Header

PRESTO BALLET

Crossover Prog • United States


From Progarchives.com, the ultimate progressive rock music website

Presto Ballet picture
Presto Ballet biography
PRESTO BALLET is the new band from Metal Church guitarist Kurdt Vanderhoof. Evoking a classic 70's feel, their debut album "Peace Among The Ruins" heralds a return to a time when music was at its most colorful and influential. An album full of tasteful guitar parts, crunching Hammond organ and rich vocals, the band follows a path previously tread by rock pioneers such as KANSAS, YES, GENESIS and DEEP PURPLE. Vanderhoof describes the album from a production point of view, "We recorded the whole album in a somewhat 'old school' manner, which means analog synthesizers, real Hammond organ and real Mellotron sounds".

All of the tracks from "Peace Among The Ruins" were recorded using an analog tape machine, which was another nod to the sounds of the seventies. Vanderhoof explains, "Digital recording techniques are annoying! For rock music it's absolutely fatal when you always rely on samples, sequencers and drum machines. It destroys the live feel of the music. With PRESTO BALLET, it was our aim to return to a more 'natural' feel while keeping as melodic and musical as possible."

Without a doubt, the band has succeeded in the approach they took to their debut album. With the opening notes to the title track "Peace Among The Ruins", it's easy to see the band's full strengths on display. Following on from that, "The Fringes" powerfully recalls the sound of early American stadium rock. Tracks like "Seasons" or "Find The Time" unmistakably show the band's allegiance to a time in which they felt rock music was at its most alive. "For me, the seventies was the most interesting time, with the most skilled bands, the best songs and the best ideas", says Vanderhoof. "I've never understood why nobody has gone back to that kind of music again". The album also occasionally references the progressive and inventive approach of the BEATLES, with psychedelic sounds and unconventional arrangements. How does Vanderhoof summarize his new band? "For me PRESTO BALLET is like a modern 70's progressive/rock band." And "Peace Among The Ruins" can't be described any better than that.

To realize his ambitious plans, the composer and producer hired an effective team. Singer Scott Albright was lead singer on Vanderhoof's first solo album and also front man for his European tour, as special guests of SAVATAGE. As with Albright, keyboard player Brian Cokeley is also on long time musical partner of Vanderhoof. Cokeley has worked with the likes of EARTH, WIND & FIRE, QUIE...
read more

Presto Ballet official website

PRESTO BALLET MP3, Free Download (music stream)


Open extended player in a new pop-up window | Random Playlist (50) | How to submit new MP3s

PRESTO BALLET forum topics / tours, shows & news


PRESTO BALLET forum topics
No topics found for : "presto ballet"
Create a topic now
PRESTO BALLET tours, shows & news Post an entries now

PRESTO BALLET Videos (YouTube and more)


Showing only random 3 | Search and add more videos to PRESTO BALLET

Buy PRESTO BALLET Music


Invisible PlacesInvisible Places
Import
SAOL 2011
Audio CD$15.35
$12.77 (used)
Love What You've Done With The PlaceLove What You've Done With The Place
EP
Body Of Work
Audio CD$19.99
Relic Of The Modern WorldRelic Of The Modern World
PROGROCK RECORDS 2013
Audio CD$55.13
$45.91 (used)
Peace Among the RuinsPeace Among the Ruins
Import
InsideOutMusic 2005
Audio CD$16.61
$14.54 (used)
Right Now on Ebay (logo)

More places to buy PRESTO BALLET music online Buy PRESTO BALLET & Prog Rock Digital Music online:
  • AmazonMP3: Search for PRESTO BALLET DRM-Free MP3 Downloads @ AmazonMP3 (USA Only) | AmazonMP3 (UK Only)

PRESTO BALLET shows & tickets


  • Progtoberfest on 25 Oct 2014

PRESTO BALLET discography


Ordered by release date | Showing ratings (top albums) | Help Progarchives.com to complete the discography and add albums

PRESTO BALLET top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.46 | 63 ratings
Peace Among The Ruins
2005
3.61 | 69 ratings
The Lost Art of Time Travel
2008
3.68 | 81 ratings
Invisible Places
2011
3.72 | 45 ratings
Relic Of The Modern World
2012

PRESTO BALLET Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

PRESTO BALLET Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

PRESTO BALLET Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

PRESTO BALLET Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

4.29 | 21 ratings
Love What You've Done To The Place
2011

PRESTO BALLET Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 Peace Among The Ruins by PRESTO BALLET album cover Studio Album, 2005
3.46 | 63 ratings

BUY
Peace Among The Ruins
Presto Ballet Crossover Prog

Review by UMUR
Special Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

4 stars "Peace Among the Ruins" is the debut full-length studio album by US progressive rock/metal act Presto Ballet. The album was released through InsideOutMusic in June 2005. Presto Ballet was founded by guitarist Kurdt Vanderhoof, who wanted to pursue a progressive rock career in addition to his work with traditional heavy metal act Metal Church.

