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PANDORA SNAIL

Eclectic Prog • Russia


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Pandora Snail biography
Pandora Snail band was founded by professional musicians in 2008 in Saint-Petersburg as an instrumental project, but in practice the band became the solid team in 2010.

On February 2011 the band got a new drummer Igor Cheridnik, enough skilled and known musician, who played in many well known St.Petersburg bands such as Auction, Kolibry, Igry.

The whole year 2011 was spent by musicians preparing musical content composed by Ulyana Gor, who was the author of majority compositions in the first album, polishing and making better performance of melodic and complicated compositions.

Since that moment the band became the permanent member of music festivals, mainly progressive, and making recital performances in their native city St.Petersburg.

All the members of Pandora Snail are serious and professionally skilled people. The leader of the band and keyboard player Ulyana GOR has classical grand piano player education. Kirill KLUSHIN is also enough known bass player, the member of UNION OF COMMERCIAL AVANTGARDE.

In 2014, Igor CHERIDNIK left the band. His place now is occupied by young drummer Vsevolod SHUVALOV.

The band is influenced by QUEEN, Sergej RAHMANINOV, KING CRIMSON, and most of the progressive rock of the early 70's.

Also, at the festival "Strange Music," they won the title of "Very Strange" (in Russian, "Страннее странного"). In addition, since the founding of the group, they have changed the three soloists, two bassists and three drummers.

In 2015, a label from Moscow ArtBeat released the first bands album «War And Peace».

Today the bands members are:
- Ulyana GOR (keyboards, composer)
- Oleg GORGADZE (guitar, composer)
- Vsevolod SHUVALOV (drums)
- Kirill KLUSHIN (bass guitar)
- Artem GAREEV (violin)

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PANDORA SNAIL discography


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PANDORA SNAIL top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.96 | 112 ratings
War and Peace
2015

PANDORA SNAIL Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

4.05 | 9 ratings
Live at Babooinumfest
2017

PANDORA SNAIL Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

PANDORA SNAIL Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

PANDORA SNAIL Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

3.02 | 5 ratings
Metamorphosis
2016

PANDORA SNAIL Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 Live at Babooinumfest by PANDORA SNAIL album cover Live, 2017
4.05 | 9 ratings

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Live at Babooinumfest
Pandora Snail Eclectic Prog

Review by kev rowland
Special Collaborator Crossover Prog Team

4 stars

No prizes for working out that this is a live album, which was recorded at a festival in St. Petersburg on 6th November 2016. This was my first introduction to this eclectic progressive band, although they released a studio album in 2015, which I haven't heard. There are some interesting bands coming out of Russia at present, bringing together multiple different styles, and these guys are yet another that is totally out of left and producing something that is a million miles away from the mainstream, yet is also accessible (at least to me) and enjoyable the very first time I played it. What we have here are five people who are all incredible musicians, and have the jazz confidence in their bandmates that comes from many hours of playing together, are combining that with modern classical influences and then bringing in elements of RIO and the more complex areas of progressive rock music to create something that is refreshing and new. No Genesis clones here!

In terms of instruments we have keyboards (which is often piano), bass, drums, electric guitar and violin (plus a guest trumpeter on two songs) with no vocals. If there are boundaries in music, then these guys aren't just stretching them but are trampling them underfoot as if they don't exist. If I was to liken to them to another band then possibly After Crying, but I can also see Frank Zappa getting a real kick out of what they are doing, and would it be too much to bring Art Zoyd into the equation? It doesn't sound as if they were playing in front of a mass crowd, but those who were there were certainly provided with a musical treat. I look forward with great interest to hearing more from Pandora Snail.

 Live at Babooinumfest by PANDORA SNAIL album cover Live, 2017
4.05 | 9 ratings

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Live at Babooinumfest
Pandora Snail Eclectic Prog

Review by Neu!mann
Prog Reviewer

4 stars The real test for any band, Progressive or otherwise, is how well their music plays in concert, and here's a clue: it has nothing to do with being able to reproduce studio tracks note for note. The Russian group Pandora Snail gets it exactly right on their first live album, already one of the highlights of the New Year.

The gig was recorded in late 2016 in front of what sounds like a sparse but sympathetic crowd, totally appropriate for the band's intimate blend of energetic, instrumental Classical Rock. Smaller venues typically foster a stronger rapport with an audience, and the quintet responded with a dynamic performance far surpassing the expectations raised by their warmly-received debut album "War and Peace".

