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COLIN BASS

Crossover Prog • United Kingdom


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Colin Bass biography
COLIN BASS started to play bass in 1968, he was member of several bands during the late 60´s and early 70´s. He plays in bands like The KRISIS, The VELVET OPERA, THE FOUNDATION, CLANCY and the more know STEVE HILLAGE. In 1979 he was introduced to CAMEL by STEVE HILLAGE´s manager entering in CAMEL to record "I Can See Your House From Here" (1979) and "Nude" (1981), and since then he is a permanent member of CAMEL, co-writing and playing with Andy Latimer´s CAMEL around the world till last year CAMEL´s "Farewell Tour". In the 80´s he was joined to 3 MUSTAPHAS (later called SABAH HABAS MUSTAPHA) due to his growing interest in other countries music. The music of SABAH HABAS MUSTAPHA can be described like Indonesian traditional music with a lot of classical instruments; they even released a hit single called "Denpasar Moon". The band was touring with a big successful through America, Japan and Europe, but the band was disbanded in 1991 after the release of 4 albums ("Jalan Kopo", "So La Li", "Denpasar Moon" and "Play Musty For Me"). After the disbanded of SABAH... COLIN joins to CAMEL again with the release of the great "Dust and Dreams" (1991) and the next albums "Harbour Of Tears" (1996), "Rajaz" (1999) and "A Nod And A Wink" (2002).

COLIN´s solo career stars in 1999 with the publish of the marvellous "An Outcast Of The Islands" an album in the pure CAMEL vein, with a bunch of excellent songs, with the collaboration of CAMEL´s partners Dave Stewart (drums) and Andy Latimer (guitars) and some members of polish prog bands ABRAXAS and QUIDAM. A single of this album was released only in Poland, called "As Far As I Can See", with some unreleased tracks. In 2000 two live albums were released during his tour in Poland, "Live At Polskie Radio 3", and "Live Vol. 2 Acoustic Songs", the first one was an electric set, and the second acoustic; both albums include Colin BASS, CAMEL and SABAH HABAS MUSTAPHA songs, Dave Stewart and Emilia Derkowska were some guest on the live performances, also some great polish musicians. After this live albums, in 2002 a new single was released with some new songs, called "Gently Kindly" and one year after, in 2003 the long awaited new studio album was released. "In The Meantime" (2003) is also a great album, with a sound more personal, more mature, not so similar to CAMEL. Like "An Outcast...", "In The Meantime" is an album more acoustic and with some blink to other musical styles.

Great musician, great person (know by myse...
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Outcast of the IslandOutcast of the Island
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Live at Polski Radio 3Live at Polski Radio 3
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Audio CD$80.78
$14.99 (used)
In The MeantimeIn The Meantime
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COLIN BASS discography


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COLIN BASS top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.82 | 47 ratings
An Outcast Of The Islands
1999
2.22 | 8 ratings
In The Meantime
2003

COLIN BASS Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.42 | 5 ratings
Live At Polskie Radio 3
2000
2.16 | 6 ratings
Live Vol. 2 - Acoustic Songs
2000
3.07 | 5 ratings
Planetarium (with Józef Skrzek)
2004

COLIN BASS Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

COLIN BASS Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

COLIN BASS Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

3.08 | 3 ratings
As Far As I Can See
1998
4.00 | 1 ratings
Gently Kindly
2002

COLIN BASS Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 In The Meantime by BASS, COLIN album cover Studio Album, 2003
2.22 | 8 ratings

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In The Meantime
Colin Bass Crossover Prog

Review by SouthSideoftheSky
Special Collaborator Symphonic Team

2 stars When Will You Ever Learn?

