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DAAL

Eclectic Prog • Italy


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Daal biography
Formed in Bergamo, Italy, in 2008

DAAL is an Italian duet. It's a project by Davide GUIDONI and Alfio COSTA. They're both experienced musicians on Italian Prog rock scene - Guidoni is a drummer who had been working with Taproban, The Far Side, Gallant Farm, Nuova Era, Ozone Player and others. Costa (Tilion, Prowlers, Colossus project, Dark Session) plays keyboards - mostly vintage ones, as well as some softsynths.

It's not surprising their music is rich in lush textures, with emphasis on a multitude of layers; a heritage of Italian Progressive Rock movement is evident, as well as various other influences. A curiosity is their nod to a Swedish progressive rock scene.




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DAAL discography


Ordered by release date | Showing ratings (top albums) | Help Progarchives.com to complete the discography and add albums

DAAL top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.71 | 104 ratings
Disorganicorigami
2009
3.99 | 139 ratings
Destruktive Actions Affect Livings
2011
4.03 | 278 ratings
Dodecahedron
2012
4.00 | 217 ratings
Dances of the Drastic Navels
2014
4.24 | 319 ratings
Decalogue of Darkness
2018
3.91 | 161 ratings
Navels Falling into a Living Origami
2018

DAAL Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

DAAL Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

DAAL Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

4.81 | 21 ratings
Destruktive Actions affect Livings limited edition boxset
2011
4.60 | 25 ratings
Dodecahedron (Limited Edition Boxset)
2012
4.06 | 5 ratings
Archives
2019
4.00 | 8 ratings
Daecade
2020

DAAL Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

4.21 | 117 ratings
Echoes of Falling Stars
2011
4.31 | 35 ratings
Echoes
2012
4.36 | 39 ratings
The Call of the Witches
2012
4.71 | 7 ratings
Decalogue of Darkness - Chapter I
2018

DAAL Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 Decalogue of Darkness by DAAL album cover Studio Album, 2018
4.24 | 319 ratings

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Decalogue of Darkness
Daal Eclectic Prog

Review by andrea
Prog Reviewer

5 stars After a long period of silent work, in 2018 Daal expressed their creativity by releasing contemporaneously on Agla Records two excellent albums: "Decalogue Of Darkness" and "Navels Falling Into A Living Origami". The first one features dark atmospheres and vintage sounds that could recall some seventies soundtracks of horror films. Here the line up features along with Alfio Costa (Mellotron, Moog, piano, synthesizers) and Davide Guidoni (drums, percussion) the guests Ettore Salati (guitars) and Bobo Aiolfi (bass). According to the liner notes, this work is dedicated to the memory of some dear persons that the musicians lost and miss but who are still present in their hearts. The art cover, taken from a 1508 woodcut portraying the devil taking the soul of a dying man, and the pictures in the booklet try to describe the musical content, conceived as "an inner mirror reflecting the dark side of a man with his nightmares and fears"...

Despite the gloomy subject matter and the Gothic art cover, the music has nothing to do with depressing black metal or dissonant passages evoking infernal sceneries. On the contrary, all along the untitled ten chapters in which is divided this long album, the music is always characterised by a sumptuous, symphonic beauty... Delicate, dreamy passages evolve into nervous parts with the rhythm section giving a strong sense of tension while light, soaring melodies alternate with sudden surges of dark, mysterious energy. At times bands such as Goblin or L'Albero del Veleno might come to mind, but this work has it's own originality and deserves a very attentive listening from the very first notes to the last...

By chance, recently, while re-listening to this album I was reading a novel by Gaston Leroux and I stumbled in a passage that in my opinion seems to capture its spirit: "He called out, with all the strength of the sorrow that filled his breast... He called in the way in which you call not upon a living, but upon a dear dead woman, in the hope that she may appear to you. For there are moments when human sorrow does not dread ghosts and when it conjures up shades to press them to its heart, without trembling on the threshold of the great mystery; moments when love would have the dead come forth from the dark and when it is astonished - so loud has been its call - that the spirits do not come and kiss its lips!" (quote from Balaoo, by Gaston Leroux). Well, I think that this music is a kind of powerful call to the ghosts, a lay requiem mass able to stir emotions and even to express a sense of positivity by exorcising the evil spirits of melancholy and sadness.