On stage the group sounds completely liberated from whatever inhibitions might have hindered a pleasant but (in my opinion) too-polite studio recording. Their live sound is more eclectic, and takes bigger risks in pursuit of higher rewards, at times approaching the kinetic intensity achieved by ANGLAGARD, fellow travelers along the same line of musical latitude.

Almost all the music is new too, perhaps offering a road-tested preview of the band's new studio album, currently in the works. If so, we can expect to hear some complex, clever, and hard to categorize music, driven by the agile hand of keyboardist and composer Ulyana Gor but deftly integrated within the full ensemble, playing tricky material with remarkable cohesion and skill. The only familiar track in this set is also the longest ("James Pont", at 16-minutes), and it comes across far stronger in the larger context of a live performance than it did in the studio.

The Snail is suddenly picking up speed, having released three distinct and very different albums within a brief sixteen month time span. Progressive Rock - the real thing, not the comforting nostalgia of Neo Prog - is apparently alive and well in Saint Petersburg, and Pandora Snail is quickly and quietly emerging as a local standard-bearer.

 Metamorphosis by PANDORA SNAIL album cover Singles/EPs/Fan Club/Promo, 2016
3.02 | 5 ratings

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Metamorphosis
Pandora Snail Eclectic Prog

Review by Neu!mann
Prog Reviewer

3 stars Prog at its best is all about upsetting expectations, and here's a perfect example: surprising electronica-laced revisions of several songs from the acclaimed debut PANDORA SNAIL album "War and Peace". Talk about a change of pace: the originals were melodic fusions of Classical Rock with local Saint Petersburg Jazz accents; the new EP is more suitable for your next after-hours Ambient House rave.

Remix albums would normally be a hard sell to conservative Proggers who prefer listening with their head instead of their feet. And with good reason: the techno-grooves and critical beats of modern electronic dance music are genetically incompatible with Progressive Rock ideals, dating back to the original schism between Prog and Disco in the later 1970s.

But in truth the music here isn't far removed from some of the more blissful digressions by Ozric Tentacles. And the translation isn't merely cosmetic, with boilerplate 4/4 laptop bleeping added to the songs. Listen to the airy Edelis remix of "To Catch the Wind" and you'll hear a radical re-imagining of what had been a macho gypsy rocker, in a totally contrary vernacular: foreign to pre-millennial Progheads maybe, but completely valid on its own hardwired merits.

The old-school anchor that keeps the new music honest is the soaring violin of Artem Gareev, sounding even more lush when enhanced by the spacious echo added to these nightclub dubs. The reworking of "Mother's Tears" turns a romantic Neo-Classical ballad into an elegant, atmospheric space-groove, and the already nervous-and-jerky "Stones' Names" becomes an amped-up ethnic stomp in a pair of very different interpretations, proof that at the end of the day music is music, regardless of the pigeonholes we force it into.

In keeping with older Prog traditions the 'cover' art (for a digital download) is gorgeous, and amusing too if you think about it. Slimy gastropods aren't usually given the same aesthetic consideration as butterflies, and I suppose the same could be said for this particular style of music on a Progressive Rock website (ignoring for now the crossover charms of Björk). It's only a temporary detour while the band is prepping its second full-length album, but the EP is certainly unexpected and thus worth hearing.

My own first instinct was to politely dismiss it as little more than a fashionable novelty. But after repeated plays the music has grown on me...like a flower, not a fungus. Three bright stars, gaining luminance with each successive listen

 Live at Babooinumfest by PANDORA SNAIL album cover Live, 2017
4.05 | 9 ratings

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Live at Babooinumfest
Pandora Snail Eclectic Prog

Review by zravkapt
Special Collaborator Post/Math Rock Team

4 stars This live release from this Russian band is somewhat of a preview of what the sophomore album will sound like. All but one track here is a new composition (although I don't know if every track will make the new album). The sound on this recording is very good; in particular, I love the tone of the bass. The music of Pandora Snail is instrumental and can be described as a mix of fusion and symphonic prog. The version of "James Pont" from the debut here is similar in sound but better performed than the album version. The newer tracks are generally in the same style as the debut album. Two songs specifically stand out to me: "Epsilon" and "Moment Of Eternity." The former opens with some tuned percussion (not sure if that is a glockenspiel or something similar) and a rhythm section which vaguely reminds me of the band Tortoise. Great classical styled piano playing here. In addition also some lovely emotional violin work. I like the riff/groove they get into towards the end.

