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FATAL FUSION

Crossover Prog • Norway


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Fatal Fusion biography
Fatal Fusion is a progressive rock band from Oslo, Norway.
The group got together in early 2008, after emerging from the ashes of several Rock/Blues covers bands, dating back to the 1980's.
The lineup consists of Erlend Engebretsen on Keyboards, Lasse Lie on Bass, Audun Engebretsen on Drums/Percussion, Stig Selnes on Guitar, and Knut Grøntvedt on Vocals.

Utilizing classic instruments, vintage synths, mellotron and hammond organ as part of their sound, they pay homage to the progressive rock bands from the 70´s, whilst still aiming to create their own unique sound, blending in elements form different musical genres like hard rock, classical music, metal, blues, jazz, psychedelia, and latin. They like to explore and mix styles together, trying to get a broad musical landscape.

The release of their debut album Land of the Sun in 2010 have received great reviews from around the world, and also got them nominated for best debut album 2010 by Prog Awards.

Main influeces are bands like Rush, Led Zeppelin, Yes, ELP, Genesis, Camel, Pink Floyd, King Crimson, but also newer acts like IQ, Marillion, Spocks Beard and Dream Theater.

Thanks to Moonstone for the bio


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Total AbsenceTotal Absence
Import
Karisma 2016
Audio CD$9.65
$12.82 (used)
The Ancient TaleThe Ancient Tale
Karisma 2016
Audio CD$8.97
$6.99 (used)
Land of the SunLand of the Sun
CD Baby 2010
Audio CD$20.18
The Ancient Tale by Fatal Fusion (2013-12-10)The Ancient Tale by Fatal Fusion (2013-12-10)
Karisma
Audio CD$58.64
Land of the Sun by Fatal Fusion (2014-08-03)Land of the Sun by Fatal Fusion (2014-08-03)
CD Baby
Audio CD$63.00
$16.99 (used)
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FATAL FUSION discography


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FATAL FUSION top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.42 | 36 ratings
Land of the sun
2010
3.97 | 128 ratings
The Ancient Tale
2013
4.03 | 14 ratings
Total Absence
2016

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FATAL FUSION Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 Total Absence by FATAL FUSION album cover Studio Album, 2016
4.03 | 14 ratings

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Total Absence
Fatal Fusion Crossover Prog

Review by tszirmay
Special Collaborator Crossover Team

4 stars Finally it has happened, happened again actually! True prog fans are 'look out' people, constantly scouring the globe for something exciting or even mind blowing to surface, out of the blue. True devotees research, cross reference or analyze the credits for a familiar musician or just go with their gut feeling. This knowledge has served us well, I can acknowledge that music has given my life purpose, enjoyment, escape and panacea. We all know life is not easy, getting even more dangerous than ever before (and I am from 'the Cold War generation', I am proud to say), so you cannot fathom the sheer salvation that music was, is and always will be. Its medication, vision, courage and unending faith, all combined as a musical vehicle to dream and emote without fear or judgement. Prog certainly covers the entire spectrum of human emotions and proud to do so. While the golden years of the 70s were remarkable and highly inspired, I must say , having lived it then and today, the quality of 21st Century prog has been the best period ever, so many talented and adventurous bands out there, who make music they enjoy, not for groupies, not for fortune or not for fame. That is the true measure of how prog is evolving, spewing out jewels one after the other.

This is another one, the brand spanking new Fatal Fusion album, a Norwegian group I only recently hooked up with, after a lot of glances but no bite. Well, their sophomore album "The Ancient Tale" really blew me away, though it did take some concentration and effort, as there were many familiar things mixed in with some unexpected ones to keep one on the edge. What threw me off was trying to compare the band to anyone else out there, which was a huge mistake on my part, as I tried to take the easy road. But once I took on that album for what it was, it started hitting hard. The first three tracks certainly do smash rigid, then the set list suddenly evolves into much mellower realms that will catch any listener unaware.

