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FAUST

Krautrock • Germany


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Faust picture
Faust biography
Founded in Wümme, Germany in 1971 - Disbanded in 1975 - Regrouped since 1990 (from 2004 as two bands)

Considered by many music historians as one of the most important group out of Germany, FAUST were certainly ahead of their time. They took their music to unsuspecting heights somewhere in between CAN, VELVET UNDERGROUND, NEU, LA DUSSELDORF or HENRY COW but also much farther and can be considered as founding fathers of the Industrial Rock. Having made their debut in 71 in Hamburg, FAUST will never stop their groundbreaking and will be always one step ahead of everybody else including the groups above mentioned and are the prime example of Rock In Opposition (RIO) along with HENRY COW.

FAUST is definitely not for the faint-hearted person and can only be recommended in small doses because it is very dangerous for the sanity of the average proghead. DO NOT and I repeat this Do Not feed this to a pregnant woman or a mentally fragile person - although you could give it to Techno Heads - as they would greatly enjoy this.

: : : Hugues Chantraine, BELGIUM : : :

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FAUST discography


Ordered by release date | Showing ratings (top albums) | Help Progarchives.com to complete the discography and add albums

FAUST top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.89 | 245 ratings
Faust
1971
3.57 | 155 ratings
So Far
1972
3.81 | 142 ratings
The Faust Tapes
1973
3.94 | 253 ratings
Faust IV
1973
3.59 | 18 ratings
The Last LP
1988
3.89 | 25 ratings
Rien
1994
3.84 | 29 ratings
You Know Faust
1996
2.75 | 18 ratings
Faust Wakes Nosferatu
1997
3.94 | 38 ratings
Ravvivando
1999
3.70 | 19 ratings
Faust & Dälek: Derbe Respect, Alder
2004
3.53 | 23 ratings
Faust & Nurse With Wound: Disconnected
2007
3.41 | 33 ratings
C'Est Com... Com... Compliqué
2009
3.23 | 27 ratings
Faust Is Last
2010
3.53 | 29 ratings
Something Dirty
2011
3.58 | 10 ratings
Just Us
2014
3.92 | 17 ratings
Fresh Air
2017

FAUST Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

2.23 | 3 ratings
The Faust Concerts Vol. I
1990
2.23 | 3 ratings
The Faust Concerts Vol. II
1992
3.22 | 9 ratings
Live in Edinburgh
1997
3.80 | 5 ratings
The Land Of Ukko&Rauni
2000
4.25 | 4 ratings
Faust ... In Autumn
2007
2.00 | 1 ratings
Schiphorst 2008
2010

FAUST Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

5.00 | 1 ratings
Faust In Japan
1998
2.26 | 4 ratings
Trial And Error
2005
5.00 | 1 ratings
Nobody Knows if it Really Happened
2006

FAUST Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

4.35 | 17 ratings
Munic And Elsewhere
1986
4.07 | 19 ratings
71 Minutes of Faust
1989
3.83 | 6 ratings
Faust
1996
4.63 | 17 ratings
The Wümme Years
2000
4.71 | 22 ratings
Faust / So Far
2000
4.00 | 12 ratings
BBC Sessions +
2001
4.50 | 2 ratings
Freispiel
2002
3.12 | 8 ratings
Patchworks 1971-2002
2002
5.00 | 1 ratings
Collectif Met(z) 1996-2005
2005

FAUST Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

3.00 | 1 ratings
So Far
1972
0.00 | 0 ratings
Faust Party Extracts 1/6
1979
5.00 | 1 ratings
Faust Party Extracts 2/4
1979
0.00 | 0 ratings
Ravvivando Remix
2001

FAUST Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 The Last LP by FAUST album cover Studio Album, 1988
3.59 | 18 ratings

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The Last LP
Faust Krautrock

Review by Mortte

3 stars This album is more same kind of compilation of unreleased Faust recordings from seventies as 'Munic and Elsewhere' than really their last album from those days when they disbanded. In the album cover is said this is recorded in 1971, but not sure about that. Also some parts of this were early released in two e.p:s. Really don't understand album name, had the record company then some information Faust will not reunite ever? 'The Faust Party' would have been better name. The same record company also released same year 'Seventy One Minutes Of...' that has this album and 'Munich and Elsewhere' in CD. But unlike 'M & E', this album has lots of material heard in different versions in two Faust seventies albums.