"Moment Of Eternity" is one of two tracks that feature a guest trumpeter. Fast paced classical piano opens the piece, joined by some sympathetic trumpet. I love when the harder-edged synth comes in, turning the track temporarily into some kind of synth-rock. Great trumpet solo later on. Overall a nice release worthy of your attention. The album is available on Bandcamp. it will be interesting to hear how the new album will sound like. If you like modern instrumental 'eclectic prog' with an emphasis for the fusion-y as well as the symphonic, this music might be what you are looking for. I will ultimately give this a 3.5 rounded up to 4 stars.

 Metamorphosis by PANDORA SNAIL album cover Singles/EPs/Fan Club/Promo, 2016
3.02 | 5 ratings

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Metamorphosis
Pandora Snail Eclectic Prog

Review by admireArt
Prog Reviewer

3 stars Pandora Snail through the electronic glass.

Pandora Snail's "Metamorphosis", 2016, makes some gutsy move by letting some of their 2015 "War & Peace" songs go through the electronic remixing process and if anything this turn of events is daring. This alone is plaussible as it is in proportion quiet experimental and ironically will probably turn off most of those who raved over the original versions, thus in itself, it shows a true commitment to their personal evolution, free of any kind of prior attachments or compromises to external factors.

Opposite to what most non-progressive electronic followers and some other kind of prog listeners would expect or immediately assume as a direct route to young electronic dance floor music audiences, this release keeps on a healthy distance away from becoming a sell out route to success on mainstream's radio waves ( unlike, let me set as an example, Tangerine Dream's 80s, 90s and later works or YES' post "Going for the One" works or Steven Wison's popish Blackfield direction). This accomplished (opposite to those examples) by never allowing contemporary trends, their remixing processes and its fashionable gimmicks to interfere nor distort what they have already proposed, but allowing it to be deconstructed and restructured in a different plane focused on highlighting their flexibility and possibilities and not the other way around.

Now, for those original versions enthusiasts, I will hardly think this is the route Pandora Snail will follow in upcoming releases, so they should not take this EP too seriously, but should encourage this kind of uncompromising freedom in their future works.

As for rating this release, as such, I will not overrate nor underrate, therefore a respectful ***3 stars rating is quiet fair.

 War and Peace by PANDORA SNAIL album cover Studio Album, 2015
3.96 | 112 ratings

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War and Peace
Pandora Snail Eclectic Prog

Review by Neu!mann
Prog Reviewer

3 stars In this increasingly fragmented digital world we share, it's reassuring to see how the Web has allowed Progressive Rock to rediscover its original grass-roots appeal, with small bands from unlikely corners of the globe now promoting their music over the world-wide aether, often (though not in this case) without even a physical CD to vend. A case in point is Pandora Snail: a (relatively) new group from northwest Russia aggressively marketing its debut album in these Archives: not a bad strategy with music that doesn't sit comfortably in a pre-fab cubbyhole.

Eclectic is the perfect word to describe their style: a relaxed but dynamic blend of instrumental, quasi-symphonic rock combining light fusion à la JEAN-LUC PONTY with moments of heavy guitar machismo and rhythmic GENTLE GIANT counterpoint. Listen closely and you might also detect a strain of native folk music, buried deep within the mix of other influences.

What you won't hear, to their credit, is the sort of self-conscious, retro-'70s artifice that defines so much of what passes for Progressive Rock these days. The band is simply playing what comes naturally to them, and making it sound easier than it actually is.

The group is a true ensemble too, with each member supporting the others and no single instrument hogging the spotlight. The electric violin of Artem Gareev is the obvious focal point, but Kirill Klyushin's nimble bass guitarmanship deserves a shout-out: check out his funky Chris Squire vs. Les Claypool break in 'To Catch the Wind'.

Other Archive reviewers, solicited as I was for an opinion but quicker on the uptake (the album was released over eight months ago, at this belated writing), have already described each track in detail. I would just add that the longest selection ('James Pont', at 16+ minutes) is also the album's weakest link, perhaps as a result of the quintet trying too hard and overreaching its grasp, always a worthwhile risk when attempting music of any real scope.

