Progarchives, the progressive rock ultimate discography

KING GIZZARD & THE LIZARD WIZARD

Psychedelic/Space Rock • Australia


From Progarchives.com, the ultimate progressive rock music website

King Gizzard & The Lizard Wizard picture
King Gizzard & The Lizard Wizard biography
Founded 2010 in Melbourne, Australia

KING GIZZARD & THE LIZARD WIZARD is an experimental rock band from Australia with a stable line up of seven members. Stu Mackenzie, Joe Walker, Eric Moore, Ambrose Kenny-Smith, Lucas Skinner, Cook Craig, and Michael Cavanagh all grew up and went to school in the Melbourne region. They started off as a loose jam crew, until the band once was asked by a friend to play at a local show.

During some time their music was dominated by a psychedelic garage and acid rock style. Gradually though they went on to widen the musical scope with the result of some progressive rock albums, for example 'Polygondwanaland' and 'Sketches Of Brunswick East'. Both were released in 2017, which must have been a very inspiring year for them. While covering diverse genres nowadays, every new album is appearing like another surprise bag. Above all their live shows are said to be distinctly energetic.

See also:
- WiKi
- HERE

KING GIZZARD & THE LIZARD WIZARD forum topics / tours, shows & news


KING GIZZARD & THE LIZARD WIZARD forum topics Create a topic now
KING GIZZARD & THE LIZARD WIZARD tours, shows & news
No topics found for : "king gizzard % the lizard wizard"
Post an entries now

KING GIZZARD & THE LIZARD WIZARD Videos (YouTube and more)


Showing only random 3 | Show all KING GIZZARD & THE LIZARD WIZARD videos (3) | Search and add more videos to KING GIZZARD & THE LIZARD WIZARD

Buy KING GIZZARD & THE LIZARD WIZARD Music



More places to buy KING GIZZARD & THE LIZARD WIZARD music online

KING GIZZARD & THE LIZARD WIZARD discography


Ordered by release date | Showing ratings (top albums) | Help Progarchives.com to complete the discography and add albums

KING GIZZARD & THE LIZARD WIZARD top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

2.82 | 33 ratings
12 Bar Bruise
2012
3.04 | 28 ratings
Eyes Like the Sky
2013
3.76 | 34 ratings
Float Along - Fill Your Lungs
2013
3.15 | 33 ratings
Oddments
2014
4.21 | 62 ratings
I'm in Your Mind Fuzz
2014
3.97 | 44 ratings
Quarters !
2015
3.58 | 45 ratings
Paper Mâché Dream Balloon
2015
4.39 | 88 ratings
Nonagon Infinity
2016
4.16 | 88 ratings
Flying Microtonal Banana
2017
4.04 | 57 ratings
Murder Of The Universe
2017
3.79 | 56 ratings
King Gizzard and the Lizard Wizard & Mild High Club: Sketches of Brunswick East
2017
4.24 | 108 ratings
Polygondwanaland
2017
3.96 | 54 ratings
Gumboot Soup
2017
3.67 | 54 ratings
Fishing for Fishies
2019
3.78 | 59 ratings
Infest the Rats' Nest
2019
3.86 | 62 ratings
K.G.
2020
3.54 | 62 ratings
L​.​W.
2021
3.37 | 34 ratings
Butterfly 3000
2021

KING GIZZARD & THE LIZARD WIZARD Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

4.50 | 4 ratings
Live In Adelaide '19
2020
4.50 | 4 ratings
Live In Paris '19
2020
4.50 | 4 ratings
Live In Brussels '19
2020
4.10 | 10 ratings
Chunky Shrapnel
2020
4.50 | 6 ratings
Live in San Francisco '16
2020

KING GIZZARD & THE LIZARD WIZARD Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

KING GIZZARD & THE LIZARD WIZARD Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

KING GIZZARD & THE LIZARD WIZARD Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

2.89 | 9 ratings
Willoughby's Beach
2011
0.00 | 0 ratings
Anglesea
2011
3.63 | 8 ratings
Cyboogie
2019
4.00 | 11 ratings
Honey
2020
3.83 | 6 ratings
Some of Us
2020
4.13 | 8 ratings
Straws in the Wind
2020
4.00 | 7 ratings
Automation
2020
3.91 | 11 ratings
If Not Now, Then When?
2020

