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DAAL

Eclectic Prog • Italy


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Daal biography
Formed in Bergamo, Italy, in 2008

DAAL is an Italian duet. It's a project by Davide Guidoni and Alfio Costa. They're both experienced musicians on Italian Prog rock scene - Guidoni is a drummer who had been working with Taproban, The Far Side, Gallant Farm, Nuova Era, Ozone Player and others. Costa (Tilion, Prowlers, Colossus project, Dark Session) plays keyboards - mostly vintage ones, as well as some softsynths.

It's not surprising their music is rich in lush textures, with emphasis on a multitude of layers; a heritage of Italian Progressive Rock movement is evident, as well as various other influences. A curiosity is their nod to a Swedish progressive rock scene.




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Decalogue Of DarknessDecalogue Of Darkness
Maracash 2018
$19.25
$19.24 (used)
Navels Falling Into A Living OrigamiNavels Falling Into A Living Origami
Maracash 2018
$17.25
$17.24 (used)
DodecahedronDodecahedron
Agla Records
$21.99
Dances Of The Drastic NavelsDances Of The Drastic Navels
Agla Records
$19.99
DisorganicorigamiDisorganicorigami
Mellow Records
$19.99
Dodecahedron by Daal (2012-08-03)Dodecahedron by Daal (2012-08-03)
Agla Records
$62.93
Destruktive Actions Affect Livings by Daal (2011-08-03)Destruktive Actions Affect Livings by Daal (2011-08-03)
Agla Records
$75.98
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DAAL discography


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DAAL top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.72 | 99 ratings
Disorganicorigami
2009
4.00 | 137 ratings
Destruktive Actions Affect Livings
2011
4.23 | 115 ratings
Echoes Of Falling Stars
2011
4.07 | 259 ratings
Dodecahedron
2012
4.02 | 204 ratings
Dances Of The Drastic Navels
2014
4.32 | 215 ratings
Decalogue Of Darkness
2018
4.01 | 115 ratings
Navels Falling Into A Living Origami
2018

DAAL Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

DAAL Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

DAAL Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

4.95 | 20 ratings
Destruktive Actions affect Livings limited edition boxset
2011
4.60 | 25 ratings
Dodecahedron (Limited Edition Boxset)
2012
0.00 | 0 ratings
Archives
2019

DAAL Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

4.45 | 33 ratings
Echoes
2012
4.41 | 37 ratings
The Call of the Witches
2012
4.71 | 7 ratings
Decalogue of Darkness - Chapter I
2018

DAAL Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 Decalogue Of Darkness by DAAL album cover Studio Album, 2018
4.32 | 215 ratings

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Decalogue Of Darkness
Daal Eclectic Prog

Review by LakeGlade12

2 stars 1.5 Stars, An endless fog of mellotron

While it is frowned on to pass judgement on a album after a single listen, when an album is either amazing or awful it does not require too many repeated plays, and unfortunately Decalogue Of Darkness falls into the latter. DAAL have been one of those highly rated bands that I often saw mentioned but never got around to checking out. Given the hype around this album in particular I knew I eventually needed to give them a fair listen.

I can get where the high ratings are coming from, as it fits directly into the mellotron-heavy, vintage Prog that has been very successful for bands such as Wobbler and the All Traps On Earth. However, what this instrumental album severely lacks that the others possess is variety, not just within tracks but between them as well. I can understand why each song has almost the same title as there is so little to distinguish each one from another!

The entire album is mostly mid-tempo, dark but nothing sinister and is driven primarily by the mellotron and piano. There are some more intense secions but nothing I have not heard before. I am struggling to find anything that is really original on this album, it often sounds like the soundtrack to Epitaph on King Crimson's 1969 debut, with a lot of recycled themes that have been done better from many other bands. The only slight exception was Chapter VII which had a pleasant space-rock middle part and was the only highlight and song I can remember from the entire 70 minute album.

There is little else that can be said about the album really, other than it is well produced, makes for decent background music and worth getting if you like your tracks submerged in mellotron. As the album is 100 % Prog I will give it a 2 star rating for this site, but that is the highest rating I can give for this overhyped album. If you want a mellotron-heavy, mostly instrumental masterpiece then I would strongly recommend the recently released A Drop Of Light from All Traps On Earth, which totally outclasses this album. The main reason being is that they have clear changes in composition structure to maintain your attention, and that they go well beyond the vintage-prog sound by adding Magma influences and Avant-Prog unpredictability into their sound. Decalogue of Darkness is very one-note in comparison and to be honest is one of the most boring Prog albums I have ever heard. I was fed up after only 10 minutes of listening, and had to push myself to get through it all.