Following 1999's An Outcast Of The Islands, Colin Bass released this second solo album in 2003. While the former was fairly described as a Crossover Prog album--mixing elements from Colin's day job in Camel (with Andy Latimer guesting on that album and all) with subtle World-Music influences--In The Meantime features a rather bland mixture of Folk Rock, Blues Rock, Jazz Rock, and Pop Rock, with hardly a single trace of anything progressive. Perhaps this could be compared to Steve Hackett's least progressive aspects, as Hackett too blended Folk-, Blues-, Jazz-, and Pop Rock, and the voice of Colin Bass is quite similar to that of Hackett. Needless to add, nothing here reminds even vaguely of Camel, and of course Latimer is not involved this time.

The quality of the song writing here is rather average, by no means embarrassingly bad or anything, just not memorable or in any way striking. Listening to this album is bearable, even occasionally pleasant, but it fails to leave any lasting impression on me. As such, it is a major let down after An Outcast Of The Islands. I am certain that fans of Camel and of progressive Rock in general are bound to feel the same about this album.

If you are curious about what Colin Bass has done outside of Camel, the aforementioned An Outcast Of the Islands and the live albums (one electric and one acoustic) he recorded for Polish radio when touring in support of that album are the releases to go for. In The Meantime is not a complete disaster or an utter embarrassment, but it is certainly an album only for hardcore fans and serious collectors. Fans of Camel and of progressive Rock can very safely pass by, you're not missing anything here!

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 Planetarium (with Józef Skrzek) by BASS, COLIN album cover Live, 2004
3.07 | 5 ratings

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Planetarium (with Józef Skrzek)
Colin Bass Crossover Prog

Review by SouthSideoftheSky
Special Collaborator Symphonic Team

2 stars Singer, oh singer!

Colin Bass is apparently very popular in Poland as he has no less than three different live releases all recorded in that country. Also, on all of these, as well as on his studio solo album An Outcast Of The Islands, he has Polish musicians participating. I am not sure in which direction the causal direction runs; that is, if he is popular in Poland because he uses Polish musicians, or if he utilized Polish musicians because he was antecedently popular there. Anyway, for the present live recording, Colin collaborated with keyboard player Józef Skrzek. I don't know the precise circumstances surrounding this concert, how it came about, etc. (Maybe it was some kind of charity gig or special event?)

With only the two of them on stage, this is naturally a very stripped-down performance. But even if Colin plays only acoustic guitar and sings, this is not an "unplugged" affair as Skrzek adds lots of spacy synthesisers to the mix. The material is divided about equally between Colin Bass songs and songs that I presume are by Józef Skrzek (whom I am not previously familiar with). Three songs are taken from Colin's An Outcast Of The Islands (Goodbye To Albion, As Far As I Can See, and Denpasar Moon), and there is one Camel song in Refugee (originally from 1984's Stationary Traveller; Colin has played this song live frequently both with Camel and on his solo shows). All of these songs are good and work rather well here, though I certainly prefer other versions.

When it comes to the other songs, I must say that it is a mixed bag. The show opens with almost nine minute instrumental called Star Overture consisting of acoustic guitar and atmospheric/electronic keyboards. This one is pleasant enough and functions well to set the mood for the show. Skrzek is a good keyboard player, but (I'm sorry to say) an awful vocalist. The songs on which Skrzek takes to the microphone are difficult to bear. He has a weak voice and he sings in English with a strong Polish accent. The repetitive and clichéd lyrics don't help things along either with trite lines such as "Babe, I love you" and "Freedom, I love freedom" being repeated over and over. It would have been much better to let Colin sing all the songs, or just keep them instrumental.

I think that this concert could have been much better with a full band backing up the two men. With the addition of a rhythm section and some electric guitars, the sound could be a lot more interesting. As it stands, it feels a bit "naked" and leaves a lot to be desired. If you are interested in Colin Bass live, I strongly recommend you to start instead with the much better double-disc set called Live At Polskie Radio 3. That album includes full band versions of all of the Colin Bass songs also present on this album plus many more, including several more Camel songs.