On the surly opener instrumental opener "The Gates of Ishtar", Fatal Fusion are slanted more towards the masculine, testosterone-laced prog bravado, the sonic palette pumping audacious yet heavily symphonic, very obviously led by Erlend Engebretsen who shines on a wide variety of keyboards. Guitars are honed and masterly wielded, gritty when rhyming and soaring when leading. Stig Selnes is quite the craftsman, both rash and fluid at a moment's notice, pushing the murky theme to glorious heights, with just a hint of Middle Eastern aroma. It serves as the ideal introduction for "the Shadow of the King", energized by a husky-voice singer that takes some getting used to, allied to a brooding scimitar of heavy riffs that hammer home, unrelenting. There is an undeniable Zeppelin shuffle that recalls "Kashmir" for a while until Selnes shoots off a dizzying axe solo that bounces off sand dunes, whirls beyond the oasis and spirals into the broiling sky. "Forgotten One" possesses a well-balanced arrangement that stings one moment with metallic fury , organ ablaze and drums pumping wildly only to veer into a gentler lullaby where the piano leads the march. The gargling lead vocals from Knut Grontvedt certainly are different, to say the least. And then quite unexpectedly, the material just gets flung into another dimension altogether.

On the stunning "Astral Flight", the spirit and the dexterity combine for some savagely brilliant instrumental episodes, but when the extended e-piano solo enters, I am slain! As if the early Santana guitar cavalcade was not enough, the entire mood is memorable, bright, smoothly jazzy and impassioned. The rocket-fueled rhythm section is propulsive, serpentine and utterly focused on the appointed flight path, no auto-pilot programming on this one! This is a killer track of the highest order and a harbinger of things to come.

The next three pieces are all epic in scope and running time, heavily dominated by massive mellotron winds that will take you back to the Court of the Crimson King, beginning with the reverential "the Emperor's Letter" , a colossal symphonic ballad that groans and moans with bittersweet content. The overall feel is stately and imperial, the beastly legendary keyboard doing its celebrated magic, the ideal stage for Knut to howl to the moon, the electric guitars snarling and the keys impetuous. Stig emotes on acoustic before unleashing a gorgeous electric solo, flush with pressing despair. Totally beautiful, morose and forbidding, this is primo prog that make you kneel at the shrine.

Yet the biggest surprise is without any doubt, "Endless Ocean Blue" with its disarming pastoral intro of clanging bucolic strings and weaving synths, becoming a melancholic 11 minute voyage on a sea of serenity, a sense of floating that owes more to classic Pink Floyd than anything else. The plaintive vocals in particular are hushed, elbowed by Lasse Lie's low bass rumble and concussed by a resilient binary beat. Within the mid-section, the expectant storm intensifies into gale wind organ flurries, Erlend rifling along his board with dedicated precision and urgent mania. Stig's turn to show his restraint and command of the e-guitar, carving a superlative arch of slow- burning notes, a kaleidoscope of emotions painting the air. Knut roars out his pain, in that raspy shriek that is both manly and desperate.

The title track finishes off this monster, a quarter of an hour of musical bliss that kicks off with urban sound effects, cars honking and a forlorn piano tinkling morosely. Voice, acoustic guitar and an orchestral background sets the stage for the pleasures to come, searching the road to some salvation. The buildup gradually goes tornado (as Bill Bruford once stated), as the sonic heat is ratcheted up considerably, the rhythms concussive and the guitars persuasive. The mighty Mellotron returns again to prove the point, shoving the steam roller of sound forward and beyond. Stig agrees to fiddle with his axe once again, with tremendous efficiency and taste.

Heavy prog is perhaps the best way to describe the style here, but it's somehow different from other players within the genre. Loads of paradoxes abound, its heavy and yet isn't, its brooding yet also very inspired. It's typical but also original. A wild and savage mix of entertaining progressive rock music that might not be everyone's cup of tea but highly enjoyable under the right circumstances.

4.5 complete nonattendances

 The Ancient Tale by FATAL FUSION album cover Studio Album, 2013
3.97 | 128 ratings

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The Ancient Tale
Fatal Fusion Crossover Prog

Review by tszirmay
Special Collaborator Crossover Team

4 stars Another Norwegian group that I finally picked up on, once glanced at and set aside, is Fatal Fusion, excited by some of the reviews including their third and latest opus 'Total Absence', whose second album I decided to take the leap of faith on. Warthur gave this a perfect score, so how could I go wrong? 'The Ancient Tale' has meandering themes some very left and others very right, a wide panorama of styles, the bombastic being the top dog.

