Header

ENBOR

Prog Folk • Spain


From Progarchives.com, the ultimate progressive rock music website

Enbor biography
Another Basque group that benefited from the dislocation of Franco's regime in 75. Indeed the "ethnic" minorities were not really allowed to express their difference under the fascist leader's dictatorship and once Spain became a democracy, the three Basque Provinces claimed more autonomy, not only political but cultural as well. And a bunch of popular folk rock group appeared on the scene, singing their freedom in their native tongue and probably pushing the spirit of independence as well, much like what was happening in Quebec at the same time. Within a couple of years, groups like HAIZEA, ERROBI, ITZIAR, IZUKAITZ, LISKER, ENBOR , GURE BIDEA and EIDER all appeared on the scene over the next three years, claiming their freedom in the folk rock vein, although everyone of them cultivated their own particularism (sense of identity).

In this regard, ENBOR was one of the most original, being a sextet, including a wind player, which induced some jazz tendencies. They released two albums on the inevitable Elkar label (the other being the Xoxoa label), the first eponymous in 78 presenting some rather conventional songs (in spite of the frequent use of clarinet), but heavy on the Basque spirit. After losing half the group, ENBOR reconvened without a female singer, but adding a keyboard player and a second sax player, and in 80 recorded their second album, Katebegiak, which left much more space to the music, including a sidelong title track.

In terms of more international folk prog, ENBOR can't easily be likened to UK groups as they have really their own sound. Should I name one, I'd say THE PENTANGLE (more electric, though) mixed with the better-known Basque group ITOIZ (sax player Carlos Jimenez playing in both groups). Like most of their "compadres" (if the Basque will allow me), ENBOR folded at the turn of the decade when the nationalism took on a violent form with ETA, with only ITOIZ surviving most of that dreadful 80's decade.


::::: Hugues Chantraine, Belgium :::::

Enbor official website

ENBOR MP3, Free Download (music stream)


Open extended player in a new pop-up window | Random Playlist (50) | How to submit new MP3s
No MP3/Stream available for this artist.
Collaborate with Progarchives.com, learn how to submit new MP3s.

ENBOR forum topics / tours, shows & news


ENBOR forum topics
No topics found for : "enbor"
Create a topic now
ENBOR tours, shows & news
No topics found for : "enbor"
Post an entries now

ENBOR Videos (YouTube and more)


Showing only random 3 | Search and add more videos to ENBOR

Buy ENBOR Music


EnborEnbor
Elkar Xoxoa 2011
Audio CD$15.99
$80.12 (used)

More places to buy ENBOR music online Buy ENBOR & Prog Rock Digital Music online:
  • AmazonMP3: Search for ENBOR DRM-Free MP3 Downloads @ AmazonMP3 (USA Only) | AmazonMP3 (UK Only)

ENBOR shows & tickets


ENBOR has no upcoming shows, according to LAST.FM syndicated events and shows feed

ENBOR discography


Ordered by release date | Showing ratings (top albums) | Help Progarchives.com to complete the discography and add albums

ENBOR top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.08 | 8 ratings
Enbor
1979
2.69 | 4 ratings
Katebegiak
1980

ENBOR Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

ENBOR Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

ENBOR Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

ENBOR Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

ENBOR Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 Enbor by ENBOR album cover Studio Album, 1979
3.08 | 8 ratings

BUY
Enbor
Enbor Prog Folk

Review by GruvanDahlman
Prog Reviewer

3 stars I like the folky side of prog. I guess it all started, for me anyways, with Jethro Tull. After that I went all in with the likes of Fairport Convention, Pentangle and onwards and upwards. There are many a good prog band to be found in variuos parts of the world. The basque prog folk of the 70's and early 80's is not an exception.

Enbors first album reminds me of the times it was made. There is a certain warmth and lustre about Enbor which really strikes a chord with me. Every now and then I return to this album and I find myself smiling and feeling a warm embrace, because the music is warm and gentle. Unfortunately it is not very varied, I'd say. There's more of a general feeling than an albums worth of really good material. The songs does not stand out. Not really. They blend together into one.

The conclusion has to be that Enbors first album is a pleasant and warm album with nice instrumentation and gentle voices. Not a masterpiece, though very pleasant listening.

MEMBERS LOGIN ZONE

As a registered member (register here if not), you can post rating/reviews (& edit later), comments reviews and submit new albums.

You are not logged, please complete authentication before continuing (use forum credentials).

 Enbor by ENBOR album cover Studio Album, 1979
3.08 | 8 ratings

BUY
Enbor
Enbor Prog Folk

Review by apps79
Special Collaborator Neo Prog Team

3 stars ENBOR were a short-lived Electric Folk Rock group,who produced two albums in late-70's/early- 80's.They came from the region of the Basque country in Spain and their line-up included no less than 7 members,most of them contributing on vocals as well.Their first eponymous album was released in 1979 on Elkar Label.

