is born. I am sure he will become a stalwart addition to the prog community in the future.

The 7 tracks presented on his sophomore 2020 recording "Rise & Fall" all gleam with shimmering beauty, heartfelt impact, and technical prowess. Expertly constructed and delightfully scored, the lush style welds music and lyrics that leave a lasting impression, effortlessly gliding into the pleasure nodes, like aural anesthesia. This impression is indelibly stamped on the opening epic 10 minute+ "Leap of Faith", a symphonic/pastoral reverie that has all the sonic beauty one can hope for, an orchestrated adventure featuring Peter Jones' sacral voice, intensified by choral backdrops, adding some light rhythmic muscle, whilst weaving a compelling arrangement that covers all the bases with sumptuous detail. It definitely establishes a "religious" feel, as if playing in some ancient cathedral, where solemn resonance and mystic bliss coalesce.

The title track has Jean Pageau on vocals, in a more conventional neo-prog musical setting, neatly accessible in its simplicity and splendor, with Jon Camp's bellowing bass rumbling underneath. Oliver Day unleashes an echo-laden lap steel guitar foray as well as a more conventional electric solo. Mature and intelligent music. The Golden Thread introduces a duet between Joe Payne and Lauren Nolan, two deliriously suave voices, welded together in a classical setting with loads of strings and Oliver Wakeman's erudite piano. Forlorn atmosphere, grandiose in scope as if some movie soundtrack song, finalized by some cinematographic percussion and choir. The tender placidity is rudely bullied by the appropriately titled "Dark Arts", a somber musical reflection that has buzzing guitars, a deliciously vibrant Billy Sherwood bass ramble with NDV on drums pounding surely. Payne delivers a less spectral vocal, as the piece swirls from soft to hard settings, all slayed by a sizzling Zaid Crowe guitar intervention. A wonderful shift in mood and atmosphere.

"Heretic" is another extended piece that has manifold facets to discover. Joe Payne is in fine voice, ably aided by Sally Minnear, accompanied by Vikram Shankar's deft piano, in a romantically overpowering anthem, soaring together in perfect harmony. A tortuous guitar solo ensues with tough Fitzgerald bass underpinning and jungle percussion as a mid-section before returning to the graceful duet. Thoroughly enjoyable. "After the Storm" is another mood setter, Sally's redolent voice gliding solemnly over the glittering piano and a flashy guitar solo from Oliver Day, followed by a whistling synth line, and back to the pastoral eloquence. The final track is probably the highlight apex, a majestic stamp of genius that engulfs the listener in sheer delight, with an expressive platform of emotional singing by Joe, Jean, Lauren and Sally and instrumental interplay of the highest order. In the mid-section, the chorus soars to the heavens with weaving harmony vocals, intensely evocative. Michel St-Père lights in up with his usual brilliant technique with a swift but expressive blast. This climaxes into a paroxysm of feeling and overpowering lift, followed by gentle outro.

Already looking forward to his imminently to be released next one, where more of the same quality is expected and hopefully, take John Holden' s craft up there with the big boys.

4.5 Up and down buttons

 Rise and Fall by HOLDEN, JOHN album cover Studio Album, 2020
3.73 | 66 ratings

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Rise and Fall
John Holden Neo-Prog

Review by sussexbowler

3 stars Basically, a disappointment after 'Capture light'. I think that it shows that such an album relies on the tonality of the singers, and this is where it falls down, with too many 'muddy' tones pervading the middle of the album.

As an extreme example, didn't Chris Squire choose Jon Anderson because the tone of his voice was outside that of the band itself? A classic solo album, 'A curious feeling' had rich higher tone vocals fron Kim Beacon, and it's noticeable that when the vocals of (I presume) Peter Jones come in in the last track 'Ancestors and satellites' it's a noticeable relief.

Infact, 'Ancestors and satellites' is the reason to buy this album, as it's basically on another level to everything else, and is truly a great piece of music. It sets standards, that unfortunately the rest of the songs struggle to match.

 Capture Light by HOLDEN, JOHN album cover Studio Album, 2018
3.87 | 33 ratings

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Capture Light
John Holden Neo-Prog

Review by sussexbowler

3 stars On reflection, there are simularities between this and a Tony Banks solo album, in that there are many singers involved. The Fish songs always stood out on Tony Banks albums.

