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DAAL

Eclectic Prog • Italy


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Daal biography
Formed in Bergamo, Italy, in 2008

DAAL is an Italian duet. It's a project by Davide GUIDONI and Alfio COSTA. They're both experienced musicians on Italian Prog rock scene - Guidoni is a drummer who had been working with Taproban, The Far Side, Gallant Farm, Nuova Era, Ozone Player and others. Costa (Tilion, Prowlers, Colossus project, Dark Session) plays keyboards - mostly vintage ones, as well as some softsynths.

It's not surprising their music is rich in lush textures, with emphasis on a multitude of layers; a heritage of Italian Progressive Rock movement is evident, as well as various other influences. A curiosity is their nod to a Swedish progressive rock scene.




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DAAL discography


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DAAL top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.70 | 118 ratings
Disorganicorigami
2009
3.97 | 152 ratings
Destruktive Actions Affect Livings
2011
4.03 | 299 ratings
Dodecahedron
2012
3.99 | 236 ratings
Dances of the Drastic Navels
2014
4.21 | 357 ratings
Decalogue of Darkness
2018
3.90 | 183 ratings
Navels Falling into a Living Origami
2018
4.15 | 106 ratings
Daedalus
2022

DAAL Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

DAAL Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

DAAL Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

4.74 | 23 ratings
Destruktive Actions affect Livings limited edition boxset
2011
4.58 | 26 ratings
Dodecahedron (Limited Edition Boxset)
2012
4.03 | 7 ratings
Archives
2019
4.06 | 17 ratings
Daecade
2020

DAAL Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

4.22 | 118 ratings
Echoes of Falling Stars
2011
4.27 | 37 ratings
Echoes
2012
4.34 | 42 ratings
The Call of the Witches
2012
4.67 | 9 ratings
Decalogue of Darkness - Chapter I
2018

DAAL Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 Daedalus by DAAL album cover Studio Album, 2022
4.15 | 106 ratings

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Daedalus
Daal Eclectic Prog

Review by Mellotron Storm
Prog Reviewer

4 stars DAAL are a band who never disappoint and their latest "Daedalus" from 2022 is no exception. I thought this duo had actually expanded to a four piece as the bass player and guitarist who guested on "Decalogue Of Darkness" are part of the "DAAL are... followed by four names" in the liner notes but then further down where they thank people they thank these two and refer to them as being "Our very special guests". So still a duo and still creating soundscapes with lots of atmosphere and mellotron. Some symphonic stuff too like on "Navels Falling Into A Living Origami" but this isn't as experimental as that one. Close to an hour of music over six tracks.

The album opens and closes with "Journey Through The Spiral Mind" Parts 1 & 2 respectively and the opening 2 minutes are haunting then a piano line arrives as it builds slowly. Back to piano only at 5 minutes then it builds again. It's experimental 7 minutes in then back to piano after 10 minutes before turning symphonic with beats and mellotron. The closer is powerful to start with that organ and more. Piano only before 2 1/2 minutes and I love the RPI sounding organ pulsating away before 4 minutes. Symphonic sounding before 5 minutes then mellotron only after 6 1/2 minutes then atmosphere ends it. Headphone music my friends!

"Icarus Dream" is surprisingly uptempo but there are contrasts throughout with the calms. More contrasts throughout "Painting Wings" with the organ helping to create the powerful sections. "Labyrinth 66 Part 1 & 2" is as good as the opener and closer and at 13 minutes a nice long ride. Sounds sweep across the soundscape over and over as keys join in. The rhythm reminds me of UNIVERS ZERO here and this is dark. Finally "In My Time Of Shadow" opening in a spacey/symphonic style. Relaxing is the word with light beats and mellotron but also some guitar and piano. Check it out after 5 minutes, an interesting soundscape here of atmosphere.

This might be the most consistent recording of the seven studio albums they have released so far. No vocals either which I prefer.