The music on the album is 70s influenced progressive rock with a hard rock singer and some nods toward progressive metal. The use of vintage keyboards (especially mellotron)/organ are dominant features on the album, but Presto Ballet are no one trick pony, and skillfully incorporate heavy guitars and psychadelic pop flavours (reminiscent of late sixties Beatles) to colour their brand of progressive rock. "Peace Among the Ruins" are both exceptionally well played and very well produced, which makes it a very enjoyable listening experience. Itīs the high level songwriting skills that stick out the most though. Intriguing Progressive rock tracks like the title track, "The Fringes" and "Speed of Time" are complimented by more pop oriented tracks like "Seasons" and "Sunshine" but also by a heavier and darker track like "Slave". I think it says a lot about the quality of the material and the musicians involved, that Presto Ballet pull off all music styles they play in a highly convincing manner. These guys are professional to the bone. If I have to make references to other artists I would mention acts like Spockīs Beard and Frost* (and a slight nod towards Kansas).

"Peace Among the Ruins" is the kind of album that blew me back in my seat the first time I listened to it. Further listens have proven the longivity of the album, but it is what I would call an instantly enjoyable and memorable release. They donīt come much more professional than this and a 4 star (80%) rating is fully deserved.

MEMBERS LOGIN ZONE

As a registered member (register here if not), you can post rating/reviews (& edit later), comments reviews and submit new albums.

You are not logged, please complete authentication before continuing (use forum credentials).

Forum user
Forum password

WARNING: Forum software upgrade in progress, login function maybe affected for some users during that time.

 Relic Of The Modern World by PRESTO BALLET album cover Studio Album, 2012
3.72 | 45 ratings

BUY
Relic Of The Modern World
Presto Ballet Crossover Prog

Review by Memo_anathemo

3 stars This album really impressed me, with a lot of progressive passages and a good conceptualization and art work. It reminded me The Flower Kings and Spock's Beard. All the songs have their good moments, it is a cheerful album made of 5 songs, from which, 4 of them are short pieces in comparison to the title track "Relic of the Modern World", which is a real epic of around 19 minutes and maybe it is the song that can summarize the rest of the album with many changes, and as I mentioned above, all the album maintains a cheerful perspective with outstanding keyboards by Kerry Shacklett and drumming by Chris G. The rest of the band has good participation in the album, maybe discrete. Chuck Cambpell reminds me a lot to Roine Stolt and Neil Morse together. I think "Relic of the Modern World" is a good album worthy to be listened and analysed.

MEMBERS LOGIN ZONE

As a registered member (register here if not), you can post rating/reviews (& edit later), comments reviews and submit new albums.

You are not logged, please complete authentication before continuing (use forum credentials).

Forum user
Forum password

WARNING: Forum software upgrade in progress, login function maybe affected for some users during that time.

 Invisible Places by PRESTO BALLET album cover Studio Album, 2011
3.68 | 81 ratings

BUY
Invisible Places
Presto Ballet Crossover Prog

Review by Conor Fynes
Prog Reviewer

3 stars 'Invisible Places' - Presto Ballet (6/10)

Founded by former Metal Church guitarist Kurdt Vanderhoof, Presto Ballet sees the man pay homage to the greats of 70's prog rock. 'Invisible Places' is the third album by this band, and it is a well-performed and decently composed effort. However, like so many prog rock acts nowadays, the feeling of deja-vu I get when listening to it seems to rob the music of its legitimacy, especially when the bands who made these sounds first did it a lot better.

Presto Ballet's music is an upbeat mixture of Hemispheres-era Rush and Kansas, heartwarming melodic prog that gets the tenants of being 'prog' down, without necessarily crossing over and getting truly inventive with it. The compositions here could be labelled as being neo-prog in the sense that they are very melodic, and rarely get too complex, despite the fact that the song lengths here occasionally tip over the ten minute mark. Possibly the most notable thing about Presto Ballet's sound is their vocalist Ronny Munroe, who sounds like he should be fronting a heavy metal band rather than a retro-prog outfit. He howls in a generally higher register, at times sounding similar to Iron Maiden's Bruce Dickinson, and though his voice wears thin at times, there is a lot of power to be heard when the rest of the band allows him space to really belt out.