Whether many singers detracts from an album 'Being one whole' is a point. In 'Capture light' no one singer stands out, leaving the songs to take the laurels.

Again, like a Tony Banks solo record, 'Capture light' is a pleasant enough listen (Very enjoyable infact) without having moments that really stand out. All except two, that is. The first is the song 'Dreamcatcher' which I really enjoy and I find is in a class above, whilst the second is the haunting bell that precedes the last track 'Seaglass hearts'. You can almost smell the sea air.

If you approach the album in a similar way to a Tony Banks solo album, then you won't be disappointed. 'Dreamcatcher' is very enjoyable, and well worth a listen, but it's not enough to take the whole album into the 4 stars zone, for me at least. Regardless, it's still an enjoyable listen.

 Rise and Fall by HOLDEN, JOHN album cover Studio Album, 2020
3.73 | 66 ratings

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Rise and Fall
John Holden Neo-Prog

Review by kev rowland
Special Collaborator Honorary Reviewer

5 stars Although the name John Holden may be new to many of you, I know the stellar guestlist involved in this album will be extremely familiar. More of them later, but hopefully that namecheck will intrigue you enough to search out what is an incredibly powerful album in so many ways. The other thing people need to do is go to John's website where there are full details of what every song means, how it came about etc. I am not going to try and condense that all within the review, as it is much better for everyone to go and read it themselves as it is the perfect accompaniment to what is an incredible piece of work. John provides guitar, bass, keyboards and drum programming and writes the music while his wife Libby provides the lyrics, and then together with the guests bringing in their expertise and experience these wonderful songs are then lifted to a whole new level. If I were pushed to describe the sound, I would suggest crossover progressive rock that somehow also has a hymn-like quality, and in many ways is quite bombastic while also being incredibly restrained. At all times it is the voices which are front and centre, and the use of different singers seems right in the context of an album which never sounds like a project but always like a solid performance from an incredible band. Every musician is there to do a particular job, and they all relish the opportunity to perform on the material, adding their own flavours yet never trying to dominate. For me, the section on "Dark Arts" that really made me turn my head was some rippling piano behind the main melody which only lasted a few bars yet totally transformed the song.

There is aggression, huge breadth of styles, yet it is always in total control. It may be solemn at times, yet there is a beauty and joy which swells through. I can imagine this being performed in a cathedral and the sounds reaching up to the vaulted ceilings and the reverberations and echoes taking the music to new heights. "Heretic" featuring "That" Joe Payne (The Enid) is incredibly powerful yet delicate, with Sally Kinnear providing some sublime backing and duet vocals. Sheer beauty, nothing less. It is hard to fathom this is just the second album by an independent musician, with no label support, yet surely it can only be a matter of time until he is picked up as this is a superb piece of work which needs much wider recognition.

Oh, those guests? How about Peter Jones, Sally Minnear, Lauren Nolan, Jean Pageau and That Joe Payne on vocals; Nick D'Virgilio on drums; Jon Camp, Simon Fitzpatrick and Billy Sherwood on bass; Vikram Shankar and Oliver Wakeman on keyboards; Zaid Crowe, Oliver Day and Michel St-Pere on guitar! They felt this was an important project to be involved, and your ears are demanding you get in involved with it as well. There is a grace within this album that is palpable. Go to the site, read about the album, then buy it ? you will not regret it.

 Capture Light by HOLDEN, JOHN album cover Studio Album, 2018
3.87 | 33 ratings

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Capture Light
John Holden Neo-Prog

Review by tszirmay
Special Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

4 stars It is always a revelation when you land on some new hidden talent, an impulse that makes the hunt for musical stimulation oh so attractive. Therefore, I religiously follow certain progressive rock pundits whom I not only respect, but I also trust their well-crafted words in defining some style that I might feel comfortable with. Drew (aka BrufordFreak) is a long-time colleague who has introduced so many otherwise unknown to me artists, I am left with only the luxury of scouring the net, finding the target and clicking the "purchase" button. Such is the case with John Holden , a British musician who has recently released 2 intricate opuses, loaded to the gills with famous artists to guest on both the 2018 debut 'Capture Light' as well as the stunning sophomore 'Rise and Fall'. One word: IMPRESSIVE!

