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FATAL FUSION

Crossover Prog • Norway


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Fatal Fusion biography
Fatal Fusion is a progressive rock band from Oslo, Norway.
The group got together in early 2008, after emerging from the ashes of several Rock/Blues covers bands, dating back to the 1980's.
The lineup consists of Erlend Engebretsen on Keyboards, Lasse Lie on Bass, Audun Engebretsen on Drums/Percussion, Stig Selnes on Guitar, and Knut Grøntvedt on Vocals.

Utilizing classic instruments, vintage synths, mellotron and hammond organ as part of their sound, they pay homage to the progressive rock bands from the 70´s, whilst still aiming to create their own unique sound, blending in elements form different musical genres like hard rock, classical music, metal, blues, jazz, psychedelia, and latin. They like to explore and mix styles together, trying to get a broad musical landscape.

The release of their debut album "Land of the Sun" in 2010 have received great reviews from around the world, and also got them nominated for best debut album 2010 by Prog Awards.

Main influeces are bands like Rush, Led Zeppelin, Yes, ELP, Genesis, Camel, Pink Floyd, King Crimson, but also newer acts like IQ, Marillion, Spocks Beard and Dream Theater.

Thanks to Moonstone for the bio


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The Ancient TaleThe Ancient Tale
Karisma 2016
Audio CD$9.47
$6.99 (used)
Total AbsenceTotal Absence
Import
Karisma 2016
Audio CD$9.30
$12.96 (used)
The Ancient Tale by Fatal FusionThe Ancient Tale by Fatal Fusion
Karisma Records
Audio CD$74.15
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FATAL FUSION discography


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FATAL FUSION top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.50 | 38 ratings
Land Of The Sun
2010
3.94 | 134 ratings
The Ancient Tale
2013
3.63 | 40 ratings
Total Absence
2016

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FATAL FUSION Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 Land Of The Sun by FATAL FUSION album cover Studio Album, 2010
3.50 | 38 ratings

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Land Of The Sun
Fatal Fusion Crossover Prog

Review by PH

4 stars For the recent years now Norway is pumping out a plethora of very good groups and FATAL FUSION was no exception. On their debut CD 'Land Of The Sun' (2010) this five-piece covers a varied assortment of styles: classic hard-rock and neo-prog, funk and latino, space and jazz, blues and classical music. Just try to imagine a melting pot of Atomic Rooster, classic Deep Purple, early Marillion, psychedelic traits of Pink Floyd, at times - Carlos Santana and King Crimson, and you should understand the approach of Fatal Fusion. Skillfully balancing with tempos, fusing the loud elements and gentle ingredients, using delicious guitar playing and vintage keyboards (Hammond, Moog, Mellotron), raging bass and drums, these Norse went out to reveal a quite unique progressive product. Sure, the great asset to band's originality lies in ability of singer Knut Erik Grøntvedt to combine his bluesy timbre with a bitter-sweet performance. Each of the 7 cuts on the album has a style of its own, whilst maintaining an organic cohesion. Impressive stuff, indeed. So.. I just hope that my brief comment will induce some additional interest in what FF are doing.
 Total Absence by FATAL FUSION album cover Studio Album, 2016
3.63 | 40 ratings

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Total Absence
Fatal Fusion Crossover Prog