 Navels Falling into a Living Origami by DAAL album cover Studio Album, 2018
3.90 | 183 ratings

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Navels Falling into a Living Origami
Daal Eclectic Prog

Review by Mellotron Storm
Prog Reviewer

4 stars 4.5 stars. DAAL are the Italian duo of keyboardist Alfio Costa and drummer Davide Guidoni and as usual they bring in some guests to fill out the sound. Six in fact and three of them play guitar with one of those adding oud. We also get violin and bass with some vocals late in this 49 1/2 minute track called "Navels Falling Into A Living Origami". Not as much mellotron as usual I think they saved it for the other album they released at the same time as this one called "Decalogue Of Darkness".

This is a lot to take in given it's one long piece but I am so impressed at the way it flows despite changing it's stripes throughout. I will also say that after spending some time with their earlier albums just a couple of weeks ago that this one right now is my favourite. This just connects with me more. It would be a short story for me to describe this all the way through.

We get so much atmosphere and soundscape music but also that powerful ANEKDOTEN-like section with mellotron. The Gilmour-like guitar at times. Electronics in spades. Some surprisingly uplifting sections too. Lots of experimental bits and samples. Love that upfront bass 16 minutes in and the angular guitar 27 minutes in.

I get that using a lot of "D" words in the album titles gives some continuity to their discography but confusion too especially when it's the same word. Regardless this is an incredible album. Bring your headphones!

 Daedalus by DAAL album cover Studio Album, 2022
4.15 | 106 ratings

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Daedalus
Daal Eclectic Prog

Review by siLLy puPPy
Collaborator PSIKE, JRF/Canterbury, P Metal, Eclectic

4 stars Celebrating 15 years as a musical entity, DAAL, the Italian duo of Davide Guidoni and Alfio Costa has delivered some of the most exhilarating musical statements in the 21st century that have mixed various elements of progressive rock, progressive electronic and pacifying space rock with myriad touches of avant-garde. Several albums and shorter releases later, DAAL is back four years after the double dose releases of "Navels Falling Into A Living Origami" and "Decalogue Of Darkness" with a brand new dose of sophisticated space prog waiting to unfold and slink its way into your consciousness.

DAEDALUS is the band's newest release and yes this is a band. In addition to Costa (keyboards) and Guidoni (drums, percussion and other keys), the musicians Ettore Salati (guitars) and Bobo Aiolfi (bass) are back for another stint with the dynamic duo of Italian space prog. DAEDALUS takes the listener into another hour long journey of nuanced processions through ambience, symphonic splendor and guitar rock heft in all instrumental form as always. The limited edition (with different cover art) adds another three tracks to the original list of six and as always the production is state of the art with beautiful sounds existing on many levels.

DAAL continues to deliver an ethereal mix of progressive rock elements and the abstract nature of this style of detached from reality prog makes it difficult to distinguish one album from the next at least in terms of conveying differences through the means of mere language. The DAAL experience really must be heard to be comprehended. In writing, DAEDALUS continues down the DAAL playbook without much in terms of new elements being added to the band's now classic underground space prog sound. In short, if you are already a huge fan of what DAAL has delivered in the past, then you will not be disappointed in the least with DAEDALUS as it engages the same escapist journey through space rock dreams comes true.

Bookended by the space rock splendor of "Journey Through the Spiral Mind," DAAL showcases its classic repetitive grooves laced with psychedelic atmospheric touches that spiral out into larger compositional fortitude in a logical procession that allows the listener to simply chill out and go along for the ride, a ride that evokes classic prog sounds ranging from King Crimson, Tangerine Dream and Pink Floyd yet never sounding like any other artist from the golden age of prog. Masters of musical foreplay, DAAL introduces digestible melodies and musical motifs that slowly aggregate more accompanying sounds until the equivalent of a full space effect emerges however at no point on the album does anything sound too busy, too crammed with excess and the musical delivery always sounds warm and organic.