 Decalogue Of Darkness by DAAL album cover Studio Album, 2018
4.32 | 215 ratings

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Decalogue Of Darkness
Daal Eclectic Prog

Review by minus

5 stars Decalogue of Darkness is a new Daal album released in 2018, simultaneously with "Navels Falling into a Living Origami". Stylistically Decalogue of Darkness is a return to the atmosphere of "Dodecahedron", considered by many the best work of Alfio Costa (Mellotron, piano, noises, samplers) and Davide Guidoni (drums, acoustic percussions, noises, samplers), here still in the company by Ettore Salati (guitars) and Bobo Aiolfi (bass). Decalogue of Darkness is divided into ten chapters which investigate the darkest corners of the Daal sound universe, a concept album whose underlying theme is the sonic atmosphere, sometimes darker and more decadent, others more romantic and delicate, with a level of very high compositions that makes this work the most mature and complete of the group. The Decalogue opens with "Chapter I" that envelops the listener with atmospheres full of pathos and mystery. Mellotron and keyboards weave a seductive sound plot, but at the same time anxious and horrifying, made even more dramatic by the menacing piano chords, Salati's guitar and Aiolfi's bass give rise to an obsessive circular flow with incisive and magnetic passages: even the video of this first chapter traces the cultural obscurantism of the "dark ages", staging a parallel between medieval and contemporary society, with inquisitorial processes, osculum, diabolical orgy, blasphemous rites, human sacrifices and macabre dances. "Chapter II" is a suite of sixteen minutes musically divided into two different parts: The first is almost a chamber piece: which takes shape between sinister noises and distressing sounds: a dark celebration that leaves moments of great emotional tension. The second fraction it is a rhythmic jazz rock explosion in which all the musicians manage to carve out an important space, the pace dictated by Guidoni is imposing and decisive, the sound architectures of Costa are based on an eclectic prog, which amalgamates obsessive "Goblinian" passages. "Chapter III" is the most dreamy episode of the album, a short but poignant instrumental, that with tumultuous symphonic cues alternates delicate melodic brackets. The significant work of Mellotron brings out the most twilight, melancholic component of the Daal sound that, accomplices the violent rhythmic accelerations and guitar bumps, moves towards purely Nordic atmospheres (Anekdoten, 'nglag'rd...) "Chapter V" is a terrifying ballad that excites and scares in equal measure. The ancient acoustic sounds that enhance the song show the spiky gothic features of "Suspiria", while the dark electric textures venture into the dark territories beaten by Devil Doll in "Dies Irae" . To tone down the tone is "Chapter VI", with majestic symphonic openings and liquid solutions that let appreciate the great work of Costa and Salati, respectively on the piano and the guitar, and the rhythmic solidity of the couple Aiolfi / Guidoni. The disturbing "Chapter VII" is articulated around an obsessive and hypnotic circular motion, that makes so much "vintage italian progressive horror music". The blows of punches at the door underline unusual rhythmical lines that emphasize the cinematic nature of the piece. "Chapter VIII" falls back into the murky Daal sound nightmare. Pain and anguish are dripping from every single note with such power as to annihilate the listener, and suck him into a tormented vortex, pitch black and scary as the worst of all possible hells. A creepy sound experience! "Chapter IX" deals with darkness with elegant romanticism. The poignant melodies of the piano play the sound verses that lead to the grandiose epilogue of Decalogue of Darkness. "Chapter X" is the final Magnus Opus, with more than ten minutes of progressive seasoned by breakaways and breaks. Repeated arpeggios, melancholic agreements, solemn openings and sudden rhythmic turns determine the worthy conclusion of a work of undeniable imaginative power.
 Decalogue Of Darkness by DAAL album cover Studio Album, 2018
4.32 | 215 ratings

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Decalogue Of Darkness
Daal Eclectic Prog