'Party 2' starts the album and it's different version of 'J`al Mal Aux Dents' that is part of excellent 'The Faust Tapes'. 'Party 8' is short, calm but very cheerful instrumental piece played by keyboards. 'Psalter' sounds to me to be exactly same as 'L'uft...Heisst Das Es L'uft Oder Es Kommt Bald...L'uft' in 'Faust IV', there is even that clock ticking in the end. 'Party 7' is unheard, aggressive collage track not to be taken too seriously. 'Party 5' is the last track in a-side and is the least interesting one. It has only drums and percussions with some sound experimentations.

B-side starts with 'Party 1' that is the greatest track in this album. It has something common with 'No Harm' from 'So Far'-album, but is still totally different piece. Hard to believe this very electro track is really recorded in 1971. 'Party 3' has at first helicopter-like electro noise, but then starts instrumental version of 'Giggy Smile'. 'Party 6' is short experimental human talking piece. Last 'Party 4' is again unheard collage piece with many different, but awesome atmospheres.

As a huge Faust-fan really like to give this four stars just because this mostly includes just so great music. But when I am honest, this really isn't 'excellent addition to any progrock music collection' just because this includes so little material you can't find anywhere else in any form. But this is anyway really good, although it's essential only Faust-fans. So it's three.

 Munic And Elsewhere by FAUST album cover Boxset/Compilation, 1986
4.35 | 17 ratings

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Munic And Elsewhere
Faust Krautrock

Review by Mortte

5 stars It is really interesting I have made first review from this really great album! Well, one reason can be that this has released only as vinyl in the eighties and as fas as I know, it isn´t as streaming in the net. Anyway this was the first release from Faust after their "disappearance" in the seventies. There is mystery in that, no-one seems to know what happened, did they just get bored to poor sales of "Faust IV" or were there conflicts between members? Band members didn´t do anything else in this "hiatus"period before reunion in the nineties, somewhere I read they made few concerts as Faust in the eighties. Also Wikipedia claims there exists "Faust V"-cassette, that Virgin records had released in 1975, but there is no information about that in discogs. Anyway in this album there are unreleased recordings made before and after "Faust IV".

I believe first piece, "Munic/Yesterday" is one of those Faust recorded after "Faust IV". You can hear it immediately they were going into new direction. This long piece is really electro sounding and hypnotic. It´s somewhere middle of Can and Kraftwerk, specially repeated vocal parts reminds Can. Electro direction continues in "Don´t Take Roots", but it also has very distorted guitars. Also it´s same kind of collage piece as the ones in their first album and the whole "The Faust Tapes", so I believe it is earlier recording. First side ends into "Meer" that is really serene, but absolutely awesome sounding piece.

Second side starts with "Munic/Other" that really has lots of common with the first sides Munic-piece. First you hear some horn playing, then starts very fast rhythm. All the way this piece is as great as the other in A-side, really I can imagine it played in some experimental rave parties. "Baby" is the most ordinary song in this album, but in the middle song structure breaks and there comes strong rhythm and some distorted and feedbacked guitars. But in the end song goes back into it´s structure. As some other early Faust-songs this reminds a lot the Velvet Underground. Last piece "We Are the Hallo Men" is some kind of early "lazy rap", there is good drumbeat in it and in the back there are some samples, for example from Rolling Stones mellotron parts from "2000 Light Years Home".

There has been speculations about some albums in the pop history that never materialized would they have been the most ultimate masterpieces, I think the famous example is the Beach Boys Smile-project. From this album I can say next album after Faust IV would have been great! You could also wonder, would their later material have sounded same kind if they had continued in the seventies, but we never knew it. Anyway this album is just so balanced and full blooded Faust masterpiece, that I have to give it five stars!

