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3RDEGREE

Crossover Prog • United States


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"Try keeping a secret in the age of the diode" (from Circuit Court)
ONES & ZEROS: the building blocks of data in our modern world. Our Internet is made of it-our governments in thirst to find out what everyone's doing with it...
"from the quaintest living room to a huge industrial boom we thank it's name
...Let's just hope he's nice" (from The Best & Brightest)
ONES & ZEROS put to the test. Ultra-Artificial Intelligence out of control? Where's the rulebook for countries to play by? Who's going to have the first one? What will they do with it?
"I never thought my chances of contentment would be determined by a transistor" (from This Is The Future)
ONES & ZEROS inside us all. Making us..."better". Who wants to improve? Should we all? Will we be made to?
"How much would you take from your very own children...for more life would you spare any cost?" (from Life At Any Cost) ONES & ZEROS extending life until the decision to join a digital mausoleum...a final "home in the clouds"...

These are various aspects of our future possibly on their way to becoming commonplace. These are the things on the mind of 3RDegree and make up its fifth and first full concept studio album, ONES & ZEROS: vol. 1 - their first for label 10T Records. All songs offer a unique take on the issues and ethics associated with the rapid progress of technology. Ray Kurzweil & others have been discussing futurism and transhumanism since the 1970s but only now are we seeing it impact our daily lives. Spearheaded by 1990's-era members, California guitarist Patrick Kliesch & New Jersey lead vocalist/keyboardist George Dobbs, the rest of the band shortly pitched in different songs - all closely associated with the overall theme. As with previous albums, both fully-fledged and skeletal ideas were created and passed between band members via the Internet and worked on in the flesh soon after.

ONES & ZEROS: vol. 1 continues to embody the musical direction envisioned by band founders Robert James Pashman & Patrick Kliesch in 1990: to create interesting and engaging music that mixes accessible melodies and catchy hooks with the intelligence and complexity of Progressive Rock. Releasing a debut cassette in THE WORLD IN WHICH WE LIVE in 1993 (w/ Pashman on lead vocals), 3RDegree decided to step up their game in 1995, adding a world class lead vocalist in George Dobbs and releasing their first CD (second "album"), 1996's HUMAN INTEREST STORY, which was re-released digitally...
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Ones & Zeroes: Vol. 1Ones & Zeroes: Vol. 1
10T Records 2015
Audio CD$13.99
The Long DivisionThe Long Division
CD Baby 2012
Audio CD$16.29
$11.11 (used)
Narrow-CasterNarrow-Caster
CD Baby 2008
Audio CD$8.81
$8.14 (used)
Human Interest StoryHuman Interest Story
Self-Produced
Audio CD$20.33
Hunters Unite (feat. Fluid) - SingleHunters Unite (feat. Fluid) - Single
Starfury Films 2011
Audio CD$8.98
$20.72 (used)
The Long Division by 3rdegree (2012-09-04)The Long Division by 3rdegree (2012-09-04)
CD Baby
Audio CD$38.49
Narrow-Caster by 3rdegree (2008-11-11)Narrow-Caster by 3rdegree (2008-11-11)
CD Baby
Audio CD$35.95
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3RDEGREE discography


Ordered by release date | Showing ratings (top albums) | Help Progarchives.com to complete the discography and add albums

3RDEGREE top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.10 | 11 ratings
The World In Which We Live
1993
3.56 | 21 ratings
Human Interest Story
1996
3.71 | 52 ratings
Narrow-Caster
2008
4.05 | 176 ratings
The Long Division
2012
4.47 | 120 ratings
Ones & Zeros: vol. 1
2015

3RDEGREE Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3RDEGREE Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

4.32 | 3 ratings
The Reunion Concerts
2008
4.27 | 5 ratings
Live At ProgDay 2009
2010

3RDEGREE Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3RDEGREE Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

5.00 | 1 ratings
The World In Which We Lived (2011)
2011

3RDEGREE Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 Ones & Zeros: vol. 1 by 3RDEGREE album cover Studio Album, 2015
4.47 | 120 ratings

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Ones & Zeros: vol. 1
3RDegree Crossover Prog

Review by Evolver
Special Collaborator Crossover & JR/F/Canterbury Teams

5 stars Back in 2012, an election year here in the U.S., 3RDegree released one of the finest albums of that year, "The Long Division", a scathing critique of the political system, and the way the corporate news outlets portray the process. The album blew me away in it's concept and execution. I really had might doubts that any band could improve upon such an effort. But with "Ones & Zeros: Volume 1", they have accomplished that task.

