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FLAMBOROUGH HEAD

Neo-Prog • Netherlands


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Flamborough Head biography
FLAMBOROUGH HEAD is rooted in Friesland. This province in the northern part of The Netherlands has its own language (a bit similar to the Skandinavian languages), anthem, traditional sports and banner. In the Eighties prime mover Edo Spanninga was a member of a Top 40 cover band but this was not really satisfying for him, Edo was more delighted about symphonic rock. In the capital Leeuwarden he met the Wolf brothers and the trio decided to make the music they all loved. Soon drummer Koen Roozen joined Edo and and the musicians started to rehearsal in a hen-house (!) on Koen's camping-farm in Bakkeveen. By the way, this is also the craddle of the known annual Dutch progrock festival Progfarm. After the Wolf brothers had left the band, bass player Marcel Derix, guitarist André Cents and finally, after some auditions, singer Siebe Rein Schaaf (also keyboardist) completed the new FLAMBOROUGH HEAD line-up.

The name is derived from a part of the rocky British coast and comes from Edo, an Anglophile, he wanted a double name like LED ZEPPELIN, URIAH HEEP or JETHRO TULL. Just before the band got tired of writing music and endless rehearsals without getting the opportunity to play live, FLAMBOROUGH HEAD got invitations for several gigs. And the British progrock label Cyclops reacted positive on a demo, in '98 this resulted in their first album entitled "Unspoken Whisper". Within half a year it sold 1500 copies and the debut-CD was recieved warmly by the music press, only the vocals got some negative remarks. A fine boost was the award by The Classic Rock Society (UK) as "best new band". The second album "Defining the Legacy" was released in 2000, a year later followed by a CD with tapes from '94. FLAMBOROUGH HEAD's music is 24-carat symphonic rock, very melodic and has echoes from MARILLION, PENDRAGON and ARENA but the different musical backgrounds and personal taste from the members (from CAMEL and AOR to blues and rock) gives their music music an orginal twist.

In 2002 FLAMBOROUGH HEAD released their acclaimed new CD entitled "One For The Crow" with new members Margriet Boomsma (lead vocals, flute, tin whistle and recorders) and guitarplayer Eddie Mulder, they replaced André Cents and Siebe Rein Schaaf. The music has still hints from the known neo-prog masters but the band sound more original and their compositions has reached a very mature level. The new album "One For The Crow" is wonderful, I'm stunned by the progress this band has made since I witnissed them on Progfarm a few years ago. This album showcases eight mature and alternating compositions with a lush and varied keyboardsound, strong electric guitarwork (rocky riffs and moving solos), beautiful classical guitar, some cheerful tin whistle and powerful vocals.

My conclusion is that FLAMBOROUGH HEAD prooves with their new CD that they have developped their own sound (a blend of classical, rock, folk, symphonic - and neo progrock) and that all those years of playing together has shaped them into good and creative musicians. And with fresh ideas from the new members, FLAMBOROUGH HEAD has turned from an average neo-progband into a serious member of the current Dutch progrock scene. Perhaps the hand of new manager Foppe de Haan (former coach from FC Heerenveen) has contributed to this marvellous development. I hope that their label Cyclops will do a good job with a worldwide distribution.

: : : Erik Neuteboom, The NETHERLANDS : : :
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Flamborough Head official website

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Buy FLAMBOROUGH HEAD Music


Lost In TimeLost In Time
Oskar
Audio CD$21.89
$11.88 (used)
One for the CrowOne for the Crow
Cyclops Records/Wheezy 2007
Audio CD$30.21 (used)
Unspoken WhisperUnspoken Whisper
Audio CD$29.99
$19.99 (used)
looking for john maddocklooking for john maddock
Import
Cyclops Records
Audio CD$21.89
Live in Buda PestLive in Buda Pest
Import
Cyclops Records 2008
Audio CD$19.67
$47.11 (used)
Flamborough Head - Lost In Time [Japan CD] MAR-132169Flamborough Head - Lost In Time [Japan CD] MAR-132169
Marquee Japan
Audio CD$40.81
$68.33 (used)

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FLAMBOROUGH HEAD discography


Ordered by release date | Showing ratings (top albums) | Help Progarchives.com to complete the discography and add albums

FLAMBOROUGH HEAD top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.61 | 38 ratings
Unspoken Whisper
1998
3.70 | 55 ratings
Defining The Legacy
2000
2.59 | 16 ratings
Bridge to the Promised Land
2000
3.66 | 26 ratings
One for the Crow
2002
3.50 | 24 ratings
Tales Of Imperfection
2005
3.85 | 66 ratings
Looking For John Maddock
2009
3.91 | 84 ratings
Lost in Time
2013

