Header

WARM DUST

Jazz Rock/Fusion • United Kingdom


From Progarchives.com, the ultimate progressive rock music website

Warm Dust picture
Warm Dust biography
Among the wave of brass rock groups that embraced the rock world from 68 until 71 or 72, Warm Dust was a late-comer, but quickly became one of the most interesting and progressive group of the genre. The sextet developed a solid psych-laced progressive brass rock, lead by the twin sax players of Alan Solomon (also KB) and John Surguy (also guitar) and featuring future Mike Rutherford and Steve Hackett acolyte Paul Carrack.

They released their debut album And It Came To Pass on the small Trend label and the double vinyl was a small tour-de-force (all things considered for a debut effort) with long compositions, thought-provoking lyrics and plenty of instrumental interplay, including sax, flute, organ, guitars etc.. Their second (conceptual) album released the following year is a frightening recount of the horrors of war and remains their most even album and usually pointed by connoisseurs as their best. It came out in Germany under a different name (Peace For Our Times) on the BASF label. Their last self-titled album with a striking whale artwork is mostly remembered for the sidelong suite blind boy, a stunning full-blown progressive track, which remains their crowning achievements.

Warm dust is definitely of of one the Brass Rock genre's more interesting band along with Brainchild, Galliard and in all honesty deserve at least as much recognition as the much more celebrated early Chicago, If or the cheesy BS&T and certainly much more fame than The Greatest Show On Earth. Exactly why the group broke up remains a mystery for this writer, so if anyone knows anything, please contact Sean Trane on this site's forums


:::: Bio written By Hugues Chantraine, Belgium ::::

WARM DUST MP3, Free Download (music stream)


Open extended player in a new pop-up window | Random Playlist (50) | How to submit new MP3s

WARM DUST forum topics / tours, shows & news


WARM DUST forum topics
No topics found for : "warm dust"
Create a topic now
WARM DUST tours, shows & news
No topics found for : "warm dust"
Post an entries now

WARM DUST Videos (YouTube and more)


Showing only random 3 | Search and add more videos to WARM DUST

Buy WARM DUST Music


And It Came To Pass (CD 2001)And It Came To Pass (CD 2001)
RED FOX Records
Audio CD$22.50
$20.00 (used)
Peace For Our TimePeace For Our Time
Import
Soundvision
Vinyl$34.99
S/T LP (VINYL ALBUM) EUROPEAN SOUNDVISION 2013S/T LP (VINYL ALBUM) EUROPEAN SOUNDVISION 2013
SOUNDVISION
Vinyl$34.90
Warm DustWarm Dust
Audio CD$23.50
$24.99 (used)
Right Now on Ebay (logo)

More places to buy WARM DUST music online Buy WARM DUST & Prog Rock Digital Music online:
  • AmazonMP3: Search for WARM DUST DRM-Free MP3 Downloads @ AmazonMP3 (USA Only) | AmazonMP3 (UK Only)

WARM DUST shows & tickets


WARM DUST has no upcoming shows, according to LAST.FM syndicated events and shows feed

WARM DUST discography


Ordered by release date | Showing ratings (top albums) | Help Progarchives.com to complete the discography and add albums

WARM DUST top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.43 | 26 ratings
And It Came To Pass
1970
3.42 | 15 ratings
Peace For Our Time
1971
3.95 | 14 ratings
Warm Dust
1972

WARM DUST Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

WARM DUST Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

WARM DUST Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

2.33 | 3 ratings
Dreams Of Impossibilities
1972

WARM DUST Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

WARM DUST Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 And It Came To Pass by WARM DUST album cover Studio Album, 1970
3.43 | 26 ratings

BUY
And It Came To Pass
Warm Dust Jazz Rock/Fusion

Review by Ancient Troubadour

4 stars You'll note that of the Warm Dust albums reviewed here "And it came to Pass" has been reviewed and rated by more users than "Peace for our Time" and "Warm dust." and its rating is a little lower than those other two.

However, the rating on this is more reflective of the content than at least "Peace," whose average from a smaller number of scores have been easily skewed higher than this effort, higher than they ought, perhaps.

If you're a poet, perhaps "peace in our time" will appeal to you more than "And it came to pass" but as a musician, as a rocker and a bloke who enjoys subtle humour and elements of irony this reviewer finds this album the most palatable of the two.