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 Live Vol. 2 - Acoustic Songs by BASS, COLIN album cover Live, 2000
2.16 | 6 ratings

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Live Vol. 2 - Acoustic Songs
Colin Bass Crossover Prog

Review by SouthSideoftheSky
Special Collaborator Symphonic Team

2 stars Don't let it slip through your fingertips

Colin Bass had no less than two of his live performances in Poland recorded by a Polish radio station; one electric and one acoustic performance. The former was released as a double-disc set called Live At Polskie Radio 3, while the latter became this single CD called Live Vol. 2 - Acoustic Songs. Many of the same songs appear on both albums including some that Colin originally performed with Camel in the 80's and several from his first solo album An Outcast Of The Islands. The latter album had featured many Polish musicians as well as guest performances by Andy Latimer.

Being an "unplugged" affair, these performances are naturally stripped-down, featuring predominantly lead vocals, acoustic guitar, and piano. Flutes are added to several songs to great effect. The set starts out in full-on singer-songwriter style with what I think are a couple of cover songs. Camel's Refugee (from the Stationary Traveller album from 1984) is interestingly performed with Jethro Tull-like flute embellishments. City Life and Drafted (both from 1981's Nude; sung by Colin on the original album) are both pleasant as well in these versions, but somewhat less interesting. I prefer the electric versions on Live At Polskie Radio 3. Later on in the set there is one further Camel song that was not performed in the electric concert: Fingertips (also from Stationary Traveller). This one is the best of the four Camel songs included here and works very well in this acoustic version.

As Far As I Can See, Goodbye To Albion, and Denpasar Moon (all from An Outcast Of The Islands), lend themselves well to the acoustic treatment. The highlight of these is Goodbye To Albion which has a strongly Celtic sound and sounds better here than anywhere else. Reap What You Sow is less memorable and is again deeply into plain singer-songwriter territory.

Starting with Fingertips, which I have already mentioned, and with the exception of the utterly embarrassing Blues rocker Poznan Pie (which unfortunately is included on both the electric and the acoustic sets), the best songs come at the end of the disc. The Water Is Wide, The River And The Sea, Sailing Home, and The Parting Glass are a series of Folk songs that work really well here. These intimate performances are very nice, reminding me of acoustic Strawbs.

I somewhat regret giving this rather pleasant folky, singer-songwriter performance a rating of only two stars. But it is of minimal interest to fans of Progressive Rock. If, on the other hand, you happen to be a fan of both folky singer-songwriters and of late 70's/early 80's Camel, then this is for you.

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 Live At Polskie Radio 3 by BASS, COLIN album cover Live, 2000
3.42 | 5 ratings

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Live At Polskie Radio 3
Colin Bass Crossover Prog

Review by SouthSideoftheSky
Special Collaborator Symphonic Team

3 stars Avoid the pie!

Colin Bass is best known around these parts for being a member of Camel from the late 70's to the present day (with only a short break between 1981 and 1984 when they did The Single Factor which was effectively an Andy Latimer solo album in all but name). In 1999 Bass released an album under his own name entitled An Outcast Of The Islands (on which Latimer guested on guitar). The present double-disc set features a live recording done for Polish radio (Polskie Radio 3) in 2000. But don't be misled into thinking that this is one of those live-in-the-studio affairs; no, this is a real live band performance with an audience and all. And the audience is very appreciative, and the band--which features Dave Stewart (drummer for Camel in the late 90's) and many Polish musicians--seems to enjoy themselves on stage. Bass plays the bass (obviously!), some acoustic guitar, as well as sings lead vocals--all of which he does very well.