FLAMBOROUGH HEAD Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

4.04 | 6 ratings
Live In Budapest
2008

FLAMBOROUGH HEAD Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

FLAMBOROUGH HEAD Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

FLAMBOROUGH HEAD Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

FLAMBOROUGH HEAD Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 Lost in Time by FLAMBOROUGH HEAD album cover Studio Album, 2013
3.91 | 84 ratings

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Lost in Time
Flamborough Head Neo-Prog

Review by tszirmay
Special Collaborator Crossover Team

5 stars Flamborough Head are a veteran Northern Dutch neo-prog outfit that has had a solid yet still unremarkable career, even after 6 fine releases since 1998. They have finally arrived to the promised land with a delightful collection of masterful songs on 'Lost in Time' , six extended neo/symphonic prog workouts given plenty of room for artful soloing, great tempo intervals and solid instrumental arrangements. The core of the band has remained the same since day one with keyboardist Edo Spanninga leading the orchestral frenzy, helped along by the stalwart rhythm section of fluid bassist Marcel Derix and drum basher Koen Roozen. The sweeping vocals from Margriet Boomsma really altered the direction with 2002's One for the Crow and have now reached a fertile level of accomplishment. She contributes deft flute playing as well. The incredibly talented guitarist Eddie Mulder has graced a series of FH albums but he is now concentrating on Trion (a Flamborough Head side project) as well as Leap Day, a fine compatriot band looking to expand their own career. New stringer Gert Polkerman is no slouch tough, providing stellar axe shrieking when necessary. But the biggest change is the material in question, a sharper, more focused level of expression, loaded with dense keyboard carpeting, plush guitar solos, and simply grandiose themes that ache and moan. In fact, Flamborough Head have attained a level of assurance and confidence that is unmistakably evident within the grooves of their energized symphonic pieces. Much like fellow Netherlanders Odyssice , their craft is a fine balance between hummable and spectacular.

The sensational epic title track kicks off the festivities with a fertile disposition , a musical universe with huge swaths of mellotron, ornate piano work, powerful bass and drum anchoring, as well as a churning magical flute . Sheer, unadulterated bliss with Margriet's wistful voice weaving a wondrous story, equalled by a sumptuous chorus ('Right there for a moment'), some superb Spanish guitar strumming and a glorious sense of purpose. Polkerman unleashes his first of many poignant solos to come, a six-string shriek of the finest order. The mood is upbeat, positive and confident, the organ whooshes, the synth swirls and the piano utters pure melancholy. Finish off with a bright lead guitar solo and presto, instant gratification.

The nearly dozen minutes of 'The Trapper' just keeps the positive vibe going, a rollicking exercise led by a biting guitar cavalcade, everyone in gleeful tow; you can just imagine the players smiling as they unite in harmonious osmosis. Margriet takes charge of the microphone stand and conveys a disquieting tale of a young miner's fate, profoundly choked by the deepest earth, a bleak world of dust and grime, dirt and despair. Despite all this gravity, there is a sense of eternal hope emanating from the playing which again credits the spiritual outlook this band now professes. The instrumental sections easily rival classic Focus, which is not surprising as there is a strong reverence in Holland for progressive rock to this day (The Dutch love being different!). In fact, there are many winks and nods to famous Focus tunes throughout the album, an added thrill for us prog treasure hunters.

The instrumental 'Dancing Ledge' is not a disco infused tune, as it starts off with thick mellotron blasts and a 'hard' guitar, giving booming bassist Marcel Derix the front stage to carry this bruising piece forward, adding a delicious solo to boot as the howling organ joins the frenzied fray. Polkerman again releases all his talent on the exuberant guitar, caressing its mighty strings with profound passion, Spanninga uses piano with clever detail, tallying an elegant highlight to the lively leads. Three tunes in and it's just magical stuff!

'Damage Done' is the proverbial 'love gone wrong' song, a reminder that feelings will always rule our technological lives, regardless of any new upgrades offered. The lyrical content is bleak, troubled and angst-ridden, while the instrumental playing alternates between sweet and sour, love and despair, night and day. Margriet recounts the difficulty of coping with changing relationships, a world where charm is replaced by dread. The damage is done, so what is next? Losing your self-esteem being the ultimate failure. Not bad inspiration for a neo-prog band, eh? The brash guitars are harsh and evocative, the beat relentless and the flute is there to provide hope for a better world.