One of my favourite 2018 albums!

 Navels Falling into a Living Origami by DAAL album cover Studio Album, 2018
3.91 | 161 ratings

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Navels Falling into a Living Origami
Daal Eclectic Prog

Review by andrea
Prog Reviewer

4 stars "Navels Falling Into A Living Origami" if compared to the symphonic sounds of its 2018 'different twin', "Decalogue Of Darkness", is more experimental and dissonant. Here the line up features along with Alfio Costa (keyboards, piano, Mellotron) and Davide Guidoni (drums, percussion, loops, soundscapes) the guests Simone Montrucchio (bass), Lorenzo Fasanelli (guitars), Salvatore Lazzara (oud, guitars), Marcella Arganese (guitars), Guglielmo Mariotti (vocals) and Mir Khista (violin). The album features just one long track, a disquieting suite that blends different influences such as psychedelic folk and electronic music with ethereal, eerie atmospheres and cosmic couriers.

The albums begins by the sound of the wind blowing through the trees in what seems to be a forest, then an acoustic guitar arpeggio and a soaring melody conjure up a mystical atmosphere before a change of direction and a plunge into mystery. Every now and again you can hear Pink Floyd echoes or passages evoking exotic, nocturnal landscapes and incense smells. It's like the soundtrack of a film where you have to add you own images...

The plot of this imaginary film is revealed in the short lyrics at the end of the suite. It tells about an introspective journey back in time and of the meeting with a very strange little creature. You're walking in a forest coloured in autumnal, purple colours when you hear a strange noise. There's little, furry creature sitting on a trunk. You pick it up and try to shave off its greasy hair and then you look at it, at its frightened expression... Then you see it implode and feel that something is atrophying your soul!

All in all, this is an intriguing, complex album that needs many spins and the right mood to be fully appreciated for all its inspiring, melancholic beauty.

 Decalogue of Darkness by DAAL album cover Studio Album, 2018
4.24 | 319 ratings

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Decalogue of Darkness
Daal Eclectic Prog

Review by alainPP

4 stars "Decalogue of Darkness" is the 8th album of this group in duet with a certain Davide Guidoni on percussion , which has released an intimate and very mesmerizing Album sour the name of B-RAIN. This album is actually composed of 10 orchestral pieces based on samplers and other Mellotrons played by Alfio Costa and the various percussions by Davide Guidoni himself; these different pieces, all passing the 70-minute mark, offers a musical adventuree on a post rock sound a little melancholy, with a lot of melancholy, depressive and intimate climates. The mellotron sounds vintage, while the ambient air gives in the ambient compositions with introspection. No voices, just instruments that cut notes to make you go on cold, Scandinavian continents, where each note leads you to reflection, meditation, appeasement. 10 movements in fact that provide a slow and inexorable feeling of relaxation, an impression of wisdom provided by the different melodies. One feels captivated by the sad and intimate sound, cold and icy, while keeping a dose of creativity that allows to recharge de facto, musical oxymoron in fact by the creative action generated.

In short, it is paradoxically with the last two tracks with basic piano support at the beginning that we realize in which universe we left; at this point the piano arpeggio seems to fall from the sky, it's a bit like chamber music while the previous tracks all flirt with the sound generated in its time by KING CRIMSON or ELP; the guitar here much more present catapults our stirrups and other anvils well scattered in the bottom of our ears for a feeling of fullness. An album to listen to in the evening to let you ramble before falling into the arms of Morpheus. Complex and heady, icy and hot as a morning ember.