Lying somewhere between pleasant Electric Folk and slightly CAMEL-esque mellow prog rock,''Enbor'' is a nice album in terms of balance and composition,totally sung in the Basque dialect.Clocking at 33 minutes,this album offers the listener three musically positive elements.Firstly it's the smooth yet carefully performed guitar work of Inaki Gutierrez, Joxe Portela and Ramon Gardeazabal with a sensitive edge and delicate melodies,both electric and acoustic.Especially the slow-tempo rhythms come close to the style of ANDY LATIMER.Secondly,there are some really pleasant male and female vocal harmonies in here.The warm voices of the singers are all over the album and making the album even deeper in its sensitive section.Last, but not least,the wind instruments and their smooth interplays with the rhythm section are really awesome.The dreamy flutes and the clarinet passages of Inaki Urettxaga will reward every fan of decent folk rock purchases.

Thougt not that well known like other Basque folk bands (ITOIZ, HAIZEA etc.) or having even a complicated sound, ENBOR certainly deserve a place in the book of progressive rock for their careful blending of rock,wind instrumentation and multi-vocal arrangements .Folk Rock fans around the world,this was made for you!3,5 stars is my accurate rating.

MEMBERS LOGIN ZONE

As a registered member (register here if not), you can post rating/reviews (& edit later), comments reviews and submit new albums.

You are not logged, please complete authentication before continuing (use forum credentials).

 Katebegiak  by ENBOR album cover Studio Album, 1980
2.69 | 4 ratings

BUY
Katebegiak
Enbor Prog Folk

Review by kenethlevine
Special Collaborator Prog-Folk Team

2 stars Although I generally prefer ENBOR's debut to this second and final production, "Katebagiak" is likely to be of greater appeal for progressive fans if only because of its "side-long" title cut. Unfortunately, while this behemoth does sport some fine, and occasionally pseudo heavy guitars, melodic vocal parts, sprightly flutes, and the requisite adventurousness, it also has some disco style rhythms, and is somewhat distant, like an attractive individual who is difficult to get to know and love. It might be a case of the group being overly ambitious and failing to play to its strengths.

The sublime vocal harmonies that really made the self-titled album are virtually absent throughout the disk. The greater emphasis on the wind instruments and keyboards works best on "Neska Adiskidea", and is more than a little like ITOIZ circa "Ezekiel", while the closer "Agurra II" is probably the folkiest thing done by Enbor. Both point a way to a more unique sound less pressured by the somewhat obtuse jazz orientation which permeated the earlier part of the album.

Katebagiak is overall a slightly inferior package to the previous ENBOR album. I am going to round down from 2.5 stars, with the N.B that this is the more progressive of the two albums, but we all know that doesn't necessarily mean better.

MEMBERS LOGIN ZONE

As a registered member (register here if not), you can post rating/reviews (& edit later), comments reviews and submit new albums.

You are not logged, please complete authentication before continuing (use forum credentials).

 Enbor by ENBOR album cover Studio Album, 1979
3.08 | 8 ratings

BUY
Enbor
Enbor Prog Folk

Review by kenethlevine
Special Collaborator Prog-Folk Team

3 stars If you don't know any other Basque prog, it's hard to find a reference point for ENBOR, but suffice to say that it does not sound like the late 70s at all. A groundswell of creativity had been stifled under Franco, which came to light in the 1976-1980 period, then essentially vanished. It's rock that is so mellow as to be lumped in with folk, even though I mildly question that categorization. Added winds of diverse pedigree, multipart vocals, and occasional insistent lead guitars, complete an intriguing picture.

I hear a lot of ITOIZ in here, not surprisingly since they had already produced 2 acclaimed albums by this time. In the first minute of the debut, I hear a bit of ELOY's "Ocean", but this seems a passing snippet, mentioned more to reveal the breadth of interests. "Ondoan ez dut inor" and "Zuek ez dazizue" are the strongest tracks, with the latter bearing similarities to early HORSLIPS ("Musical Priest" and to DECAMERON's ("Tomorrow's Pantomime"). The lovely harmonies make me think of Germany's EDEN. The instrumental closer solidifies the eclectic chill-out vibe, with fluid percussion and electric piano to the fore.

Ultimately this is not an exciting album by any stretch, with a sameness that would not engage more demanding progressive ears. However, that same quality lends itself better to relaxation and reflection, and those who enjoy the pastoral, sometimes breezily jazzy, Basque sound of the period will be in raptures.

MEMBERS LOGIN ZONE

As a registered member (register here if not), you can post rating/reviews (& edit later), comments reviews and submit new albums.

You are not logged, please complete authentication before continuing (use forum credentials).