Review by PH

5 stars FATAL FUSION have pulled off a stunner with the third studio album 'Total Absence' that checks in at seven compositions and high praise- worthy 56-plus min. What makes this new disk really special is the refreshing blend of diverse influences as well as portrayed emotion, added to challenging songs and great performances. The cohesive material shines through, especially when heard straight from the very first number to the last one. Fittingly enough, the album kicks off with a mysterious overture to showcase what Fatal Fusion are capable of. Played with sheer authority, the instrumental piece 'The Gates Of Ishtar' brings a predominant Arabian feel, providing a somewhat ominous atmosphere. Symphonic set-up is followed by martially sounding track 'Shadow Of The King', to recall the Rainbow's musical blueprint which functions like a mid-tempo rocker. From its outset, there's a solid build up featuring impeccable guitar work (Stig Selnes), huge keyboards (Erlend Engebretsen), intensive power of rhythm section (Audun Engebretsen / Lasse Lie). The structural components are fitted together perfectly, the ensemble accomplishes its mission enabling Knut Erik Grøntvedt to deliver his remarkable vocal style. A bit hoarse voice gives another sort of momentum. Next up, 'Forgotten One' adorned by prominent sound of flute. To a certain extent, it betrays an influence from Jethro Tull. Besides, The Windmill kept coming to my mind while listening to this catchy song. Afterward, sparkling 'Astral Flight', based on the reveries and instrumental grooves. A typical Jadis manner prevails, though the experimental section in vein of TFK is also present. The guitar wiz Stig Selnes and key virtuoso Erlend Engebretsen are in the spotlight, filling the air with depth and colour. Permanently audible, bassist Lasse Lie and drummer Audun Engebretsen supplement a dynamic dimension. The lead singer is kept aside here. Moving on. 'The Emperor's Letter' balances between mellow Spock's Beard and calm Salem Hill, before descending into absolute magic: flawless guitar solo is reminiscent of Steve Hackett. It brings goosebumps to my spine. Yet again, Knut Erik Grøntvedt affords a lyrical meaning to content. The further CD goes, the more intriguing it becomes. Depicting different emotional states, a lengthy composition 'Endless Ocean Blue' is a kind of prog-suite with its three acts ('Meditation', 'Ascension', 'Realization'). If you can mix Iluvatar, Marillion, Deep Purple and Pink Floyd, you will have a good idea for the general sound of this opus. The musicianship is still terrific, while Knut Erik pours his soul into every note he sings. By no coincidence, 'Total Absence' is the longest track on the whole album, clocking in at 15:30 min. Four parts ('Empty Houses, Empty Streets', 'Losing Faith', 'Night Must Fall', 'United We Stand') transfer into each other making the epic vertex. In musical ways, it largely leans on old Genesis and Dream Theater. Flows and ebbs with changes of pace and time- signatures. The front man sings with heart, creating the tangible imagery. It's curious to note, however, Fatal Fusion have decided to place a beautiful guitar solo in the final segment, providing a true Pendragon vibe. And when the music gradually fades away, you are left a fully delighted customer!!! All in all, this release is both very melodic and adventurous; it should deliver tons of enjoyment for progressive rock heads who chose to seek it out. Definitely recommended.
 Total Absence by FATAL FUSION album cover Studio Album, 2016
3.63 | 40 ratings

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Total Absence
Fatal Fusion Crossover Prog

Review by aapatsos
Special Collaborator Prog Metal and Heavy Prog Teams

2 stars Vintage prog with limitations

It is difficult to categorise Fatal Fusion judging from this disc; vintage prog is probably the most accurate description since the sounds clearly rises from the 70's. From hard rock-infused riffs, to organ and hammond-filled passages, the band clearly show their keeness on keeping to their roots.

There is a mutiltude of elements and styles in their, otherwise stuck-to-the-roots, crossover prog. There are bombastic, epic intros (The Gates of Ishtar), heavy rock fantasy-driven tunes (Shadow of the King), fusionesque and uptempo melodies (Astral Flight), nostalgic low tempo tracks in the vein of Blood Ceremony (Forgotten One, The Emperor's Letter) and long epics guided by the giants of the 70's such as Pink Floyd and Genesis (Endless Ocean Blue and Total Absence). Hammond and organ dominate the sound of the album while the guitars and drums generate a more demo-like feeling, and it is unclear if this was intended or is a production limitation. Although it does stand out, it does somehow blend with the atmosphere.