The concept here is a not too distant, nor unthinkable future, where our present obsession with immortalization through our many electronic gadgets has led to the ability to (if you can afford it) digitize your consciousness, ensuring virtual immortality. This process is overseen by a corporate entity called "Valhalla", that controls these "people" with a mechanical logic. I don't want to give much away, but the story is told with a clever and sophisticated humor, reminding me more than a little of the wordplay of 10CC or XTC. Just the images from the song title [i]Circuit Court[/i] in this context should give a taste of this.

The music itself could best be describes as the vocal tonality of 10CC, with the inventive instrumentation of that same band, except with an underlying complexity reminiscent of Echolyn, with the hooks and power of Spock's Beard. But the mix of those styles brought together, makes the sound truly original 3RDegree music.

I received the album some weeks ago, yet still, every time I listen to it, I hear more and more inside each song. I cannot find anything at all to knock this down from a perfect rating.

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 Ones & Zeros: vol. 1 by 3RDEGREE album cover Studio Album, 2015
4.47 | 120 ratings

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Ones & Zeros: vol. 1
3RDegree Crossover Prog

Review by Subterranean Android

5 stars This is New Jersey-based band 3RDegree's fifth album, and each of their albums outdoes the previous effort. As it stands, Ones & Zeros: Vol.1 is their crowning achievement to date. On their last album, 2012's The Long Division, 3RDegree created a pseudo-concept album with political themes running throughout. It was apropos for the 2012 election year, and it still holds up as a fantastic album today. However, make no mistake with Ones & Zeros ? this is a full on concept album, dealing with weighty and complex moral issues such as life extension, the Ultra A.I., and the singularity. The band cleverly weaves the storyline by creating Valhalla Biotech, an all-encompassing mega-conglomorate. Think Apple merged with Google, who then merged with Facebook and Microsoft. Valhalla Biotech presents itself through a cheery, if not detached, computerized customer service rep, at times stating "We regret to inform you that your father has been deleted." It's as if the band has taken the inanity of today's ever increasing lack of human interaction, and notched it up a level in this dystopian future. Musically speaking, the band has always straddled the line between melodic, hook laden pop and prog complexity, and it seems as though they are doing it better than they ever have on Ones & Zeros. Now a 6 piece, 3RDegree sound fuller, more complete, and more mature than any of their previous releases. Lead singer George Dobbs is the finest amalgamation of Stevie Wonder, Peter Gabriel, Donald Fagan, and a host of other world-class singers. Underneath him are the multilayered vocal harmonies reminiscent of Queen, The Beatles, and Yes, and they have never sounded so good. What makes the rather disturbing scenario on this CD so palatable is that it is all disguised by their characteristic sunny melodies. The band has done a fantastic job telling a cautionaly tale (to quote a song title of theirs) and they do it with their signature tongue-in-cheek wit. And the best part of it is that this is only Volume 1, with Volume 2 set to be released in 2016. Thanks, guys, for finally not making me wait 4 years until your next release ;) Ones & Zeros Vol. 1 is firmly on my "Best of 2015" list. This is an excellent CD and highly recommended.

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 Ones & Zeros: vol. 1 by 3RDEGREE album cover Studio Album, 2015
4.47 | 120 ratings

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Ones & Zeros: vol. 1
3RDegree Crossover Prog

Review by javajeff

5 stars I love concept albums, so the positive buzz surrounding this new release, Ones & Zeroes from 3RDegree, really perked my interest. The album concept is not new, but has never been executed this well before in an album. I do not want to give away any information about the concept, so try to immerse yourself before reading too many reviews. After the intro, The Gravity starts off with a bang, and that will draw you in immediately. You will find amazing musicianship, excellent vocals, and a stellar concept wrapped in a prog goodness shell. There is so much to enjoy here and so many subgenres delivered in an eclectic fashion. You will find some funk, folk, jazz, mixed in with layers of complex prog. Do not miss out on this gem!