 Faust by FAUST album cover Studio Album, 1971
3.89 | 245 ratings

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Faust
Faust Krautrock

Review by jamesbaldwin
Prog Reviewer

5 stars And here's to you Faust!

What a lovely debut!!!

The first song, "Why don't you eat carrots (9:31)": in the beginning Faust mentions the trumpets of All You Need Is Love, and the guitar riff of Satisfaction of the Rolling Stones, then there are other crippled sounds. In the beginning this piece recalls Revolution n. 9 of the Beatles but the substantial difference is that here there is, under the noises, a more organic musical work, then it becomes a crazy stuff by a band of music hall. Despite being in its essence an instrumental song, there are also the vocals of Florentine Papst who sings goliardic choruses. It is avant-garde, very abstract. Rating 8,5/9.

Second song "Meadow Meal (7:30)" This piece is more obsessive than the preious one, and it is based on a rhythmic level and then becomes rarefied and abstract. A kind of noisy symphonic poem. Rudolf Sosna e and Arnulf Meifert particular voices,, and the synthesizer played by Wusthoff and the drums played by Diermeier are essential for this kind of music. Rating 8,5.

End of Side A. Third song, " Miss Fortune (Live *) (13:51) This one starts as a very speedy space rock, then around five minutes becomes a very German martial cabaret (vocals by Peron and Diermeier) , which however has an interesting rhythmic progression with percussion, then around ten minutes it changes again and becomes even more experimental with synthetic sounds that they seem to chirp of birds and then the last part, very noisy, loses a little the paroxysmal charm of the previous one. The question is: "Are we supposed to be or not to be?" Very Strange. Rating 9.

This album, in my opinion, is a little masterpiece of fantasy and inventiveness, where Goethe, Wagner, Stockhausen are just around the corner. Chamber music, experimental music, confusion, noise music, Existential philosophical music developed with the ingenuity of a child.

Small masterpiece. Rating 9. Five stars.

 Faust by FAUST album cover Studio Album, 1971
3.89 | 245 ratings

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Faust
Faust Krautrock

Review by patrickq
Prog Reviewer

3 stars Faust's self-titled debut is experimental, avant-garde, and wacky for the sake of wackiness. The musicians are competent, the singers are passable, the performances are adequate, and the sound quality is decent. But I'm not sure any of that matters. Faust is not comprised of songs in any traditional sense; the two tracks on Side One, for instance, are sound collages. The point - - and I do believe there is a point here - - seems to be the postproduction, not the performances.

The first side is comprised of two studio tracks. The first, 'Why Don't You Eat Carrots,' is the more musical, with a middle section built around a brass vamp. On the other hand, the final two minutes is almost like a medley of weirdness. Then there's the even more experimental 'Meadow Meal.' The stream-of-consciousness vocal section which ends right before the song's halfway mark could be an irreverent stab at a Zappa tune. Like 'Why Don't You Eat Carrots,' 'Meadow Meal' is evidently assembled from divergent recordings, some (probably) sonically manipulated beyond recognition. But unlike its predecessor, the most musical section of 'Meadow Meal' comes at the end. It's an atmospheric passage played on a heavily treated organ - - sounding quite a bit like Klaus Schulze's first two albums (both of which were released after Faust).

Side Two is taken by a live track, 'Miss Fortune.' It stars off like something from Ummagumma, but quickly heads for left field before settling into a trance-y - - but still Ummagumman - - groove for a few minutes before launching into a brief Krautrock freakout. And that's just the first five minutes! Some jamming follows, evolving back into a freakout situation. Then, just when I start to think that 'Miss Fortune' sounds like a different band than the one that performed the first side, the drummer stops, then the guitarist stops, leaving just the piano. Next in the pattern of non sequiturs is a heavily effected vocal duet - - you get the idea: it's almost like a pasted-together piece. And then, a little after thirteen minutes into the track, a squawking tape loop appears, and 'Miss Fortune' actually becomes a studio sound collage - - which is also a bit Zappaesque, come to think of it.