KING GIZZARD & THE LIZARD WIZARD Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 Polygondwanaland by KING GIZZARD & THE LIZARD WIZARD album cover Studio Album, 2017
4.24 | 108 ratings

BUY
Polygondwanaland
King Gizzard & The Lizard Wizard Psychedelic/Space Rock

Review by Artik

5 stars To my ears this is the best KIng Gizzard there is. It's mixes progressive complexity with psychedelic repetitions and vocal melodies with a touch of Wyattesque quirkiness to receive something vigourous and very fresh which is an acomplishment of it's own these days. It's highly enjoyable listen experience on many levels. One can admire the complex rhythms and intertwined in lace-like manner guitar parts while tripping to the heady vocal harmonies. At the same time music contains a foot stomping and head-nodding qualities. It'a a rare (and very fine) example of catchy extravaganza. Brilliant stuff. Five stars for puting music of such quality. Like a beacon of light in our troubled times.
 L​.​W. by KING GIZZARD & THE LIZARD WIZARD album cover Studio Album, 2021
3.54 | 62 ratings

BUY
L​.​W.
King Gizzard & The Lizard Wizard Psychedelic/Space Rock

Review by Kempokid
Collaborator Prog Metal Team

3 stars While I praised KG for taking a pre-established sound that King Gizzard and the Lizard Wizard went down previously and polishing and maturing it considerably to create something that sounded quite distinct and impressive for the band, I personally think that the same cannot be said about its companion piece, LW. While I completely expected this album to be essentially a 2nd part of the band's previous album to the point of cleanly transitioning from the closer of it into this one's opening track, I'm honestly still surprised about how little this one manages to stand up on its own or really at all in a significant way. The band undoubtedly attempted to bring some more eclectic sensibilities into the fray here, with a lot more songs that felt stylistically distinct in some rather dramatic ways (all of course within the context of their own sound), but at the same time, it ends up lacking some cohesion as a result. Furthermore, when it's not all over the place, it often ends up feeling quite flat, with the less out there songs lacking any compositional appeal or charm and just being flat boredom that further reinforces the album's lack of cohesion. Its inability to stand on its own without coming off KG is another issue it has and ends up making this lack a true sense of identity and instead makes it feel like a bit of an insignificant footnote to its far superior counterpart. Even with all of these flaws however, I'd personally consider it difficult to call this album outright bad either, as it has its moments of charm and a couple of incredible songs buried within the mess that it is.

One of the biggest issues that LW has is how it jumps around a fair bit and almost feels as if it's just reaching out and grabbing assorted pieces and trying its best to make them fit together even if the result isn't too clean. The song that represents this possibly the most is the opener, If Not Now, Then When? which has a chaotic, loud and messy intro that sprawls out of control for about a minute before things get reeled in and then completely changes everything about itself. The way that this goes from this heavy moment that feels incredibly messy into something rather soft, with a jazzy, funky melody played on a really quaint sounding keyboard with these soft, high pitched vocals doesn't really do anything other than feel rather annoying in the lack of major thread between the two sections. This is exacerbated by the way that this is meant to be the opener to this, further representing the fact that it feels as if the album simply wasn't meant to be listened to in isolation, which really begs the question about why the band didn't just hold off on releasing something until they were able to just make the double album KGLW. O.N.E represents the other issue the album has where the songs have a tendency to not really do too much that's in any way interesting, for the most part almost feeling like a B side but with a couple of great moments. I'll say that at the very least I appreciate the way that this song has that moment near the end where a really simple but nice guitar solo comes in to break up the monotony, which is quickly followed up with a really dense part that almost sounds as if there's a crowd idly chatting around the band as they play, really unique feel that maybe could have been cool as a full song concept rather than yet another "normal song but strange guitar tone" one.

