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HEMINA

Progressive Metal • Australia


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Hemina picture
Hemina biography
Founded in Sydney, Australia in 2008

Hemina is a Progressive Rock/Metal band formed in 2008 by Douglas Skene. The band's goal was to write an interesting take on Progressive Metal combining the sonic extremities and musical virtuosity of the genre whilst preserving the artistic edge, forward-thinking philosophy and dynamic subtleties found in Progressive Rock.

In July of 2010, Hemina released an EP entitled 'As We Know It' featuring 3 tracks from their upcoming album 'Synthetic'. The band played 15+ shows within Australia which has gained them a substantial following within their year on the live scene.

This 79 minute cinematic concept album is now here and ready to be released with impressionistic digipak art and the rich sound that Hemina have become known for since their inception. The album is to be released in October 2011 for launch shows with Voyager, Arcane and more.

With pristine sound mixed and mastered by Tommy Hansen at Jailhouse Studios (Redemption, Circus Maximus, Seventh Wonder, Jorn, Helloween), the album is a powerful, emotional adventure perfectly segueing track-by-track into a sumptuous and inviting world of Progressive Music.

Hemina's sound is a fine balance of mood, texture and dynamics in order to sculpt a vast musical journey for its listeners. The band experiments with intricate harmony (both vocally and instrumentally), thundering rhythms and intense appreciation for melody which will certainly encapsulate the attention of a great multitude of fans.

Hemina have also written a 70+ minute concept album to follow up 'Synthetic' entitled 'Venus' which shall be released some time in 2013.


(Bio kindly provided by Dougie Skene and edited by progmetalhead)


www.facebook.com/heminamusic
www.myspace.com/heminaaus

HEMINA are preparing for the release of their third album, "Venus", on November 11. Venus is an 80 minute concept album detailing and examining domestic violence, relationships, and individuality in the 21st century with a narrative arc to accompany and elaborate on their previous conceptual output. The bands first two albums "Synthetic" (2011) and "Nebulae" (2014) were met with critical acclaim traversing two different sides of the band's sonic spectrum from the complex and dark, to the concise and uplifting.

Venus sees that spectrum expand, offering flavours of what fans have come to expect in the past as well as a new palette and range of expression ...
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HEMINA discography


Ordered by release date | Showing ratings (top albums) | Help Progarchives.com to complete the discography and add albums

HEMINA top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.95 | 231 ratings
Synthetic
2012
3.86 | 143 ratings
Nebulae
2014
3.89 | 103 ratings
Venus
2016
3.94 | 46 ratings
Night Echoes
2019

HEMINA Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

HEMINA Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

HEMINA Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

HEMINA Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

3.78 | 21 ratings
As We Know It
2010
4.00 | 4 ratings
Haunting Me!
2012
4.50 | 2 ratings
Freedom
2014
5.00 | 2 ratings
Waikiki
2015
4.00 | 1 ratings
We Will
2019

HEMINA Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 Night Echoes by HEMINA album cover Studio Album, 2019
3.94 | 46 ratings

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Night Echoes
Hemina Progressive Metal

Review by AtomicCrimsonRush
Special Collaborator Symphonic Team

4 stars

Australian prog rockers Hemina have released in 2019 their fourth album "Night Echoes" and it is a welcome return to the heavier sound of their back catalogue. Previous releases are "Synthetic" 2011, "Nebulae" 2014, and "Venus" 2016, all of which are excellent examples of Heavy Prog at its finest. The Australian quartet consist of Douglas Skene, Vocals, Guitars and Keyboards; Mitch Coull, Guitars and Vocals; Jessica Martin, Bass and Vocals; and Nathan McMahon, Drums, Percussion and Vocals. Their influences are as diverse as the music, but you can expect sounds along the vein of Pain of Salvation, and Haken. Hemina have toured with an incredible array of prog giants such as Uriah Heep, Kamelot, Apocalyptica, Queensryche, and will be opening for Haken. They have shared the stage with Australian legends Caligula's Horse, Breaking Orbit and Divine Ascension, among others.