Naturally the set list features many of the songs from the An Outcast Of The Islands album, but also no less than six Camel numbers; two each from the albums I Can See Your House From Here (1979), Nude (1981), and Stationary Traveller (1984). From the first of these albums come Hymn To Her and Your Love Is Stranger Than Mine. The latter was co-written by Bass, and is here performed in a version that I like better than the original, featuring a great addition of flute. From Nude comes City Life and Drafted, both of which were sung by Bass on the original album. Finally, from Stationary Traveller come Refugee and Cloak & Dagger Man; tracks that Bass has performed live with Camel since the tour in support of that album in 1984 (as can be heard and seen on the Pressure Points live album and videos). Apparently, the song Denpasar Moon was first written and recorded by Bass under the name Sabah Habas Mustapha and became a very big hit in Indonesia in the mid-90's (before it was re-recorded for An Outcast Of The Islands)!

The whole of the first disc of this live album is very strong and the lion's share of the second disc is similarly very enjoyable. However, towards the end it begins to drag a little, and there is the misplaced and (lyrically and musically) embarrassing Blues rocker Poznan Pie which is best avoided altogether. Overall, this is a good Crossover Prog live album and a very worthy companion to An Outcast Of The Islands (or a very good introduction to Colin Bass). Despite the absence of Andy Latimer, I actually prefer many of these live versions of the An Outcast Of The Islands material to the studio versions (though both have their charms).

A strong three stars

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 An Outcast Of The Islands by BASS, COLIN album cover Studio Album, 1999
3.82 | 47 ratings

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An Outcast Of The Islands
Colin Bass Crossover Prog

Review by BORA

3 stars More pleasant than expected, but hardly sensational.

My introduction to Colin Bass was via that disastrous CAMEL release "I Can See Your House From Here". Ditto for Kit Watkins of HAPPY THE MAN fame. Both contributors were filed away as of little - if any - interest in the future.

Later, I've seen footage of CAMEL with Mr Bass on bass and his lukewarm, almost indifferent attitude didn't really impress. Sure, he had some very big shoes to fill in CAMEL after Doug Ferguson's great riffs and Richard Sinclair's groovy Canterbury approach. Instead, he chose to decline the challenge and remain mediocre, not unlike a hired hand. Basically he suited Latimer's obsession with bittersweet concept themes that border on sorrow and misery without breaking, or maintaining musical grounds.

Having read some recent reviews of this album left me somewhat intrigues, so I've decided to check it out - after all. Firstly, I agree that Crossover is an appropriate genre for it as it's pleasant enough to be listed, but one that's lacking any "grunt" associated with Prog basics.

One can hear some bass for a change and the vocals are undoubtedly nice. Latimer - who's always been a great guitar player - is continuing his Gilmour inspired elegance of post- Bardens CAMEL and this comes off nicely. Flutes, orchestral arrangements add a nice touch, evoking comparisons with Latimer's CAMEL's better moments.

This album is far from great, but quite reasonable in Crossover territory. Has it made me more interested in Colin Bass? Probably not, but in all fairness, I could put it on repeat without being irritated by it. These days it's almost a plus...!

A 3.5 rating may be appropriate - unless you have plenty of more inspired works - like I have - in your collection to listen to. Excellent it isn't, only pleasant enough for a lazy Sunday afternoon with friends by the pool, in place of absolute commercial crap.

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 An Outcast Of The Islands by BASS, COLIN album cover Studio Album, 1999
3.82 | 47 ratings

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An Outcast Of The Islands
Colin Bass Crossover Prog

Review by sinslice

4 stars For over ten years I got this CD, I was recommended to be a inexhaustible follower of Camel. It is an exquisite music, at least for my taste in music. Some will find it mellow, but also has powerful parts.

Colin is fabulously supported by colleagues from Camel, Quidam and Abraxas. All musicians are more than acceptable, no amateurs, which is clearly reflected in each piece. Of course, perceived the great contribution of Latimer, on topics such as Macassar, As Far As I Can See, The Straits of Malacca.

There are good contributions from the flute performed by Jacek Zasada of Quidam and drums by Dave Stewart. Also add color parts of violin and orchestra in specific sections. Abraxas keyboardist and guitarist do a good job too.

Colin's work is seen mainly in the vocals and composition, along with the proper performance of his bass guitar. Aissa is the only song (instrumental) focused on his instrument.