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 Ones & Zeros: vol. 1 by 3RDEGREE album cover Studio Album, 2015
4.47 | 120 ratings

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Ones & Zeros: vol. 1
3RDegree Crossover Prog

Review by Mellotron Storm
Prog Reviewer

5 stars 3RDEGREE have truly out-done themselves with their latest "Ones & Zeros: vol. 1". This is a concept album that looks into the future in a very detailed, dark and yet humerous way. I can't even begin to imagine the time and energy that went into not only the clever lyrics but outstanding instrumental work. I'm not even into concept albums yet here I am giving this recording 5 stars without any hesitation. These Americans have created a record that is sophisticated and complex yet very melodic and accessible. Not an easy thing to do. This is the third straight studio album I have received by this band and each one has out-done the other.

"Hello World!" is a 17 second futuristic ad for Valhalla Biotech the company that this album revolves around. It blends into "The Gravity" which is a top three track for me. It's catchy with harmonies that really add a lot to my enjoyment of it. The vocals are the focus until it settles down before 2 minutes and becomes spacey. Great sound! A pleasant synth/ guitar section arrives 3 minutes in as reserved vocals join in. A relaxed guitar solo follows then back to that earlier theme where vocals are the focus. How good is this 6 minutes in?! Oh my! My head is banging and I adore the passionate vocals. So good!

"This Is The Future" has a nice intro with some excellent guitar before the vocals kick in. Catchy stuff. This song reminds me of the previous album somewhat. Great sound here. The drummer is busy and we get those futuristic words that come and go throughout the album helping to keep us up with the story line, then back to the music. "Life" features strummed guitar and liquid sounding keys as the reserved vocals join in. It's beautiful when the backing vocals come in. Such a feel good tune. "The Best & Brightest" is also a top three track for me. These guys have so many great ideas including the way this starts in that spacey manner with vocals before it picks up with a repetitive vocal line then it kicks into gear. All i'm feeling right now is emotion, it's been a while.

"Circuit Court" has a STEELY DAN vibe until the chorus arrives. The organ is a nice touch here. This is smooth and sophisticated. I like the instrumental break before 3 1/2 minutes to almost 4 minutes. Such an enjoyable song. "Life At Any Cost" is another catchy and intelligent track with those killer vocals. This all changes before 3 1/2 minutes when it turns heavy and all instrumental. The guitar reminds me of GARDEN WALL here and I love the synths over top. The guitar then starts to soar and this continues for some time. The vocals are back 5 minutes in. Man I don't how this didn't make my top three.

"What It Means To Be Human" is powerful yet restrained until it picks up before 2 minutes but then we get another change with lots of vocal melodies. So cool as the drums support. Synths to the fore before 3 1/2 minutes after the vocals have stopped. It's brief though as the vocals and that powerful sound return. "We Regret To Inform You" is my other top three song. The intro reminds me of a good place for some reason. We get heavy and distorted guitar with prominent bass as lighter sounds come in over top. Man I love the sound here. Emotion. Those futuristic words come and go. This song blows me away, vocals come in after 3 minutes. "More Life" is another catchy, vocal led tune. Check out the backing vocals 1 1/2 minutes in followed by some great keyboard sounds, huge bass lines then a guitar solo. Nice. Those backing vocals are back. So freaking good!

Without question this will be a very serious contender for my album of the year.

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 Ones & Zeros: vol. 1 by 3RDEGREE album cover Studio Album, 2015
4.47 | 120 ratings

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Ones & Zeros: vol. 1
3RDegree Crossover Prog

Review by LJK

4 stars I heard about this album from a friend of a friend of a friend. These guys are not well known but this album is outstanding. I pretty much liked every song on the album but a couple stand outs are "Hello World", "This is the Future" , and "The Best and the Brightest" I really enjoyed it and look forward to checking out some of their older stuff and possibly seeing a live show. From what I understand their live shows are mostly East coast and Europe. I hope they get out to California sometime soon. I highly recommend checking this album out.

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 Ones & Zeros: vol. 1 by 3RDEGREE album cover Studio Album, 2015
4.47 | 120 ratings

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Ones & Zeros: vol. 1
3RDegree Crossover Prog

Review by AmericanProg

5 stars This first appeared on AmericanProg.com and has been edited slightly.