Hemina prefer to let their music tell the story but they present a conceptual framework and all their albums bring forth a narrative that grabs the listener and seems to unfold on subsequent listens like an existential adventure. The main protagonists differ with each album and are nameless, perhaps due to the fact that they may represent us as we delve into the soundscape, and we can relate to certain aspects of the characters in some way. The characters undertake some personal trauma and we come along with them on the journey from darkness to light. From isolation to inner conflict, the characters are prisoners and victims of abuse, but they are given a mode of escape with the hope of a new accepting family. The Female protagonist on "Nebulae" and "Venus" is indeed the wife of the central character from "Synthetic", so there is a definite connection to all the albums. "Night Echoes" continues to echo these themes. It is ten years following the tragic suicide of the protagonist's father, and he is finding it difficult to cope with the past, lapsing into a manic depressive state, and a loss of identity. On the borderlands of a breakdown, the adolescent struggles with self esteem and the closure he desires and need to break away from this prison of guilt seems further and further out of reach. These are heavy dark themes but the hope for redemption or reconciliation is always there, but will it be too late for the protagonist or will they find an escape from this crisis?

Out of the gates, The Only Way introduces a melodic metal guitar and some mesmirising vocals with clean harmonies that sweep us along at the beginning of the journey. This is followed by a fractured riff on What's The Catch? "Are you waiting?" is the question asked. A blistering lead break augments the atmosphere and soars into a high register till it cuts out suddenly. We Will follows with a spacey synthwave sound till it is joined by a crunching riff and aggressive vocals. There are some death metal growls on this too to enhance the aggression, sounding like Devin Townsend. The guitars are choppy and the rhythm breaks and jolts. A definite highlight on the album, We Will has some intense time sig changes and a superb melody that kicks it along.

One Short is a genuine oddity, with a blues flavour intro, until it unleashes into a metal guitar riff. I really like the vocals as you can hear the words and it helps to grab hold of the conceptual story; "Most folks I know like to try before they buy, its just a fact of life." Guitarist Mitch Coull states, "The standout tracks... are ones such as The Only Way, which blends that 90's rock sound within the progressions and One Short with that pure soul emphasis. One might say it's a departure from the sounds of "Venus" but, at the very essence of it all, the grooving metal is still there."

Flat opens with sparse acoustic vibrations and a soft soulful vocal. This is a gentle breeze after the more intense blasts of metal. Percussion joins with bass and synth washes to generate a calming atmosphere. It finally unloads into heavier distorted guitars and fast double kick drums, with screeching vocals and a scorching lead break. For me this is another highlight on the album, featuring some powerhouse vocals and a complex rhythmic structure.

Everything Unsaid is an acoustic piece with strong harmonies, short and to the point. Nostalgia soon follows, with atmospheric keys and then a catchy riff; the vocals here remind me of the Dream Theater style. The protagonist reminisces about the good times in the past; "I have been guilty of living in the past" to the simpler times. But will that be enough to get him out of the present situation? It is unlikely but the hope remains. There are some great drum flourishes before a lead break takes over, then some bass soloing; a genuine instrumental workout by Hemina in full flight.

In Technicolour opens with a creepy music box and what sounds like a vinyl record playing in its end groove. A strong metal guitar riff smashes through and some 80s retro synth lines. Then it locks into a broken rhythm and a lead guitar intro. The contemplative vocals are again clean and speak of the break in the father and son connection, and the need for closure "If I could only just say goodbye". The outro is beautiful harmonies over acoustics, "In a world full of colour, a boy without a father." Another outstanding track from Hemina is the result.

Flicker closes the album with a melodic metal sound, and a syncopated rhythm that switches time signatures throughout, perhaps one of the more complex songs on offer. It is always nice to hear Jessica's vocals too as she adds so much depth to the harmonies. More great lead breaks from Skene are woven into the tapestry, and it changes mood from urgent to emotionally spent, echoing the mood swings of the protagonist who is trying to come to terms with his identity crisis. The vocals are incredible, with hurt cries of mercy and soulful pleadings that bring the album to an end.

"Night Echoes" is another solid release from Hemina and the songs grow on you with each listen. The musicianship is excellent and there are some outstanding tracks aforementioned. There are no lengthy suites this time around and the album is less intricate or complex in structure, and it a shorter album than their lengthy opus, "Venus". Perhaps that makes this album more accessible for the average rock fan which may not be a bad thing, depending on how you like your prog served up. However I longed for more of the instrumental workouts and progressive wizardry of masterful "Venus" and "Nebulae". This album comes recommended for those who enjoy melodic prog metal, and for those who love to delve headlong into concept albums. I look forward to further albums from this great Australian Prog metal band, Hemina.