The production is decent, although passing me as being mechanical at times. While I am not too much into this retro-prog direction that Presto Ballet takes, I love the range of keyboard sounds that are heard on 'Invisible Places'. From rich organs to lead synths, Kerry Shacklett adds some great depth to the sound of the band. Vanderhoof is obviously a very good guitarist in his own right, but he rarely lets loose and shows the listener his talent; his riffs are always kept within the context of the song. Once again, it is quite pleasant to hear, but this band's work is far too tame for my tastes. The talent and skill is here, but the excitement is not.

MEMBERS LOGIN ZONE

As a registered member (register here if not), you can post rating/reviews (& edit later), comments reviews and submit new albums.

You are not logged, please complete authentication before continuing (use forum credentials).

Forum user
Forum password

WARNING: Forum software upgrade in progress, login function maybe affected for some users during that time.

 The Lost Art of Time Travel by PRESTO BALLET album cover Studio Album, 2008
3.61 | 69 ratings

BUY
The Lost Art of Time Travel
Presto Ballet Crossover Prog

Review by Richens

3 stars This, Presto Ballet's second album, I feel is a big improvement on their first album which sauntered along at a steady but fairly sedate pace. The music on 'The Lost Art of Time Travel' is altogether stronger. It has more conviction to it and has a number of high points with more pronounced melodies. The last song on the album 'Haze' is an absolute gem. I'd buy this album for that song alone. They are not the best in the genre but they are good and they are getting better! I've only heard snippets of their new album 'Invisible Places' so I'll hold off on my comments about that one until I've heard it in its entirety. A solid group that is getting better all the time.

MEMBERS LOGIN ZONE

As a registered member (register here if not), you can post rating/reviews (& edit later), comments reviews and submit new albums.

You are not logged, please complete authentication before continuing (use forum credentials).

Forum user
Forum password

WARNING: Forum software upgrade in progress, login function maybe affected for some users during that time.

 Invisible Places by PRESTO BALLET album cover Studio Album, 2011
3.68 | 81 ratings

BUY
Invisible Places
Presto Ballet Crossover Prog

Review by b_olariu
Prog Reviewer

4 stars Preso Ballet is no longer an unknown band to progressive rock fans, they manage to create 3 great albums, at least for me, and since their second release they proven that they are among the best in this filed in last years. Invisible places is their latest album , issued in 2011 is again a great symphonic, eclectic heavy prog album smelling of '70's greates progressive rock period but with a touch of moder sound. I realy like this band, own all 3 albums, each one having something for real intrest to offer, this one is no exception. Even they bring nothing new releated with previous 2 albums in manner of composing and sound, they known and manage to keep that excellent fresh sound first 2 albums, I mean the album sounds very happy, well produce and with perfect musicianship. More then half of the original members are gone, remaining still only the drumer Bill Raymond and the master of the band Kurdt Vanderhoof, the rest are unknow musicins to me, but what a great job they done here. The music from the start was reminiscent of Kansas, Rush in places, and even Styx, but Kurdt Vanderhoof succede to creat something realy intristing in amoder progressive rock scene, the freshnes of the compostions are still present at this third album like on previous 2. Enjoyble arrangements where the mellotron, keybords , bass all are melted very very well and surprisingly fresh in sound, or at least is how i see this album. The ne voice Ronny Munroe is perfect for Presto ballet, fits like a hand on glove to their music, that why I realy like him here. Lenghy pieces, some of them, 4 out of 7, with complex arrangements, excellent musicianship and perfect balance between mellower parts with more edgy ones.All pieces are great, special The Puzzle who has a great keybords intro that reminds me of Renaissance (Prologue or Turn of the cards era) So, another worthy album from this excellent band, worth 4 stars for sure, very positiv, happy and pleasent album in today progressive rock scene, they are like a fresh air tot his scene. Recommended, all 3 albums, you can't go wronng with any of them.

MEMBERS LOGIN ZONE

As a registered member (register here if not), you can post rating/reviews (& edit later), comments reviews and submit new albums.

You are not logged, please complete authentication before continuing (use forum credentials).