It reaches greater heights of auditory excitement, with elements that bring to mind the flavours of Tull's "Thick as a brick", Thijs Van Leer's "Focus III" and the era that brought us the recording of "Jesus Christ Superstar" with its fusion of classical, jazz and rock.

MEMBERS LOGIN ZONE

As a registered member (register here if not), you can post rating/reviews (& edit later), comments reviews and submit new albums.

You are not logged, please complete authentication before continuing (use forum credentials).

 Peace For Our Time by WARM DUST album cover Studio Album, 1971
3.42 | 15 ratings

BUY
Peace For Our Time
Warm Dust Jazz Rock/Fusion

Review by Warthur
Prog Reviewer

3 stars The second Warm Dust album is a decided step up from the unfocused and inconsistent first album. The conceptual structure in which the songs are interwoven by a narrative about human conflict and exploitation from the 1930s to the time of recording and beyond provides focus for a band that was in dire need of it, and the single album format results in less filler. Musically speaking, the band seems to have matured a bit too, the strong bass line on the opening track suggesting that they'd been paying attention to the funk scene. Plus, there's much less heavy- handed use of distortion on the lead vocalist's singing, which lets the true qualities of his singing voice come through.

The album is not, however, without its flaws. Chief among these is the inclusion of spoken word statements between the songs in which the band members outline all sorts of injustices, poor decisions, and occasional outright malevolence on the part of the political establishment. Regardless of whether or not you are inclined to agree with the band's sentiments, the fact is that the presentation of them is incredibly preachy and self-important, to the point where they become positively irritating as the album progresses. Still, the disc is enough of a step up from the band's debut to earn an extra star. But only one extra star.

MEMBERS LOGIN ZONE

As a registered member (register here if not), you can post rating/reviews (& edit later), comments reviews and submit new albums.

You are not logged, please complete authentication before continuing (use forum credentials).

 And It Came To Pass by WARM DUST album cover Studio Album, 1970
3.43 | 26 ratings

BUY
And It Came To Pass
Warm Dust Jazz Rock/Fusion

Review by Warthur
Prog Reviewer

2 stars Ambitiously starting their career with a double album, Warm Dust have a complex sound with all sorts of instruments jostling for attention - as well as standard rock instrumentation there's also flutes, organs, pianos, a healthy brass section and various interesting types of percussion thrown into the mix. The band are able to include nods to many of their influences - coming across in parts like a tribute band to early Jethro Tull, at other parts like somewhat more mellow followers of the Mothers of Invention, and so on. But the album is a bit of a muddle, with some filler in to round out the running time (like the asinine Keep On Trucking), and for some reason the band just can't bring themselves to leave vocalist "Les" Walker's voice alone, applying such heavy distortion to it that for half the album he sounds like he's singing from the bottom of a well. Interesting but unconvincing.

MEMBERS LOGIN ZONE

As a registered member (register here if not), you can post rating/reviews (& edit later), comments reviews and submit new albums.

You are not logged, please complete authentication before continuing (use forum credentials).

 Warm Dust by WARM DUST album cover Studio Album, 1972
3.95 | 14 ratings

BUY
Warm Dust
Warm Dust Jazz Rock/Fusion

Review by Hishmaliin

4 stars Little-known group whose sounds are only partly related to progressive rock. The progressive element in their sound is sometimes accidental and related only to the temporal location. Nevertheless they released three good albums of jazz-rock baroque and avant-garde. This, the third and, in my opinion, the most advanced. Here different musical trends reach a balance, blending perfectly sounds more rock than jazz and finally to prog. The opening is highly engaging and powerful and gives the listener a clear idea of their expressive capacity and strength of the sound they can create. Among the most intense moments to other more direct continues the the album's first side, they never get weary with tasty time changes and subtleties of composition that enrich the rock structure. After an introduction entrusted the execution of an arrangement of "A night on Bare Mountain", a composition by Mussorgsky in the most classic progressive style starts the long suite which closes the album, a perfect example of building a suite, this one, alone, deserves 5 stars! The voice of singer Dransfield "Les" Walker is powerful and espressive, sax, guitar and rhythm section chasing themselves while maintaining perfect balance both at rock than in more intimate. The fantasy instrumental composition, the wisdom of the band is able to build a song so perfect as engaging, surprising and even epic. A mature album, complex but especially engaging, from the first note to the exciting conclusion. for those who like the progressive more rock and jazz, near by setting to something of Audience or Van Der Graaf Generator.

