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ABORYM

Tech/Extreme Prog Metal • Italy


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Aborym biography
ABORYM is an Italian experimental/ progressive black metal act formed in 1992 in Taranto, Apulia. Malfeitor Fabban ( bass, keyboards) is the only consistent member of the band. There has been many lineup changes in the bandīs career. One of the more spectacular changes was the addition of former MAYHEM vocalist Attila Csihar to the lineup in 2001. Attila Csihar left ABORYM in 2005 to rejoin MAYHEM. Another spectacular change was the addition of former EMPEROR drummer ( and convicted murderer) Bard "Faust" Eithun to the lineup in 2005.

ABORYM released three demos in the years 1993 - 1997 before releasing their debut full-length studio album "Kali Yuga Bizarre" in 1999. The 2nd full-length album "Fire Walk With Us" followed in 2001. The third full-length album "With No Human Intervention" was released by Code666 Records in January 2003. The fourth full-length studio album "Generator" which was released in 2006 marked a change in the bandīs sound as Bard "Faust" Eithun was added to the lineup. Itīs the first ABORYM album with a "real" drummer. The drums on earlier albums were programmed. "Generator" also pushed the band in a more progressive and adventurous direction. Prime Evil replaced Attila Csihar on vocals on the album.

The inclusion of ABORYM to the Prog Archives database was approved by the Progressive Metal Team.

( Biography written by UMUR)

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ABORYM discography


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ABORYM top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

2.69 | 7 ratings
Kali Yuga Bizarre
1999
3.00 | 5 ratings
Fire Walk With Us
2001
2.83 | 6 ratings
With No Human Intervention
2003
3.56 | 9 ratings
Generator
2006
3.95 | 12 ratings
Psychogrotesque
2010
3.30 | 9 ratings
Dirty
2013
3.86 | 16 ratings
Shifting.negative
2017
3.95 | 2 ratings
Hostile
2021

ABORYM Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

2.00 | 1 ratings
Live In Studio
1993
0.00 | 0 ratings
Live in Groningen
2013

ABORYM Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

ABORYM Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

ABORYM Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

2.00 | 2 ratings
Worshipping Damned Souls
1993
0.00 | 0 ratings
Antichristian Nuclear Sabbath
1997
0.00 | 0 ratings
Something for Nobody Vol. 1
2017
0.00 | 0 ratings
Something for Nobody Vol. 2
2018
0.00 | 0 ratings
Something for Nobody Vol. 3
2019

ABORYM Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 Hostile by ABORYM album cover Studio Album, 2021
3.95 | 2 ratings

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Hostile
Aborym Tech/Extreme Prog Metal

Review by nick_h_nz
Collaborator Prog Metal Team

4 stars [Originally published at The Progressive Aspect]

One of the best things about reviewing music is that something can be thrown my way that I might otherwise not have come across. This happened when I was offered Aborym's 2021 album, Hostile. I knew of the band, as I enjoyed their 2017 release, Shifting.negative, though at the time I seemed to be one of few who did. The band had previously been a black metal band who integrated industrial sounds into their mix, but I knew none of that. Shifting.negative was the first thing I had heard from the band, and I loved it. But black metal it was not. Reading reviews at the time, it seemed the general consensus that the new album was a horrible new direction for the band. Indeed, it wouldn't have surprised me if Hostile had been named as such because of the reception its predecessor received. It seems that in the interim, Aborym have released a three album series of soundtrack and remix tracks, which I guess I shall delve into soon. But for now, the focus should be on the new album, and, in my opinion, it deserves that focus.