Hints of Deep Purple and (more) of Wishbone Ash, some fantasy Neo-prog sounds in the vein of Marillion and a heavy rock Sabbathy mood are the strongest characteristics of Total Absence, which suffers from a major flaw: the vocals appear distinctly ''in-front'' and harsh - not out of tune but out of shape, they could put you off from enjoying this album. Perhaps this is why I find the instrumental track as the highlight of this album. Not that the rest of the music is overtly impressive: yes, the players are skilled but the tunes lack inspiration and innovation, charting on a well-trodden path. Had it not been for the vocals, I might have given this a few more chances, but as it stands it is very difficult to go back, other than spinning the enjoyable Astral Flight. Fans of vintage prog might find more to like than I did.

2.5

 Total Absence by FATAL FUSION album cover Studio Album, 2016
3.63 | 40 ratings

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Total Absence
Fatal Fusion Crossover Prog

Review by tszirmay
Special Collaborator Crossover Team

4 stars Finally it has happened, happened again actually! True prog fans are 'look out' people, constantly scouring the globe for something exciting or even mind blowing to surface, out of the blue. True devotees research, cross reference or analyze the credits for a familiar musician or just go with their gut feeling. This knowledge has served us well, I can acknowledge that music has given my life purpose, enjoyment, escape and panacea. We all know life is not easy, getting even more dangerous than ever before (and I am from 'the Cold War generation', I am proud to say), so you cannot fathom the sheer salvation that music was, is and always will be. Its medication, vision, courage and unending faith, all combined as a musical vehicle to dream and emote without fear or judgement. Prog certainly covers the entire spectrum of human emotions and proud to do so. While the golden years of the 70s were remarkable and highly inspired, I must say , having lived it then and today, the quality of 21st Century prog has been the best period ever, so many talented and adventurous bands out there, who make music they enjoy, not for groupies, not for fortune or not for fame. That is the true measure of how prog is evolving, spewing out jewels one after the other.

This is another one, the brand spanking new Fatal Fusion album, a Norwegian group I only recently hooked up with, after a lot of glances but no bite. Well, their sophomore album "The Ancient Tale" really blew me away, though it did take some concentration and effort, as there were many familiar things mixed in with some unexpected ones to keep one on the edge. What threw me off was trying to compare the band to anyone else out there, which was a huge mistake on my part, as I tried to take the easy road. But once I took on that album for what it was, it started hitting hard. The first three tracks certainly do smash rigid, then the set list suddenly evolves into much mellower realms that will catch any listener unaware.

On the surly opener instrumental opener "The Gates of Ishtar", Fatal Fusion are slanted more towards the masculine, testosterone-laced prog bravado, the sonic palette pumping audacious yet heavily symphonic, very obviously led by Erlend Engebretsen who shines on a wide variety of keyboards. Guitars are honed and masterly wielded, gritty when rhyming and soaring when leading. Stig Selnes is quite the craftsman, both rash and fluid at a moment's notice, pushing the murky theme to glorious heights, with just a hint of Middle Eastern aroma. It serves as the ideal introduction for "the Shadow of the King", energized by a husky-voice singer that takes some getting used to, allied to a brooding scimitar of heavy riffs that hammer home, unrelenting. There is an undeniable Zeppelin shuffle that recalls "Kashmir" for a while until Selnes shoots off a dizzying axe solo that bounces off sand dunes, whirls beyond the oasis and spirals into the broiling sky. "Forgotten One" possesses a well-balanced arrangement that stings one moment with metallic fury , organ ablaze and drums pumping wildly only to veer into a gentler lullaby where the piano leads the march. The gargling lead vocals from Knut Grontvedt certainly are different, to say the least. And then quite unexpectedly, the material just gets flung into another dimension altogether.

On the stunning "Astral Flight", the spirit and the dexterity combine for some savagely brilliant instrumental episodes, but when the extended e-piano solo enters, I am slain! As if the early Santana guitar cavalcade was not enough, the entire mood is memorable, bright, smoothly jazzy and impassioned. The rocket-fueled rhythm section is propulsive, serpentine and utterly focused on the appointed flight path, no auto-pilot programming on this one! This is a killer track of the highest order and a harbinger of things to come.