The rest of the songs I did not mention, are enjoyable and suit well with the rest.

It is not a masterpiece from a progressive analysis, but it is a very good selection of music, with style and quality.

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 Planetarium (with Józef Skrzek) by BASS, COLIN album cover Live, 2004
3.07 | 5 ratings

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Planetarium (with Józef Skrzek)
Colin Bass Crossover Prog

Review by octopus-4
Collaborator RIO/Avant/Zeuhl Team

4 stars It's probably because I really like Colin Bass and his "An Outcast to the Island" as some of the songs of that album are played in this live, also Jozef Skrzek is the keyboardist of the Polish S.B.B. that's a band that I like. I think this is a great live.

It sounds like an unplugged, because there are only Skrzek and Bass on stage and Bass is often playing acoustic guitar.

The gig is opened by "Star Ouverture". A keyboard's carpet with Colin playing what I think is an "ovation" as it sounds like a classical guitar amplified. Then the keyboards volume raises up giving the track more than a touch of Krautrock. Here Bass demonstrates a quite good guitar skill.

Same instruments for "Eli", but this time Colin sings. "Baby I love you" is not a great example of poetry. Imagine a Jon Anderson's song of the kind of the A side of Jon and Vangelis' Private Collection.

"Goodbye To Albion" is a simple song, but one that I really love. I have listened to it tons of times, probably since when I have left "Albion". In this version it looses something of the good original arrangement because it's just played by a duo, but Jozef makes great things with his keyboards while Colin is just playing rhythm guitar and singing.

"Singer, Oh Singer" starts very melodic with some dissonances, more similar to "errors", on a live it can happen. This song is too mellow and musically trivial, maybe with a different arrangement it could sound better. I'm used to skip this song. It can cause diabetes.

"Freedom With Us" is more interesting. Everything would be, effectively. However the guitar makes a lot of work while the keyboard provides the bass and the background. This is Krautrock...a very hypnotic sequence of echoes and major chords with a hammering bass behind. Sometimes reminding of the instrumental part of "Alan's Psychedelic Breakfast", I mean the part with nothing frying. Colin starts singing after about 5 fantastic minutes, then some minor chords enter in the sequence. Listening better, the chords are the same of Prince's "Purple Rain", but this song appears to be more intense. Great vocal work.

Then it comes "As Far As I Can See", another song from An Outcast To The Island. Being a song largely based on acoustic guitar it's not so different from the original. Initially it's only Colin with his guitar and voice. Jozef adds background vocals on the chorus, then some keyboard background work that's his personal touch to the song. Very melodic but non- trivial. This live version of the song is at least as good as the original if not better.

"The Golden Harp" is a great song. I don't know if it's an SBB track or a Skrzek solo effort. It's a very good song, still melodic, with good passages but I can't compare it with the original version if any.

"Denpasar Moon" is again from Outcast, but it's from an Indonesian author: Sabah Habas Mustapha. If you have ever been on the island of Bali you can understand it better.

"Wish" makes me think to "Pete Bardens" on Seen One Earth. There's along section, maybe a bit too long, made of two keyboard's chords (A- / E) that are very useful to jam on, since Santana. Just a long jam. The two should have had some fun playing it. Not sure about the public.

"I Bid You Goodnight" is a country song. I don't know if it's a traditional or they just wanted to make a western song. The piano part is very good and the song is funny.

Finally a nice version of a Camel's classic. At least classic of the Bass era. From Stationary Traveller, a song that played in Poland is more significant. The keyboard part is totally different, but effectively Ton Scherpenzeel has played it in the early 80s.

I think I can forgive the duo for a creamy song and a country joke. The rest of the songs are good. It's a very good live that sounds like an unplugged. To be not missed by Camel's fans, an excellent addition for all the others.