Forum user
Forum password

WARNING: Forum software upgrade in progress, login function maybe affected for some users during that time.

 Invisible Places by PRESTO BALLET album cover Studio Album, 2011
3.68 | 81 ratings

BUY
Invisible Places
Presto Ballet Crossover Prog

Review by Nightfly
Special Collaborator Rock Progressivo Italiano Team

4 stars Kurdt Vanderhoof returns with a complete line-up change for Invisible Places, the third album from Presto Ballet. You'd hardly notice though as he's assembled an equally fine collection of players to deliver this compelling collection of American seventies style prog.

On a musical level it's pretty much business as usual with no real leaps in style over 2008's The Lost Art Of Time Travel. That's no bad thing though considering what a fine album it was and Invisible Places while not necessarily bettering it is certainly its equal. Once more a seventies prog retro feel is present though more in an American vein than the kind of stuff that was coming out of the UK at the time. Fans of the likes of Kansas and Styx will find much to enjoy on the seven compositions with some great instrumental interplay present amongst the melodic hooks. Sundancer could be Rush around their A Farewell To Kings era, the synths reminiscent of Geddy Lee's work and Vanderhoof's guitar sound strongly in the Alex Lifeson vein at the time. Throughout the album there plenty of great Hammond organ to keep vintage keyboard lovers happy, Kerry Shacklett being a particularly excellent player.

Two longer tracks around the twelve minute mark, Of Grand Design and No end To Begin capture the band at their best, shifting between busy dextrous musical workouts and memorable vocal sections. I may have a slight preference for previous vocalist Scott Albright but Ronny Munroe is a worthy successor with an equally histrionic rock style. The band still manage to fit a lot in on the relatively shorter pieces, in fact the aforementioned Sundancer may just be the finest moment on the entire album but opener Between The Lines is not far behind with some busy and impressive drumming from Bill Raymond with bassist Bobby Ferkovich locked into every twist and turn.

Overall then another impressive effort from this most consistent of bands. Hopefully this line- up might manage to stick together long enough for album number four.

MEMBERS LOGIN ZONE

As a registered member (register here if not), you can post rating/reviews (& edit later), comments reviews and submit new albums.

You are not logged, please complete authentication before continuing (use forum credentials).

Forum user
Forum password

WARNING: Forum software upgrade in progress, login function maybe affected for some users during that time.

 Invisible Places by PRESTO BALLET album cover Studio Album, 2011
3.68 | 81 ratings

BUY
Invisible Places
Presto Ballet Crossover Prog

Review by ozzy_tom
Prog Reviewer

4 stars "Invisible Places" is the 3rd album of American retro-prog formation Presto Ballet, led by Metal Church guitarist - Kurdt Vanderhoof. This time more than half of band's musicians were replaced, we have new vocalist, keyboardist & bassist here. Anyway I have to admit that these changes are very welcome because after very solid debut album and slightly weaker (but still good) second output, "Invisible Places" seems te be their pinnacle! Everything seems to work perfect here and their retro-style shines more than ever. I especially have to praise Kerry Shacklett who is a truly fantastic keyboard-player, his wide range of old school equipment (Hammond organ, electric & acoustic pianos, mellotron, Moog synthesizer etc.) is astonishing and he always manages to "stay on top", never being overshadowed by Kurdt's electric guitar wailing.

1. "Between the Lines" - album begins with great track driven by fat organ chops and analog/digital synthesizers + metallic guitar riffs. Very catchy & memorable tune with fantastic vocals by new member - Ronny Munroe. All in all it sounds very much like Kansas from early 70s but with more aggressive vocals and harder edged guitar delivery. Some fantastic mellotron/organ interludes in the middle! And lots of great acoustic guitar moments! Overall stunning piece.

2. "The Puzzle" - electrifying intro with swirling Hammond and crunching guitar riffing, followed by lovely piano tune makes a good start for "The Puzzle". In general piano plays very important part in this song and it's a very welcome factor. After almost 3 minutes Ronny Munroe starts to sing and it's another solid performance. Refrain is very memorable and has almost sing-a-long feature, but it's miles away from being cheesy/poppy of course. Good Moog runs (near the end of the track) included.

3. "Sundancer" - it's softer composition compared with previous ones. More synthesizers than organ-driven this time, but in the middle section we can can still listen to some fast tempo Hammond runs so everything's as it should be. To sum up: proggy ballad a la Uriah Heep's "Circle of Hands" and alike. Probably the weakest track on the album I'm afraid.