DAEDALUS is noticeably less dark than what DAAL was producing a decade ago. Releases like "Destruktive Actions Affect Livings" and "The Call Of The Witches" could be downright scary and tattered the nervous system with impending doom and dread. It also seems that the progressive electronic aspects of DAAL's overall sound have been expanded upon as well with an overall less emphasis on the heavier rock parts experienced on previous releases. DAAL's musical equation is simply changing around the ingredients from album to album and this time around a complex symphony of electronica seems to be the dominant force. Any way you slice it DAEDALUS is another excellent release by this great Italian tour de force. The tracks vary sufficiently to eschew tedium and the music is, as always, professionally delivered with the highest level of attention paid to every aspect of the album's hour-long playing time. In short, DAEDALUS is exactly what the doctor ordered for a progressively infused space rock album emerging in 2022. Looking forward to many more to come.

 Daedalus by DAAL album cover Studio Album, 2022
4.15 | 106 ratings

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Daedalus
Daal Eclectic Prog

Review by andrea
Prog Reviewer

5 stars "Daedalus" is the seventh studio album by Daal and was released in 2022 on the independent Ma.Ra.Cash Records label. The line up features, along with founder members Alfio Costa (Mellotron, Moog, piano, organ, synthesizers) and Davide Guidoni (drums, percussion), also Ettore Salati (guitars) and Bobo Aiolfi (bass) here promoted to effective members while they were credited just as guests on the 2018 album "Decalogue Of Darkness". The art work by Davide Guidoni in some way reflects the musical content with its dark, oneiric figures loosely inspired by ancient Greek mythology...

The long opener "Journey Through The Spiral Mind Part I" begins with a slow pace. The cinematic intro conjures up a creepy atmosphere and might recall Goblin, then hypnotic notes take you across mysterious places "where the world under your feet suddenly seems no more real than the world of a dream, apt to dissolve without warning and send you tumbling into a great, dark void..." (the short quote is from "Lightning", a novel by Dean Koontz).

"Icarus Dreams" begins by a surge of energy. As the rhythm rises you can set off on an interstellar journey on the wings of fantasy. In the open space, as the dizziness of the departure dissolves, darkness becomes an excellent screen on which the mind can play out its architectural whims. For this track the band provided a video to give you an idea of what the music is about...

"Painting Wings" starts softly, the atmosphere is relaxed and dreamy but after three minutes the music takes a different direction and dreams seem almost turning into nightmares as the rhythm becomes more obsessive and threatening. When the calm comes back you could feel scared by your own lethal visions...

Then it's the turn of the long, complex "Labyrinth 66 Part I & II". Here the music depicts a sinister place, where some evil and malignant force lurks behind sombre corners, a kind of dark presence coming in steady, inexorable waves. You're prisoner of your dreams and waking up will be hard...

The ethereal "In My Time Of Shadow" starts by the sound of the wind and a delicate piano pattern. It's a calm piece with beautiful melodic lines and a nocturnal mood. For this track the band shot an interesting video where two statues come to life in a deserted atelier. They're like sleepwalkers dancing to a surreal choreography, assailed by their own inner demons... Eventually they turn to stone again, after all, "a moving statue becomes grotesque, it only has majesty in immobility..." (quote from "Le Roi Squelette" by Serge Brussolo).

"Journey Through The Spiral Mind Part II" ends the album and closes the circle by taking back the atmosphere and the melodies of the opener. The dream reaches its climax in a crescendo of tension and desire, then slowly fades away...

On the whole, a magnificent album that, in my opinion, might be a perfect score for an adventure in the crazy, ancient world of Brussolo's characters Shagan and Junia...

 Daedalus by DAAL album cover Studio Album, 2022
4.15 | 106 ratings

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Daedalus
Daal Eclectic Prog

Review by BrufordFreak
Collaborator Heavy Prog & JR/F/Canterbury Teams

4 stars Italy's RUSH-like soundtrack masters, DAvide Guildoni and ALfio Costa are back with their first album since 2018 (Navels Falling into a Living Origami).