Will it bring back the fans the band lost after the release of Shifting.negative? I would say definitely not. But for people like me, who came to the band without knowing its history prior to that 2017 album and enjoyed it for what it was ? a perfectly respectable slab of progressive industrial music, fusing elements and influences from bands such as The Young Gods, Silly Puppy and Ministry, among others ? then Hostile takes that formula and makes it even more interesting and enjoyable. I liked Shifting.negative, but I love Hostile. Everything about it is insanely well done. Composition, performance and production. The music and the mix is wonderful, and although it has none of the extreme metal that the band had prior to Shifting.negative, Hostile feels more extreme. Perhaps, even, it might win some of the old fans back after all? Honestly, I am unsure. It is undoubtedly heavier (in sound, volume, weight, and feeling, and however else you like to define that word) than Shifting.negative, and it's far more reminiscent of more black metal infused albums such as Dirty. But it's still the "new" Aborym.

I guess you could draw comparisons with Opeth, and how their music changed post-growl but has come back closer to their old sound even if the growls have not returned. That's about where Aborym appear to be. There is so much menace in opening track Disruption that the title of the album is already something tangible. I can feel the hostility, and it's amazingly palpable when you consider how little this track provides sonically. The greatest threat is delivered with minimal fuss and noise. In the last minute-and- a-half, the tone and volume changes dramatically, and it hits hard. Even after repeated listens, and knowing it is coming, it still somehow surprises me. A perfect jump scare. But here is where it becomes more interesting for me. The band could easily have jumped back into their old sound from this point. It would not have been a stretch at all to fall back into blast beats and black metal vocals here, and resurrect the band of old.

Instead, second song Proper Use of Myself is reminiscent of Perverse-era Jesus Jones mixed with Ænima-era Tool. At the time, Melody Maker (I think it was) suggested that Jesus Jones sounded like "the Prodigy fist f***ing The Young Gods". If that were the case, then this is Aborym seeing Jesus Jone's fist f***, and raising it with Tool's Stinkfist. I can't say I really heard much Tool on Shifting.negative, but I definitely do on Hostile. One more ingredient in their recipe of industrial sound that seems less about satisfying their fans as themselves. And, when it comes down to it, I love when a band or artist displays that kind of "don't give a f***" attitude. Apparently the band "sold out" with Shifting.negative. Let's face it, bands pretty much never sell out. That's just something their fans accuse them of. Hostile is one big Hooker with a Penis. F*** you, buddy. The is the Proper Use of Myself, and I'm totally down with it.

And although I'm mentioning names, Aborym really sounds like none. Shifting.negative was criticised for sounding like a derivative misdirection into industrial (which I don't really hear myself), but I can't see Hostile receiving the same criticism, simply because the sound is all over the place compared to the previous album. There are so many influences thrown into the pot, and mixed so thoroughly, that it's hard to say the band sound like any other band, so much as are reminiscent at times. And I'm not even convinced that what I'm hearing is what the band were even influenced by, so much as me pulling inferences for the sake of attempting to find comparisons for the sake of this review. I hear bands like Depeche Mode, Massive Attack, Pink Floyd, and Portishead, as much as I hear bands like Ephel Duath, Machines of Loving Grace, Ministry, Nine Inch Nails, Skinny Puppy and The Young Gods.

I guess you could argue that Shifting.negative was less progressive than the band's former blend of black metal and industrial, but I think Hostile could be the band's most progressive release, yet. Even if industrial has long since passed its peak of popularity, Aborym are showing there is still new ground to be made. And even if there is no overt black metal in Hostile, I am reminded at times of progressive black metal bands such as Progenie Terrestre Pura and White Ward, whose music is full of atmosphere and texture that is at least as important, if not more so, than the music. Hostile travels the same territory, and there are many atmospheric (dare I say cinematic?) moments where the textures and moods invoked are deliciously emotive. There are some quiet and minimalist moments that are almost ambient. And then some gloriously anthemic songs like Lava Bed Sahara, which reminds me a little of God Lives Underwater, and the way they fused industrial with alternative (almost like Stabbing Westward meets Alice in Chains).