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 An Outcast Of The Islands by BASS, COLIN album cover Studio Album, 1999
3.82 | 47 ratings

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An Outcast Of The Islands
Colin Bass Crossover Prog

Review by octopus-4
Collaborator RIO/Avant/Zeuhl Team

4 stars Years ago I have rated this album without writing a review, as I was thinking, reading the other's comments, that everything was already said about it. This morning I have found myself listening to it for the fifth time this week (It's Friday) while going to work so I have decided to write my own one.

First of all this is the album closest to Camel, in a good sense, that I've ever heard, not only because Colin played in the band since the 80s. There is plenty of good music in this album: the "Camelistic" songs like "As Far As I Can See" or "Holding Up My Hand", the various string quartets and songs like "Denpasar Moon" and "Goodbye To Albion" that give me something more. Regarding those two songs I think is the fact to have been in Denpasar and having lived for a period in "Albion" so they touch me in a particular way.

Technically speaking it's all well played and Colin's voice sounds incredibly good. It features Andy Latimer and Dave Stewart (not the Eurythmics one) and it should be enough to make this album appealing for proggers, but also the polish rest of the lineup deserves to be mentioned.

There's no need to go track by track with this review. This is an excellent album that together with Colin's live with Joszef Skrkzek I strongly suggest to all the fans of Camel.

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 An Outcast Of The Islands by BASS, COLIN album cover Studio Album, 1999
3.82 | 47 ratings

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An Outcast Of The Islands
Colin Bass Crossover Prog

Review by SouthSideoftheSky
Special Collaborator Symphonic Team

3 stars Mr. Bass doesn't just play the bass

This solo album by Colin Bass represents the lighter side of Camel and strongly reminds of Camel's late 70's/early 80's Pop phase with albums like I Can See Your House From Here (the first Camel album after Colin Bass joined the band), Nude and The Single Factor, much more so than more recent (and much better) Camel albums like Dust And Dreams, Harbour Of Tears and Rajaz.

Colin Bass has been an important part of Camel since he joined in the late 70's and the mutual influence between him and the band can be clearly discernible on An Outcast Of The Islands. Those who know Camel's 90's live repertoire (see, for example, the fantastic live DVD Coming Of Age) know that Bass sang lead vocals on some songs and those songs give you a good idea of what you find on An Outcast Of The Islands. It is clear that Bass' favourite aspects of Camel's music - and music in general, I suppose - lie in the ballads and softer pieces. This is a rather laid back and soft album. Bass' vocals are similar to those of Andy Latimer, but less distinctive and more anonymous. Latimer plays some guitars here and he is amazing as always with his distinctive guitar sound.

An Outcast Of The Islands is not a typical bass players album, strongly based on songs rather than instrumental workouts. This can both good and bad, I suppose, but mainly good. The songs are mainly well written and this is by no means a bad album. But to say that it is 'the lost Camel album' or that it is up to par with albums like Dust And Dreams, Harbour Of Tears and Rajaz is strongly deceiving. To my ears this is in a different league altogether. As I said at the outset, I think that An Outcast Of The Islands is comparable both in style and quality to those late 70's/early 80's albums like I Can See Your House From Here, Nude and The Single Factor and these are among the least good Camel albums in my opinion.

One thing that I do not like about this album is the orchestral interludes. These are not bad, but they feel completely out of place on this album. It sounds as if you accidentally pushed the shuffle button with a play list of two very different albums, one orchestral album and one Pop/Rock album. Bass seems to be unable to integrate the different influences on his music. This is not a particularly progressive album at all.

As most of the songs are in a similar mood and tempo it is a relief to hear Burning Bridges towards the end of the album that rocks a bit harder compared to the rest of the album. But it is too late to save this album from being rather average. Still, this is a competent album that deserves three stars; a good album but not more than that. I can recommend it only to Camel fans who want to go beyond the Camel discography or for people who like the softer, poppier side of Camel.