1. "Journey Through the Spiral Mind Part 1" (14:10) reminiscent of past DAAL works, this one seems unfinished and unenthusiastic. I don't feel any connection to any "spiral mind." I like, however, the band's choice to return to less- treated, more analog-sounding sound engineering choices. Bravo! Halfway through, we get an almost full shift in sound, textures, style and mood with lots of cacophonous guitar, industrial synths, and untethered drumming before things settle down into a rather meditative synth & organ passage at the end of the tenth minute. This then yields into a piano-supported section in which guitar, bass, and Mellotron take over as the lead instruments (with drums right there with them). Very nice melody-supporting chord progression here. (26/30)

2. "Icarus Dreams" (7:30) Active human drumming beneath more conservative, slowed down "21st Century Schizoid Man" chords and soundscape. If the sophistication of the drumming were only matched by the other instruments. (12.75/15)

3. "Painting Wings" (9:22) slow, simple MIDI keyboard arpeggi and chords leave one thinking this is a contemplative play by an artist alone with his keyboard. Near the end of the second minute saw and two-note guitar arpeggi join in with bass to give this a little more chordal structure and progression. Bridge at 3:!3 into heavy organ-centric VDGG-like passage is not weak, clich'ed--as is the organ play. Some Crimsonian chord progressions and sound palette follow. At the six-minute mark the full soundscape retracts to the second motif with saw and guitar, bass, and keyboard arpeggi woven together into a simple fabric. Song deconstructs nearly symmetrically to the opening. (16.25/20)

4. "Labyrinth 66 Part 1 & 2" (13:07) sinister and old (1970s) sounding, like GOBLIN, the music slowly develops into a zombi-paced nighttime scavenger hunt with boots-marching, metallic clanging, harpsichord-imitation, and saw- synths, establishing quite a somber cinematic walk through the cemetery. Part 2 sees a shift into jazz-rock mode with heavy use of Mellotron and arpeggi coming from every which way. I very much like the old "analog" sound of this piece as a whole. Calming "flute" and searing electric guitar take off at the same moment, providing quite an interesting contrast--with a third droning electric guitar later added to complicate the mix. Interesting! Very cinematic. Well done! (22.5/25)

5. "In My Time of Shadow" (6:30) Too conservative and controlled; everybody feels confined and expressionless. Nice guitar work in both the "strings" passage and the wah-guitar section. I also like the fretless bass play. Melodies make such a difference for me--to a song's likability--and this one I like. (Cool video!) (8.75/10)

6. "Journey Through the Spiral Mind Part 2" (7:51) solo electric guitar strums through the chord progression established in the second half of the album's opening song, "Journey Through the Spiral Mind Part 1." When the full compliment of rock instruments join in it sounds quite a little like the final song of the film score to 1981 James Caan film, Thief, "Confrontation" (a song credited to Craig Safan due to Tangerine Dream's completion of their own commitments to the soundtrack.) At 2:40 we get a full transition into a Emerson, Lake and Palmer-like passage. Then we hear more GOBLIN-like references from a piano riff before the music settles into a more typical, plodding DAAL section until 6:30 when a pretty solo Mellotron passage takes over to the song (and album's) aqueous end. (12.5/15)

Total Time 58:30

I like the "live" in the studio sound and feel of the drums. I don't like the conservative, Math Rock-like structures of the rest of the music: it's as if the musicians are trapped into the forms of the song's chord structures with little of no freedom to express individuality (except for the drummer).

B/four stars; a very nice addition to any prog lover's music collection.

 Daedalus by DAAL album cover Studio Album, 2022
4.15 | 106 ratings

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Daedalus
Daal Eclectic Prog

Review by JohnProg

4 stars As usually happens with this type of bands so rooted in the symphonic rock of the 70's (in the case of Daal I also notice more recent influences, close to the somber sound of Anglagard) the interest they generate is limited, very niche, namely: of those vintage enthusiasts in progressive rock (mostly people contemporary to the birth and rise of classic bands, and who often reject -with a nostalgic attitude- more modern proposals); also of those who listen to music without prejudice and try to find out what is happening regardless of the forms or times (where I include myself).

And if we add to this the fact of finding few findings or elements that can differentiate Daal from any conventional band, the result - despite how well produced and the brilliant moments there are in 'Daedalus' - is no different from that of many other bands whose offerings will be overshadowed by more adventurous bands.