 Night Echoes by HEMINA album cover Studio Album, 2019
3.94 | 46 ratings

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Night Echoes
Hemina Progressive Metal

Review by Toxteth Toaster

5 stars Another record from my favourite Australian group. I am always on the promo list which makes me excited as a little surprise every 2 years or so. This album cuts out some of the long prog epics which I am a bit sad about but it is replaced by an album with 3 distinct movements of upbeat prog metal with a pop touch, some brooding and emotional acoustic laced music and a 3 song prog challenge to end the album. Despite it being not such a "prog" album, it holds up with Venus very well if you want a different flavour.

Kinda like Voyager meets Crosby, Stills and Nash.

Best track: In Technicolor

 Night Echoes by HEMINA album cover Studio Album, 2019
3.94 | 46 ratings

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Night Echoes
Hemina Progressive Metal

Review by Second Life Syndrome
Prog Reviewer

5 stars 9/10: Originally written for theprogmind.com

I have been following Hemina since their 2012 debut "Synthetic", and what a ride it has been! I honestly have a hard time believing it has been that long. The band is back with a stylish new album entitled "Night Echoes", and, even considering the quality of all their releases, this album is definitely going to be the one that I return to the most. The album releases on August 9th.

Hemina hails from Australia, and they are part of the lively prog scene down under. The line up includes Douglas Skene on vocals, guitars, and keyboards; Mitch Coull on guitars and vocals; Jessica Martin on bass and vocals; and Nathan McMahon on drums, percussion, and vocals. You will notice that all four members are credited with vocals, and we will explore that later.

The music here is progressive metal, though there are plenty of curve balls, too. Hemina has always offered a highly cinematic, highly melodic progressive metal with lush vocal harmonies. Some of their albums feel like films, complete with climaxes and loads of depth. This album continues that tradition, but feels even more influenced by pop, funk, soul, blues, and even electronic music. While the cover might make it seem like Hemina has gone 70s/80s on us, I would argue that they have already been there since the beginning, at least in the vocal melodies, but I would also point out that the 80s tropes you might expect are not present. This album is far more creative and masterfully crafted than to resort to clichés.

"Night Echoes", then, has plenty of riffs for the metalheads, and they are deep and dark riffs, too. But the album has so much more to offer than that. It is also catchy, quirky, and beautiful. It focuses less on mind-bending time signatures this time, and more on rich composition. You can hear the abundance of the melodies hanging in the air around you while you listen. The band often pairs these towering melodies with shadowy vox and dark riffs to fantastic effect, too.

Douglas proves once again that he is one of my favorite vocalists. His vocals are rich no matter the tone, and his high range is absolutely insane! However, like with their other albums but also somehow more noticeably here, the rest of the band sings and produces harmonies that really make this album what it is. Whether it is crowd singing, funk harmonies, or balladic duets, this album is made even more poetic and sophisticated by the interplay between the band's voices.

"Night Echoes" addresses the story of a boy who is living through his adolescent years after the suicidal death of his father. You can hear the pain, the memories, and the longing throughout the album, and I think the title is fitting. It is also their shortest album, to my knowledge, clocking in at about 44 minutes in length. I believe that is a good thing and makes this album even stronger.

There are many songs that deserve mention here. Some just have a fantastic chorus and are simply fun to hear. "The Only Way" and "We Will" are both great examples of that, as well as of the wonderful melodies the band is offering this time. Other songs have a distinct funk vibe to them, as Hemina has done somewhat in the past. "One Short" and "Nostalgia" fall into that category, and I love hearing them.

My favorites, though, are "Flat", "In Technicolour", and "Flicker". "Flat" starts as a gorgeous ballad that feels incredibly lush and melodic, and it transitions with some wonderful vocal fireworks into soulful solos and atmospheric synth. "In Technicolour" has a giant sound with myriad tones, fantastic atmosphere, and a bit of an 80s power ballad feeling to it. "Flicker" ends the album superbly. We get to hear a high-energy song that ends with Douglas' irresistible vocal musings that are both haunting and striking.

Overall, Hemina really went out on a limb with this one, and it pays off well. I absolutely love the melodies, the approachability, and the genius pairing of various textures and tones. Hemina has simultaneously become more accessible and also more complex and eclectic. It seems like the band is gelling more and more as time passes, and so I only expect even greater things from them in the future.