The epic 'City of Zerych' is a sprawling sea of crests and eddies, tempests and storm clouds above, chooses a variety of sub-sections amid the 18 minutes allotted here. It starts off bewildering, demanding closer attention I guess, as the unexpected leaps out of the speakers, mixed in with clever references points that can even hint at old classics, winks at Joe Cocker. There are some mellotron-drenched passages with the ticking bas that really blows the mind, growly voices evoke rancid fear and hollow dread, the beat funeral-like until the speed machine powers in unrelenting, spurred by keyboardist Erlend Engebretsen's expansive and emotive arsenal, highly symphonic and occasionally Neo, what with those nasty synth solos garnishing the pace. Stig Selnes is a rock guitarist and he lays it on, thick and creamy, throw in a stellar organ parade and, oh My! Magic!

Half as long is 'Halls of Amenti', a classic rock track, smeared with so many prog influences with various recipes that are guaranteed to be noticed, extensively adorned by orchestral keys and slippery synths and a doom-laden theme, bold instrumental passages and a convincing disposition. Singer Knut Erik Grontvet has a raspy, hoary and even throaty set of pipes that comes across as quite original, certainly within the prog context where stupendous vocalists lag behind the remaining musicians by a country mile. Some need time to getting used to, some you never get used to (Peter Hammill) but this guy can sing the blues, if you see what I mean. The fiery axe does a few flaming pirouettes under the tent, the drums elephantine, the bass reptilian like a python and the electronics screaming like eagles. All that is missing is the bearded lady! No clowns, though!

Another epic piece, a more angular and hard ride, is 'The Divine Comedy', presumably referring to Dante's legendary and rather magnificent poem. Here the mood is quickly greasy, infernal, sweaty and sombre, the guitars plowing with the rhythm section into an almost Hawkwind-like obsession , leaden riffs and choir mellotron in tandem (personally, I get all frazzled, it's so yummy). A long dreamy mid-section stuns by its temporary restraint, sweeping cascades of the white monster, sequencers aglow, until the symphonics come shining through, laser guided by a linear lead guitar , showing the way, leading the flock, searching for a new euphoria. Not the most complicated stuff, but sublimely put together, brilliant in its demeanour and inventiveness, while remaining easily enjoyable. Keyboard fans will be enthralled by the ivory presentation shown here. Then the church organ kicks in, just a final coup de grace! I am done, Yes! A superb track of the highest order, perhaps a classic!

I am also a sucker for harpsichord, a true weakness since childhood, so guess what 'Tears I have cried' commences with? And flute, emanating aromas of leas, ponds and rural exodus, a seemingly unassuming folky lament that builds into a power riff, then returns again and again in puerile naivet' , bullied by the responsive riff , sounding a lot like 'She's So Heavy' by them four lads from Liverpool. Unexpected and quite daring, the soft and hard contrasts quite beguiling, the bluesy singing enticing, as it's a very masculine voice, that still emotes eloquently (not many of those around). Stig Selnes puls out all the stops, a well-endowed craftsman, soaring beyond the pale.

So we finish off with the title track, 17 minutes + of musical adventure, raising the drawn bridge on a romantic piano etude, and entering the castle walls with a tight, medieval-tinged guitar rant. Eventually, the main romantic melody dances in to the room, an air that is absolutely drop-dead gorgeous, a smooth vocal that is imperial, an acoustic guitar section, very Spanish and fever clever, an extended return to that celestial chorus , a guitar blitz that gets a turbo charge and spirals into the horizon at high velocity, oh my! Again. Spoken words as an intermezzo, melancholia drenching, piano drizzling and echoed voice beckoning further discovery, this is a killer track. No, make that assassin track! The thrill is repeated one more time, the Norse horses galloping in the bend, headed for home, Selnes carving divinely, as the mellotron bids farewell.

Oh my!

4.5 Old Stories.

 The Ancient Tale by FATAL FUSION album cover Studio Album, 2013
3.97 | 128 ratings

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The Ancient Tale
Fatal Fusion Crossover Prog

Review by Windhawk
Special Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

4 stars Norwegian band FATAL FUSION was formed in 2008, most of them musicians who had been active since the 80's and 90's that now have a desire to play music of a more progressive orientation. They self-released their debut album "Land of the Sun" in 2011, and in 2012 they signed to Karisma Records. Towards the end of 2013 they released their second full-length production "The Ancient Tale" through that Norwegian record label.

If you have a general soft spot for bands exploring the harder side of 70's progressive rock and are generally fond of bands that use organ and Mellotron textures rather liberally, Fatal Fusion has made an album you should appreciate with "The Ancient Tale". Especially if you're fond of multi-part, epic-length compositions.