 Daedalus by DAAL album cover Studio Album, 2022
4.15 | 106 ratings

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Daedalus
Daal Eclectic Prog

Review by nick_h_nz
Collaborator Prog Metal / Heavy Prog Team

4 stars [Originally published at The Progressive Aspect]

I've always found books more interesting and enjoyable than film or tv, because I almost always prefer the images my imagination can conjure up from the words on a page than that which is presented to me. Similarly, I often find instrumental music more evocative than that with vocals, allowing my mind to wander and wonder in unexpected directions. It's no surprise then that I've been a fan of Italian duo Daal for many years now, with their intriguingly titled (mostly) instrumental releases, and Daedalus felt like the album that Davide Guidoni and Alfio Costa had been leading me to all along. Every labyrinth has its centre, and with Daedalus it seemed I had found Daal's. The only trouble is I was almost 90 per cent sure I was entirely wrong. It was as if I had seen two and two, and had somehow managed to make five. I knew it was improbable, because two and two make four - and yet, I could so easily join the dots to make five seem entirely reasonable. In the end I sent my review to Davide, and let him let me down. Two and two make four, not five. I was (as I already was almost sure I was) wrong. It would have been easy to simply rewrite my review, but music can be a very personal thing, and interpreted and experienced by different listeners in different ways. We all choose our own path through the labyrinth, and this is mine.

I was late to seeing the intertwining levels of meaning (if they even existed) in Daal's releases. It took until 2018's Navels Falling Into a Living Origami for me to start making connections. It is almost inarguable that both the artwork and titles of much of Daal's discography share imagery. That didn't mean there was also shared meaning, but my mind ascribed meaning - whether it was there or not. I even couldn't help wondering if the previous Nodo Gordiano album (H.E.X.) was also part of the foreshadowing to Daedalus. After all, the 'X' in H.E.X. on that album stands for 'Xoana' - wooden cult images from Ancient Greece, associated with (yes, you guessed it) Daedalus. So here we are, with what ostensibly is an album about the classical mythology surrounding Daedalus, his labyrinth, and his son, Icarus (two plus two equals four). But the artwork and titles of this album, taken along with the artwork and titles from previous releases suggested to me that the labyrinth is that of human variation, of the human genome, of DNA, and of genetic modification (two plus two equals five).

Perhaps it's because my introduction to Daal was Dodecahedron (2012). Its cover art implies that the dodecahedron in question is the "Platonic solid". Of the five Platonic solids, Plato associated each with one of the four elements. Each, that is, except the dodecahedron, which he claimed the gods used for creating the constellations of the heavens. With the zodiac symbols on the cover, this seems a fairly safe interpretation (two plus two equals four). But I'm determined to crack a code, even if it doesn't exist. The dodecahedron is not just the building block of space, but of life! In the geometry of DNA, its double helix consists of stacked dodecahedra that rotate along the molecule (two plus two equals five). The inner cover art and CD for 2014's Dances of the Drastic Navels shows the navel as a labyrinth. Navels Falling Into a Living Origami from 2018, has a title that references previous Daal titles, and connects them neatly (two plus two equals four). But the navel shell is an origami design, that looks like the (not paper) shell on the cover art (showing its umbilicus). Furthermore, the manipulation by nanoscale folding of DNA is called, yes, DNA origami - living origami, if you will. And you'll never guess what one of the most revolutionary DNA origami design algorithms is known as? Ok, you might. Yes, it's Daedalus. (Two plus two equals five).

Regardless of whether or not I was right (I was not), the labyrinthine nature of Daal's music is completely suited for Daedalus. All labyrinths have an inherent duality, embodying simultaneously great artistry, design, and order; and confusion, chaos and dissonance. Daal's music has also always had the same duality, being both beauty and beast chasing itself through complex patterns that beguile and bewilder in equal measure. Without ever really sounding like either, there is surely a good deal of influence from Pink Floyd and King Crimson, and for added colour, perhaps a little Tangerine Dream. I could probably draw a list of A to Z of artists I'm reminded of - or, at least Art Zoyd to Zappa. But Daal really do sound like no other band, and for that I'm glad as I doubt I'd keep coming back to them otherwise. The biggest attraction for me has always been the drums and percussion of Davide Guidoni. I hate to play favourites, because Alfio Costa is as essential to Daal as Davide (or otherwise it would be only Da), but I can only be honest. The rhythm section (either the drums, bass, or both) is invariably where I'm most drawn to in any music. And Davide is cooking up a storm from the very first track. (Yes, I've taken a very circuitous route to arrive here at the opening number, but such is the nature of a labyrinth.)