Review by Alex_Smirnov

5 stars The DAAL are two brains thinking and their cd is one of those destined to fall in love every Prog-lover, as its ruts out scholars of extraordinary beauty notes, all accompanied by a beautiful cover and a booklet with 10 great pictures, that tell the mood of the record. "Decalogue of Darkness" has the magic of the great progressive sound: a magic created by the immensity of Mellotron, moreover it has a symphonic force that makes the 10 chapters truly exciting. Soon we realize that we are in the presence of a formation well above average, especially because the Daal, while taking the most important themes of the sound of seventies, can always be very personal thanks to an explosive creativity supported by an enviable individual technique. The Mellotron that colors "Chapter I", the more than 16 minutes of "Chapter II" marked by brilliant instrumental intuitions, and a final funambulist part, that can remember the best King Crimson of the early days. Impressive changing scenarios in "Chapter IV", which starts quietly and then turns into a progressive explosion ... this song is a masterpiece !!! As always, they are accompanied by Ettore Salati on guitars and Bobo Aiolfi on bass, who perform their work with taste and professionalism. So the Daal, after the extraordinary Dodecahedron, have produced a new creature destined to become one of the most beautiful Italian progressive albums of the last 10 years. Simultaneously with this record, we should mention the release of "Navels falling into a Living Origami", a cosmic suite of over 45 minutes that detects an experimental face of the group, but not less important.
 Decalogue Of Darkness by DAAL album cover Studio Album, 2018
4.32 | 215 ratings

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Decalogue Of Darkness
Daal Eclectic Prog

Review by Raphaell Gerrez

5 stars Italian Daal duo Davide Guidoni and Alfio Costadid are able to create an album that speaks to the imagination. And here's why. When you're in search of finding a great album just by looking to the cover, "Decalogue of Darkness" will invite you in a blink of an eye. After all, impressionism speaks for itself, right? Like a picture is worth a thousand words. Well, this is what you get from this album. I mean, when you look more and more to the artwork, you will find more and more details that, in a kind of way, explains what really happens. So, with that said, lets dive deeper into it.

"Decalogue of Darkness" has been separated in 10 parts, all representing a chapter. The 10 chapters are standing on their own, yet, they're very similar to each other.

Chapter I is probably the best track on the entire album. The opener is a great illustration to the artwork with an atmospheric beginning. It creates that mysterious feel. There's a great instrumentation going on. Piano, drumming, bass and mellotron are blending the whole package in an old fashion way with a modern touch. And to my understanding, this is how it must go.

Chapter II is a good track with mellotron and piano driven melody's. It really has some great moments, for sure in the dying minutes of the track. However, the combination of more quiet and harder parts are not fitting very well together. Not the greatest touch of finesse but still very pleasant as a whole.

Chapters III and IV are giving a more rhythm oriented idea to the album and they fade out in a similar way. The instrumentation on both tracks are top notch. The first and last part of Chapter III is very much similar to each other while Chapter IV progresses more in a different way. But the identity of both Chapters stays the same.

Chapter V starts off with a more intermezzo feel. It has a slower pace in comparing with the previous two Chapters. Especially in the beginning. There's more activity in it when the track moves on. A more Post-Rock approach but the end doesn't give us any outburst. In fact, the end falls slightly apart in a kind of folklore way.

We can find a great piano melody in the beginning of Chapter VI in the likes of early 70ties Genesis. The acoustic touch is wonderful and the contribution of drums, electric guitar and bass guitar works so nice. I like the mellotron here. Very prominent. The electric sound closes this chapter like a flame that fades in the night.

Chapter VII has been separated in 3 parts what makes it one of the more interesting one's because of the, let's say, oddity. It kicks off with a very mysterious horror piano intro and some heart beating bass. The knocking sounds makes you wonder what the fuzz is all about. After 73 seconds, the horror show comes to an end and the middle part of the track changes completely into dreamy waves like in the vein of Porcupine Tree. Yet, the beautiful middle section doesn't continue till the end. The last part kicks in again with the similar sound that we had in the beginning of Chapter VII. The 3 parts are great but how they melt together hasn't been perfectly done.

Chapter VIII is another great track. The retro prog track builds up into a great spectacle where drums and mellotron rule. Daal presents a more harder instrumentation in the middle section and it works amazingly well. On this track, everything melts very well together. Just a brilliant strong piece. The symphonic arrangements in the first and last part are lifting Chapter VIII to glorious heights.

Chapter IX is where the piano is the dominant force. The melody lights up the most emotional side of "Decalogue of Darkness". A very delightful passage through an already great journey. Phenomenal track.

Chapter X is the most important reason to make me listen to the whole album over and over again. It's the most complete progressive and symphonic track on here with all the best bits you can possible think of. The decree of the ten Chapters. What a great ending.