The next three pieces are all epic in scope and running time, heavily dominated by massive mellotron winds that will take you back to the Court of the Crimson King, beginning with the reverential "the Emperor's Letter" , a colossal symphonic ballad that groans and moans with bittersweet content. The overall feel is stately and imperial, the beastly legendary keyboard doing its celebrated magic, the ideal stage for Knut to howl to the moon, the electric guitars snarling and the keys impetuous. Stig emotes on acoustic before unleashing a gorgeous electric solo, flush with pressing despair. Totally beautiful, morose and forbidding, this is primo prog that make you kneel at the shrine.

Yet the biggest surprise is without any doubt, "Endless Ocean Blue" with its disarming pastoral intro of clanging bucolic strings and weaving synths, becoming a melancholic 11 minute voyage on a sea of serenity, a sense of floating that owes more to classic Pink Floyd than anything else. The plaintive vocals in particular are hushed, elbowed by Lasse Lie's low bass rumble and concussed by a resilient binary beat. Within the mid-section, the expectant storm intensifies into gale wind organ flurries, Erlend rifling along his board with dedicated precision and urgent mania. Stig's turn to show his restraint and command of the e-guitar, carving a superlative arch of slow- burning notes, a kaleidoscope of emotions painting the air. Knut roars out his pain, in that raspy shriek that is both manly and desperate.

The title track finishes off this monster, a quarter of an hour of musical bliss that kicks off with urban sound effects, cars honking and a forlorn piano tinkling morosely. Voice, acoustic guitar and an orchestral background sets the stage for the pleasures to come, searching the road to some salvation. The buildup gradually goes tornado (as Bill Bruford once stated), as the sonic heat is ratcheted up considerably, the rhythms concussive and the guitars persuasive. The mighty Mellotron returns again to prove the point, shoving the steam roller of sound forward and beyond. Stig agrees to fiddle with his axe once again, with tremendous efficiency and taste.

Heavy prog is perhaps the best way to describe the style here, but it's somehow different from other players within the genre. Loads of paradoxes abound, its heavy and yet isn't, its brooding yet also very inspired. It's typical but also original. A wild and savage mix of entertaining progressive rock music that might not be everyone's cup of tea but highly enjoyable under the right circumstances.

4.5 complete nonattendances

 The Ancient Tale by FATAL FUSION album cover Studio Album, 2013
3.94 | 134 ratings

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The Ancient Tale
Fatal Fusion Crossover Prog

Review by tszirmay
Special Collaborator Crossover Team

4 stars Another Norwegian group that I finally picked up on, once glanced at and set aside, is Fatal Fusion, excited by some of the reviews including their third and latest opus 'Total Absence', whose second album I decided to take the leap of faith on. Warthur gave this a perfect score, so how could I go wrong? 'The Ancient Tale' has meandering themes some very left and others very right, a wide panorama of styles, the bombastic being the top dog.

The epic 'City of Zerych' is a sprawling sea of crests and eddies, tempests and storm clouds above, chooses a variety of sub-sections amid the 18 minutes allotted here. It starts off bewildering, demanding closer attention I guess, as the unexpected leaps out of the speakers, mixed in with clever references points that can even hint at old classics, winks at Joe Cocker. There are some mellotron-drenched passages with the ticking bas that really blows the mind, growly voices evoke rancid fear and hollow dread, the beat funeral-like until the speed machine powers in unrelenting, spurred by keyboardist Erlend Engebretsen's expansive and emotive arsenal, highly symphonic and occasionally Neo, what with those nasty synth solos garnishing the pace. Stig Selnes is a rock guitarist and he lays it on, thick and creamy, throw in a stellar organ parade and, oh My! Magic!