Throughout history the labyrinth has been a symbol of journeys, so it makes sense that Daedalus begins with a Journey Through the Spiral Mind, or, at least, the first part of it. It begins with a noise I can't help but think sounds similar to that you hear when you put a shell to your ear, invoking both the navel shell of Daal's past, and the labyrinth of the human body, found in the inner ear. Eerie string sounds come in atop a more melodic keyboard line - beauty and, if not the beast, something potentially sinister in the shadows. Then the drums, those glorious drums. All the while, regardless of what anything else is playing, that simple melodic keyboard line draws you in and on, on and in, spiralling gently but assuredly, and keeping order amidst the surrounding chaos. Sometimes, but never quite, drowned out, that constant melody is our Ariadne's thread, keeping us safe as we journey deeper into our own spiral mind. At university, in one of the psychology papers I took, we were taught about the Minotaur as a metaphor for internal struggles, so as the tension in the track is ratcheted up, and as the sense of running from something - something unseen, but nevertheless malevolent - it seems as appropriate as it is palpable. Then have we reached the eye of the storm, as everything suddenly feels safe and gentle, with a beautifully Floydian passage? Of course, just as with the eye of the storm, once one reaches the centre of a labyrinth (even a metaphorical one inside ourself), there is still a need to find a way out again.

Before we continue that journey, though, are a couple of tracks that suggest they are about the mythological son of Daedalus, Icarus (two plus two equals four). Yet Icarus is an interactive web server for RNA analysis, and Ikaros is a DNA binding protein (two plus two equals five). Painting Wings could so easily refer to the studies of butterfly genes, where scientists have literally painted their wings, after isolating and switching on and off the genes responsible for the wings' colour variations. Before we're Painting Wings, however, Icarus Dream[s], and it seems his is a particularly violent dream, with much thrashing about. Again, there is an easing, but with no part two later on, this gentle lull soon turns more sinister, though never reaching the earlier torment. Painting Wings is then beautifully airy and ethereal to begin with, before becoming heavier. A wonderful pairing of tracks, followed by a number which is a pairing of tracks in itself! If Labyrinth 66 is not named for the artwork by Mark Wallinger, the artist behind the installation of 270 labyrinths adorning the London Underground stations, then it is a marvellous instance of serendipity.

As mentioned earlier, labyrinths have long been a symbol of journeys, and for Wallinger they were an appropriate metaphor for the daily journey commuters embark upon while traveling on the Underground, Labyrinth 66, the artwork, can be found at The Elephant and Castle station, so perhaps the two parts of Labyrinth 66 are somewhat reflective of the double barrelled place name? Or perhaps they are indicative of the two locations often assumed to be possibilities for the location of Daedalus's Labyrinth? The gateway to the Labyrinth, depending on which tourist trap you're visiting, is said to be either in the basement of the palace at Knossos, or in the cave system nearby. (Whichever one you choose, it is still Underground.) It's easy to hear the Elephant in the first part of Labyrinth, with its slow and heavy, plodding sound. Though it's also like hearing one's own heartbeat in great whooshy waves, or perhaps echoes of the navel shell of living origami. The pace picks up for the second part, and it could easily be mistaken for a different piece. The Castle? The Palace of Knossos? It certainly sounds regal and majestic. The two contrasting halves abut each other as perfectly as did the two previous pieces of music.