 Katebegiak  by ENBOR album cover Studio Album, 1980
2.69 | 4 ratings

BUY
Katebegiak
Enbor Prog Folk

Review by ClemofNazareth
Special Collaborator Prog Folk Researcher

2 stars Generally I find Basque folk music to be rich in textures and emotion although sometimes a little light in percussion and elaboration. That applies here as well, but in a bit too great a measure. I don’t know anything about Enbor other than this was their last album and the female singer from the debut was gone by the time this was recorded.

Beyond that this is a fairly plain album musically, with very little energy and not any particularly noteworthy musicianship either. Nothing here is actually poor, it just doesn’t go very far to draw the listener in and keep their attention either.

The first half of the CD was a side-long title track suite on the original vinyl release, although it is actually made up of several loosely joined smaller parts. The band is mostly acoustic except for some electric guitar (there’s also an acoustic guitar). Add Iņaki Urretxaga on some sort of woodwind (flute or something ethnically similar) and piano and you have most of the band’s sound. Amaia Kareaga’s vocals are competent but not exceptional, but his shortcomings are offset somewhat by decent harmonizing backing from the guitarists Joxe Portela and Iņaki Gutierrez.

After the lengthy opening the band seems to have struggled to come up with enough material to complete the album, and indeed the record is just over thirty-six minutes long so there would have easily been room for another song or two if the band had something more to add.

Of the remaining tracks “Kutsadura” is too long on vocals and too short on musical variety, while “Neska Adiskidea” features some mellow and intricate guitar fingering along with horns but little else. Neither of the other two tracks stand out either, and only the closing “Agurra II” features any measure of percussion or acoustic guitar that would hint that this is actually a Basque album (other than the vocals of course).

I actually kind of like this album the way I like to listen to some of the b-list west-coast American folk singers of the seventies once and a while. But not often, and the same goes for this record. A fair effort, but not much more than a collector piece for fans. Two stars that would be 2.5 if that were possible in the current rating system.

peace

MEMBERS LOGIN ZONE

As a registered member (register here if not), you can post rating/reviews (& edit later), comments reviews and submit new albums.

You are not logged, please complete authentication before continuing (use forum credentials).

 Katebegiak  by ENBOR album cover Studio Album, 1980
2.69 | 4 ratings

BUY
Katebegiak
Enbor Prog Folk

Review by Sean Trane
Special Collaborator Prog Folk

4 stars After suffering an important line-up shuffle (half the group was changed), Enbor recorded their second album in the spring of 80, still on the inevitable Elkar label with a much less evocative artwork. Besides changing drummer, the group had lost part of their multi- vocal (as much as four-part) harmonies (and losing their female singer Amaia Karaega, who still appears on one track), but gained a keyboard player and even hired Itoiz's Carlos Jimenez for a second horn player. Obviously, these changed would dramatically affect the group's sound, giving it instantly a proggier feel, even tilting towards jazz at times.

Starting with the 17-min+ title track, the album takes a solid plunge into progressive jazz-tinged folk, with flutes, saxes, acoustic and electric guitars exchanging roles, trading licks, interacting with each other beautifully. Around the 7th minute, an electric guitar riff changes the song's feel and structure, and the track gains in intensity with solid double/triple harmonies contrasting with Portela's dramatic delivery, resembling somewhat Itoiz's singing.

The flipside contains four songs between 6:30 and 3:30, none of which can match the epic on the first side, but still coming quite close for two of them. The opening Kutsadura is an upbeat song where the saxes are taking the front role. The flute-laden Behin Une Batetan is yet another solid track, even if Enbor doesn't take full advantage or their extended line-up to provide more variety top their sound. Although starting dully, Neska Adiskidea is probably the most dramatic track after the lengthy title track; while the closing Agurra is rather embarrassing and musically sticks out like a sore thumb.

The Basque language being completely unknown to me, I have few means to confirm that the lyrics are (as I suspect) all related to each other in a theme or even a concept and my guess is that if so, the theme must be poignant. While Enbor is yet another good (even excellent) Basque folk group, they can't match Itoiz's solemnity or Errobi's adventurous spirit or Haizea's medieval psychedelia. Nevertheless Enbor is much worthy of your investigation, but you'd better start with this one.

MEMBERS LOGIN ZONE

As a registered member (register here if not), you can post rating/reviews (& edit later), comments reviews and submit new albums.

You are not logged, please complete authentication before continuing (use forum credentials).

Thanks to ProgLucky for the artist addition.

Copyright Prog Archives, All rights reserved. | Legal Notice | Privacy Policy | Advertise | GeoIP Services by MaxMind | RSS + syndications

Other sites in the MAC network: JazzMusicArchives.com — the ultimate jazz music virtual community | MetalMusicArchives.com — the ultimate metal music virtual community


Server processing time: 0.67 seconds