 The Ancient Tale by FATAL FUSION album cover Studio Album, 2013
3.97 | 128 ratings

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The Ancient Tale
Fatal Fusion Crossover Prog

Review by phillihp

2 stars A well-played but unoriginal vintage prog album marred by poor lyrics and average singing. A must for fans of Mellotron and keys in general. It will appeal to those who prefer emotion rather than creativity.

City of Zerich: This tells the childish tale of a hero freeing a city of its evil lord, nothing less' Mini- Moog opening followed by choir Mellotron then classic rock riffage and keys: the tone is set. The intro stops around 2min and half. Gentle guitar and the singing begins smoothly. The song morphs at 5 min and half: wall to wall Mellotron, guitars, the tone is darker. Later on demon-like voice adds anguish. A good jam between the 13 and 16 minute then the grand finale, as cheesy as can be: ' Zeeeerich, people of Zeeeeeeerich I have saved you from the darkneeeeeeess! I am your chosen oooooone!' This story may please some teenagers but I just can't go beyond that. Without the juvenile lyrics and singing the song would have been enjoyable.

Halls of Amenti: A 9 minutes song that should have been half long. The first 6 minutes keep the same pattern in a non-prog manner with very simple and repetitive instruments. Mellotron to add ambiance and Mini-Moog for the spacey effect here and there. Then a minute long guitar solo and back to the same pattern. A change with some repetitive keyboards 30 seconds before the end, too little, too late.

The Divine Comedy: My preferred song of the lot by a good margin. It's an instrumental with lots of keys. They almost over abuse Mellotron (choir) in particular, although I don't think there's lots of prog fans that will complain. Not me for sure! This songs floats, it's not fast-paced for the most part except around the 2/3 where it accelerates but to slow down after 2 minutes. Again it's very repetitive but not in a bad way this time. All in all not a very complex song, nor original, but it creates a grandiose effect.

Tears I've cried: Harpsichord opening, gentle flute & classical guitar later on. Cheesy lyrics once again. This one has similar length and is built like the second track with a guitar solo near the 2/3 of the song and keys solo near the end. The singer tries to create passion (Teeeeaaaaars IIIII've Criiiiiiied) but it doesn't work at all.

The Ancient Tale: Short piano-voice intro followed by uninspired repetitive instruments for the first 4 minutes. Gentle Mellotron (violin) follows with smooth voice for another 4 minutes. When the singer doesn't push his voice beyond its limits it's not bad. Then passed the 8 minutes mark, faster guitar paced section for a little more than a minute. A talking voice telling a tale accompanied by piano follows, disturbing the flow. The piano is nice though. A duo of Mellotron and singing to the forefront after that. The singer is replaced by a pleasant classic guitar solo still accompanied with the Mellotron. Then comes the ending section: keys and slow burning electric guitar solo creating a poignant finale. This one is a mixed bag.

If you have a knack for vintage prog and can tolerate the singing and the childish tales then you might appreciate this album very much. For my part I can't. The Divine Comedy saves the day, hence the 3 stars rating, but without this song it would have been a 2 stars rating.

 The Ancient Tale by FATAL FUSION album cover Studio Album, 2013
3.97 | 128 ratings

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The Ancient Tale
Fatal Fusion Crossover Prog

Review by Warthur
Prog Reviewer

5 stars Fatal Fusion play in a prog style which remains rooted in the genre's 1970s roots (with a strong flavour of 1980s neo-prog on the side), but avoid turning themselves into a sterile nostalgia act by playing in a loose, wild style which feels like it could have blasted forth from the stage of prog venues of old. Avoiding the overprecise, fussy production which less interesting retro-prog outfits pursue in the name of sonic perfection, Fatal Fusion instead create an album whose imperfections are, in fact, part of its charm - the rest of its charm being taken up with its gloriously sincere embrace of its fantasy themes as expressed in its lyrics.

This is one of those albums like Galadriel's Muttered Promises From an Ageless Pond where somehow it ends up sounding incredible even though in terms of originality and technical excellence it's nothing special - there's a magic to Fatal Fusion's compositions which drips from every second of the album. Great stuff.