The shortest track here is the 6 minute+ 'I'll Take the Blame', a rapid fire recounting of the human expressions that rule the thematic content of this disc but here , the band proposes a slight sense of dissonance and experimentation, with tonal textures that differ from their usual style. The human condition seemingly dictates constantly, shepherding its victims into unknown horizons and that attitude is well captured here.

The coup de grace is the immensely intriguing finale 'Andrassy Road' , a wonderful composition about a famous (and infamous) Budapest boulevard , a broad tree-lined avenue that would have made Baron Haussmann proud, connecting Pest's inner centrum to the glorious Heroes Square in a very straight line . The idea presumably arose from a FH 2008 concert in Hungary's capital which resulted in a 'Live in Budapest' album. This avenue has history painted onto its gorgeous palatial facades, sumptuous pink marble opera house and the gruesome 'Terror House' where both fascists and communist secret policemen tortured often the same disobedient resisters. This is now a museum to human cruelty, a must visit if one ever travels to this remarkable city. The band has infused within the gorgeous music, the essence of what makes Hungary tick, a tragic mix of hopeless uniqueness and rebellious positivity. The poignant lyrics clearly prove that the band's inspiration was undoubtedly of historic proportions. The quasi-orchestral music is therefore beyond splendiferous! Hope springs eternal.

A magical album, the culmination of an ever progressing talent and artistic vision. Not a weak second here. Bravo, Flamborough Head have definitely arrived! 2013 continues to be an unparalleled 'cuvee'.

5 Missing Rolexes.

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 Lost in Time by FLAMBOROUGH HEAD album cover Studio Album, 2013
3.91 | 84 ratings

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Lost in Time
Flamborough Head Neo-Prog

Review by Warthur
Prog Reviewer

4 stars I'd previously found Flamborough Head's material rather inconsistent - I'd enjoyed Defining the Legacy but felt that subsequent albums were a little lukewarm - but Lost In Time goes a long way towards correcting that. The band have thoroughly updated and reconfigured their sound, and Margriet Boomsma's vocals have never sounded better; in addition, there's a new dramatic flair to their songwriting that demonstrates that they're no longer satisfied just to deliver the same old material. It's still solidly within the neo-prog field, but it's in a more individual style with more tendency towards risk-taking, which makes me inclined to pay a little more attention to the Head than I have recently.

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 One for the Crow by FLAMBOROUGH HEAD album cover Studio Album, 2002
3.66 | 26 ratings

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One for the Crow
Flamborough Head Neo-Prog

Review by kev rowland
Special Collaborator Crossover Team

4 stars This is the third album by the Dutch prog outfit, but their first with vocalist Margriat Boomsma (who also contributes recorders and flutes). This is album of great depth and contains influences and styles that grow on the listener the more it is played. Margriat has a voice in the style of Tracy Hitchings, with good range and power and harmonises well with guitarist Eddie Mulder. While the cop out is to say that Flamborough Head are a progressive rock band, it is much harder to decide on all of the musical strands that the band are bringing together.

The obvious ones are Pendragon and Pink Floyd, but there is also 'Wind & Wuthering' era Genesis, and even Gryphon to consider. It is an album of delicacy with plenty of space for the music to move, and is never intrusive but far more laid back. In many ways it is the perfect dreamy summer album, with the long instrumental passages showing not only the musical talents of the band but also how they react to each other. The direction can shift quite suddenly at times, but somehow it always manages to make sense.

There is a real feel of the Seventies and this is heightened by the use of delicate instrumental pieces, often just acoustic guitar and piano, which lead onto the longer songs. The electric guitar is rarely riffed but used instead to provide melodic leads, sometimes in harmony with the keyboards or providing a supporting role. A very enjoyable album indeed.

Originally appeared in Feedback #69, Aug 02

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 Bridge to the Promised Land by FLAMBOROUGH HEAD album cover Studio Album, 2000
2.59 | 16 ratings

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Bridge to the Promised Land
Flamborough Head Neo-Prog

Review by apps79
Special Collaborator Neo Prog Team

3 stars After the performance at Progfarm 2000 there was a constant demand for the release of Flamborough Head's early recordings, so the members of the band decided to give the 94' demo as a hidden pearl to the fans.It was a limited 500-numbered release, again mastered for Cyclops, which eventually saw the light in 2001.