If I go back to the beginning of this review, I said that the cover reveals more details if you take your time with it. This is the same for the music that Daal gives you. You can't simply judge after a few listens. After all, complexity needs time to figure out. Highly recommended.

 Navels Falling Into A Living Origami by DAAL album cover Studio Album, 2018
4.01 | 115 ratings

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Navels Falling Into A Living Origami
Daal Eclectic Prog

Review by BrufordFreak
Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

3 stars An album that is getting a fair amount of attention with most of the responses being glowing, it is interesting that this album was released simultaneously with the band's other 2018 album, the highly acclaimed Decalogue of Darkness--for which this reviewer issued a five star review. Navels is a completely different beast with one long, flowing collage of musical themes registering over 49 minutes in length and being given one single title--a whole-album prog epic.

1. "Navels Falling into a Living Origami" (49:27) opening with 90 seconds of ghostly whispers and crazed synth swashes and reverse-engineered swipes, the song shifts rather radically into a slowly soloing Mellotron and a slowly picked (later, briefly, strummed) two chords of an electrified acoustic guitar. I do not like the old, "poorly engineered" sound of either the guitar or the 'tron. It's kind of Moody Blues By the end of the fifth minute, this movement is finished, as noted by the bridge of chaotic cacophonous "crowd voices of clamoring metal trash" returned to from the end of the opening section. The following section is pure imitation of PINK FLOYD's opening section of the song "Wish You Were Here" from the 1974 album of the same name, but things evolve fairly quickly into the next section starting in the middle of the eighth minute after a brief bridge of astronauts-in-space chatter feels KING CRIMSONian--in a simplified XII ALFONSO/cinematic GOBLIN kind of way. In the middle of the 12th minute there is another cinematic shift into a section in which airy Middle Eastern sounding music like that of PETER GABRIEL's Passion: Soundtrack to the Film The Last Temptation of Christ plays. Hand drums and other percussives, synths, synth wooden flutes and violins flit and float around the soundscape. A swish-wash synth interlude in the sixteenth minute gives way to a chunky-bass-led more up-tempo section. At 17:00 we then take a turn through a radio static intersection before a slow electric piano-based section shows off some old, early synthesizer sounds similar to those heard in early TANGERINE DREAM albums. It's pretty if rather simple. At 19:40 there is another shift as Davide's cymbol play is teamed up with Alfio's ancient synth slow arpeggi. The nasal-sounding drones of Middle Eastern-sounding pipes or bagpipes take over the lead while a TD Berlin-School-like synthesizer 'sequence' establishes itself while, all the while, Davide plays a mix of rapid-hit, syncopated plastic-sounding and normal sounding toms (roto- or dragon-toms?). Is this their "On the Run" tribute? or "In the Air Tonight" blended with TD/Klaus Schulze? At the 24:00 mark everything stops and a new theme of ominous low-flying WWII bomber synth takes over the foundational sound before a weave of a repeating singular piano minor chord arpeggio, bass, Mellotron, and hand, kit, and programmed percussives slowly become intwined and interwoven. The presence of lead guitar comes and goes all the while the cheezy drum machine beat and buzz of the low flying dirigible hold fast. By the time the 28:00 mark comes, it is the dirigible saw synth that is alone holding it all together--until things begin to dissemble while an imitation ROBERT FRIPP guitar solo wanders around the sound field. Reverse synth notes, bubble noises, slow-picked electrified acoustic guitar, and Fripp pervade and then fade in the 36th minute as a two-sequence piano arpeggio takes over the forward movement. Kind of sounds like a take off on the "Tubular Bells" theme. Tensions rise as the key and chord used slowly shifts up in pitch, but then they've disappeared as a slowly soloing cello and synth arpeggio carry us into an electric guitar section that sounds like a variation on the adagio section of Rodrigo's "Concierto de Aranjez"--while piano chord progression and synth-generated and tuned percussives play an oddly discordant "oppositional support" beneath. Weird. At 35:30, a low-end Mellotron "chamber strings" chord-play section bridges us to a section of eerie, scary New Age synths and washes. Boy! the synth sounds used throughout this song are so dated! Makes me appreciate how far sound technology has come! More "On the Run"-like synth sequences and plastic percussives pick up at the 38-minute mark as they build into an old-video game (Atari Pong)-sounding "Popcorn." This, then gives way into a weird Schulze/Parsons-synth-backed "zither" section. Again, the simplicity of the music and solo is rather surprising with their very slow, simple, straightforward time signatures. This ends around the 43-minute mark when slowly-morphing synth-saw notes bridge us to a recapitulation of the song's second guitar-based section over which a highly processed male voice sings an impassioned psychedelic lyric while accompanied by some very nice COLIN TENCH-like soloing electric guitar. After the guitar solo, at the end of the 47th minute, more zither-like acoustic instruments are subtly added to the foundational weave for the final Nice melodies, harmonies, This is the best section of the song. The final 90 seconds sees us move into a multi-track Mellotron lead over the guitar foundation. An okay Crimsonian finish to a song that seems to quite minimally entertain. Though there are multiple themes and sections over the course of this 49 minute song, the overall pacing and complexity have very few dimensions to offer. (79/100)