 Land of the sun by FATAL FUSION album cover Studio Album, 2010
3.42 | 36 ratings

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Land of the sun
Fatal Fusion Crossover Prog

Review by apps79
Special Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

3 stars Norwegian band from Oslo with a strong Blues Rock background.Keyboardist Erlend Engebretsen and bassist Lasse Lie played together in the 80's cover band ''No Name'' and later with ''Moonstone'' along with Erlend's brother Audun on drums.Failing to land a decent singer, this group disbanded in 1999 and in 2002 the trio formed another cover combo under the name of Chrystal Blues.Five years later this act would also fall apart due to singer problems and a desire for more adventurous musical paths.Thus, Fatal Fusion were born in 2008 and the three musicians recruited singer Knut Erik Grontvedt, followed by guitarist Stig Selnes, who had been a member of the Prog Metal band Agate.In 2010 Fatal Fusion debuted with their first, independent release ''Land of the sun''.

While the bluesy influences of the group's main core have been left more or less in the past, the evident 70's Classic Rock inspirations are definitely among Fatal Fusion's preferable styles, especially the music of DEEP PURPLE, LED ZEPPELIN and URIAH HEEP.As a result the shorter tracks reveal a definite vintage power akin to the aforementioned legends with punchy lead guitars and rock-to-the-bone solos as well as deep Hammond organ washes, while you should add to the menu the very Hard Rock-oriented voice of Grontvedt.Entertaining, enjoyable but not fully convincing material, which fails to escape from its own sources of influence.The longer cuts though are much more interesting, musically intricate and quite lyrical when needed, without losing the general orientation of the group or any inch of the pure power of the previous tracks.The sound becomes richer and more original with the use of Mellotron, electric piano and synthesizers and the combination of in-your-face rockin' grooves with more elaborate, instrumental arrangements ranges from decent to simply fascinating.Moreover there seems to be a flexibility throughout the compositions with spacey/symphonic ambiental textures followed by jazzier moves and a kind of deep FLOYD-ian atmosphere in the more sensitive guitar solos.These different angles are nicely connected to form long and interesting semi-prog suites like the 12-min. ''Broken man'' or the great 16-min. opus ''Out to the fields'', where melody meets energy meets atmosphere in a lovely combination of modern and nostalgic, analog soundbeats.

Nice and fairly recommended debut by this Norwegian act.70's-inspired Heavy Prog, where grandieur meets pomposity meets pure rock power in a collection of well-executed tracks.

 The Ancient Tale by FATAL FUSION album cover Studio Album, 2013
3.97 | 128 ratings

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The Ancient Tale
Fatal Fusion Crossover Prog

Review by OneOpinion

5 stars Comments based on a download from Amazon. Don't make a decision based on the short sound clips of the web sites, I almost did not buy it. Thankfully I decided to chance it. Hit the jackpot! Fatal Fusion's new album, "The Ancient Tale" is incredibly good. The production is very clear with each instrument clearly heard. The music is top-notch. A solid band. The bass and drums are excellent and prominent. The guitars are solid, spacey and buzzy. There are some enjoyable acoustic moments too. What really shines through, though, are the keyboards. The organ is ever present with splashes of piano, synths galore, mellotron washes, church pipe organs, and I believe maybe even a harpsichord(?) thrown in. This album has a real majestic sound to it. The vocalist also shines. He can be guttural, there is even a section of death growls, gritty, and at other moments quite tender. He is able to hit all the ranges with ease and aplomb. Very talented. At times the music sounds to me like (a little leeway here please) Black Sabbath decided to slow it down a bit and create a symphonic prog album and brought in Rick Wakeman for keyboard duties. This sounds, to me, like heavy symphonic. Love it. No, the singer does not sound like Ozzy. Every song shines, no weak ones here. Highly recommended, an A+ effort. I'm on a roll here with unknown bands. First, Profuna Ocean and Sandcastle, then the latest from Morild and Traumhaus, and now Fatal Fusion. Thanks ProgArchives!
 Land of the sun by FATAL FUSION album cover Studio Album, 2010
3.42 | 36 ratings

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Land of the sun
Fatal Fusion Crossover Prog

Review by Windhawk
Special Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

3 stars Norwegian band FATAL FUSION was formed in 2008 by a fivesome of musicians who had plied their trade in various bands since the 1990's or thereabouts, who then got together out of a joint desire to create music that crossed multiple stylistic boundaries and also incorporated the styles and sounds of bands from the 70's and 80's they enjoy listening to. "Land of the Sun" is their debut album and was self-released towards the end of 2010.