Faust is one of those albums that I appreciate more than enjoy; it succeeds more as art than entertainment. But it's not as successful as, say, Ash Ra Tempel's self-titled album or Tangerine Dream's Electronic Meditation, two other Krautrock debuts from the same period.

 Faust by FAUST album cover Studio Album, 1971
3.89 | 245 ratings

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Faust
Faust Krautrock

Review by siLLy puPPy
Collaborator PSIKE, JR/F/Canterbury & Eclectic Teams

5 stars On the more adventurous side of Germany's Krautrock spectrum, the Hamburg based FAUST took their name not only because it was the name of the classic German protagonist legend who made a pact with the devil but also because it was the German word for "fist" and therefore had a double impact and after experiencing this legendary debut from this highly experimental band that was way ahead of its time, it becomes clear that both meanings of the moniker apply. The band members Arnulf Meifert (drums, vocals), Gunther Wüsthoff (synthesizer, saxophone), Rudolf Sosna (guitar, keyboards, vocals), Hans-Joachim Irmler (organ), Jean- Hervé Péron (bass, vocals) and Werner 'Zappi' Diermaier (drums) all met in 1969 but didn't officially form FAUST until 1971. The second drummer Arnulf Meifert joined for the debut album but then departed.

Despite almost no history of playing together, FAUST was signed immediately to Polydor records due to the rush to cash in on the burgeoning Krautrock scene engulfing the German music scene however the various members had all played in the bands Nucleus and Campylognatus Citelli which apparently was good enough for the label under the Deutsche Grammophon parent company. Despite the band's newbie status, they were given full reign to have complete artistic freedom and were gifted the time, space and money to create anything they desired which sounds almost unheard of by any day's standards. With all liberties any such band could dream of, the members spent a year recording this debut album in a rural studio in the small town Wümme near Hamburg.

The band has stated that they basically wasted six months with alcohol, drugs and partying with only wild experimentation with sound effects emerging and only got their act together in the second half of the year. When it was time to cough up the goods, the band panicked but found a way to patch in all the avant-garde experiments with some more conventional musical output. The result was this bizarre amalgamation of Krautrock, musique concrète, sound collages, industrial noise and an early example of avant-prog many years before bands like Henry Cow took it to new levels. The result of this experimental mishmash was that it sold disastrously but did please the critics who were excited by such bold musical statements. Polydor's disappointment was followed by an equally disastrous tour that only demonstrated that FAUST was unable to replicate these wild antics in a live setting, nevertheless the band gained a cult following and would slowly but steadily gain an audience however not fast enough for Polydor who dropped them after three albums.

While bands like Amon Duul II and Can were going for the psychedelic jugular, FAUST took the surrealist's approach and crafted an album that took a multitude of musical styles, sound manipulations and chaotic displays of progressive rock attributes on steroids and cranked out one of the most demanding musical deliveries of 1971, a year when the progressive rock scene was just gaining full maturity. FAUST eschewed catchy melodies, 60s grooves or any other conventional means (for the most part) of musical expressions and instead constructed a rotisserie of tones, timbres, mood enhancers and playful antics that were cryptic, chaotic, complex and highly creative. The three tracks that constituted the near 36 minute running time consisted of side A delivering two lengthy tracks roughly around 9 minutes each with side B consisting of a single track that was just shy of 18 minutes.

The opening track with its absurd title "Why Don't You Eat Carrots" obviously found some Canterbury scene whimsy that was mostly absent from the nascent Krautrock scene but the music was dark, mysterious and atmospheric. The opener begins with FAUST's famous first impressions of heavy static that sounds as if it's leaping through various frequencies and happening upon popular music such as The Rolling Stones' "I Can't Get No Satisfaction" and The Beatles' "All You Need Is Loving" but the fleeting samples disappear as soon as they are detected and the inter dimensional trip through musical portals leads to new alien soundscapes. "Meadow Meal" continues this avant-garde musical journey into a labyrinth of sonic possibilities and only contains sparse dabbling of "real" music.