 Archives by DAAL album cover Boxset/Compilation, 2019
4.06 | 5 ratings

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Archives
Daal Eclectic Prog

Review by Mariusprog

4 stars The last 12 months have been very prolific for the Daal. Exactly one year ago "Decalogue of Darkness" and "Navels falling into a living Origami" were published, and besides the drummer Davide Guidoni published his first solo album at the same time "Echoes from the undertow " (B-Rain the name of his project). In 2019 the Daal decide to reprint a collection, which includes their second album (now sold out)" Destruktive Actions Affect Livings (D.A.A.L.), and two other discs that came out in limited edition: "Echoes of the falling stars" and "The call of the Witches". "Archives" presents itself in a splendid double package, with many images and descriptions of the material, omitting the details of their second CD (D.A.A.L.) in which, moreover, one of their best compositions is found ("The Dance of the Drastic Navels Part II") I would dwell on the second CD which contains some songs I have never heard before. "The Call of Cthulhu" is an o very dark chapter of their discography...scratchy, hard, desperate, with a final worthy of horror films The Suite "The Fall of the House of Usher" in pure Gothic style, with even a part sung, a very rare thing for the group "Witches" which I believe is part of a tribute album produced by Musea, and finally "Echoes" by Pink Floyd, also present on a tribute album, with the singer of the Bacio della Medusa Simone Cecchini! A record not only for completists, but for anyone who wants to go deeper, the unfathomable secret world of this strange creature!!
 Decalogue of Darkness by DAAL album cover Studio Album, 2018
4.24 | 319 ratings

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Decalogue of Darkness
Daal Eclectic Prog

Review by Astrod

5 stars If dark, chilling instrumentals are your thing, check this out right away, because this album is genuinely horrifying (especially Chapters VI-X). I'd never consider this album for casual listening. The best way to listen to this album is at night, alone, in the dark.

I first checked out this album seven months ago after I read the glowing reviews. I was not initially impressed. It sounded interesting, especially the first track, but it did not hold my attention, and I rarely went back to it. When I did return to it, I would usually get bored after the second track and stop listening. I recently listened to it again, (probably my fourth time all the way through), and I have to admit, the album grew on me.

It was late at night, and I couldn't sleep. I was sick of everything I had been listening to, and I wanted to listen to something creepy. So I decided to listen to this album again.

The first few seconds of Chapter I make it clear that this is bleak music. The whole track breathes doom and desolation, and I imagine figures in the dark. The drumming is intense, and the blaring mellotron is unsettling. Somewhere around the halfway mark is a break, where heavy, fatal piano keys begin. Eerie. The piano is used throughout this album very well.

Chapter II is the track that I enjoy the least. While it has an enticing start, I found the repetitive drumming and mellotrons that blare from the 4-11 minute marks to lose my interest. Honestly, the drumming is rather deranged. It's too "out there" for my taste. Thankfully the song get's real interesting around the 12-minute mark, but as a whole, this song is just too "demented" for me to really grasp and enjoy. Despite not really enjoying this song, I can definitely appreciate its artistic value. It almost seems like it is a genuinely "evil" song, (if that makes any sense). I could imagine music like this being played by demons in hell. Chapter II is the reason why I had such a hard time getting into this album, but I would not be surprised if I grow to love this song as much as the others.

Chapters III and IV have their moments, but in my opinion, they only serve to lead up to the truly heart wrenching, bleak, and chilling aspects of the album which begin on Chapter V. I have never heard instrumental music that was able to affect my emotions as strongly as tracks V-X.

Chapter V is an off-putting and demented song that is more than a little creepy. It ends with a bunch of explosions. Chapter VI is a tragic, tear-jerking song, which seems to embody depression itself, I'm guessing the war was lost. And just when you think it couldn't get any darker, Chapter VII begins, and it is exceptionally unsettling; it gives me the chills. Sound effects and eerie knocking sounds make it feel as if a hundred malicious creatures are trying to gain entry into my house.

Chapter VIII dials down a bit, (initially), but gets intense. The drumming and distorted guitar sounds are incredible. I get the impression that I am running through a dark forest, pursued by whatever those creatures were from Chapter VII. Chapter IX returns to the dismal, but incredibly beautiful depressed feeling presented in Chapter VI. The sound effects here are gripping, and the melody is chilling.

Chapter X begins a little lighter than the other tracks and features some excellent mellotron, guitar, bass, and drums interplay. Not only can these artists compose incredible melodies, but they can really play. The final two minutes are pure gold, a superb and fatal ending. Lots of goosebumps...

5 Stars, a masterpiece of prog. I have never heard instrumental music more disturbing, emotional, depressing, and tragic than this. I wonder what images the artists had in their heads when they wrote this.