The press release I received with Hostile calls it "their most challenging studio album to date", and this might not be far wrong. Layer upon layer of different sounds are piled together in a way that could be confusing for some listeners. It's not an easy or cohesive listen the first time around. As much as I liked Shifting.negative, I was left a little bemused by Hostile at first. I knew I liked it, but I wasn't sure how much, and I wasn't sure why. It's not as immediate as the preceding album, but ultimately it is far more rewarding. Unlike Shifting.negative, there are quite a few songs which I could easily imagine being black metal, if the band so desired. But to have done so would be to take a step backwards, and clearly the band are looking ever forwards. And I absolutely love that they are, because this is the best album I have heard from the band by a very long shot.

Hostile is a schizophrenic, kaleidoscopic, ever-changing barrage of hostility occasionally wrapped up in a more melodic skin, but never something that feels fully safe. The Pursuit of Happiness, for example, is a glorious dirge sung by someone that would be more likely to revel in Dexter's happiness as he dispatches his next victim, than by chasing unicorns and candy floss. On their Bandcamp page, Aborym claim to have a "post-industrial (prog)rock-metal aesthetic". I think they rather have a maladjusted, murderous and malevolent aesthetic that is presented via a progressive industrial musical performance. It feels nasty, and I feel nasty for liking it ? but like it, I do, and very much so. I liked Shifting.negative, but made no effort to follow the band that made it. I love Hostile, and I can't wait to hear what Aborym come up with next!

 Shifting.negative by ABORYM album cover Studio Album, 2017
3.86 | 16 ratings

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Shifting.negative
Aborym Tech/Extreme Prog Metal

Review by kev rowland
Special Collaborator Honorary Reviewer

5 stars Aborym is an industrial/experimental metal band formed in Taranto (Italy) in 1992 and based in Rome. Founder and frontman Fabban has always been there, but the rest of the line-up has been fluid at times, and there is no difference with the follow-up to 2013's 'Dirty' recorded with another new line-up, plus a host of guests. Joining Fabban this time is multi-instrumentalist Dan V, bassist and guitarist RG Narchost, guitarist Davide Tiso (ex-Ephel Duath, Gospel Of The Witches), and keyboardist Stefano Angiulli. Then there are the guests, with guitarist Sin Quirin (Ministry), Ricktor (The Electric Hellfire Club), Pier Marzano (Koza Noztra), drummer Andrea Mazzucca, vocalists Victor Love (Dope Stars Inc., Victor Love), Cain Cressall (The Amenta) and Nicola Favaretto N-ikonoclast. Further there's Greg Watkins (Static of Masses, Order Sixty-Six) and Luciano Lamanna on modular synths, Kelly Bogues (Zogthorgven) delivering additional ambient noise, Joel Gilardini (The Land Of The Snow, Mulo Muto, Black Machineries) on additional treated guitars, electronics & (D)ronin, Ben Hall (Silent Eretic) on power-electronics and Tor Helge Skei (Manes) on ambient-electronics! Phew!

, with that many people involved it is either going to be a triumph or a disaster, and I am so happy to report that it is the former! This is one of those albums that in many ways defies categorisation, as while the label describes it as industrial experimental metal, it would also fit happily within the genres of black metal and progressive rock. There is a lot going on here, and while there are nods to bands like Throbbing Gristle, there is also Ephel Duath, Katatonia and The Axis of Perdition among others, with possibly just the odd hint of Anaal Nathrakh. To say that it contains atmosphere and depth is something of an understatement: there is also menace, beauty, delicacy and a feeling that these guys have created a dark, misty world, where anything can happen, and probably will. It is the cold murky streets of an abandoned industrial estate at night, after a nuclear holocaust. It is hard to describe in so many ways, as the layers of keyboards and guitars combine create something that is an intense wall of sound that is full of threat and lack of hope.

have been fortunate to hear a few of Aborym's albums over the years, and this is the best so far.