Half as long is 'Halls of Amenti', a classic rock track, smeared with so many prog influences with various recipes that are guaranteed to be noticed, extensively adorned by orchestral keys and slippery synths and a doom-laden theme, bold instrumental passages and a convincing disposition. Singer Knut Erik Grontvet has a raspy, hoary and even throaty set of pipes that comes across as quite original, certainly within the prog context where stupendous vocalists lag behind the remaining musicians by a country mile. Some need time to getting used to, some you never get used to (Peter Hammill) but this guy can sing the blues, if you see what I mean. The fiery axe does a few flaming pirouettes under the tent, the drums elephantine, the bass reptilian like a python and the electronics screaming like eagles. All that is missing is the bearded lady! No clowns, though!

Another epic piece, a more angular and hard ride, is 'The Divine Comedy', presumably referring to Dante's legendary and rather magnificent poem. Here the mood is quickly greasy, infernal, sweaty and sombre, the guitars plowing with the rhythm section into an almost Hawkwind-like obsession , leaden riffs and choir mellotron in tandem (personally, I get all frazzled, it's so yummy). A long dreamy mid-section stuns by its temporary restraint, sweeping cascades of the white monster, sequencers aglow, until the symphonics come shining through, laser guided by a linear lead guitar , showing the way, leading the flock, searching for a new euphoria. Not the most complicated stuff, but sublimely put together, brilliant in its demeanour and inventiveness, while remaining easily enjoyable. Keyboard fans will be enthralled by the ivory presentation shown here. Then the church organ kicks in, just a final coup de grace! I am done, Yes! A superb track of the highest order, perhaps a classic!

I am also a sucker for harpsichord, a true weakness since childhood, so guess what 'Tears I have cried' commences with? And flute, emanating aromas of leas, ponds and rural exodus, a seemingly unassuming folky lament that builds into a power riff, then returns again and again in puerile naivet' , bullied by the responsive riff , sounding a lot like 'She's So Heavy' by them four lads from Liverpool. Unexpected and quite daring, the soft and hard contrasts quite beguiling, the bluesy singing enticing, as it's a very masculine voice, that still emotes eloquently (not many of those around). Stig Selnes puls out all the stops, a well-endowed craftsman, soaring beyond the pale.

So we finish off with the title track, 17 minutes + of musical adventure, raising the drawn bridge on a romantic piano etude, and entering the castle walls with a tight, medieval-tinged guitar rant. Eventually, the main romantic melody dances in to the room, an air that is absolutely drop-dead gorgeous, a smooth vocal that is imperial, an acoustic guitar section, very Spanish and fever clever, an extended return to that celestial chorus , a guitar blitz that gets a turbo charge and spirals into the horizon at high velocity, oh my! Again. Spoken words as an intermezzo, melancholia drenching, piano drizzling and echoed voice beckoning further discovery, this is a killer track. No, make that assassin track! The thrill is repeated one more time, the Norse horses galloping in the bend, headed for home, Selnes carving divinely, as the mellotron bids farewell.

Oh my!

4.5 Old Stories.

 The Ancient Tale by FATAL FUSION album cover Studio Album, 2013
3.94 | 134 ratings

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The Ancient Tale
Fatal Fusion Crossover Prog

Review by Windhawk
Special Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

4 stars Norwegian band FATAL FUSION was formed in 2008, most of them musicians who had been active since the 80's and 90's that now have a desire to play music of a more progressive orientation. They self-released their debut album "Land of the Sun" in 2011, and in 2012 they signed to Karisma Records. Towards the end of 2013 they released their second full-length production "The Ancient Tale" through that Norwegian record label.

If you have a general soft spot for bands exploring the harder side of 70's progressive rock and are generally fond of bands that use organ and Mellotron textures rather liberally, Fatal Fusion has made an album you should appreciate with "The Ancient Tale". Especially if you're fond of multi-part, epic-length compositions.