I applaud their ambition: the long suite gives the band an opportunity to show its collective chops. But the album works better when the band is indulging its natural melodic instincts (in the lovely 'By the Mountain River', and elsewhere), instead of straining toward the virtuoso complexity of RUSH or KING CRIMSON...laudable aims to be sure, but a difficult plateau to reach without a Neil Peart or Bill Bruford setting the tempo.

A nitpicker might, as a constructive criticism, also say the album was arguably too smoothly produced, to a point where even the noisy free-form coda ending 'After the War' sounds over-rehearsed. This is music calling out for a little raw energy, but the arrangements lean more toward the latter half of its Tolstoyan title: constructive peacekeeping over compelling warfare.

Excusable growing pains, maybe, for a debut recording. Otherwise, Pandora Snail (an unfortunate name by the way, possibly improved when rendered in Cyrillic hieroglyphs) is a band worth nurturing.

 War and Peace by PANDORA SNAIL album cover Studio Album, 2015
3.96 | 112 ratings

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War and Peace
Pandora Snail Eclectic Prog

Review by Aussie-Byrd-Brother
Special Collaborator Rock Progressivo Italiano Team

5 stars Forming back in 2008, Russian band Pandora Snail released one of 2015's best instrumental albums with their debut `War and Peace', a work greatly received by fans and a wide range of progressive music followers. Comprised of a mix of male and female members, the group deliver an eclectic collection of pieces that cross many prog-related styles including symphonic, jazz- fusion, classical and folk, especially standing out due to the music being constantly driven by violin. Progressive rock has a small but special tradition of artists that prominently feature violin, so Pandora Snail join the ranks of vintage bands like French symphonic romantic group Terpandre and the British female-fronted band Curved Air, and they also fit in nicely alongside modern acts that highlight the instrument such as Japanese fusion band PTF and Italian RPI'ers Progenesi amongst others.

Artem Gareev's sweeping violin weaves a memorable romantic theme in and out of opener `Dilemna', which bristles with Igor Cheridnik's skittering drumming, Kirill Klyushin's percolating bass, Oleg Gorgadze spirited acoustic guitar duels with heavier electric guitar growls, and Ulyana Gor's keyboards moving between ethereal strains and colourful energetic spirals. `By The Mountain River' is predominantly a medieval-flavoured swoon with boisterous bursts of piano and electric guitar leaping out, `To Catch the Wind' a dirty and aggressive up-tempo race with runaway piano, the thickest of puncturing bass and playful ragged electric-guitar (and even the obligatory drum solo!), and the violin throughout the jazzy `Submarine' takes on a classical dramatic stirring elegance not far from Jean-Luc Ponty.

The centrepiece of the album sure enough falls right in the middle of the disc, the almost seventeen-minute (and amusingly and not-so-subtly titled!) `James Pont'. It's a constant musical showcase for the skill of the musicians here, all given plentiful solo showcase moments whilst also revealing just how well they gel together as a group. A range of tempo and time changes smash back and forth throughout the epic, forceful and spiked with danger one moment, reflective and calming the next (and it's also frequently grooving and funky!), but it always retains a sense of flow and cohesion. Never-ending fiery electric guitar runs, buoyant bass that swallows and lunges, cooking Hammond organ and a range of keyboard colour, restrained but effective use of percussion in fleeting moments between the insanely busy drumwork, and there's even a delightful little break in the middle that strips back to just moving cascading piano and careful violin that could have been expanded even further. Perhaps little reigned-in passages that don't dart around in endless directions like this could be looked into further by the band on future albums?

`Mother's Tears' begins as a melancholic piano and violin-led reflection that turns more joyous as the rest of the band carefully joins in, `Red Rivers' is a frantic and furious Curved Air/Ponty-esque short interlude, and `Stone's Names' mixes folk thoughtfulness conveyed by soaring keyboard- driven symphonic themes (and the foot-tapping light reggae-break in the middle is just lovely!), making it one of the highlights of the album. `Dance Under The Bullets' wouldn't have sounded out of place on a Mahavishnu Orchestra album with its nimble-fingered jazz/fusion electric guitar runs, busy percussion/drumming and sprinklings of electric piano, and parts of `After The War' brood with a murky danger due to latter King Crimson-like chiming guitars and electronic drums. `Satori' is a genuinely emotional piece with warm symphonic themes constantly attacked by dominating classical piano, scratchy violin danger, imposing organ blasts, aggressive guitar and bass assaults and truly maddening drumming. The sense of expertly building atmosphere with sudden energetic diversions displayed by all the musicians on this album closer is first rate, revealing a musical maturity far beyond their young years.