 Psychogrotesque by ABORYM album cover Studio Album, 2010
3.95 | 12 ratings

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Psychogrotesque
Aborym Tech/Extreme Prog Metal

Review by UMUR
Special Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

4 stars "Psychogrotesque" is the 5th full-length studio album by Italian black metal act Aborym. Itīs the successor to the critically acclaimed "Generator (2006)". "Psychogrotesque" was released in November 2010 through Season of Mist. The band is a three-piece on the album. Bandleader and only original member Malfeitor Fabban on vocals, bass and keyboards, new member Hell:IO:Kabbalus on guitars, synths and programming, and Norwegian drummer Bård G. Eithun (Emperor, Blood Tsunami), who also played on "Generator (2006)".

"Psychogrotesque" is a concept album where all 10 tracks seque into each other. They are titled "Psychogrotesque I-X". Itīs an album featuring a disturbing dark atmosphere. A sense of paranoia and insanity hits the listener from the get go and doesnīt let go until the album is over. Stylistically "Psychogrotesque" continues the progressive black metal style of "Generator (2006)" and expands on it. Aborym always had an industrial element in their music which is also present on this release. Itīs black metal featuring raspy vocals and layered with synths and chilling sound effects. Atmospheric and even occasionally ambient but not to an extent where power is sacrificed. This is indeed a both raw and powerful album yet at the same time highly sophisticated.

"Psychogrotesque" is very well produced and the sound production elevates the already strong and powerful music to an even higher level like a good production should. The musisianship is strong too and "Psychogrotesque" is in every way a high quality release and itīs recommended to those who enjoy the more adventurous side of black metal. A 4 star (80%) rating is deserved.

 Kali Yuga Bizarre by ABORYM album cover Studio Album, 1999
2.69 | 7 ratings

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Kali Yuga Bizarre
Aborym Tech/Extreme Prog Metal

Review by UMUR
Special Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

3 stars "Kali Yuga Bizarre" is the debut full-length studio album by Italian black metal act Aborym. The album was released through Scarlet Records in April 1999. While an Italian black metal act coming out of nowhere usually didnīt turn heads, the case is a bit different with Aborym, as "Kali Yuga Bizarre" features the vocal services of prolific Hungarian vocalist Attila Csihar (on three tracks). At that point former vocalist of Tormentor and more notably Norwegian legends Mayhem. Such a stunt is always bound to attract attention.

The music on "Kali Yuga Bizarre" is black metal with symphonic sounding synths. The drums are programmed but are overall pretty well programmed and suits the music well. The vocals are raspy and delivered in a convincing manner. The material are generally of a decent quality, but itīs an album featuring little material that stick out. The production is raw but not too raw and primitive. The synths provide the polish that means the album isnīt really raw sounding. The lyrics more or less cover the usual occult/anti-Christian subjects that most black metal acts cover (with an occassional added Hindi theme though in tracks like "Wehrmacht Kali Ma" and "Tantra Bizarre"), which is also obvious when reading songtitles like "Horrenda Peccata Christi", "Darka Mysteria" and "Come Thou Long Expected Jesus".

The musicianship are on a decent level too and "Kali Yuga Bizarre" is upon conclusion a pretty good release by Aborym. Itīs not exactly an album that makes my blood boil, but itīs an alright start to Aborymīs career. A 3 star (60%) rating is warranted.

 Dirty by ABORYM album cover Studio Album, 2013
3.30 | 9 ratings

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Dirty
Aborym Tech/Extreme Prog Metal

Review by UMUR
Special Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

3 stars "Dirty" is the 6th full-length studio album by Italian black metal act Aborym. The album was released through Agonia Records in May 2013. Itīs the follow up to the bandīs 2010 album "Psychogrotesque". Aborym have been through quite an interesting development in sound and personel through the years, and if anyone thought the band had settled with the release of "Generator (2006)" and "Psychogrotesque (2010)", which feature a relatively similar musical approach, they will be surprised by the direction Aborym take on "Dirty".