MEMBERS LOGIN ZONE

As a registered member (register here if not), you can post rating/reviews (& edit later), comments reviews and submit new albums.

You are not logged, please complete authentication before continuing (use forum credentials).

 And It Came To Pass by WARM DUST album cover Studio Album, 1970
3.43 | 26 ratings

BUY
And It Came To Pass
Warm Dust Jazz Rock/Fusion

Review by Lozlan

5 stars Quite surprised to see And It Came To Pass shouldering the weakest review amongst Warm Dust's three albums. Whereas their latter albums stray into far more commercially viable brass rock territory (Peace For Our Time might seem more daring if the vocals weren't so deeply buried in the mix), And It Came To Pass is a tremendous, sprawling monster of an album, a substantial work of art that it takes a considerable amount of time and dedication to digest. All the trappings of epic prog are here: sprawling, mutli-part suites, wonderfully varied instrumentation, and some of the most aggressive, growling keyobard work I've ever heard on a record. The vocals strive alongside the music (such a shame that these are played down on subsequent albums!) and the lyrical content is impressively well wrought. This is a release to be digested by degrees: I've spent about a year getting to know it, and can shamelessly hand out a five-star review. Sadly, the group would never even remotely come close to this level of songcraft again.

MEMBERS LOGIN ZONE

As a registered member (register here if not), you can post rating/reviews (& edit later), comments reviews and submit new albums.

You are not logged, please complete authentication before continuing (use forum credentials).

 And It Came To Pass by WARM DUST album cover Studio Album, 1970
3.43 | 26 ratings

BUY
And It Came To Pass
Warm Dust Jazz Rock/Fusion

Review by Sean Trane
Special Collaborator Prog Folk

4 stars WD is one of those rare groups that started with a double album for a debut (Chicago Transit Authority being the other example I can think of), and the least we can say is that for a double album, it is a monster debut album. Just like Chicago, WD is a brass rock band, with the particularity of not having any brass instruments (no trombone, trumpet or tuba), so they might sit better with the compatriots If, if musically WD was not way proggier than both other groups. The sextet is built around future Rutherford-collab Paul Carrack on keys, Les Walker on vocals and the twin wind section or Surguy and Soloman (seriously!! ;o)). Except for the drum stool, the group will have a stable line-up throughout its three-album career. With a rather tackily funny artwork, their debut album is quite an exploit, manageing not only a double, but also not allowing weaker material, bar the bluesier material (not inferior as such, but always a bit of a waste of time, once you know the group's potential.

Developing a psychedelic brass rock that will enthral most progheads that are not always at ease with Electric Flag or BS&T's soul & RnB adventures, WD keeps a very prog (almost proto-prog at times) providing cool pastoral hippy atmospheres that many woodwind instruments will enhance. The 11-mins Turbulance is the perfect introduction to their world with plenty of interplay between all the musos, but never getting too complex. The following 7-min+ Achromasia is a brassier thing with saxes all over the place. On the flipside of the first disc starts the mega emotive Circus with full dramatics for its 5-min+ duration, and finishes on the 10-mins+ title track, a narrative piece that goes into chaotic free jazz middle section. Both tracks are sandwiching a blues- rock track Keep On Trucking, which holds lesser interest no matter how well executed.

The second disc soothes your ears with a gentle flute, soon to become bedevilled leading into the organ-driven almost-8 mins Loosing Touch, which can drag on at half-speed like Vanilla Fudge did, but never fails to deliver on emotions. The second blues (the one For Pete that last over 7 minutes) of the album is much more impressive, because of Walker's dramatic tone, pulled by devilish sax lines underlining the complete madness of the track. A more upbeat Man Without A Straw (very funk and brassy) and a Richie Havens cover Indian Rope Man (just as funky and brassy) are giving a more Motown feel to this otherwise very progressive album. But let's face it, early 70's Motown (from J Brown to sly stone and George Clinton) has most progheads agreeing with their musical preferences, and it is certainly the case with this writer. The much proggier 14-mins Wash My Eyes has a full spectrum of ambiances and is a constantly evolving tune that reaches complete and utter madness around the 6-minute mark before returning to the organ-ic world it had left behind for a short while and a lengthy calm flute leads the band into orgasm-ic apocalypse.