 Decalogue of Darkness by DAAL album cover Studio Album, 2018
4.24 | 319 ratings

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Decalogue of Darkness
Daal Eclectic Prog

Review by patrickq
Prog Reviewer

3 stars Here's an album which, if nothing else, has an accurate title - - although Ten Instrumental Heavy-Symphonic Prog Songs would've been even more descriptive.

I really like the drumming here. Since drummer Davide Guidoni is half of Daal, it's not surprising that he's much more prominent in the mix than drummers usually are. On songs like "Chapter VIII" his kit is cranked up while the listener must strain to hear the guitar (played by a sideman) - - it seems a little odd for rock music. But Guidoni's position in the mix works here because he's not showy. On some Emerson, Lake and Palmer albums it seems obligatory that Carl Palmer have a showcase every so often, whether it's demanded by the material or not (OK, to be fair, the material is sometimes arranged so that a drum solo seems necessary). Guidoni seems content to play second fiddle, so to speak, to pianist/keyboardist Alfio Costa. Costa composed the entire album and even gets a track ("Chapter XI") to himself. Most likely Guidoni shares the drummer's trait of humility (he does get full responsibility for the art direction, though).

For his part, Costa dominates the proceedings but doesn't hog the limelight. Many instrumentalists have been much less central on projects billed as solo albums. But Costa is no Wakeman; Decalogue of Darkness isn't about him, it's about... well, actually, it's not entirely clear what this album is about. The song titles provide no obvious clues, nor does the title or the cover art. Of course, as the cliché goes, the songs should speak for themselves, and that's evidently what Costa and Guidoni intend.

Given that Decalogue of Darkness is entirely instrumental, and that each song seems to evoke a different mood, it could easily be a popularized film score. Adding to this sense is the use, especially earlier in the album, of classical motifs.

Overall, this is a good instrumental album, heavier on the atmosphere than the melody, which is why if I heard randomly-chosen 30-second passage from Decalogue of Darkness, I'm sure I couldn't tell you what song it was from. The exotic "Chapter VII" is probably the best track here, although the 16-minute "Chapter II" is nearly as good and perhaps more representative of the whole.

Decalogue of Darkness is also accessible, ā la Trans-Siberian Orchestra, though it's less overtly commercial and has much less guitar. Put another way, those who like their symphonic prog with a bit of metal will enjoy this album, as will prog-rock fans in general. (For what it's worth, Prog Archives users rank Decalogue of Darkness among the best albums of 2018.)

 Decalogue of Darkness by DAAL album cover Studio Album, 2018
4.24 | 319 ratings

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Decalogue of Darkness
Daal Eclectic Prog

Review by Warthur
Prog Reviewer

4 stars More spoopy prog with a significant influence from mid-1970s King Crimson from the dynamic duo of Daal? Sure, why not? This is pretty much "Dodecahedron II: Polyhedral Boogaloo", with the album split into 10 chapters (hence the title!). Take Dodecahedron, immerse it in purest Mellotron for a while, and cut into 10 slices instead of 12, and you more or less arrive at this.

Lucky for Daal, Dodecahedron was a pretty good album, with the result that this one is as well. Perhaps a more retro- prog styled approach this time, in keeping with the historical style of the cover illustration, but otherwise we're looking at business as usual for Daal.

 Archives by DAAL album cover Boxset/Compilation, 2019
4.06 | 5 ratings

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Archives
Daal Eclectic Prog

Review by siLLy puPPy
Collaborator PSIKE, JR/F/Canterbury & Eclectic Teams

4 stars

DAAL has been busy in the last year. Not only has this duo released two stellar new classics in the form of 'Navels Falling Into A Living Origami' and 'Decalogue of Darkness' towards the end of 2018 but now in 2019 this electric space rock act that supplies beautiful doses of avant-prog and progressive electronic into their cauldron of sonic delight releases a new compilation accurately titled ARCHIVES.

ARCHIVES is just what it sounds like. No, it is not a greatest hits of sort but rather a compilation that consists of the 2011 album 'Destructive Actions Affect Livings' along with the other 2011 release 'Echoes of Falling Stars' and if that wasn't enough it also includes my favorite DAAL release of all: the outstandingly beautiful and haunting 2012 EP 'The Call of the Witches.'