"Land of the Sun" is a solid package of retro-oriented progressive rock with a slight emphasis on the harder-edged variety, sporting three high-quality epic or near-epic-length creations and a handful of shorter constructions containing slightly less intriguing material. At least for art rock fans, those fond of sophisticated harder-edged blues rock will most likely reason the other way around. If you enjoy 70's-style art rock, the 35 or so minutes that those three pieces clock in at in length will make this a disc well worth investigating, and if you have a soft spot for sophisticated but varied harder-edged rock from the same era, Fatal Fusion is a band you most likely will adore. A skilled and talented act, one I hope we'll hear much more from it in future years.

 Land of the sun by FATAL FUSION album cover Studio Album, 2010
3.42 | 36 ratings

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Land of the sun
Fatal Fusion Crossover Prog

Review by Moonstone

4 stars I finally got to review this fine album.

Fatal Fusion is a Norwegian band, and a newcomer in the Progressive Rock-world, though the group have existed since 2008. The musicians have played in quite a lot of different bands over the years, though in quite uknown bands, and got together and founded THIS great band.

This is their debut album, and what a fine album it is! The band is on fire, and are exploding in a mixture of different styles over the entire album. There are elements of Jazz, Blues, Hard Rock, Classical music, Space rock, Metal, and even Latin. There are so many different styles, even in ONE song, and because of that this record never gets boring!

The title track is a classic pro song, flowing really well, with a nice jazzy/funky 7/8 halftime groove with a beautiful melody sung over it. Bass & drums working very good together here. There are some tricky time signatures here, from the 7/8 groove to waltz 6/8, but curiously enough it doesn't sound weird, it's flowing really well. Great guitar solo over a Classical piano part, with Mellotron in the background, ending in a really hard & heavy Latin groove with pounding double bassdrums and a spectacular keyboard solo. Really nice Jazzy ending as well, with great Fusion-type drumming. Great lyrics, dealing with the Astec and Maya indians being slayed by the Spaniards.

"Cry no more" is very much like Led Zepps "Black Dog" and even some "Moby Dick" Could as well have been a Deep Purple tune from the David Coverdale-era.

"Promises" is another great tune. Drenshed in Hammond organ & Mellotron, this song starts with a kind of Medievel melody on a flute, and ends up in Prog-Rock-heaven. Awesome ending!

"Love in the sky" could easily have been on a Rainbow or Dio album, with some Iron Maiden like vibes as well. Again the Mellotron is up front, creating an Eastern and Classical vibe to it. Great dramatic guitar solo on this one, very Eastern and psychedelic. A killer Organ-solo in the end, very Keith Emerson and Jon Lord-like.

"Shot to the ground" is a Hard-Rock-Blues number that sucks you in and never lets go. The groove is relentless, and again very much like Led Zepp and similar 70's bands. Great vocals on this one.

"Remember" is the only ballad on the album, and a quite nice one. Erlend Engebretsen uses mainly piano through the whole song, with the addition of Mellotron on the chorus. Nice mellow song, and a sad ending with just piano and Mellotron-chello to great effect.

With the epic "Broken man" is were the band gets really serious and proggy. Almost 13 minutes long, it's a rollercoaster ride of different time signatures and styles. 5/8 rythm in the verses, 6/8 rythm in the bridge sections, again blending with Latin to great effect. Beautifully played acoustic guitar here, from guitarist Stig Selnes. A sad middle part with an outstanding guitar solo, very David Gilmour-like. Goosebumps city. An agressive Latin-ish part follows, very Rush-like rythms and groove, followed by a Rhodes piano solo from Erlend and awesome Fusion-drumming from Audun Engebretsen. Great ending, with great powerful harmony singing on the choruses. An epic song, with great lyrics about a guy being hanged for something he didn't do.

Ending perfectly with "Out to the fields", an epic Space-rock instrumental were the musicians really stetches out, jam and have fun. The song is like a mixture of Dream Theater and Pink Floyd, in a strange way. Pink Floyd comes to mind especially in the middle part were it goes really spacey. Awesome guitar solo, again a la Gilmour. Some really agressive Space-War-like parts with cool sound effects behing the music, making it more dramatic, with strange time-signatures alterning between double-time 4/4 and 7/8 rythm. An epic ending a la Pink Floyd's "Echoes" wraps up this album quite nicely.

Overall: 4,5 stars, and an impressive debut album. Looking forward to hear what these guys will do next. An essential album in the Progressive Rock collection.

Thanks to chris s for the artist addition. and to NotAProghead for the last updates

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