4. "Of Grand Design" - begins with birds' sounds so "Close to to Edge" springs to your mind but it's not the case here. "Of Grand Design" is the first 12+ minutes epic on "Invisible Places" and I really, really like it but it has nothing in common with "Close to to Edge" except the beginning. It sounds more like mix of Kansas, early Styx, Uriah Heep and Birth Control. Kerry Shacklett's Hammond organ runs are especially heavy & they're driving this piece perfectly, while his organ solo showcase in the middle is especially worth to be mentioned. But don't be mistaken, "Of Grand Design" included also many calmer moments with synth/piano passages.

5. "One Perfect Moment" - the shortest song of this release isn't bad at all too. Very enjoyable heavy prog/hard rock in the vain of Deep Purple or Birth Control (and you can find this kind of songs in Don Airey's & Ryo Okumoto's last solo albums too). Quite straightforward but with highly entertaining organ & guitar leads.

6. "All in All" - this one surprisingly begins with Pink Floyd-ish synthesizer sounds but after few seconds everything comes back to standard Presto Ballet style. It's still interesting composition where slow & dynamic fragments are incorporated perfectly to keep listeners happy. Organ solo is a top notch here, it has truly 70s "feeling" for me. Crazy organ/Moog crescendo in the end is also great.

7. "No End to Begin" - second, the longer epic is probably my favorite track of the album. It's a real multi-part mini-suite which begins very mellow (acoustic guitar, synths, relaxing vocals) but as the time goes on "No End to Begin" shows its "claws". Especially long, elaborated Hammond organ solo in the middle of the suite is a wonderful culmination of preceding "tension". In the second part we can also witness some fantastic piano melodies & glorious mellotron waves.

To summarize: "Invisible Places" is definitely my favorite album recorded by Presto Ballet. It sounds like culmination of their career but I still hope that they will be able to "beat it" in the future. All fans of Kansas, early Styx & Journey, but also Uriah Heep, Birth Control & Deep Purple should check it out. If you like such analog keyboards oriented heavy prog you should also check such retro-prog bands like Wicked Minds, Standarte, Black Bonzo, BigElf, Cosmic Nomads, Storm at Sunrise or The Divine Baze Orchestra.

Best tracks: "No End to Begin" & "Between the Lines"

Fully deserved 4,5 stars from ozzy_tom

MEMBERS LOGIN ZONE

As a registered member (register here if not), you can post rating/reviews (& edit later), comments reviews and submit new albums.

You are not logged, please complete authentication before continuing (use forum credentials).

Forum user
Forum password

WARNING: Forum software upgrade in progress, login function maybe affected for some users during that time.

 Peace Among The Ruins by PRESTO BALLET album cover Studio Album, 2005
3.46 | 63 ratings

BUY
Peace Among The Ruins
Presto Ballet Crossover Prog

Review by Brendan

4 stars Presto Ballet is a modern pomp rock band that mixes fantasy rock styling, characterised by organs and organ-similar synths, with a lot of hard-rock. They have been compared to a lot of bands, to my ears they sound like they're trying to recapture the sound of 'Styx' but trying to make that sound more progressive, and a bit heavier, and it works wonders!

Their vocals harmonies are very good, very reminiscent of Styx, but also could be compared to Uriah Heep, and Deep Purple, who I haven't heard yet. The choruses are quite catchy too. They've been able to re-capture that science fiction aura that those bands were able to convey in the mid and late seventies. In fact, if I heard this album on the radio, I probably would have thought it was from the late 70's.

Although sometimes their instrumental sections can meander a bit, they mostly offer quality work on "Peace among the ruins". There are a couple of more acoustic songs on here to help add a bit of diversity to the recording.

In the modern world of prog, I would definitely say this one is worth tracking down. Definitely check it our if you like hard-rock meets prog-rock.

MEMBERS LOGIN ZONE

As a registered member (register here if not), you can post rating/reviews (& edit later), comments reviews and submit new albums.

You are not logged, please complete authentication before continuing (use forum credentials).

Forum user
Forum password

WARNING: Forum software upgrade in progress, login function maybe affected for some users during that time.