If there's one slight problem with the album, it's that it is way too long (sixty-two minutes), which means re-listening to the CD in whole may become difficult. While there's nothing even close to bad on the entire disc, a few spots of sameness creep in, so perhaps a punchier vinyl length product (ie 45-50 minutes) in the future might be preferable? But there is no denying whatsoever the exceptional instrumental skill, sophisticated compositional strength and endlessly melodic ear displayed by the band on `War and Peace', made even fancier by the warm production that allows all the instruments ample room to shine. It's even more staggering to think this is Pandora Snail's first album, and it absolutely ranks as one of the best progressive-rock debut albums of the last several years, an essential purchase for fans of instrumental discs and lovers of violin-led progressive music. Well done to this talented young band with a bright future!

Five stars.

 War and Peace by PANDORA SNAIL album cover Studio Album, 2015
3.96 | 112 ratings

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War and Peace
Pandora Snail Eclectic Prog

Review by memowakeman
Special Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

5 stars What an amazing album!

I want to tell you that Pandora Snail was one of my favorite discovering of last year, so thank you very much Nikolaj for introducing me to the band. Naturally, this debut album entitled War and Peace stays in my personal top 10 of 2015, because of the magic it brings while the seconds pass. I remember I was positively surprised since I first listened to it due to its variety of sounds that take vintage progressive rock, jazz fusion and of course that special modern touch. So if you want to experience a great musical journey, please go and listen to this 11-song album.

The 62 minutes of this release have a wonderful start. It is "Dilemma", a song that in my opinion was the best choice to open this debut album. There is a very good vibe on the music, the atmosphere is great and seems that the musicians are greatly connected to each other, so the music perfectly flows. In moments, violin is the instrument that leads, but I like that it is not always, I mean, sometimes keyboards take the leadership, always complemented by great drums, wonderful bass lines and great guitars. This song is amazing, it has several changes that touch rock, jazz fusion, and symphonic music, so with this song is enough to realize that Pandora Snail's music has no boundaries.

"By The Mountain River" is a shorter track that shares sweetness and tenderness created by violin and piano, mainly. The sound is soft so anyone can easily enjoy it, even those who are not into progressive rock. "To Catch The Wind" has a relaxing sound, the wind actually chimes in the first seconds, then they vanish and all of a sudden an explosive song begins to be built up. Virtuoso violin guiding us through atmospheres, nuances and textures. Later the bass creates nice repetitive figures that are complemented by a guitar solo and by those constant drums. People's voices and joy can be heard, so I imagine a kind of feats of friends with people applauding and dancing; of course it brings a smile on my face. It is great how they manage to create a lot of changes and to blend different styles without harming the music, I mean, no matter the direction, what they offer is truly enjoyable.

With "Submarine" the cadency returns for the first two minutes. Later it changes, the bass marks the rhythm and the tendency and then the other instruments add their grain of sand and together create an interesting salad of sounds and images. Pandora Snail, confident of their talent, dared to create a magnificent 17-minute epic that wow, left me speechless. If they make lots of changes in short songs, now imagine how many changes you will find on this long track, a well-crafted song that does not have weak moments, I realized about it when I suddenly found that the song had already finished. Loony moments, hard rock passages, symphonic slices, jazzy moods, my god, a lot of things can be found in this endless world of deep colors. It is incredible to be delighted with so many high- quality passages, which means of course, that they are truly talented musicians, great composers and performers. This is "James Pont", an impressive song, you must listen to it!

"Mother's Tears" is a very melancholic piece, disarming violin guides us through different passages of life. Actually the whole album is a journey through life, through moments of war and peace, this can be felt without a doubt. "Red Rivers" is the shortest piece but probably the most vibrant due to its fast rhythm full of vertigo, carefully contrasted by soft piano notes and led of course, by that representative violin sound. "Stones' Names" has a great blend of jazzy tunes, kind of oriental sounds, Spanish guitar in a brief moment and even some kind of new-age atmospheres created by keyboards. Wow, while writing the review I feel excited once again, I must say that their compositional skills impress me. "Dance Under The Bullets" continues with a style alike to the previous track, however here they add heavier and rockier moments in which you can bang your head a little bit, and even dance.