The music is still quite adventurous (which is also the case on the two direct predecessors) and you can definitely defend calling the music style on the album progressive black metal, even though the music isnīt overtly complex in structure and the playing is not technically focused as a stylistic element. This is still technically well played music though, featuring both blastbeats and a host of other tempi. The big difference between "Dirty" and the two predecessors is how much Aborym embrace industrial and goth elements on this album. An act like Nine Inch Nails come to mind at various times on the album. The clean vocals on the album provide the album with the goth touch (Iīm sometimes reminded of how Kreator sounded on "Endorama (1999)"). There are actually a surprisingly large amount of clean vocal sections on "Dirty" even though Malfeitor Fabban also snarl away in his usual black metal type delivery. The music features an omnipresence of keyboards/synths and even the occasional use of electronic beats (take a listen to "Helter Skelter Youth") and in that respect the sound on "Dirty" harks back to the bandīs early album releases.

"Dirty" is a well produced and powerful sounding album. Itīs the kind of album where youīll find new details with each new listen. To my ears itīs quite a bold move to release an album like this. I think itīll be a fan base divider, but itīs certainly proof that Aborym havenīt stagnated. Personally I think the result is somewhat a mixed bag, that doesnīt quite live up to the high quality of the two predecessors, but "Dirty" is the kind of album that you might listen to in 10 years and have a different opinion about. Therefore my 3.5 star (70%) rating is not set in stone.

 Dirty by ABORYM album cover Studio Album, 2013
3.30 | 9 ratings

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Dirty
Aborym Tech/Extreme Prog Metal

Review by Conor Fynes
Prog Reviewer

3 stars 'Dirty' - Aborym (5/10)

Running parallel to an extent with Norway's Dodheimsgard, Italy's Aborym began as a fairly unassuming second-wave black metal band before taking on a more experimental and avant-garde approach. Although they might be best known for Mayhem and Tormentor vocalist Atila Csihar's tenure with the band, Aborym have adopted a pretty interesting and unique stance in the black metal realm at large. Industrial black metal has long been Aborym's calling, and unlike other bands who have dared to marry the two genres, Aborym have taken great care to blend the two with care and consideration. Aborym's sixth album, "Dirty", is appropriately named; it is decadent, hedonistic, and rotten to the core. The style has potential, and much of Aborym's material here is enjoyable on a surface level, but with the band's obsessive determination to forge a dense and distinctly industrial style, the songwriting and execution come up short. There is potential here, but it may have sounded better on paper.

If there's one thing Aborym has excelled in with "Dirty", it's the way they've seamlessly blended industrial and EDM music with black metal. As far as my own listening history and taste is concerned, this fusion of styles has assumed a form in bands like Blut Aus Nord and The Axis of Perdition, bands that, while making ample use of industrial music's timbre and cold aesthetic, scarcely translated into music that might appeal to industrial music fans. Instead, it was almost always black metal itself that was highlighted, and even then, the genre's elements would be often contorted with jarring experimentation and additional influence from other styles. By contrast, Aborym's style bridges the black metal and industrial styles with greater equality and due reverence paid to the latter. Although it's still right to file Aborym first under 'metal', "Dirty" integrates their industrial influences so deeply that the metal elements are forced to play a democratic role, often cautiously navigating around the electronic noise. The songwriting also presents a major departure from the black metal standard- many of the tracks here are driven by upbeat rhythms, some to the point of even being considered 'danceable'. Although Aborym recall plenty of black metal conventions in tandem with this industrial element, the style on "Dirty" reminds me a lot more of Marilyn Manson than Blut Aus Nord. It's admittedly not a style or sound I have found myself inclined towards before or after hearing this album, but it's at least refreshing to hear a fusion of genres unfold in a manner I'm not wholly familiar with.