Despite all my complaints with this however, there's still some greatness buried within that makes that album worth a listen. Pleura is the first of these, with its main appeal to me being the unusual vocals, with some lower, more intensely performed ones being contrasted by some very soft and pretty melodies being layered underneath it, creating a rather unique effect that plays well into the heaviness of the song as a whole. The bridge taking on a far lighter approach further fleshes out the song in an even more satisfying way and I wish that the album would have attempted to revolve around more of these sorts of dynamics because this track proves that it could be something really, really awesome. Supreme Ascendency is yet another great song, with a far more grandiose vibe than is typically expected from the Ambrose led track on a King Gizz album. The production feels rather strange here as well, but in a good way, with the instrumentation feeling as if it's getting given centre stage at practically all times, the vocals instead being pushed back enough to more elevate the soundscapes being evoked rather than the other way around, all in all creating something I'm a big fan of yet again. The final song that I feel is worth special mention is that closing track, which is without a doubt my favourite of the doom metal songs the band's written up to this point. Not only do I like the way it ties back into the intro of KG, but I also love how it once again doesn't just rely on being heavy, and really leans into those mysterious, almost occult sounds and imagery to give it so much more depth. The riffs also rock, the middle section where it's just hard hitting instrumental part after hard hitting instrumental part is phenomenal, the way that it manages to bring an incredible sense of finality to things, it's all just an amazing time and almost makes it worth listening to this album for that track alone.

Overall, while there are a few great songs on LW, I can't help but feel that there was really not too much reason for it to have existed in the form it took. With a bit of moving things around I feel like that this and KG had enough material to make a really solid album that was still considerably longer than anything else the band had released, without putting out a double album in 2 pieces with one of them just not working too well at all in isolation and is also got a ton of filler. The more I listen to this the more I just wish that King Gizz just approached things in this other way because even when listening to both albums back to back, this one just carries on too long with the filler present within, and resulted in what has some of the band's greatest material being buried by a hodgepodge of ideas that didn't all fit together as cleanly as the band probably would have liked. Is this worth listening to? yeah, at least once, it's not bad, but is there a reason to exist and does it actually add all that much to things overall? no not really beyond a couple of fantastic highlights. I also feel like this one kinda hurt the band's reputation for some because of the fact that it's another microtonal album which has gotten some people complaining about them getting lazy or something, which I just highly disagree with considering this was clearly the plan from the start, to revisit a previous sound in a more longform way before continuing to expand outwards, it's just a detour in whatever the band feels like doing at that moment. Despite being disappointed with LW and thinking it retroactively makes KG a less rewarding listening experience, I still look forward to seeing what KGATLW are able to do next, because I have faith that even if they'll continue making really fun and interesting music in the future even if there's the potential of them releasing some fairly underwhelming stuff in between.

Best tracks: Pleura, Supreme Ascendancy, K.G.L.W.

Weakest tracks: If Not Now, Then When?, East West Link, See Me

 K.G. by KING GIZZARD & THE LIZARD WIZARD album cover Studio Album, 2020
3.86 | 62 ratings

BUY
K.G.
King Gizzard & The Lizard Wizard Psychedelic/Space Rock

Review by Kempokid
Collaborator Prog Metal Team

4 stars With how incredibly prolific King Gizzard have been it really was only a matter of time before we'd get an album that would be more or less a sequel to one of their pre-existing sounds as opposed to attempting to fit their brand of psychedelic rock into yet another style. Of all that they could have chosen, I also definitely feel like the right choice was made with KG, attempting to redefine the microtonal sound of Flying Microtonal Banana, pushing forward one of their least inspired diversions while also capitalising on the fact that it was easily one of their most beloved albums. That's not to say that this really feels like a simple rehash either however, as KG represents the band fully embracing the potential of this sort of sound rather than feeling almost as if some songs could have just been tuned a bit differently and put on a different album instead. The commitment that KGATLW have to the style this time around, all without sacrificing their own identity ultimately culminates in an album that feels like one of their most complete experiments, even if a bit more time definitely could have been spent to even further flesh out this sound, though this issue could be said about most of the band's output anyway.