Exactly how Warm Dust is so unknown to the public is a bit of a mystery, but eventually, one might see that the small Trend label might have lacked the power to push the band through. Nevertheless, WD's IACTP is a small-unearthed gem that later albums will match in terms of preciousness, all three waiting for a wider acceptance from a demanding proghead. In either case, all three albums have received a semi-legit reissue under the Red Fox label, but this writer cannot wait for fully legit releases that would include a rare '70 single as bonus tracks. Very much worth the frequent spins you'll give it in the next months following acquisition and the still numerous spins during the rest of your life. A really shamefully forgotten band along with Brainchild (one album) and Galliard (two albums).

MEMBERS LOGIN ZONE

As a registered member (register here if not), you can post rating/reviews (& edit later), comments reviews and submit new albums.

You are not logged, please complete authentication before continuing (use forum credentials).

 Warm Dust by WARM DUST album cover Studio Album, 1972
3.95 | 14 ratings

BUY
Warm Dust
Warm Dust Jazz Rock/Fusion

Review by Sean Trane
Special Collaborator Prog Folk

4 stars 3.85 stars really!!!

Third and last album from this sextet that can be included in the fairly closed category of brass rock. With only a change of drummer (Bedson coming in for Bailey), this album is the logical continuity of the two previous albums, entertaining us with a brass-heavy proto-prog rock that is often uneven, but can reach awesome height of brilliance. Coming with an rather amazing but na´ve gatefold artwork depicting an orca whale having swallowed the band on their raft, along with a couple of sexy mermaids.

The first side is filled with short tracks (bar one) that have more to do with pure brass rock ala Blood Sweat & Tears than with prog, even if Long Road is one of those pleasers that even the harder-lined progheads would have a hard time resisting. The lengthier Hole In The Future has a long Indian-laced mid-section where Surguy's flute hold the centre stage before a fairly flawed Moog solo from Carrack destroys the previous effort and the track suddenly and abruptly (no warning) reverting to its original pattern. Gone are the superbly subtle chord changes of Rejection in their previous album, so much that this track has a "botch job" written all over it.

Obviously on the flipside, everyone is waiting for the 18-min+ Blind Boy suite to save the album, but one has to be patient and suffer a rather tedious (but thankfully short) rendition of Sibelius' Bare Mountain. However the Blind Boy suite does come in to save the album from sinking to depths of no-return, as it is easily the album's highlight and is often as inspired as the previous album was. The opening movement called trouble In The Mill sounds like a superb Oblivion Express track meeting Chicago Transit Authority for a full speed crash on rails. The following Clogs And Shawls is a quiet starter where Surguy's enchanted flute is leading through a slow crescendo with all the finesse you hoped they would developed on the first side of the album and finally climaxing with Walker's delicious gutsy vocals in the following self-titled movement. Superb stuff. But with such climax, the fall could only have been a shattering one, and the band takes a few minutes to collect the scattered parts and start reassembling them to rebuild an awesome groove called Slibe, where Soloman's sax might be reminiscent of Traffic's Chris Wood. Spine chills and goose bumps assured. The closing Dustbust is just a short recall of the original riff

With only the 5-part Blind Boy suite to save the album from drowning, that very same track being worth the ticket price alone, Warm Dust's last album is a very uneven affair, not matching the constancy and consistence of Peace For Our Time, but the album's centrepiece is definitely the group's best achievement without the slightest hint of a shadow of a beginning of a doubt. Hard not to give it at least equal rating than its predecessor.

MEMBERS LOGIN ZONE

As a registered member (register here if not), you can post rating/reviews (& edit later), comments reviews and submit new albums.

You are not logged, please complete authentication before continuing (use forum credentials).

 Peace For Our Time by WARM DUST album cover Studio Album, 1971
3.42 | 15 ratings

BUY
Peace For Our Time
Warm Dust Jazz Rock/Fusion

Review by Sean Trane
Special Collaborator Prog Folk

4 stars 3.85 stars really!!!