 The Lost Art of Time Travel by PRESTO BALLET album cover Studio Album, 2008
3.61 | 69 ratings

BUY
The Lost Art of Time Travel
Presto Ballet Crossover Prog

Review by Brendan

2 stars Why oh why? Their debut album was a highly enjoyable modern pomp-rock album. it had it's weaknesses,but it was a kind of tribute to the hard-rock meets prog masters of the 70's, like Styx, Deep Purple and others. In fact they were trying to be like a modern Styx with more artistic vision. Their strengths were catchy choruses, tight vocal harmonies, swirling synths and big riffs, while not relying so much on generic rock like their 70's counterparts.

So why have they forsaken their strengths and gone in techno-flash overdrive? For a band whose best qualities might be their vocal harmonies, this record strikes me as being mostly based on long, meandering instrumentals. They're trying to be very proggy and technical, but that's not their forte. The main instrument in their sound is heavy guitars, so you can imagine what their ten minute instrumental work is like. The organs aren't that prominent in the mix. Technoflash records are hard for Emerson, Wakeman, Howe, etc. to pull off, so why do these guys have to try and pull it off? At least know your limits and your areas of interest!

The opening ten minute "The Mind Machine" is actually pretty good. The instrumental music is quite good and the choruses aren't bad either. But "Thieves" makes little impression over nine minutes. The acoustic "You're alive" is a very enjoyable 4-minute ditty that plays to their strengths, a big sound, vocal harmonies and pleasant melodies. But it's followed by "One tragedy at a time", a tragedy indeed. This fourteen minute song just meanders and leaves the listener with very little of interest. At least it's followed by the best song on the album, the excellent "I'm not blind", which is vintage Pomp rock, with a beautiful chorus. The only other song that offers anything interesting is "haze", which meanders a bit, but does have some good sections. There's even a Dennis DeYoung sound-alike ballad moment. With some editing it could have been a great five minute song? The closing two and a half minutes of this song is excellent. Unfortunately, the other song, "Easy Tomorrow" has a weak chorus.

I think PB should have a good think about where they are going. They are a very good pomp- rock band who seem to be pandering too much to the prog crowd. There are three great short tracks that were left off their 2005 album "Peace among the ruins", namely 'Surprise', 'Gypsy Road' and 'Mr. Amazing', which are better tracks than most of what is on this album.

MEMBERS LOGIN ZONE

As a registered member (register here if not), you can post rating/reviews (& edit later), comments reviews and submit new albums.

You are not logged, please complete authentication before continuing (use forum credentials).

Forum user
Forum password

WARNING: Forum software upgrade in progress, login function maybe affected for some users during that time.

 The Lost Art of Time Travel by PRESTO BALLET album cover Studio Album, 2008
3.61 | 69 ratings

BUY
The Lost Art of Time Travel
Presto Ballet Crossover Prog

Review by progrules
Prog Reviewer

3 stars Can't shake of the feeling where this American band has it's roots. It's from their fellow countrymen Kansas and Styx in my opinion with also big resemblance with their lesser known compatriots Cryptic Vision. The long and fairly complex compositions have obviously most resemblance with Kansas but funny enough the sound is more like Styx to me with Cryptic Vision as good second. So there's probably an obvious typical American prog style at least where the heavier symphonic prog is concerned.

Because that's what this is to me, a blend of symphonic prog and heavy prog but there's indeed also an inexplicable hint to pop music I notice every time I hear this album and that's where my comparison to Styx comes from and is probably the reason this band is categorized in the crossover genre. The main reason for this feeling is caused by the vocals I believe. But there's also a strange mix of this almost commercial Styx style with the sheer symphonic style of Kansas. The instrumental parts are pretty complex and extensive and bemuse me somewhat.

All things considered this album is quite hard to rate for me. The best score would be 3,5 stars but that's still not possible alas so I will have to make the hard choice once again. And even though this is a good/very good album I feel 4 stars would be just about too much for my taste so I will give three. Fans of Kansas and the other mentioned bands should really check this one out.

MEMBERS LOGIN ZONE

As a registered member (register here if not), you can post rating/reviews (& edit later), comments reviews and submit new albums.

You are not logged, please complete authentication before continuing (use forum credentials).

Forum user
Forum password

WARNING: Forum software upgrade in progress, login function maybe affected for some users during that time.

Thanks to erik neuteboom for the artist addition.

Copyright Prog Archives, All rights reserved. | Legal Notice | Privacy Policy | Advertise | GeoIP Services by MaxMind | RSS + syndications

Other sites in the MAC network: JazzMusicArchives.com — the ultimate jazz music virtual community | MetalMusicArchives.com — the ultimate metal music virtual community


Server processing time: 1.94 seconds