"After The War" has a darker atmosphere at first, later it changes (as usual) and the joy appears. But well, emotions and sounds bring us a great time. The last song is "Satori", whose first minute is totally peaceful, relaxing, zen; but later it becomes fast and fabulous, dynamic and extraordinary for another minute, because as you can imagine, later changes and changes again, always bringing interesting and quite enjoyable passages.

Congratulations Pandora Snail for releasing such a wonderful album, which of course, I highly recommend to all my readers and fans of progressive rock.

Enjoy it!

 War and Peace by PANDORA SNAIL album cover Studio Album, 2015
3.96 | 112 ratings

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War and Peace
Pandora Snail Eclectic Prog

Review by octopus-4
Special Collaborator RIO/Avant/Zeuhl & Neo Teams

4 stars It's probably time to create a subgenre specific for Russian prog artists and their contaminations with classical music, or at least for the use of classical instruments. Even an avant band like ROZ VITALIS has those elements, but how not to think to IAMTHEMORNING and the solo work of the two band members?

Now PANDORA SNAIL appear suddenly and add another chapter to this great Russian season. This debut album is totally instrumental, with the violin playing the main role. The tracks go from the beautyful lazyness of "Dilemma" and "The Mountain River" to the uptime funky of "Catch The Wind" with an impressive bass riff, on which every instrument has its moment. Then comes "Submarine" on which those different moments are fused in a single track.

But it's the epic "James Pont" the very highlight. In some moments it has made me remind the CARAVAN of the first three albums, but in the most rhytmic moments driven by the keys, also NIACIN come to mind. Sixteen minutes of beauty.

The classical mood is back with "Tears" followed by the excellent "Rivers". "Names" has some folky accents. The first notes are probably the only clue of the fact that this is a band from Russia. So to dissimulate they switch to a reggae rhythm for few beats.

"Under The Bullets" is another track reminding to NIACIN (or similar artists). The passages are never trivial and if strange signatures are a distinctive sign for progressive music, well, this is full of signature changes. "The War" proceeds in this vein, including also a small taste of heavy metal with uptime bass and drums plus highly distorted guitar, all totally mitigated by the violin which leads to a psychedelic section. I think that the word "Eclectic" describes them well.

The closer "Satori" starts very melodic. The chords are almost the same of Pachelbel's Canon, which I don't think is copyrighted anyway. But suddenly it enters a section which is very 70s. It reminded me to Prokov'ev, therefore to RENAISSANCE. But in this case it's like a medley of many short pieces, all good. The piano part after 4 minutes sounds very Emersonian.

A remark: the album title doesn't have anything to do withthe famous novel by Lev Tolstoj. It's the band itself who says so.

A very good album. A true surprise in a 2015 which in my opinion hasn't seen too many good ones. Not at this level, at least

 War and Peace by PANDORA SNAIL album cover Studio Album, 2015
3.96 | 112 ratings

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War and Peace
Pandora Snail Eclectic Prog

Review by admireArt
Prog Reviewer

3 stars Progressive Rock musical idioms seem to have been stuck somewhere along the million productions this whole world of music has released. People seem to care more for impeccable reproductions of the same old trips, rather than on the look out for ground breaking new prog music proposals.

Pandora Snail's "War and Peace",2015, owes more than a lot to very loved prog bands and some not that appreciated or known non-prog musicians. A certain closeness with Jethro Tull or PFM or Jean Luc Ponty or Fripp's "League of Gentlemen" or other Prog related influences will certainly make lot of proggers happy, seasoned with the retro Jazz standards of Django Reinhardt's "Quintette du Hot Club de France" and of course and mostly Django's all time violin accomplice Stéphane Grappelli, seems nice if you listen to them for the first time.

"War and Peace" is very well structured full of impeccable performances, with no real NEW music directions or proposals besides being top performers playing along the lines. So no matter how much I PAID or would have loved loving this happily rated work, I've heard better things, sorry me.

By the way drums are recorded too loud obstructing more than once the rest of the instruments.

***3.5 PA stars. Expecting their second release for now.

Thanks to epignosis for the artist addition.

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