The original recordings took part in 1994 at the band's rehearsal studio in Bakkeveen and this release contains three known tracks in a demo version as well as three unreleased compositions.''Childscream'', ''Unspoken whisper'' and ''Bridge to the promised land'' were all part of Flamborough Head's first two studio albums, here they are presented in their earlier forms, keeping the basic structure, while the style, for those not aware of the band, is melodic and emotional Neo/Symphonic Progressive Rock with soft guitars, sensitive vocals and plenty of keyboard drives.To the unreleased ones, ''Corrugated Road'' is a very good piece of low-tempo Symphonic Rock with strong PINK FLOYD influences, highlighted by the great vocal lines and its overall emotional atmosphere.''Running On Empty'' follows a more typical Neo Prog vein with crystalline vocals, emotional guitars and catchy keyboards parts, while the long ''Suicide'' starts in a very smooth way built around synths and guitars and later follows a Neo Prog-ish path based on vocals until the quite charming ending guitar solo of Andre Cents.

A very good document of Flamborough Head's starting point, likely to please all fans of the band and the style.Considering this is a rare CD due to the limited copies distributed, I would not call it an essential purchase but if you ever come across a copy grab it without hesitation.

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 Looking For John Maddock by FLAMBOROUGH HEAD album cover Studio Album, 2009
3.85 | 66 ratings

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Looking For John Maddock
Flamborough Head Neo-Prog

Review by Warthur
Prog Reviewer

3 stars Though I was quite taken with Defining the Legacy, I rather thought that subsequent Flamborough Head albums failed to really manifest any musical development over that one, and Looking For John Maddock hasn't rid me of that impression. It's decently performed neo- prog (with the slightly mediocre production quality which regularly seems to hamper the Head's albums), and there's some real neat instrumental performances on here, but on the whole it doesn't feel like anything that neo-proggers haven't heard a dozen times before from a dozen second-string bands. It's an entertaining listen but unless you are a particularly loyal Flamborough Head fan it probably isn't worth going out of your way to get.

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 One for the Crow by FLAMBOROUGH HEAD album cover Studio Album, 2002
3.66 | 26 ratings

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One for the Crow
Flamborough Head Neo-Prog

Review by Warthur
Prog Reviewer

3 stars Flamborough Head's followup to Defining the Legacy seems like a little bit of a step down. Part of this is down to the production values - the Cyclops label seems to have had a rather variable history when it comes to recording quality and this time around Flamborough Head aren't particularly well-served by the production available to them. But beyond that, there's also the fact that the band were struggling to accommodate the changes to their lineup; new vocalist Margriet Boomsma gives a better performance on flute than on vocals, whilst on the whole the songwriting seems a bit less vibrant and tight than on the previous release.

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 Defining The Legacy by FLAMBOROUGH HEAD album cover Studio Album, 2000
3.70 | 55 ratings

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Defining The Legacy
Flamborough Head Neo-Prog

Review by Warthur
Prog Reviewer

4 stars Flamborough Head's second album delivers the neo-prog goods: tight compositions, extended instrumental sections which really show of the band's talent, and a hard-edged update of the Marillion/IQ style which takes on board some of the darker touches popularised by the likes of Arena.

Of course, there's no shortage of bands which offer a Genesis/Marillion/IQ-inspired sound, but Flamborough Head come across as being particular masters of the form - you get the impression that they're not just going through the motions and following a formula, but instead that they have a genuine understanding of and appreciation for both the compositional approaches of their major neo-prog influences and that of the 70s bands who inspired the early neo-prog scene in the first place. The Cyclops label can be justifiably proud to host such a talented and capable group, and Defining the Legacy puts them in the front rank of neo-prog groups, despite occasionally shaky production values.

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 Defining The Legacy by FLAMBOROUGH HEAD album cover Studio Album, 2000
3.70 | 55 ratings

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Defining The Legacy
Flamborough Head Neo-Prog

Review by apps79
Special Collaborator Neo Prog Team

4 stars The good critics regarding Flamborough Head's debut and the satisfying response at the upcoming gigs filled the band with confidence and helped them move on to the recording process of a new album at the end of the 90's.This sophomore effort would be entitled ''Defining the legacy'' with lyrics written around an autobiographical story of singer Siebe Rein Schaaf.The album was released in 2000 again on Cyclops.

Over an hour of Neo/Symphonic grandeur split in seven tracks is the result of this effort.The first couple of them are alternating between modern MARILION-esque NeoSymphonic Rock,much driven by the synths and organs of Edo Spanninga, and pastoral progressive rock with obvious GENESIS vibes and great flute work, with a splendid result.But soon the style will obtain a heavier and rockier tune,not far from what ARENA had been creating around the time.Guitars become heavier,the tracks are filled with flashy synthesizers and bombastic atmospheres,melody is always present though and even Schaaf's voice has an angrier approach in general.Still, and despite a couple of Hard Rock-ing embarasing moments, the sound continues to be rich and diverse with some superb instrumental passages and tons of shifting tempos.What the listener faces at the end is an evident development to the band's sound compared to their debut and a qualitive increase regarding the compositions,which are now tighter and even more memorable.