After the shortest of the tracks that make up this album ("short", but sweet!), we are back in the spiral mind for part two of our journey. As expected, once we leave the more peaceful centre of the labyrinth, it's not so quiet. But what I didn't expect was to hear the closing theme of the first part reprised in a more strident and fashion. It takes the quiet meditative passage and turns it into something jubilant and celebratory ? before it all falls away, and we are off and running again, to find our way out of the spiral mind, picking up Ariadne's thread on the way out. The two parts of Journey Through the Sprial Mind perfectly bookend the album, but there are three bonus tracks on the physical release - including the Minotaur for those who were wondering where it had got to. All three bonus tracks are as good as any on the album proper, making the CD well worth purchasing, if you can still find a copy. I don't think Daedalus is my favourite Daal album, but it's definitely top three, and given the consistent high quality of their releases, that's high praise indeed.

 Daedalus by DAAL album cover Studio Album, 2022
4.15 | 106 ratings

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Daedalus
Daal Eclectic Prog

Review by Rivertree
Special Collaborator Honorary Collaborator / Band Submissions

4 stars The project masterminds Davide Guidoni and Alfio Costa are back in 2022 with a new outstanding album production. They already have gained a lot of reputation in the scene when it comes to an experimental eclectic prog music delivery. For what reason ever, considering their entire discography, well, they are putting some little hurdles in place, this has to be contemplated attentively. Nearly all albums are assigned with rather conform yet similar titles. Pay attention, mix-up errors pre-determined probably. Quite obvious in addition, on this occasion the band is complementing with the wellknown Deadalus Saga, which most prudently is deriving from the Greek Mythology. Music-wise the album proves again that they are able to keep up a high level of entertainment and production.

Who is involved? DAvide + ALfio = DAAL, yep, recently revealed by a certain in Hungary born prog aficionado! Furthermore Ettore Salati and Bobo Aiolfi ('... our very special guests ...') are responsible for all required electric guitar duties. How does it feel? The particular songs respectively themes are meandering a lot, like worked out with proper jamming appeal. Though there's a lot going on here anyway. It's just of a relaxed flow predominantly, also equipped with a dark mooded ambiance as usual. Somewhat suitable, as Daedalus' life is running into some really tragical moments. That said, for instance he will lose his son Ikarus, this due to a preventable accident. Accordingly the CD booklet is designed with dark violet colors overall. Unfortunately, in consequence, the text readability is not really ideal. Just a minor issue though.

If you're ready for a Journey Through The Spiral Mind ... well, a gripping ambient intro might be the best transition you can expect. I'm quite sure, in general, this is dedicated to the album protagonist's highs and lows, in particular his brilliant skills as an inventor, builder, artist. The last minutes of this track are preparing an irresistable mood without equal, brilliant! Ikarus Dreams and Painting Wings most likely are mirroring the context around the aforementioned accident. Soaring guitars, excellent drumming, wonderful symphonic tinged keyboards, where the use of the Mellotron is not overdone. This is quite a rounded matter, finally culminating in the beautiful In My Time Of Shadow. 4.5 stars so far for this pleasant listening experience.

 Daedalus by DAAL album cover Studio Album, 2022
4.15 | 106 ratings

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Daedalus
Daal Eclectic Prog

Review by R.Diaz

5 stars After six albums and four years of silence, Daal is back, formed as always by the duo Alfio Costa-Davide Guidoni (the first on keyboards, the second on percussion). "Daedalus" partly takes up the type of compositional philosophy of Decalogue of Darkness and is made up of 6 medium and long duration songs. The intent was to address issues relating to the history of Icarus, the desires and fears most hidden in human nature, culminating in the famous flight that proved fatal for Icarus. The cover portrays a double Icaro (or perhaps Icaro in the company of his father) while electric tension flows in the veins is beautiful! Overall "Daedalus" moves on the typical tracks of the group, a real trademark, assisted as always by the guitarist Ettore Salati and the bassist Bobo Aiolfi, engaged in the interpenetration of an album that begins with great pomp with the 15 minutes of "Journey trought the spiral mind part. I". An icy effect creeps into a repetitive goblin-style piano round that includes a second part with Ettore Salati's guitar in evidence, a dark and melancholy melody that opens a vortex towards the dark. The last 5 minutes are a compendium of the best Pink Floyd (those of A Saucerful of Secret to be clear). Huge track !!! "Icarus Dream" instead is characterized by a strong and powerful rhythm, open to variations that could even appear in a metal record. There are setbacks that recall the foggy atmospheres of the last King Crimson. In this context, Ettore Salati's distorted comments on the six strings fit very well. "In My Time of Shadow" "is a melancholy ballad, in its way also quite intense, accompanied by an amazing video clip, "Labyrinth66" is the apex of the disc!!! a long piece divided into two parts completely opposite to each other, the first very infernal and experimental, the second of excellent progressive workmanship, as a vole means travel and escape from the famous labyrinth of Knossos. In the 13 minutes of duration there is the whole Daal world that we have come to know over the years. The second part of "Journey trought the spiral mind" closes the work (oh yes ..... it's a 20-minute suite divided into two tracks !!!) Which clearly recalls the great endings of their previous albums (Dodecahedron part XII, Decalogue of Darkness part x) Magniloquent and solemn.