Unfortunately there are no bonus tracks to be had and no bells and whistles. In fact this compilation had to cut off the Pain of Salvation cover of 'Undertow' from 'Echoes of Falling Stars' for the sake of fitting all of this onto 2 CDs. This is not really one for the true fans who already find of these albums in their collection already but rather for those who missed out on DAAL's magical music mojo the first time around and take it from a true fan here, you need to check this stuff out.

Needless to say, this is more of a release for those who wish to obtain a physical release of this material since the original albums are all available as digital downloads on the DAAL Bandcamp site. The albums have been out of print and this is a way to make them available again in a more compact form. This is a must for fans of eclectic progressive space rock and these early recordings are some of my absolute favorites but then again DAAL can do no wrong in my book. It just puzzles me as to why they remain so underground after so much good music released. I guess they are ahead of their time and need several years to float by before they become more widely known. Start now! You won't regret it ;)

 Navels Falling into a Living Origami by DAAL album cover Studio Album, 2018
3.91 | 161 ratings

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Navels Falling into a Living Origami
Daal Eclectic Prog

Review by admireArt
Prog Reviewer

3 stars So the album really begins around minute six after a kind of boring and overly sweet experimental pastorale like introduction. The blues like electric guitar embarks on a trippy and enticing prog/rock ride with some added electronic noises to build what could be track 3 on an uncut one track conceptual release by DAAL in 2018 and named Navels Falling into a Living Origami.

As far as minute 12 it´s easy to sense a less experimental songwriting, unlike "old school" DAAL, in favor of more friendly melodic lines and I suppose it worked out fine considering the appeal this album had in its days here in PA.

Around minute 21 there is a 4 minute intersection which clearly displays the "old school" I was talking about. Minute 24 marks the next "track" of this release with a piano/electric guitar based composition which take turns and build a somewhat King Crimsony mood although its finale runs a bit too long.

Minute 30- A two minute(+-) arpeggiated , dramatic piano counterpoint introduces the next section which could easily be described as Symphonic Prog with a blues oriented electric guitar which also serves as mid section before a symphonic exercise which actually ends up sounding less interesting without the guitar.

Minute 37. For those who like Progressive Electronic this 6 minute section will turn out quiet appealing.

After a bit of silence the last section appears. A kind of Italian version of one of this duo´s heartfelt influences, Pink Floyd, in between the Barrett & Waters era.

Now the crappy part of reviewing... rating !!

Would have loved to love it after all those favorable ratings and my early DAAL days enthusiasm but it actually stays short of 4 & 5.

3 PA stars.

 Decalogue of Darkness by DAAL album cover Studio Album, 2018
4.24 | 319 ratings

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Decalogue of Darkness
Daal Eclectic Prog

Review by Flybynight-door

5 stars "Decalogue of Darkness" is not a brand new album, but for me is an absolutely discovery, So let's introduce them. What at first seems like a strange band name is easy to explain, because only the names of the two musicians who were responsible for this project from the beginning are dealt with: DAvide Guidone and ALfio Costa. On this album they are supported by two guest musicians, so the line-up looks like this: Ettore Salati - guitars Bobo Aiolfi - basses. First of all, the fine presentation of the digipak appeals. The whole thing makes a very gloomy impression, and that is confirmed by the first sounds. The album consists of ten titles that are simply numbered and are called 'Chapter I' to 'Chapter X'. The Italians offer monumental Symphonic Prog on it, which sometimes comes across as a bit bulky at one point or another. All Mellotron fans should be absolutely thrilled, because it is no coincidence that this instrument is at the top of the list above. Anyone who knows the music of Daal and the other projects of Alfio Costa, knows that this is an elementary part of his music. In addition, Daal has the powerful and varied drumming by Davide Guidoni. But the two guest musicians don't play a subordinate role either, they make important contributions. For example, the former The Watch guitarist Ettore Salati sets some accents, which goes well with the compositions of Costa. There are passages that bring back memories of old King Crimson, but the Swedish Änglagård should also come to mind from time to time.

Great, coherent album that arouses curiosity about the next album.

Thanks to clarke2001 for the artist addition. and to Quinino for the last updates

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