"Capture Light" sets the wheels in motion with the stirring "Tears from the Sun" , a 9 minute historical hymn that is a grandiose as one would hope for, guided by the lush voice of Joe Payne of The Enid fame, easily one of the UKs most powerful vocalist. Holden is aided by a duo of Olivers: Wakeman on piano and keys as well as Day on mandolin and guitar. The main theme is utterly memorable, sounding pleasant and familiar, an exhilarating entrance, to say the least.

When I first heard "Crimson Sky" , it did not do anything for me, as it was a change of direction that caught me quite by surprise, a traditional melody that harkens back to Oldfield's poppier albums featuring Maggie Reilley, here sung by Julie Gater. The chorus has a "I must have heard this somewhere before" feel, Billy Sherwood takes a lead guitar solo and its fun, quirky and addictive. In fact, I cannot seem to get that melody out of my head, damn musical drugs! The stately title track returns to more medieval stylistics, with piano, lute and acoustic guitar at the forefront, relating to Venice and its grand masters of art. Both Olivers do another tour de force, but Joe Payne really steals the show with an absolute operatic performance of a cathedral melody that is just magic as he hits the high notes like no other. Shivers down the spine.

"Ancient of Days" is more vocal oriented with Mystery's Marc Pageau on lead microphone, with the immense talent of Marc Atkinson (my current favourite vocalist), Julie Gater and Lee-Anne Beecher all on backing vocals. Prog choir extravaganza, a melody that sinks in immediately, very British and gospel at the same time. The music shifts to a more blues feel, the drums are held down brilliantly by Emily Dolan Davies, and John delivers some terrific licks on stinging electric guitar.

A big surprise comes up next "One Race", a wordplay on Jesse Owens in the 1936 Berlin Olympics, overcoming both internal and external racial prejudice in an overt Aryan superiority context with swastikas galore, and doing so with dignity and courage. Joe Payne delivering another stellar delivery, amid sound bites of crowd noise and oppressive Wagnerian fanfare. Lyrically poignant, musically expressive, this is another real gem.

Spoken intro on "Dreamcatcher", introduces a stylistic shift, closer to New Age explorations, seasoned with Native Indian influences, with Peter Jones guesting on flute and sax. The bass and the guitar also thrive in the arrangement as the solid drums shuffle gently along. Soothing little ditty.

And the fantastic pieces keep on coming with "No Man's Land", a jazzier universe where drums are handled by Gary O'Toole, a long time Steve Hackett member, while Julie Gater takes over the lead vocal duties once again. Love the lyrics here, with delightful twists like 'a subway to Paradise'. Moody and reflective, the arrangement evokes that space between the city and the countryside in lovely fashion, a very inventive take. The album ends on "Seaglass Hearts", a lovely ballad of two hearts beating as one, saxophone on the windswept beach, a gentle farewell balm of simplicity and purity.

A world class debut by a talented composer and musician, who seemingly has the gift of surrounding himself with right-minded and enthusiastic collaborators. It certainly captured my light! Rise and Fall is next.

4.5 Glow grabs

 Capture Light by HOLDEN, JOHN album cover Studio Album, 2018
3.87 | 33 ratings

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Capture Light
John Holden Neo-Prog

Review by alainPP

3 stars A great gentleman of music who starts to release his own tracks, nothing new at the moment. A musician who sees himself surrounded by musicians and singers of great renown, there it raises questions about the musical niches that said gentleman seems to have. When each prestigious guest comes to give a hand, something extraordinary is expected; it's almost the case with this first draft of John HOLDEN who offers on this album good neo-prog and melodic prog. The female melodic voice gives charm to the compositions, but it's not enough to make a very good album, it lacks a little maturity, a little pure creation to make a remarkable album. From a sure source, the last one has on the other hand this little extra that makes you want to dive back into it immediately. In short, let's not be too hard, but conciliatory.
Thanks to dAmOxT7942 for the artist addition.

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