Whilst 3rdegree may have passed under the radar for a few of you, then thankfully things started to change for them three years or so back with the release of their 4th album, The Long Division. The band was formed by Robert James Pashman back in the 90s (remember them?) and they released the excellent Human Interest Story in 1996. I had bought their 2008 album Narrow-Caster based on a review by Ron Faulkner, who gave the album a resounding 9 out of 10, drawing parallels with the work of echolyn and Izz. Ron had this to say: 'Try to imagine a grown-up 10cc, with the pop and quirky elements dialed down a good few notches, and with a hybrid of Stevie Wonder, Michael Jackson and Roger Taylor (of Queen fame) on vocals, and you're part-way to imagining the sound of this band. Sprinkle in some funk and soul, and a little late night smoky blues bar, and you're getting even closer'. New record Ones & Zeros vol.1 maintains of course that funky, bluesy vibe courtesy of the amazing George Dobbs' vocals, but adds a whole other layer of progressive rock goodness courtesy of, amongst other things, the bona-fide epics and my 'Track of the Year' contenders 'The Gravity' and the 'Life' suite (Life, Life At Any Cost and More Life). As far as I can tell the new album is garnering universal praise on the interweb. And having listened to not much else for the past month or so I can see why. Much has been made of it as a 'concept' album but before you run off thinking of wizards and floating mountains all that means is that it is a record that demands to be played all the way through, in the order that the artists intended. None of this shuffle nonsense. I played quite a few tracks on the AmericanProg radio show over on progzilla.com and excellent as the songs are, in hindsight I feel that something was lost in terms of the flow and the overall 'feel' of the material. There are some superb narrative segues interspersed throughout, charting the all-encompassing and insidious reach of Valhalla Biotech in the dystopian, cyber-future posited by the album's overarching concept. In fact I think that this has got some of the smartest lyrics you'll ever hear but what will ensure it vies for attention come the year-end cavalcade of 'Album of the Year' lists is the combination with the music that ties it all together. I spoke with guitarist Pat Kliesch a while back and he gave me a little insight into the track 'We Regret To Inform You'. He and I both love the album 'Gangs' by And So I Watch You From Afar (it was he who recommended it to me in fact) and he advised that the song almost started out as an homage to their style. It subsequrently morphed, however, with lots of extra layers and spoken VO. Such is the musical petri-dish the band delves into. Now as much as I loved 'The Long Division' and I did after all rate it 9/10, when I reviewed it for a website back in the day with this album I think that 3rdegree have released a genre-defining piece of work. Up there with some of the seminal American progressive rock releases of this or any other decade. And there's a second part coming too. Which according to Pat should be out late next year, and which includes an epic 15-20 minute long piece to end the album. Starting with the production (which is full, rich and hugely rounded), the song writing, the concept, the lyrics and the playing I find this so much more fulfilling. Which is saying a lot, given how good TLD was and which has me salivating for 2016's vol.2

If the overtly political message of TLD was perhaps lost on you then the message of Ones & Zeros vol.1 will be much more accessible and I venture that you will be hard-pressed to listen to a better record all year. It is masterfully melodic, symphonic in places but angular and more urgent when it needs to be. There are no show-off solos but check out the keyboards and guitar in 'Circuit Court'. Musically the sound is all 3rdegree but if you held a gun to my head I'd say that you can hear First-Wave of Prog things on the album that will quite easily appeal immensely if you are a fan of Rush, Genesis and King Crimson. Be in no doubt though that this is a 21st Century progressive rock album. The best bands don't sound like anyone else but respectfully pay homage here and there. So it is with 3rdegree. The standout track for me is 'More Life' but I prefer to think of it as Part 3 of the 'Life' Suite. As I've touched on already George Dobbs' voice is wonderfully evocative but when combined with the harmonic backing vocals and string arrangements it's an incredibly cinematic piece, and a crowd-pleaser when they play it live to be sure. The opening becomes the close. The end is the beginning.

I definitely think that it is an album to be listened to on headphones. Get the highest quality download you can, or better still the CD and with the right kit you'll be amazed at the sonic quality. Whatever format you listen to it on, though, you'll be blown away. Not one filler track ensures it is one of the most 'complete' albums you will have in your collection. The CD package is pretty cool, too. With art by Aleksandr V. Kouznetsov. Eric did the design and layout.

Fans are going to get a chance to see them in the States and in Europe soon and I strongly urge you to try and get along to a show. I'll see you at Leicester and Summer's End. I may or may not be wearing a hat.