Winning formula does not change; Daal wanted to exploit elements familiar to them, manipulating the sound material with great mastery and professionalism! If Daedalus had been released a few decades ago on vinyl, lovers of certain sounds would have done everything to grab it even at quite high figures.

 Daedalus by DAAL album cover Studio Album, 2022
4.15 | 106 ratings

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Daedalus
Daal Eclectic Prog

Review by alainPP

4 stars DAAL is the Italian duo formed in 2008 by Davide GUIDONI and Alfio COSTA offering a singular multi-layered music based on metal, soaring, stoner and dreamlike; group instrumentally describing dreamlike, contemplative and melancholy atmospheres on the state of the composer, also exploded. Concept album, the 7th, on the myth of Icarus wanting to overcome his limits, here the endless symphonic, melancholy, dark, complex and tormented experimentation. Ettore and Bobo assist them in this intropection

'Journey Through The Spiral Mind Part 1' with an overlooping musical journey to torture your mind with minimalist synth layers, avant-garde chamber music with a dark and ethereal atmosphere; electric tonic break to amplify this feeling then hovering atmosphere la 'Saucerful Of Secrets' by PINK FLOYD where piano and synths offer a languorous air finalized by a cello spleen. 'Icarus Dreams' takes off on a rhythmic tune with a powerful metallic groove accompanied by tribal percussion for a time before returning to this heady tune; melodic symphonic break and 'Painting Wings' for the most spleen piece with a sound reminding me of the flights of the twilight KING CRIMSON; ceremonious air amplified by this sound of musical saw reminiscent of the delusions of the film 'Delicatessen' for a very good moment, the dreamlike, dark and introspective finale with a sound of end of flight.

'Labyrinth 66 Part 1 & 2' starts with a dark and repetitive electro-spatial universe, on a slow crescendo; bordering on improvisation and austere climate just with this flute; the 2nd part refers to Frippian notes, on ZAPPA for the reading of the tormented guitar, on a crystalline and symphonic musical cascade. 'In My Time Of Shadow' follows for the dreamlike track with proven spleen; an admirable melancholic progressive ballad, a contemplative vintage tune with two beautiful guitar and synth solos in a Genesis version. 'Journey Through The Spiral Mind Part 2' gets back into the Crimsonian vibe with just that Mellotron keyboard; nervous then spleen to move without words, pompous and majestic like a hymn on the flight of man.

The deluxe version offers 'Minotaur' with a trying intro, looking for the sound of the creation of the monster, SCHULZE comes to mind. 'Sunrise' on the same vein with an evolution of the air bringing more clarity and solemnity while remaining dreamlike with the languorous guitar. 'Moonrise' drives the point home with a tormented air like the setting sun letting the moon light up the world, contrasting our life in duality.

DAAL plunges us into a universe filled with pleasurable melancholy, vintage reminiscences, ranging from KING CRIMSON to GENESIS via Elton JOHN for the intimate piano solos. It's beautiful, complex because it's instrumental but it's very moving, so inclined to meditative listening. DAAL is almost indecipherable, DAAL is to be listened to religiously.

Thanks to clarke2001 for the artist addition. and to Quinino for the last updates

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