 Night Echoes by HEMINA album cover Studio Album, 2019
3.94 | 46 ratings

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Night Echoes
Hemina Progressive Metal

Review by TCat
Special Collaborator Eclectic / Prog Metal / Heavy Prog Team

4 stars "Hemina" is a progressive metal band from Australia formed in 2008 by Douglas Skene. As of August of 2009, the have released 4 full length albums and a few EPs. In August of 2019, their fourth album "Night Echoes" was released. Skene (vocals, guitar, keyboards) remains with the band from the first album along with Mitch Coull (guitar and vocals) and Jessica Martin (bass, vocals). Joining them is Natahn McMahon on drums, percussion and vocals). There are several guests supplying "gang vocals" and a few other guests including past member Phill Eltakchi doing vocals for one of the tracks. The album is a concept album involving a story of a young man dealing with the death of his father while trying to get through adolescence. There are 9 tracks and the album has a total run time of over 45 minutes.

"The Only Way" (5:27) paves the way for the album with the complex, heavy, and guitar laden sound that you expect from a progressive metal band, the tempo upbeat and a nice complexity that isn't overbearing. The use of the "gang" vocals is a good addition as it really adds to the story well. The vocals are very good and emotional, with a section where they come near to screaming, but don't quite reach that point. "What's the Catch?" (3:24) continues this same sound, but is less complex and more straightforward, but the upbeat, heavy sound continues, while "We Will" (4:04) brings back more complexity and also adds a nice layer of synths. The vocals continue to be emotional and some shouting is involved in the heavier sections of the track.

"One Short" (3:02) features the vocals of past member Phill Eltakchi on the only track he is featured on in this album. This track has a poppier feel to it, but the layers of vocals are nice and I find that gang chorus that appears in several of the tracks a nice addition that really helps the story move along and really ties the tracks together. "Flat" (5:39) begins by taking out all of the heavy noise and simply using soft acoustic guitar, atmospheric percussion (mostly cymbal rolls, etc.) and softer vocals. A two minutes, the ballad style continues, but the full band comes in with added heaviness of guitars. The vocals reach an emotional high before the instrumental break adds in a nice guitar solo, then more of the gang chorus comes in before the music pulls back again to the softer sound. "Everything Unsaid" (1:39) features a guest vocalist adding harmony to the regular vocalist with accompanying acoustic guitar. It's a nice intermediary track.

"Nostalgia" (5:57) brings back some complexity to the melody, but stays away from full bore heaviness with the guitars content to just add riff driven back ground to the lyric heavy track. When it does reach an instrumental break, things stay pretty safe as a short guitar solo soon brings back the vocals. "In Technicolour" (9:33) starts with a soft keyboard passage which is soon interrupted with some heavier guitars and some nice development eventually bringing in the vocals. Jessica's vocals are quite apparent in certain sections as her vocals stand out in the chorus sections on this track, and that along with the gang vocal section adds some more depth to the album. "Flicker" (6:07) brings back some of the energy in the vocals and a bit more heaviness, but still seems somewhat lightweight for a metal sound. Jessica's vocals also stand out on this track at certain points and the track is a bit more progressive, but it lacks that "umph factor" that you would hope for in a ending track, and it kind of leaves you hanging.

The album has a certain amount of depth that helps to retain one's interest through the album, and the vocals are also well done, and that keeps the album moving along. Whether this interest carries through after repeated listenings is the question. While the album is definitely well written and contains some great music, it isn't highly progressive, though there are some progressive traits to it, only time will tell if it can continue to hold interest over a year or two of repeated plays. Both Prog and Metal lovers might end up wishing for a little bit of both aspects, yet those aspects are there. As for this album, it probably leans more in the Heavy Prog or Crossover Prog genres. Still, the biggest question is whether it has the staying power for most people. For now, it seems to fall around 3.5 stars, but can be rounded up to 4 because of the great production and the depth brought on by the gang vocal sections.

 Venus by HEMINA album cover Studio Album, 2016
3.89 | 103 ratings

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Venus
Hemina Progressive Metal

Review by lizzard

3 stars In my humble opinion, this album is too hard for prog rock. I am not the biggest fan of hard rock, but i believe it should also be based on some attractive themes if not melodies. Probably this topic is not the best target classification for this album and it is very likely that it deserves a 5 star rate in "hard core" or the like, but again I cannot get it as far as the prog rock is concerned. Please don't blame me for it, i have tried it twice - but no results, i simply cannot get it. I might be wrong, but even Rammstein have their core pieces where one can clearly see the pulsing nerve of the melody.
 Venus by HEMINA album cover Studio Album, 2016
3.89 | 103 ratings

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Venus
Hemina Progressive Metal

Review by BrufordFreak
Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

3 stars Not unlike the sounds and quick-change tempos of AN ENDLESS SPORADIC, this is over-processed, artifice in which manual performance or virtuosity seems to be virtually eliminated by computer programming, sequencing and editing. Horrible treatment of sound, voice and music. The heavily treated, digitally truncated and manipulated sound here grates my nerves and ears like the music of KANSAS, RUSH or HAKEN. I'm tired of being duped by modern production technologies. I can't tell if these musicians are accomplished or not because their sound is so manipulated. Give me the real thing, please!