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 Ones & Zeros: vol. 1 by 3RDEGREE album cover Studio Album, 2015
4.47 | 120 ratings

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Ones & Zeros: vol. 1
3RDegree Crossover Prog

Review by Buddahfurious15

5 stars A lot has been said in previous reviews of this brand new album about the concept and merit of the music among other things. I'd rather point out how deceptive the music of 3RDegree is-especially on this new disk Ones & Zeros: vol. 1. Knowing Prog as a sub-genre of rock as intimately as we do at PA, I think it's important to realize how difficult it is for music to be firmly within the confines of what we consider Prog while also showing a sophistication in the songwriting-the melodies, harmonies, etc.- to attract people on a first listen as well. I'm not talking about music made by progressive rock artists that is accessible. Nope. That would be Asia. What I'm talking about is the stock and trade of 3RDegree that sets them apart from almost any other band old or new. So while a lover of the most complex and rat-a-tat-tat Prog may not give props to 3RDegree, someone who can recognize how hard it is-just in a different way-to do what 3RDegree does on Ones & Zeros: Vol. 1 must point this out.

Unravel the onion that keeps giving your ears something new to focus on every time you return. You can begin at their 10Trecords.com page or at 3RDegree.bandcamp.com. 

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 The Long Division by 3RDEGREE album cover Studio Album, 2012
4.05 | 176 ratings

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The Long Division
3RDegree Crossover Prog

Review by RaelWV

4 stars We're just on the cusp of another presidential election, that several month run to November when it will be impossible to avoid the whole mess. It's either a brilliant time to release an album about the fractured nature of American politics or a sure fire bet to piss off a good hunk of the fan base. Jersey proggers 3rDegree figured out how to do both with The Long Division.

Which is to say that the political half of The Long Division isn't really a polemic, in the "vote for this guy" sense of the word. It's not even "bipartisan," a word that gets thrown around too often to have much meaning anymore. It's about the way we do politics in 21st-century, not the end result.

Take the lead-off track (mixed by Brett Kull of echolyn, who have their own fine and long awaited new album out) "You're Fooling Yourself." It throws around a lot of left v. right catchphrases you hear these days (especially if you read the political blogs), not in an effort to show that one side is right and the other's wrong, but to show that by reducing our political opponents to caricatured cardboard cutouts we're really talking past ourselves. Or there's "The Socio-Economic Petri Dish" which captures the frustration of the modern political world in one line:

Don't want the layoffs, but I don't want the pay-offs to the men in the suits

In other words, we're so far gone that the solution to almost any problem is probably not particularly palatable.

But my particular favorite of the political hunk is "Incoherent Ramblings," which takes aim at the talking head spouters of talking points that populate most cable news shows. I'm not talking about actual analysts who might have some incite into a particular incident. I'm talking about the kind of people who get brought on to argue whether the fact that the sky is blue will favor Romney or Obama come November. "Incoherent Ramblings" nails both the mercenary mentality of those flaks but also the fact that they never really say anything of substance.

It's not all politics on The Long Division. The second half of the album dives into more personal territory from love ("A Work of Art") to the nature of the universe (the absurdly catchy "Nihilist's Love Song"), and the for some people to live their lives in public ("Televised," which hearkens back to the title track from 1996's Human Interest Story). As it happens, my favorite track on the album, "Memetic Pandemic," is in the second half of the album. I don't have a good handle on the lyrics just yet, but I love the slow stalking quality of the music.

Speaking of music, The Long Division sees 3rDegree refining their style as set forth on their previous two records. It rubs up against prog, ciphering off it's intricacy and eclecticism, but is rooted firmly in catchy rock hooks. It's no surprise that the band has never really gone full-on epic (although several tracks on this album stretch to the 6-7 minute mark). But there's not reason they should, since they pack in so many layers of sound into each track that stretching things out just for the sake of it would be pointless.

2012 has already been a banner year for new albums in the prog world and it doesn't show any signs of slowing down. When December comes and those damned lists start popping up, trying to sort the best of from the rest of, The Long Division should come out near the top. Which, in this of all years, is really saying something.

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 Ones & Zeros: vol. 1 by 3RDEGREE album cover Studio Album, 2015
4.47 | 120 ratings

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Ones & Zeros: vol. 1
3RDegree Crossover Prog

Review by RaelWV

4 stars Since roaring back to life with 2008's Narrow-Caster, 3rDegree has gone from strength to strength. Their 2012 effort, The Long Division, is one of my favorite albums. Does Ones and Zeroes: Volume 1 measure up and keep pushing the band forward? It's too early to tell, but it keeps revealing great things on every listen.