Thankfully when it comes to their noise and electronic ingredients, Aborym are plenty inventive. In particular, "Across the Universe" makes excellent use of the style, cranking up a surprisingly catchy set of electronic ideas along with the expected assortment of riffs. "The Day the Sun Stopped Shining" is another highlight, giving listeners a taste of a slightly more reserved and melodic sound before the album closes. Aborym's industrial element enjoys a much-welcome presence in the mix, with the synthesizers packing just as much of a sonic punch as the guitars and drums. Unfortunately, as successful and refined as Aborym have made this stylistic fusion, they have failed to keep things interesting on the home front, that being the metal itself. It's as if Aborym got too caught up in perfecting their industrial craft that they forgot to pay attention to the other half. Although there are plenty of electronic sections that linger in the listener's mind after the album finishes, I don't think there's a single guitar riff on the album that dares to be unique or memorable. If the riffs aren't blandly recalling the done-to-death tremolo picking tricks and bland chord arrangements of black metal long-past, the riffs often default on uninventive chugging and rhythmic accompaniment. To compound the problem, the 'dirty' production pays no consideration to the guitars, which are left sounding sterile and samey. Add some lukewarm vocals to the melting pot, and "Dirty" is left an album that seems to have put all of its good eggs in one mechanical, synthesized basket.

Although Aborym have found an interesting style with potential aplenty to excite and disturb, "Dirty" ultimately comes off as a fairly mediocre collection of songs with far more flash than thunder."Across the Universe" stands out a head above for its dark atmosphere and superb electronics, but for the rest of the album, I'm typically left bored and underwhelmed.

 Dirty by ABORYM album cover Studio Album, 2013
3.30 | 9 ratings

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Dirty
Aborym Tech/Extreme Prog Metal

Review by kev rowland
Special Collaborator Honorary Reviewer

4 stars This is the sixth album from Aborym, and has been released as a double CD. Formed in 1992 by frontman Fabban, Aborym started life as a covers band and went through several transformations, eventually pioneering what the band calls 'hard-industrial-electro extreme metal'. Today's line-up consists of Italians Fabban on vocals, bass and synths and Paolo Pieri (Hour Of Penance) on guitars, keyboards and programming, together with Norway's Bard 'Faust' Eithun (Blood Tsunami, Mongo Ninja, ex-Emperor) on drums. When I first put this album on the player the temperature dropped (I honestly felt physically colder as the music went on), and I was transported to the middle of a Norwegian wood in Winter, watching a pitched battle between Rammstein, Throbbing Gristle, Children of Bodom and Napalm Death with no clear idea of who was going to win.

Various words came to mind as I played this, including 'intense' and 'bleak'. Somehow these guys are expert at conjuring up a post apocalyptic vision in sound, and the result is an extreme version of black metal that has more than a nod to both industrial and grindcore. It is a very draining album to listen to due to the sheer intensity and power of what is taking place, yet the listener feels compelled to play it all the way through to the end without taking a break, although it is almost a relief when the music stops. I found some of the cover versions on the second CD really interesting, particularly Maiden's 'Hallowed Be Thy Name' and Floyd's 'Comfortably Numb'. The first has been deconstructed and has way more keyboards that one could imagine, while the second is virtually straight and is at total odds with the rest of the album.

This is not an easy album to listen to, and many will want to discard it out of hand completely, but if you want cutting edge extreme metal then this is one of the most incredible things I have ever come across. For more details visit www.agoniarecords.com

 Worshipping Damned Souls by ABORYM album cover Singles/EPs/Fan Club/Promo, 1993
2.00 | 2 ratings

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Worshipping Damned Souls
Aborym Tech/Extreme Prog Metal

Review by Conor Fynes
Prog Reviewer

2 stars 'Worshipping Damned Souls' - Aborym (3/10)