Best songs: the diverse and interesting, 5. "Venus" (11:12) (9/10); the djenty, melodic, 8. "Starbreeze" (3:24) (9/10), and; the Jem Godfrey/FROST*-like 11. "Down Will Come Baby" (12:10) (8/10).

A solid three star album; good but non-essential.

 Venus by HEMINA album cover Studio Album, 2016
3.89 | 103 ratings

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Venus
Hemina Progressive Metal

Review by Progrussia

4 stars If there is a female prog metal demographic, Hemina got it cornered. But this is no Nightwish. If a word comes to mind, it's oversaturation. Not in a negative sense - you come back from listening feeling like a kid who ate too much Halloween candy. After the relative streamlineness of Nebulae, they come back to the sprawlingness of Synthetic, with four 10- minute songs and a threesome of seven-minutes. Not only have you got those very loud odd-time "gjenty" riffs, but ample shredding on top of that and even an occasional sax. Vocals mostly sugary, but throwing in deep crooning and screaming as well (although they seem too processed to me). And just as you think a bridge in a song is over, you get hit with 3 more. I think the guys were trying to show that they can do it all. An impressive effort, to be sure, but too crammed. Unlie previous efforts, this one requires multiple spins to sort out the melodies beheath the bombast.
 Venus by HEMINA album cover Studio Album, 2016
3.89 | 103 ratings

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Venus
Hemina Progressive Metal

Review by ProgolateCookie

5 stars Theres something in the Aussies' water. I have to admit that I have been completely bored by prog metal in the last few years but somehow I seem to enjoy each of these Hemina albums more than the last. They are in great company with bands like Glass Ocean, Caligulas Horse, Voyager and sleepmakeswaves in that they approach their genre with grace and a freshness which must be from the distance from everywhere else. High Kite Ride is the one of the songs of the year with a great balance between instrumentals and melodic vocals with not much screaming (thank god). The album sounds like modern groove based prog metal but it's almost like a softer version. Think Periphery or Meshuggah in some of the riffs but with a touch of Dream Theatre with more melody and solos. Best prog metal album this year for sure.
 Venus by HEMINA album cover Studio Album, 2016
3.89 | 103 ratings

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Venus
Hemina Progressive Metal

Review by Saralgam

5 stars Mind blowing album!I was captured by the first sound on Fantasy track...great guitar riff and awesome production, and after a while the majestic vocals are coming to fill the space with power and life.Yes it's djent-like,but not in the way of exhausting your ears by using multi rhythm equations upon the same riff,but as a path of composing with diversity and inspiration.This djentish orientation in combination with the amazing and melodic vocal lines,great guitar playing and all of the above been engulfed by genuine prog metal surprises,make this album brilliant.In Venus the discrete use of keys is full of meaning without covering the real feel of heavy sound.There are also here jazz-fusion influences with beautiful use of sax and trumpet themes,giving a special and diverse note to the overall of the album.This element of surprise,which for me is the cornerstone of Prog metal genre seems to be easily,almost without any effort,been handled, by Hemina.And yes ,once more the vocals(best by far for many years)captivate the listener and make Venus the closest thing to a masterpiece these days.Prog metal still lives in 2016!Probably,best album of the year.Give this true gem the value it worths.
 Venus by HEMINA album cover Studio Album, 2016
3.89 | 103 ratings

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Venus
Hemina Progressive Metal

Review by ProgressiveMetaller

5 stars Another masterpiece from my favourite Sydney band. The band takes a bit from the scope of "Synthetic" and some of the song craft from "Nebulae" with some emotional crossover and djent fusion and builds this whopping huge chunk of melodic prog. Brilliant vocals with the whole band singing in harmony especially on track 2. Lush with amazing grooves, thrashy beats, lots of solos and beautiful lyrics. My album of the year. I am excited to get something every 2 years or so from these guys in my promo email and they didn't let me down. Best song is Down will come baby and Collective Unconscious.
Thanks to Dougie Skene and progmetalhead for the artist addition. and to Quinino for the last updates

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