What this group of musicians achieved with ''Defining the Legacy'' is to establish themselves as one of the top Neo/Symphonic Prog bands of the millenium,setting ever higher standards for their followers for the upcoming works.Highly recommended.

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 Tales Of Imperfection by FLAMBOROUGH HEAD album cover Studio Album, 2005
3.50 | 24 ratings

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Tales Of Imperfection
Flamborough Head Neo-Prog

Review by Mellotron Storm
Prog Reviewer

2 stars This is FLAMBOROUGH HEAD's second release with the new female singer. Most consider this inferior to the previous one called "One For The Crow" but it does seem to be the most mature effort from the band so far. Not a big fan of the vocals and i'm sorry but I find the concept of this one a bit lame. I feel like i'm being a little insensitive in saying that but it's hard to relate.

"For Starters" is the short opening track with synths,guitar and cymbals that create an epic sound. "Maureen" opens with piano then it kicks in with some heaviness.Synths are prominant. A calm after 2 1/2 minutes with flute and piano standing out. It picks back up with prominant guitar before 4 minutes then we get vocals for the first time. A spacey calm after 6 minutes then piano joins in followed by other instruments and vocals. Some tasteful guitar after 8 minutes and it stays fairly laid back to the end. "Higher Ground" is mellow with piano and synths. Drums and guitar join in as it builds a little. It settles again the we get some nice acoustic guitar 4 1/2 minutes in. Flute joins in as well. Organ before 6 minutes then guitar as it kicks back in. It settles late with flute to end it.

"Silent Stranger" turns fuller before 2 minutes then the guitar starts to solo.Vocals and piano 3 minutes in then it picks up. A calm with piano and laid back guitar after 5 minutes. It picks up again before 7 minutes. Another calm 8 minutes in with reserved vocals. "Captive Of Fate" features acoustic guitar and background synths as vocals come in before a minute.This is a ballad-like track really. "Mantova" is an instrumental with where the tempo changes quite often. "Year After Year" ends the album with vocals and piano before the guitar solos 2 minutes in.

I'm just not feeling it at all with this or their previous album. Average at best.

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 One for the Crow by FLAMBOROUGH HEAD album cover Studio Album, 2002
3.66 | 26 ratings

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One for the Crow
Flamborough Head Neo-Prog

Review by Mellotron Storm
Prog Reviewer

2 stars Big changes for this one as two important members have left including the vocalist / keyboardist and the the guitarist. Enter a female vocalist who also playes flute / tin whistles and recorders.That alone constitutes a major change in sound right there. And for my taste this is definitely not for the better.There's also a lot of strings or orchestration which i'm guessing is sampled.

"One For The Crow" opens with the sound of a crow then the atmosphere and strings take over. It gets fairly heavy 1 1/2 minutes in then the vocals arrive after 2 minutes. She has a good voice i'm just not a fan of it. More strings as it settles.Vocals stop before 6 minutes as we get an instrumental break. She's back after 9 1/2 minutes. "Old Shoes" opens with synths and strings which gives us a classical feel that I don't like.Guitar, drums then piano come in. Vocals before 2 minutes.Tasteful guitar 4 minutes in when the vocals stop. It's heavier around 6 minutes. Strings come in. A calm a minute later with piano then the vocals return.The tempo continues to shft. "Seperate" is a short acoustic guitar piece with flute.

"Daydream" opens with acoustic guitar and strings? followed by flute then guitar 1 1/2 minutes in.There's a FLOYD flavour here then the flute returns. Piano only before 3 minutes then the acoustic guitar and drums are back. "Nightlife" opens with samples then it kicks in powerfully.Vocals 2 minutes in. A calm with piano and flute 4 minutes in. Strings too.It does pick up some late. "Old Forest" is a short track with acoustic guitar leading. "Limestonerock" opens with nature sounds then synths and a full sound follows.Guitar replaces the synths before a minute. It calms down with flute and vocals before picking back up. Another calm with atmosphere after 4 minutes. Flute joins in then drums and guitar before 6 minutes.Vocals are back 8 1/2 minutes. Nature sounds end it. "New Shoes" is a short piece that is led by the acoustic guitar.

There are so many things that have changed for the worse in my opinion. I am surprised at how high this is rated here, but hey we all have different tastes. Fans only for this one.

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