 The Ancient Tale by FATAL FUSION album cover Studio Album, 2013
3.94 | 134 ratings

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The Ancient Tale
Fatal Fusion Crossover Prog

Review by phillihp

2 stars A well-played but unoriginal vintage prog album marred by poor lyrics and average singing. A must for fans of Mellotron and keys in general. It will appeal to those who prefer emotion rather than creativity.

City of Zerich: This tells the childish tale of a hero freeing a city of its evil lord, nothing less' Mini- Moog opening followed by choir Mellotron then classic rock riffage and keys: the tone is set. The intro stops around 2min and half. Gentle guitar and the singing begins smoothly. The song morphs at 5 min and half: wall to wall Mellotron, guitars, the tone is darker. Later on demon-like voice adds anguish. A good jam between the 13 and 16 minute then the grand finale, as cheesy as can be: ' Zeeeerich, people of Zeeeeeeerich I have saved you from the darkneeeeeeess! I am your chosen oooooone!' This story may please some teenagers but I just can't go beyond that. Without the juvenile lyrics and singing the song would have been enjoyable.

Halls of Amenti: A 9 minutes song that should have been half long. The first 6 minutes keep the same pattern in a non-prog manner with very simple and repetitive instruments. Mellotron to add ambiance and Mini-Moog for the spacey effect here and there. Then a minute long guitar solo and back to the same pattern. A change with some repetitive keyboards 30 seconds before the end, too little, too late.

The Divine Comedy: My preferred song of the lot by a good margin. It's an instrumental with lots of keys. They almost over abuse Mellotron (choir) in particular, although I don't think there's lots of prog fans that will complain. Not me for sure! This songs floats, it's not fast-paced for the most part except around the 2/3 where it accelerates but to slow down after 2 minutes. Again it's very repetitive but not in a bad way this time. All in all not a very complex song, nor original, but it creates a grandiose effect.

Tears I've cried: Harpsichord opening, gentle flute & classical guitar later on. Cheesy lyrics once again. This one has similar length and is built like the second track with a guitar solo near the 2/3 of the song and keys solo near the end. The singer tries to create passion (Teeeeaaaaars IIIII've Criiiiiiied) but it doesn't work at all.

The Ancient Tale: Short piano-voice intro followed by uninspired repetitive instruments for the first 4 minutes. Gentle Mellotron (violin) follows with smooth voice for another 4 minutes. When the singer doesn't push his voice beyond its limits it's not bad. Then passed the 8 minutes mark, faster guitar paced section for a little more than a minute. A talking voice telling a tale accompanied by piano follows, disturbing the flow. The piano is nice though. A duo of Mellotron and singing to the forefront after that. The singer is replaced by a pleasant classic guitar solo still accompanied with the Mellotron. Then comes the ending section: keys and slow burning electric guitar solo creating a poignant finale. This one is a mixed bag.

If you have a knack for vintage prog and can tolerate the singing and the childish tales then you might appreciate this album very much. For my part I can't. The Divine Comedy saves the day, hence the 3 stars rating, but without this song it would have been a 2 stars rating.

 The Ancient Tale by FATAL FUSION album cover Studio Album, 2013
3.94 | 134 ratings

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The Ancient Tale
Fatal Fusion Crossover Prog

Review by Warthur
Prog Reviewer

5 stars Fatal Fusion play in a prog style which remains rooted in the genre's 1970s roots (with a strong flavour of 1980s neo-prog on the side), but avoid turning themselves into a sterile nostalgia act by playing in a loose, wild style which feels like it could have blasted forth from the stage of prog venues of old. Avoiding the overprecise, fussy production which less interesting retro-prog outfits pursue in the name of sonic perfection, Fatal Fusion instead create an album whose imperfections are, in fact, part of its charm - the rest of its charm being taken up with its gloriously sincere embrace of its fantasy themes as expressed in its lyrics.