All in all, Navels Falling into a Living Origami produces an overall negative taste to me because of its derivatives and it's surprising simplicity. Whether or not the album is intended as a tribute/homage to past masterpieces and their artists or as a seriously original composition, it fails for me. My reaction and continued response to this album is quite similar (but not nearly so violent) to the way I found myself convulsing in surprise and disgust at the blatant copying going on on another near-universally acclaimed album, the 1996 release from Swedish band EDGE OF SANITY called Crimson Glory. Whereas the music imitated on Crimson Glory was hard rock, metal, and heavy metal music from the 1970s and 1980s, at least the music here sounds as if it is imitative of mostly hallowed classics of Progressive Rock. Still, this album deserves, in my opinion, no more than three stars.

3.5 stars; a nice prog epic of vintage sounds and vintage derivation but nothing extraordinary, innovative, or so inviting as to prompt recurring return visits.

 Decalogue Of Darkness by DAAL album cover Studio Album, 2018
4.32 | 215 ratings

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Decalogue Of Darkness
Daal Eclectic Prog

Review by MariaCarta

5 stars After 4 years of silence italian Daal return, with two very different CDs, but complementary to their style, the first experimental and electronic, the second most "vintage" with dark and mysterious strokes, as always! Decalogue of Darkness is definitely part of their second soul, the one that gave us that beautiful CD "Dodecahedron" years ago, from which they resume and perfect the style and the compositions. We find ourselves in the presence of a cd divided into chapters (Like the Dodecahedron !!) this time 10 chapters, without any title or subtitle. this suggests that this CD is probably a concept album, and we can guess from the rich artwork that the themes are obscure, decadent, mysterious, almost horrifying, images of the booklet that perfectly match this soundtrack! the first 30 minutes of "Decalogue of Darkness" are sumptuous: From "Chapter I" to "Chapter IV" we probably have the compositional and emotional peak of the group, which had never pushed so strongly into progressive meanders, from the matrix so 'seventies and obscure, while we listen to the disk in the mind pass the images of the Roller's Goblin, the Darwin's Banco, Balletto and Metamorfosi."Chapter VI" draws poignant melodies, while "Chapter VII" is a dramatic nightmare. Perfect sounds, many vintage keyboards, and a very present mellotron, while the rhythm section supports the whole sound frame. The grand finale of "Chapter IX" and "Chapter X" seal one of the most beautiful records released in Italy in the last 10 years. To be reported "Navels Falling into a Living Origami", a second CD released simultaneously with this! - where a unique 50-minute suite shows an unpublished face of the group, with experimental, electronic, sometimes almost new age references, but nevertheless fascinating, from a group that never disappoints!!!
 Navels Falling Into A Living Origami by DAAL album cover Studio Album, 2018
4.01 | 115 ratings

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Navels Falling Into A Living Origami
Daal Eclectic Prog

Review by TenYearsAfter

4 stars The stunning and highly acclaimed Italian prog formation DAAL is an experienced Italian duo: drummer Davide Guidoni played in bands like Tapobran, Nuova Era and Ozone Player and keyboardist ALfio Costa in bands like Tillion and Dark Session, and the Colossus Project. Between 2009 and 2014 DAAL released five studio albums, two box sets and three singles. But four years later DAAL surprised the world of progrock with the release of two albums within one year, first Navels Falling Into A Living Origami and then Decalogue Of Darkness.

DAAL mentions that Navels Falling Into ALiving Origami is a hybrid project: a part of completely re-arranged published material, and a part of material completely unpublished. The album features one long composition (close to 50 minutes), divided into a serie of varied sound collages.