While I wouldn't go as far as to call the album a suite of sorts, one of the aspects I immediately noticed about KG is the way that it takes the approach of something like Nonagon Infinity or Polygondwanaland, where most of the tracks seamlessly lead into one another. There end up being a few benefits to this, the biggest one being that it gives this album a near-unmatched sense of momentum, with each song being similarly paced and simply going from one to another in a clean way that leaves little room for the album to feel as if it hits a standstill. While this can make things come off as rather unmemorable at first, there's a lot of repetition within that ends up serving to properly separate each track from the rest, with often very different tones and imagery being brought to the table to further reinforce this. The continuous pace and the way everything leads into one another also has the other benefit of providing more of a reason to tastefully repeat elements throughout and change things more gradually, which is certainly done here to great effect, as can be seen in the first 2 main songs, Automation and Minimum Brain Size. While these are undoubtedly different sounding in a lot of respects, the rhythm stays rather consistent between the two tracks and instead feels as if redefines this drumbeat into something that manages to be even more impressive. There's a more lonely, contemplative tone to Minimum Brain Size thanks to the subdued vocal performance, and the song as a whole feels very dynamic, whether it's due to the wider range of percussion being brought to the table, the central guitar riff that easily gets stuck in your head, or the way it has a lot more time dedicated to stripped back moment. The band also shows that they're still able to throw in a couple of excellent climactic conclusions even when attempting to retain a certain level of consistency, which can be seen with the way the last 30 seconds continuously introduce new layers of instrumentation and combine it with an intense bout of drumming that ties everything up very nicely.

The album also has a rather nice sense of variety to it while sticking closely to its core sound and approach that further fleshes this out and makes it feel like a very complete experience. You've got something like Straws in the Wind, which takes on a more folky sound complete with a really lovely vocal performance from Ambrose. This more than any other track on the album exemplifies one of my favourite elements of King Gizz, being able to make a song that's more or less just singing the song title over and over into something absolutely lovely, in this case using reverb to create a dreamy atmosphere and changing up the guitar melodies often enough to give the song a sense of progression. On the other side of things, you've got something like Intrasport, which is far more bombastic and takes on a quirkier idea almost as if it's just to see whether or not it will work at all. What you've got here is a distortion-laden dance track that manages to sound almost perfectly in place with the rest of the album's psyche rock approach, while also probably being the best song here. The vocal melodies perfectly complement the off- kilter, almost blaring melodic core that everything else structures itself around. with the synths being used in a rather unique way to further drive this in. The song also manages to be one of the most absurdly catchy moments in the band's career, so that's always a plus. The Hungry Wolf of Fate is another contender for best song on this album, and also follows a rather common path of making the fans just wish that they'd release a full doom metal album already, because that's what you've got here, and it's fantastic. While in some ways it definitely feels as if a bit too much is borrowed from Black Sabbath's Electric funeral, I still appreciate the way this has an almost occult feel to it, along with the fact that while it's not particularly nuanced or anything, it makes up for it by being really LOUD. While some might complain about the mixing on this song and the way it totally blows out the guitar volume, I can't help but really admire how intense it ends up being, basically becoming a wall by its climax and making for a rather good end to the album.

One thing I definitely think that is a bit lacking with the album is the fact that the band sound as if they can get a bit too comfortable revelling in their established formula, which leads to some rather underwhelming or unmemorable material in amongst the gold. Some of Us, Oddlife, and Honey to a lesser extent really embody this issue for me, as while there might be a couple of interesting isolated moments, they bring very little to the table that isn't done somewhere else on the album in a more effective way, making them feel a bit redundant, even though they're at least able to carry the general feel regardless, stopping them from feeling egregiously bad at the very least. I also feel that some songs kinda link up with one another in ways that could be considered a pretty big stretch, almost feeling as if the song suddenly will shift into a somewhat different idea near the end in order to facilitate the ability to smoothly transition from one song to the next. While this sometimes leads to some great moments, like the outro to Some Of Us almost falling into being a fast-paced, energetic jam session, I still can't help but feel that it can come off as a bit cheap at points and ultimately serves to weaken the listening experience on repeat listens.