The lengthy closer "Miss Fortune" is the closest thing to a contemporary Krautrock track as it has lengthy psychedelic jam sessions interspersed by spastic eruptions of jazz, avant-prog and just plain weird outbursts of creativity. Perhaps my favorite part of this mondo bizarro flirtation with insanity comes from the cleverly recited poem where two members take turns saying a word in different channels while the band plays seemingly nonsensical sounds away in the background. This is where the Strawberry Fields forever blossomed into watermelons and the LSD kicked in full force.

There was literally nothing like this when this album was released and obviously a little too far ahead for many. Of course, Polydor demanded the band tame things down after the commercial train wreck sunk in and for the second album "So Far" the band crafted a slightly more accessible album, however FAUST remained steadfastly untamable and nowhere does that ring more true than this wacky avant-garde musical statement on this debut. The album originally was released with a clear cover of an x-ray of a hand silkscreened on the outer sleeve. The beauty is that somehow this flows from one insane idea to the next so perfectly. A true masterpiece of the avant-garde and the blueprints for both avant-prog and the bleak industrial music scene that followed.

 Just Us by FAUST album cover Studio Album, 2014
3.58 | 10 ratings

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Just Us
Faust Krautrock

Review by Mortte

4 stars Jean Herve-Peron left Faust after their great "You Know Faust"album. Zappi and Joachim Irmler continued without him taking new members into band and making two excellent albums. They also make collaboration album with hiphop artist Dälek. After that came collaboration album with Nurse With Wound, but there was again Herve-Peron with Zappi and no Irmler. Irmler still also continued some time with members left in other Faust, so some time there were two Faust´s. But Zappi´s & Herve-Peron´s Faust has been the only active band recent years. In this album they found to be as twice, so they made this album without any others participating and there came also album name. To me it sounds most pieces are recorded live with very minimal overdubbing.

"Gerubelt" starts album in a very shamanistic, powerful way. There is just drums, bass and distorted guitar. Next "80Hz" is very experimental and has both very noisy & silent parts. "Sur Le Ventre" is greatest piece in this album. It´s again very shamanistic and has strong beat and bass. "Cavaquinho" & "Gammes" are really acoustic pieces, the latter one has great "mountain jam". "Nähmaschina" starts with weak hits to the drums and scratching, soon you hear also sewing machine & some strings sounds. A-side ends into "Nur Nous" that is first really quiet with piano and some drum sounds, but ends noisy.

In "Palpitations" there is first analog electro sound where comes string sounds and silent drum beats. Then drums tighten and in the end you hear all kinds of exciting sounds. "Der kaffee Kocht" has just sawing and some percussions. First I thought this piece little boring, but when not taking it very serious it has worked. "Eeeeeeh..." has great bass riff and trumpet, it reminds little Finnish band called "Motelli Skronkle". "Ich Bin Ein Pavian" is most cheerful piece, even Herve-Peron starting a little laugh when speaking the funny words of this piece. Last "Ich Sitze Immer Noch" is quiet melodic piece with the sounds of rain in the end of it. Beautiful ending of this really good album!

Pink Floyd tried to do album with household objects, but didn´t succeeded. This is not also fully that kind of album, but closest I have heard. There has been reviews from newer Faust albums that said Faust should change. Well, I am glad there still are bands, that not trying to be desperetaly in this time, instead making just music they like to make. Also I think every Faust album is little bit different, but sounding still just Faust. This is their most acoustic album. Really the album isn´t as great as their greatest albums, but sure four stars album!

 Fresh Air by FAUST album cover Studio Album, 2017
3.92 | 17 ratings

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Fresh Air
Faust Krautrock

Review by DamoXt7942
Forum & Site Admin Group Avant/Cross/Neo/Post Teams

4 stars Real experimental just like "Why Don't You Eat Carrots", my first surprise ... this golden phrase should be appropriate for the Krautrock legend FAUST. "Fresh Air", released in 2017, is filled with colourful sound variation, completely without any restraint by authentic rock scene. This attitude of theirs could be thought as kinda antitheses against everything nowadays, I guess ... as if they claimed "pop music must go to hell" all around the album.