In the first and final part of this very epic composition DAAL showcases its appreciation for Pink Floyd: first with fragile Gilmourian runs (evoking Shine On You Crazy Daimond) and finally with twanging guitars and exciting Gilmourian slide guitar, concluded with majestic Mellotron flights. In between DAAL delivers very adventurous musical landscapes.

From a psychedelic climate featuring sultry violin work and an Arabian sound with the Oud (the father of the European lute) to compelling experimental work in the vein of Classic Italian Prog band Il Balletto Di Bronzo.

From fat synthesizer sequencing evoking Phaedra-era Tangerine Dream to an interlude with melancholical Mellotron violin, soft piano runs and fragile electric guitar.

From intense fiery and howling electric guitar with a lush Mellotron and dark synthesizer layers to warm twanging acoustic guitars and ominous Grand piano play.

And from sensitive electric guitar and warm piano work (evoking Eighties Camel) to soaring keyboards and pulsating sequencing, in the vein of Seventies Klaus Schulze.

Well, what an adventurous and varied musical journey, DAAL has made impression on me but you have to be up to a pretty experimental sound. Because DAAL is frequently scouting the borders between Old School symphonic rock, classical, avant- garde and electronic music, with many interesting own musical ideas. A band very worth to discover!

 Decalogue Of Darkness by DAAL album cover Studio Album, 2018
4.32 | 215 ratings

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Decalogue Of Darkness
Daal Eclectic Prog

Review by Pagano

5 stars DAAL have become a very complex and sophisticated machinery. The last goal of the duo, composed by the keyboardist Alfio Costa and the drummer Davide Guidoni, is a double publication: two albums built on two styles opposite each other. "Decalogue of Darkness" collects ten chapters, and already from certain details you can see some features similar to their CD "Dodecahedron" (also divided into chapters). The cover, medieval and alchemical, introduces us in the visions evoked by vintage sounds of Alfio, the percussive drawings by Davide, the guitar by the eclectic Ettore Salati and the precise bass by Bobo Aiolfi, the faithful companions of the duo's travels, the assumptions for the masterpiece are all there. "Chapter I" is a dark abyss without end, The music is a kind of noir soundtrack that recalls old horror movies, symphonic, elegant, impressive, and in this context the Mellotron stands out flying high. Steps on a wooden floor, a metronome, a dim candle in the darkness, the elegance of the piano, introduce us to the masterpiece of the CD "Chapter II" a small suite of 16 minutes, where the progression from piano to forte is bursting out, from the gothic mood you go to a typically progressive ride, very seventies, reminded me of something of the old Italian progressive glory like Goblin or Balletto di Bronzo. The imposing sounds of "Chapter III" with a Nordic flavor, with powerful guitars and keyboards, represent 4 minutes of absolute lyricism, too few to fully enjoy the melody of this jewel that could recall an Anekdoten ballad. "Chapter VI" offers even serene landscapes, with a quiet feeling, and it almost seems to go slowly drifting, to the soft throb of the drums, after a road up to now uphill. "Chapter VIII" unexpectedly regains body and power with its most outlined symphonic rock textures, superb keyboard mixes and a chilling Mellotron sound. "Chapter X" is the truly sumptuous grand finale, the result of the meticulous screening of the right timbral colorations, of careful percussive choices, of the selection of specific details. The keyboards and the guitars interpenetrate in a scenario that is always and fundamentally symphonic in which the melody constantly manages, in one way or another, to dominate. The music is dreamlike and manages to materialize fantastic mental scenarios and sometimes has the taste of the soundtrack or the musical story. The various musical influences are mixed here in a very personal whole that oscillates between the ancient and the modern. It was not easy to go beyond what was achieved in the previous album discs but the Daal have succeeded in a very elegant way and certainly surpassing this record will not be a simple game.
 Decalogue Of Darkness by DAAL album cover Studio Album, 2018
4.32 | 215 ratings

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Decalogue Of Darkness
Daal Eclectic Prog

Review by TenYearsAfter

4 stars "TONS OF TRONS!!"