In the tradition of early '90s garage black metal demos, Aborym's 'Worshipping (sic) Black Souls' was Aborym's first recorded output. With only thirteen minutes of material here to work with, it's safe to say that this is something that won't find much appeal past the fans of the band. That being said, as black demos go, Aborym makes a decent first step. In tandem with the necessary black metal riffs and blastbeats, there are a handful of ambient keyboard passages here, and this is what incidentally makes the biggest impression on me. As campy as they are, the tinny organ hymns sound like they could be the soundtrack to one of the LeVeyan Satanic Church's cheesy rituals. 'Hermetic Brotherhood Of Luxor' starts the demo off on its best foot, with the aforementioned organs creeping along at a snail's pace. Sadly, the black metal elements of the demo do not stand out in any way, and this robs Aborym's demo from standing out. There is the usual fanfare of raspy vocal work and muffled guitars; the band is evidently influenced by the Norwegian scene.

'Worshipping Damned Souls' is not a winner, but- to be fair- it's not a total mess either.

 Kali Yuga Bizarre by ABORYM album cover Studio Album, 1999
2.69 | 7 ratings

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Kali Yuga Bizarre
Aborym Tech/Extreme Prog Metal

Review by toroddfuglesteg

2 stars Aborym is most known for it's association with the Mayhem vocalist Attila Csihar. The music takes second stage when it comes to this band and anything regarding Mayhem.

This is Aborym's debut album and Attila Csihar is listed as a guest musician here. The music on this album is a mix of symphonic black metal aka most bands from the second wave of Norwegian black metal and a lot of other things. Those other things are samples of classical music, spoken words, electronica, house and other sound samples. This album is a disjointed affair with half industrial symphonic black metal and the rest is samples.

This creates an album which sounds like various ideas thrown into an album. The music is merely decent. The musicianship is good, but nothing more.

This album is for black metal fans only. Even they will find it hard to like this album.

2 stars bordering to 1 star

 Psychogrotesque by ABORYM album cover Studio Album, 2010
3.95 | 12 ratings

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Psychogrotesque
Aborym Tech/Extreme Prog Metal

Review by J-Man
Prog Reviewer

4 stars Imagine that you are trapped in a dark forest late at night. There's no light and no other human beings that are there to comfort you. The only light is the bleak reflection of the moon, allowing only shadows to be visible. You are positive that somebody else is there... but you can't see them. You can only hear their faint, flesh-hungry whispers and devilish screams. That was the feeling I had the entire time I listened to Aborym's Psychogrotesque. A feeling of helplessness, fear, and misery. I'm not usually the type of person who enjoys such an album, but whenever a dark and perverted part of me overcomes my mind, this is precisely the album that I will put on. This is a high-quality, unique, and diverse work of art that is not recommended to the faint of heart.

Aborym plays a unique style of industrial black metal. On this album you will hear atmospheric synthesizers, fast blast beats, wailing saxophone solos, and creepy sound effects. The more industrial-influenced parts don't appeal to me very much, but they are done in a high-quality fashion. Still, I much prefer the symphonic black metal sections. This is a 10-part "concept-ish" album, consisting of song titles that only consist of a roman numeral. There is definitely a conceptual feeling throughout Psychogrotesque. I won't mention any particular tracks since the entire album is really one big song, but I will mention that the album's opening really sets the overall mood perfectly. The atmospheric keyboards throughout this album really add an extra dimension to Aborym's sound. Check out the fourth track to understand why.

The production is great. It is much more polished than old-school black metal purists will enjoy, but I personally think it's great. It's atmospheric, yet extremely heavy at the right times.

Psychogrotesque isn't the type of album I'll put on frequently, but I've really enjoyed listening to the latest Aborym album during the last week. If you want unique extreme metal that will send chills down your spine every time you hear it, this is a highly recommendable release. Just be warned - this is not an album for the squeamish. 4 stars are well deserved for this high quality album. It'll only be a matter of time before I check out some more Aborym releases.

Thanks to UMUR for the artist addition. and to E&O Team for the last updates

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