The first over 17 minute titled extremity is a cynic of sound. This crazy one reminds me exactly of "Esplanade" by Fille Qui Mousse, flooded with sensual female voices and irritable, irregular noises. Inorganic danceable rock rhythms here and there amongst noises are such a comfort, in that the audience should get immersed. "La Poulie" has tribal, ethnic percussion and spelling shouts in the same vein of Brast Burn's Debon. Obviously got freakout 'with strong intention'.

On the other hand in the following track "Chlorophyl" we can feel of downtempo psychic agents via repetitive sticky melodies with slimy saxophone sounds. Surprising at noticing some rap / hiphop essence via "Lights Flicker" (of course not simply progressive rap music but artistic hallucinogenic avantgarde electronika, we can call it as). Through the last "Fish" we can find kaleidoscopic appearance of pelagic fishes beneath the sea (normally appearance of a pelagic fish is not colourful but monotonous, so this texture might be sorta cynical presentation by FAUST I suppose).

 So Far by FAUST album cover Studio Album, 1972
3.57 | 155 ratings

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So Far
Faust Krautrock

Review by Deferred Defect

3 stars Faust is strange.

I had known about them for years, but beyond being "that group from Germany", there wasn't anything else I could have told you about the iconic Krautrock pioneers.

Actually becoming involved with the genre had somehow made them even more mysterious, and it was rare that they were brought up at all. It was groups like Popul Vuh, CAN, and Cluster that were the topics of discussion, and I had forgotten Faust had even existed.

Maybe it's because they were *too* experimental; Their first release is a smorgasbord of sampled 60's pop rock, fairground sounds, traditional folk music, and shouted, almost cult like, vocals. It's tough material to get through, and was exceedingly effective at scaring me away for a while.

"So Far" was their second release, and embraces a far more conventional structure, but of course that's entirely relative! Being a complete sellout myself, it was the first track that got me interested in the album at all.

"It's A Rainy Day, Sunshine Girl" is a basic, but impossibly catchy opener. With a heavy tom-tom playing the simplest beat imaginable, it sounds as if some far away tribe has just entered the industrial revolution, and it really doesn't get much more complicated from here on out. 98% of the lyrics are in the song title, and there's no progression, but It's got such a happy vibe that I'm certain nobody could listen to it without feeling just a little bit better.

"On the Way to Abamäe" is a fantastic followup track. As it starts, it feels as though the band has taken the elements from "Why Don't You Eat Carrots" and played them in a slightly more conventional manner. We get the shouted lyrics, but almost to a beat, the folksy/fairground atmosphere, but it's worked into the song structure, rather than just an out of phase sample.

Eventually it breaks down into a very late 1960's sounding jazz/rock piece titled "No Harm".

There's enormous energy, and although the lyrics (as usual) make absolutely no sense, I get an almost Santana or even Gypsy King vibe from their delivery. This is an extremely fun song that highlights the groups improvisational abilities.

The second half of the album is insanely diverse, covering a range of genres that really shouldn't be on the same set of grooves. If I were to be writing a screenplay covering someone's slow spiral into insanity, this would be the soundtrack.

We start with "traditional Krautrock", whatever that might be. A simple but clean buildup in "So Far" sets the stage, with elements being added and removed as the band sees fit. This could be off of one of NEU!'s first few releases, including the transition from the happy, eventually comfortable soundscape Faust sets up, promptly dissolved into the dark, industrial sounding noises and bass heavy beats in "Mamie is Blue".

If all this has gotten you down, luckily Faust has you covered. "I've Got My Car and my TV" could be the theme for a 1970s children's show, complete with more folksy lyrics and instrumentation. It's well produced, but has aged the worst of all the songs, making it slightly disorienting to my ears. It would definitely have fit in as a guest track on Yellow Submarine.

Two more atmospheric freeform tracks fill the gap between this and the final song, "...In the Spirit", a vaudeville style romp, complete with brass and finger-snapping that comes along for the ride.

If this half of the record is analogous to losing your mind, our protagonist is long gone by this point! Unfortunately, I think it's *too* well done, and instead of feeling like a Faust take on Broadway, it comes across as a musical number that was included by accident.