Second album from this English brass rock band, that was a bit the answer to Chicago Transit authority mixed with some Caravan and some Dutch/Holland Solution. Actually it is interesting to note that England had The Greatest Show On Earth, If and Warm Dust (and to a lesser extent Colosseum) to answer to American's giants of brass rock (which automatically induced a jazz feel without being the typical jazz-rock): Blood Sweat & Tears, Chicago, Electric Flag and The Flock. None of course would match the New World's candidates for commercial success, but artistically the balance tips a whole lot more evenly. Lead by singer Les "Dansfield" Walker, the sextet had a double sax attack, even if both handled other duties (namely second keyboard and guitar), but as far as the proghead is concerned only first KB man Paul Carrack would face further success (first in new wave group squeeze, than later as a collab in later Steve Hackett albums), but their three albums are definitely worth a listen.

This second album is a conceptual story based on the successive recent wars, punctuated by extracts of a Chamberlain speech spoken in 1938, then extrapolated to speak of further conflicts. Graced with an explicit war-like gatefold artwork (and some unsettling inner-fold war horrors-related pictures as well), the project was not only ambitious, it was idealist (a product of its time) and by today's standards might seem a little too pretentious for its own good. If I spoke above of brass rock, it is mostly in the regard that there are indeed many "brass" instruments - even if saxes and flutes are woodwind instruments because of the reed, but I never heard of Reed Rock (Reed Lover however..;-) - it is partly because of the songwriting (allowing for much space for wind instrument arrangements) that provides the typical sound that early Chicago or If expanded so well upon.

Starting on the superb and dramatic Blood Of Our Fathers, without wild and spine- chilling throat-splitting winds and a superb vocal line, PFOT is heading towards a small- undiscovered prog gem status, almost right away. The following Wind Of Change is less enthralling, but although of more ordinary standards, by all means not any less progressive in its songwriting. The third track, Justify, is a lengthy organ-driven blues- rock interrupted by a slow starting gloomy mid-section (which incorporates the then- obligatory drum solo), then returning to the previous blues-rock.

The flipside is composed of five shorter tracks, which build up on their usual formula. Rejection is delicate slow builder where Carrack's Rhodes and Hammond are taking the lion's share of the work with Surguy's flute (I'm guessing it's him, here) floating lightly above, but ensues a bunch of well written chord changes and brilliant playing are making this track one of the highlights of the album. The following tracks are all plenty of excellent prog twists and tricks that should please almost every progheads including the most demanding ones, such as yours truly. However the last two tracks Wrote A Letter and Peace Of Mind fail to enthral me as much as the early part of the album did. Both are very standard conservative almost soul-ish songs where way too few things are happening to raise our enthusiasm or even maintain it at a good level.

While hardly revolutionary or even groundbreaking Warm dust's second album is a rather unearthed rough gem, that has its flaws (mostly the concept narrations), but its value is no less appreciable. I will round up this album's rating to the upper unit, thus giving it an essential label that must be taken carefully, as one must be sure that he will enjoy the early UK proto-prog (in the non-PA sense of the word) peppered with much horns and take it in regards with the rest of the group's discography.

MEMBERS LOGIN ZONE

As a registered member (register here if not), you can post rating/reviews (& edit later), comments reviews and submit new albums.

You are not logged, please complete authentication before continuing (use forum credentials).

 And It Came To Pass by WARM DUST album cover Studio Album, 1970
3.43 | 26 ratings

BUY
And It Came To Pass
Warm Dust Jazz Rock/Fusion

Review by kingdhansak

3 stars Debut album from these obscure UK progsters. Certainly a gamble putting out this much material as a debut set, but there we go. Fitting into the somewhat broad catergory of jazz/fusion, there is plenty of brass and woodwind here. Being a 6 piece, what I'd simply call a big band. Lots to appeal to prog fans here, lengthy numbers, unusual tempo changes and some experimental passages. Vocals have a kind of soulful feel to them. The star of the show must go to keyboard player Paul Carrack who delivers many complex and funky passages throughout. The only drawback is most compositions are not terribly memorable. They seem to have a lack of structure and focus. However, as said the musicisanship is great, so plenty to appeal.

MEMBERS LOGIN ZONE

As a registered member (register here if not), you can post rating/reviews (& edit later), comments reviews and submit new albums.

You are not logged, please complete authentication before continuing (use forum credentials).