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 An Outcast Of The Islands by BASS, COLIN album cover Studio Album, 1999
3.82 | 47 ratings

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An Outcast Of The Islands
Colin Bass Crossover Prog

Review by tszirmay
Special Collaborator Crossover Team

4 stars This is one of those "outcast" albums, flying below the radar for no apparent reason, a true gem of cascading delight , surely as good if not better than most Camel recordings (for those of you who do not know, Colin Bass played eminently for Steve Hillage before joining Camel back in the 70s). With Polish friends/musicians from Quidam and Abraxas, as well as the magnificent Andy Latimer on guitar and the equally adept Dave Stewart on drums, this is a rousingly positive effort replete with wonder melodies, inspired soloing and marvelous ensemble playing. The opening instrumental "Macassar" is a stunning intro, full of emotion and harmony, with the axe taking a few soaring journeys. One of the finer mood pieces "sans" vocal you will ever hear. "As Far as I Can See" shows Colin's sweet voice (many actually think that its way better than Andy's wispy delivery) in a simple surrounding, very breezy and English, cherried by a couple of bluesy guitar solos from chef Latimer, pointing proudly towards the horizon. Things are kept interesting with a brief string quartet interlude played by members of the Poznan Philharmonic Orchestra, of which there will be another snippet later on.. "Goodbye to Albion" would perhaps fit well into the Camel repertoire, a very English disposition with whimsical singing, especially the wide chorus while Quidam's Jacek Zasada plays his flute and penny whistle with amusing élan. The treat here is Latimer's mandolin playing in the back ground and Bass's spirited farewell to friends in the mother country! (He spends a lot of time in Indonesia) "And I'll say goodbye to Albion, the green hills in the rain and I'll raise my glass to everyone I'll never see again". Nice. "Straights of Malacca" is another shimmering instrumental extravaganza, with Latimer raging with brash abandon, torturing his wobbly strings with composed tenacity. The guitar effects are spellbinding, heaving and howling like a banshee. Ever had doubts about his prowess, well here it is. On "Aissa" Bass showcases his tremendous fretless abilities, while e-bow guitar colorations add even more depth to the platform. "Denpasar Moon" is perhaps the highlight track here, a romping promenade with jangling rhythms undertone, a sensational vocal wrapped around an unpretentious melody front and center, Latimer displaying his amazing restraint in holding back the explosion that will inevitably never arrive, go figure, you cheeky fellow! "No Way Back" has Abraxas' Szymon Brzezinski taking over from the Camel front man on lead guitar and he acquits himself eloquently within a melancholic 6 minute arrangement that has all the ingredients for maximum enjoyment. Probably the most progressive track here, complete with another ravenous bass solo from Colin, perhaps the most underrated 4 stringer in prog and closing it out with some masterful symphonics. "Holding Out my Hand" leaves little respite, another victorious melody within a tight blues based envelope, a podium for a shimmering vocal trčs Pink Floyd and a chorus to expire for! Inspired ensemble playing as Meller, Florek and Blaszczyk supply massive doses of shine, a cool Hammond organ and synth blitz paired with an ultimate guitar burst from Mr. Latimer, all fervor and ardor in his own inimitable style . Stellar stuff! "Outcast" is another outright classically played orchestral piece from the PPO, where violins, violas and cellos find themselves bathing in luxuriant magnificence. The highly linear "Burning Bridges" starts of somewhat exuberantly but plods along much to my surprise, unable to ignite the flame. While a decent piece (great drumming), it has no bearing on the previous genius material, so I skip. "Reap What You Sow" is a colossal piece that has so many stellar moments: the low spark Traffic-like piano, the uncanny Bryan Ferry-like vocal lilt, the massed all-Polish female choir and Latimer's country/blues picking. The gentle acoustic finale "Trying to Get to You" puts this hour long joyride to rest. I can easily imagine myself listening to this on some tropical paradise island, the palms swaying to the pleasure sounds and instead of calypso/reggae, I would revel as an outcast of the islands. 4.5 Sandy sandals.

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