This is one of those albums where I find myself switching records altogether after finishing Side 1. I appreciate the work that went into it, but the mood and atmospheres so carefully crafted during the first 25 minutes are unceremoniously torn down with the rest of the album. It's easier to go from Side 1 of "So Far" into "Tago Mago", than finishing Side 2, and now being forced to put on "Band on the Run"!

If there's one thing Faust is predictable at, it's unpredictability.

3.5/5 and still highly recommended listening.

 The Faust Tapes by FAUST album cover Studio Album, 1973
3.81 | 142 ratings

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The Faust Tapes
Faust Krautrock

Review by LearsFool
Prog Reviewer

5 stars Suckerpunch: The Album. Throbbing Gristle circa 1979, take notes. First, you follow the discount model of record marketing in the '70s, and so price your new LP like a single. Next, have that LP be put together by some random bloke at Virgin with a penchant for surprises from a collection of all those old tapes of your music you have lying around. Now watch with glee as at least 50,000 members of the British music listening public become confused and disgusted by your and your Anglo label's Frankensteinian meisterwerk.

This concrete Adonis is built on hairpin turns through already strange, experimental, diverse, and unique musics and sounds and even some peppered in studio talks for that "In My Time of Dying" feel two years early. I can hear free jazz, noise, and proto- industrial alongside the snippets of more familiar krautrock kraziness. A happy surprise comes in the form of some pieces being long, providing some wonderful extended jams that are also respites from the insanity. This is more than just a representation of track skipping/channel hopping in intentional musical form, this is "Breathless" in album form. This defies category; it isn't even really concrete as we'd generally identify it; just mumble 'avant garde' and run. Excellent music in a groin smashing format. For the progheads who like surprises. I need to lie down.

 Faust & Nurse With Wound: Disconnected by FAUST album cover Studio Album, 2007
3.53 | 23 ratings

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Faust & Nurse With Wound: Disconnected
Faust Krautrock

Review by Dobermensch
Prog Reviewer

2 stars This recording is how I imagine the original Amon Düül sounding in 2007 if they'd had the technology and any sense of professionalism at hand. The opener has many similarities to 'Psychedelic Underground' from 1969. Forget about the 4/4 beat - this is a 1/1 Red American Indian tribal dirge.

Despite being well produced and being very clear in sound separation, 'Disconnected' leaves me feeling disengaged by its conclusion. I own around 40 Nurse With Wound LP's and have the first 4 'Faust' recordings so had high hopes approaching this collaboration of two very studio-bound artists.

Overall, this album sounds far more 'Nurse With Wound' than 'Faust'. I can only imagine that 'Faust' handed over some DAT tapes with which Steve Stapleton deconstructed, mashed, bashed and re-built to his own requirements.

'Disconnected' is mostly made up of the usual 'Nurse With Wound' precisely clipped vocal snippets, while all sorts of metallic drones and ethereal groans are layered one on top of the other. It creates a very odd Dadaist atmosphere where intentionally, nothing makes sense. There's even a john Cage moment called 'Silence' where you have to listen to nothing for one minute. Why?

"Tu M'Entends?" utilises that 'Nurse With Wound' electronic drum loop that he relied on heavily in the mid nineties. Steve Stapleton is the ultimate magpie plagiarist. SO many of his sounds are 'borrowed' from other bands. This is no bad thing, as they're all so fleeting it's hard to get a grip on them. But I always listen to 'Nurse With Wound' thinking I've heard that somewhere before, but can never put my finger on it. Infuriating...

'Faust' re-appear live on the last track 'Hard Rain' with some violently shouted German vocals and heavy drums. It's tuneless of course and is raw, loud and completely out of place on this recording. It does however, slap me in the face and brings me out of my dead man stupor.

This is not a good place to start if you're unfamiliar with either band. It sounds nothing like 'Faust' and there are far better 'Nurse With Wound' albums available.

Thanks to ProgLucky for the artist addition. and to Quinino for the last updates

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