The Long Division had a strong theme running through lots of it, but Ones and Zeroes goes a step further by being a full on concept album (part one of at least two, if I remember correctly). The concept revolves around a shady corporation, Valhalla Biotech, that sells a variety of life extension technology. As set forth in the band's press release, the album 'isn't so much science fiction as it is a futurist album, expounding upon current trends in technology and leading them to their logical conclusion.' As regular readers know, just saying something isn't science fiction doesn't make it so. Ones and Zeroes is as sci-fi as they come, using advances in technology to explore our own humanity.

On the album that deals mostly with the question of what it means to be human? More particularly, what does it mean to be alive? If, as we hear over and over again, 'life is needing more,' then the ultimate goal is to extend life forever. Along the way Valhalla goes from stocking 'elixir centers' that extend 'expiration dates' to realizing the dream of Ray Kurzweil ' the uploading of the human mind into a computer where it could, theoretically, live forever.

Along the way, the band explores the various issues that would arise in this situation. There's concern that this expensive tech will further class divides (there's a voice over about the world's oldest man watching his son die of old age) along with the idea that this might all be allowed under the theory that somebody will get there eventually (the Chinese, most likely), so 'we' (whoever 'we' are) might as well get there first. Most hilariously, the idea of a megacorp in charge of all this leads to the fact that, in 'Life at All Cost,' the company tries to sell upgrades while peeling apart and scanning a client's brain.

All in all, I get a strong Blade Runner vibe from Ones and Zeroes. Valhalla reminds me a bit of the Tyrell Corporation, whose motto, after all, was 'More Human Than Human.' Is that where we are at the end of Volume 1? Seems that way. In addition, the need for more life echoes the demand of replicant Roy Batty that he 'wants more life' as he kills his creator. So the concept has a lot of areas to explore and I'm sure I haven't touched them all (I'm notoriously bad at sussing out album concepts).

But this is an album after all and none of that matters if the music is subpar.

Good thing that the music is up to 3rDegree's usual high standards. The band has always walked a fine line between melodic accessibility and prog complexity, a mixture they've refined over the years. The result is a group of tunes that are instantly appealing but reveal depth and interesting details upon further listens. Believe me, once you've heard 'This Is the Future' it will stick in your head (I dare you not to sing the backup vocals in the chorus!). Not to mention it makes the cheery yet disturbing voice overs of 'We Regret to Inform You' go down easy!

If you look at the credits you'll see no fewer than three guitarists were involved on this album. Lest you fear it's an onslaught of power chords and shredding six strings, they're actually fairly restrained. In fact, I'm not sure all three of them are brought to bear on any one track. There are some nice acoustic spots and George Dobbs gets plenty of room to lay out some nice synth solos.

There's nothing on Ones and Zeroes that jumps out at me the way a few tracks did on The Long Division. But it works better as a whole, as befits a concept album. It's a mess of awfully good music wrapped around an interesting idea. And the best thing? It's only the first part!

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 Ones & Zeros: vol. 1 by 3RDEGREE album cover Studio Album, 2015
4.47 | 120 ratings

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Ones & Zeros: vol. 1
3RDegree Crossover Prog

Review by rdtprog
Special Collaborator Heavy Prog Team

3 stars This is a concept album about the future of the world and how human deal with technology. It's not the first time the band deal with that with their ironic view. We can hear throughout the album a robotic voice to link every songs together and keep the concept intact. But with the music now... After the "Long Division" album, which i stop listening realizing that he was not very progressive, the band was supposed to have done their most progressive album. From the start of the album, i can only say that i recognize the same 80's influence with so much vocals, (which are very good), that the music seems to support the vocals. The song structures are simple, there is many catchy hooks and some more unusual twists. We have to wait for the song "the Best & The Brightest to hear some heavier parts with some nice break, some spacey keyboards. "Circuit Court" is a weak track, where nothing seems to work together. "Life at any Cost" is starting to be interesting with the nice break that brings some faster tempo, heavy and darker parts with the first and probably the last memorable guitar solo. "What it means to be Human" is another complex song that show some nice work with the vocals and nice musicianship. "We Regret to Inform You" is another nice track with a long instrumental section and some nice bass playing. The last song is the return to some more simple structure type of song, some jazzy parts. In conclusion, the cd improve halfway through, but i can't say i share the same enthusiasm as many reviewers here, so this is not a masterpiece, but only the best 3rdegree album.

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