This album was my first musical encounter with the Italian prog formation DAAL, I was very curious to their sound after I noticed so many euphoric words about their two 2018 releases on the Internet. Before listening I visited DAAL its amazing website and watched a serie of music videos with tracks from the Decalogue Of Darkness album. Soon legendary medieval Dutch painter Hieronymus Bosch came to my mind: a dark, horrifying and macabre world, full of death, weird creatures, devils and religious symbols. These often dark and ominous video images match with DAAL its music on this album: lots of melancholical atmospheres that frequently alternate between dreamy, dynamic accellarations and bombastic eruptions, embellished with omnipresent Mellotron violins. These musical contrasts generates a lot of tension and turns listening tot his DAAL album into a very compelling experience. During my listening sessions often the early work of Swedish prog band Anekdoten come to my mind. This seemed no coincidence, I asked drummer Davide Guidoni about that, he answered that keyboard player Alfio Costa loves Swedish band Morte Macabre ' featuring two Anekdoten members!

Anyway, I am delighted about this second 2018 DAAL album, also due to the outstanding and prolific ex-The Watch guitar player Ettore Salati (also great work in The RedZen) his contributions as a guest musician, again, after two previous appearances in 2011 and 2014. He easily switches from sensitive to agressive, and succeeds to give the music an extra dimension with his varied and moving guitar sound.

Although DAAL plays on a very good level during the ten tracks, I would like to mention my highlights. Beautiful twanging guitars and Mellotron violin, howling electric guitar runs in the dynamic, ominous and compelling Chapter I. Warm interplay between tender piano and glorious Mellotron violin and venomous Fripperish guitar play in a heavy climate in Chapter II.

A slow rhythm with the focus on a mindblowing 'gentle chainsaw guitar sound' in the vein of Fripp in Chapter IV.

In Chapter VIII a splendid build-up, from dreamy with piano and Mellotron flute and violin to a bombastic eruption with Mellotron violins (with echoes from Museo Rosenbach), powerful drum beats and heavy wah -wah drenched guitar riffs (goose bumps!), in the end subtle harpsichord and twanging guitar, what an awseome composition!

But my favourite is the final Chapter X, a cascade of flowing shifting moods, from the tender piano intro and slow rhythm with howling guitar (evoking Andy Latimer his 'bluesy emotion') to a break with again that Fripperish 'gentle chainsaw guitar sound' and an accelaration with a propulsive mid-tempo, a dynamic rhythm-section and a lush Mellotron sound, concluded with short Mellotron choir drops, wow!

Although I am impressed by DAAL its first 2018 release, this second 2018 DAAL release is my cup of tea: more in the tradition of Seventies symphonic rock featuring awesome work on the guitar and loaded with The Mighty Tron, what an emotional experience, highly recmommended!

The first edition of this review was recently published on the Dutch progrock website Background Magazine.

 Decalogue Of Darkness by DAAL album cover Studio Album, 2018
4.32 | 215 ratings

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Decalogue Of Darkness
Daal Eclectic Prog

Review by Rivertree
Special Collaborator PSIKE Team & Band Submissions

4 stars DAAL is a project from Italy, headed by core members Alfio Costa (keyboards) and Davide Guidoni (drums). They are having a very productive phase in the back. With the result of two studio albums, plus a solo project produced by Davide, which he recently released under the moniker B-Rain. When necessary, while acting like an entire rock band, there is some exquisite support available due to Ettore Salati (guitars) and bass player Bobo Aiolfi. According to the album title it may go for a dispute over religious themes, though lyrics aren't available, for the simple reason that this is completely instrumental. Obviously evaluated in the eye of the beholder. The booklet pictures are going for a strong cinematic orientation, including exorcism, horror, mysticism and similar, just in the vein of fellow countrymen Goblin maybe.

In any case, when listening to 'Decalogue Of Darkness', you are experiencing an eclectic symphony across 10 chapters, which means a running time of about 70 minutes in total. Chapter I turns out to be a wonderful opener. Alfio Costa's effective mellotron input strikes immediately. A somewhat bittersweet lift-off, very nice main melody. Corresponding to the visual concept DAAL are providing a rather dark mooded sound, though not really depressive anyhow. Davide Guidoni puts out all the stops too, with diverse gradiations of rock and jazz. He's a prolific drummer for sure. You will find variations such as deeply moving parts dominated by symphonic patterns, furious interplays, heavy rocking turns as well as melancholic acoustic guitar and piano driven interludes. I would especially point out Chapter X as a very profound partition. Well, can't name another prog album yet which is that blatantly mellotron drenched. Something special, bravo!

Thanks to clarke2001 for the artist addition. and to Quinino for the last updates

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