 And It Came To Pass by WARM DUST album cover Studio Album, 1970
3.43 | 26 ratings

BUY
And It Came To Pass
Warm Dust Jazz Rock/Fusion

Review by tbstars

3 stars Around the turn of 1969/70, the renowned Catacombs club in Wolverhampton, succeeded in attracting, in successive weeks, Free, Caravan, East of Eden and Quintessence, with Yes and Warm Dust not long after. A hugely impressive array of rock/prog bands, with, the obvious diversity of the music aside, each performance freshly memorable in its own way to my then-youthful mind: Free's Simon Kirke delivering a hugely energetic, rock-solid and sweat-laden peformance on drums; Caravan's four-man line-up being augmented by flute courtesy of a pre-recorded backing tape; East of Eden's Dave Arbus ending up playing one of his double-sax solos on the fire escape outside the building; Maha Dev fixing a broken guitar string during Quintessence's magical set-opener, Ganga Mai; Yes appearing so late in the evening that there was only time for me to hear three songs before I had to dash for the last bus....aah! memories are made of this. And then came Warm Dust.....

In my view, WD - ( did they come from Burnley?) - more than held their own amongst their illustrious counterparts and I wholly agree that they fully deserve a place in the prog rock archives. "And it came to pass" is a genuine curate's egg of an album - and the glaring misspelling of the words "turbulence" and "losing" in the titles of two of the tracks is distinctly amateurish - but it was most definitely "progressive". I, for one, have not heard anything quite like the title track before or since (although the format is not dissimilar to "A day in the life" off Sgt Pepper), and I still regularly play it on my car cassette thirty five years after its release. To me, that speaks volumes. There are a couple of blues-based numbers that I never really liked, but "Turbulence" and "Achromasia" are wonderful vehicles for some genuinely soulful sax playing by John Surgey and Alan Soloman, working perfectly in harmony, and Dave Pepper and Terry Comer both play in a beautifully understated way throughout. (I seem to recall that Dave was involved in a serious car accident shortly after the LP was released, which may explain his absence from the subsequent LP's - apologies if I have got this wrong.) Paul Carrack, of course, needs no further introduction, but, here, he plays organ in a masterly and swirlingly evocative way. Which brings us to Dransfield Walker. Hell's bells, what a powerful voice this man had!! A bit too heavy and strident at times, maybe, but he certainly gets the band's overriding anti-war message across in a distinctly unforgettable way. "Wash my eyes", is to my mind, the stand out track - coming in at over 14 minutes it gives each band member the chance to show their paces around a compellingly haunting and recurring jazz/rock theme, and it's simply stunning.

Of the band's subsequent releases, there is, sadly (and with one very notable exception), little to say. They don't add anything to the diversity of tracks on the debut release and I would advise you not to search out either. However, the notable exception is the Blind Boy suite off the eponymous third LP. Coming in at 18 minutes, this is one of the greatest prog tracks ever produced - a diverse amalgam of styles and rhythms, fantastic woodwind segments underpinned by urgent, restless, swelling bass/organ/drums. Plus Mr Walker's vocal gymnastics. Not a lead guitar within 50 miles - and not in the least bit missed, either. An altogether wondrous track that knocked the spots of everything else on the LP, indeed, everything else they ever recorded . The recommendation is to get hold of this track, tape it straight after "And it came to pass", get in the car and head east on the M62. The journey from Lancashire to Leeds will simply fly by. With any luck, you might not even notice Halifax. That's testimony enough to just how good these two tracks are in tandem.

As regards a score for the debut LP, not everyone's cup of tea, by any means, and somewhat inconsistent, but a very well-merited three stars (bordering on four) for genuine originality and technical accomplishment. And some excellent tunes, too. Thank you, Warm Dust, for the memories.

MEMBERS LOGIN ZONE

As a registered member (register here if not), you can post rating/reviews (& edit later), comments reviews and submit new albums.

You are not logged, please complete authentication before continuing (use forum credentials).

Thanks to ProgLucky for the artist addition.

Copyright Prog Archives, All rights reserved. | Legal Notice | Privacy Policy | Advertise | GeoIP Services by MaxMind | RSS + syndications

Other sites in the MAC network: JazzMusicArchives.com — the ultimate jazz music virtual community | MetalMusicArchives.com — the ultimate metal music virtual community


Server processing time: 0.64 seconds