This is one of those albums like Galadriel's Muttered Promises From an Ageless Pond where somehow it ends up sounding incredible even though in terms of originality and technical excellence it's nothing special - there's a magic to Fatal Fusion's compositions which drips from every second of the album. Great stuff.

 Land Of The Sun by FATAL FUSION album cover Studio Album, 2010
3.50 | 38 ratings

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Land Of The Sun
Fatal Fusion Crossover Prog

Review by apps79
Special Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

3 stars Norwegian band from Oslo with a strong Blues Rock background.Keyboardist Erlend Engebretsen and bassist Lasse Lie played together in the 80's cover band ''No Name'' and later with ''Moonstone'' along with Erlend's brother Audun on drums.Failing to land a decent singer, this group disbanded in 1999 and in 2002 the trio formed another cover combo under the name of Chrystal Blues.Five years later this act would also fall apart due to singer problems and a desire for more adventurous musical paths.Thus, Fatal Fusion were born in 2008 and the three musicians recruited singer Knut Erik Grontvedt, followed by guitarist Stig Selnes, who had been a member of the Prog Metal band Agate.In 2010 Fatal Fusion debuted with their first, independent release ''Land of the sun''.

While the bluesy influences of the group's main core have been left more or less in the past, the evident 70's Classic Rock inspirations are definitely among Fatal Fusion's preferable styles, especially the music of DEEP PURPLE, LED ZEPPELIN and URIAH HEEP.As a result the shorter tracks reveal a definite vintage power akin to the aforementioned legends with punchy lead guitars and rock-to-the-bone solos as well as deep Hammond organ washes, while you should add to the menu the very Hard Rock-oriented voice of Grontvedt.Entertaining, enjoyable but not fully convincing material, which fails to escape from its own sources of influence.The longer cuts though are much more interesting, musically intricate and quite lyrical when needed, without losing the general orientation of the group or any inch of the pure power of the previous tracks.The sound becomes richer and more original with the use of Mellotron, electric piano and synthesizers and the combination of in-your-face rockin' grooves with more elaborate, instrumental arrangements ranges from decent to simply fascinating.Moreover there seems to be a flexibility throughout the compositions with spacey/symphonic ambiental textures followed by jazzier moves and a kind of deep FLOYD-ian atmosphere in the more sensitive guitar solos.These different angles are nicely connected to form long and interesting semi-prog suites like the 12-min. ''Broken man'' or the great 16-min. opus ''Out to the fields'', where melody meets energy meets atmosphere in a lovely combination of modern and nostalgic, analog soundbeats.

Nice and fairly recommended debut by this Norwegian act.70's-inspired Heavy Prog, where grandieur meets pomposity meets pure rock power in a collection of well-executed tracks.

 Land Of The Sun by FATAL FUSION album cover Studio Album, 2010
3.50 | 38 ratings

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Land Of The Sun
Fatal Fusion Crossover Prog

Review by Windhawk
Special Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

3 stars Norwegian band FATAL FUSION was formed in 2008 by a fivesome of musicians who had plied their trade in various bands since the 1990's or thereabouts, who then got together out of a joint desire to create music that crossed multiple stylistic boundaries and also incorporated the styles and sounds of bands from the 70's and 80's they enjoy listening to. "Land of the Sun" is their debut album and was self-released towards the end of 2010.

"Land of the Sun" is a solid package of retro-oriented progressive rock with a slight emphasis on the harder-edged variety, sporting three high-quality epic or near-epic-length creations and a handful of shorter constructions containing slightly less intriguing material. At least for art rock fans, those fond of sophisticated harder-edged blues rock will most likely reason the other way around. If you enjoy 70's-style art rock, the 35 or so minutes that those three pieces clock in at in length will make this a disc well worth investigating, and if you have a soft spot for sophisticated but varied harder-edged rock from the same era, Fatal Fusion is a band you most likely will adore. A skilled and talented act, one I hope we'll hear much more from it in future years.

Thanks to chris s for the artist addition. and to E&O Team for the last updates

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