Overall, despite a couple of issues that honestly could be pinpointed in a lot of the band's other albums as well, KG serves as a great revisiting of one of the band's earlier album sounds in a way that feels meaningful. The middle eastern influences present in the microtonal branches of their music feel more prominent and well-integrated into the album rather than merely being a bit of flavour to what doesn't do much to actually stand out in a huge way. Considering this is also essentially the first half of a double album, it works rather well as a self-contained listen that just feels very effective in what it attempts to do, and ends on a very satisfying note. At this point in time, King Gizzard and the Lizard Wizard have made quite a lot of music, and even so, I'd still say that this stands near the top of what they've put out, and is easily my favourite out of the 3 microtonal albums that the band have created, definitely worth a listen.

Best tracks: Ontology, Intrasport, The Hungry Wolf of Fate

Weakest tracks: Some of Us, Oddlife

 Flying Microtonal Banana by KING GIZZARD & THE LIZARD WIZARD album cover Studio Album, 2017
4.16 | 88 ratings

BUY
Flying Microtonal Banana
King Gizzard & The Lizard Wizard Psychedelic/Space Rock

Review by sl75

3 stars If, like me, the concept of this album makes you curious about how microtonality would work in a rock context - especially if you've heard, for example, the work of Alois Haba, whose piano sonata explores microtonality so thoroughly as to be utterly disorienting - well, these guys don't go anywhere near as far out as Alois Haba.

The music is mostly harmonically static - often sitting on the same pedal note for lengthy periods, particularly in "Rattlesnake" - over which they explore what mostly sound like fairly standard modal scales with the occasional microtonal inflection - enough microtonality to sound 'out of tune' to ears used to equal temperament, but not enough for you to forget what key they're in.

From other reviewers I learn that they were particularly influenced by Middle Eastern music. That explains the lesser importance given to harmony and harmonic motion in this music, although to my ears it lacks the elaborate melodicism that such music usually has when liberated from harmonic constraints - perhaps partly because it's not similarly liberated rhythmically, with an insistent Krautrock-style rhythm anchoring most of the music. The Middle Eastern Influence is most noticeable in the instrumental title track, and in those tracks that use the zurna. Most of the time the vibe I get is somewhere between Can and Hawkwind.

An interesting album. 3.5 stars if I could give half stars here.

 Butterfly 3000 by KING GIZZARD & THE LIZARD WIZARD album cover Studio Album, 2021
3.37 | 34 ratings

BUY
Butterfly 3000
King Gizzard & The Lizard Wizard Psychedelic/Space Rock

Review by ImpressiveLad1597

2 stars I'm a big fan of King Gizzard and the Lizard Wizard but for me this is by far their worst album that comes at a funny point at the band's career. The band are known for ragged psychedelic rock, polyrhythmic prog explorations, jazzy odysseys, metal and all sorts and yet have crafted a distinct identity due to commonalities in song writing and production. This approach often works very well for the band, as despite the gimmicky nature of the constant genre hopping they are generally able to back it up with enjoyable albums.

The band's last two projects K.G. and L.W. had mixed reviews due to the hodge podge nature of the songs, "overuse" of microtonality and repetition of the song writing tropes the band has crafted in the previous decade. I found them enjoyable albums but I can definitely understand some of the criticism.

Butterfly 3000 is another example of the band changing genre, this time taking things in a dream pop/modular synth direction. However in my opinion the song writing just isn't there, and when it is there it's nothing new. The album is drenched in synthesiser effects and while I'm not a big synth fan I don't mind it and at times they can sound really good as an instrument. On this album though it's all so flat, the songs fly by in a haze of barely differentiable arpeggios, there's no particular synth passage I can say I enjoyed. When I did enjoy this album it was some of the acoustic guitar riffs, mellotron fuelled chord progressions and so on. Another major gripe I have is the vocals which are often autotuned to a very high pitch, King Gizzard attempting a chipmunk vocal style is not something I want to hear at all really, even the passages with the normally brilliant Ambrose Kenny Smith taking lead vocals are ruined by this vocal meddling. The vocal hooks and melodies themselves are either unmemorable or sound like throwaway radio pop. This is a real shame as this band have a good knack for melodies and vocal hooks.

I would stop short of calling it a generic pop album even though it has too much of that, as it does have lots of polyrhythmic bits, though even then the other issue I have with the album is that when it is good it's still repeating the band's same musical ideas such as the name of the song being the chorus, polyrhythms that are just sortof, there for the sake of it , the feel of the melodies and so on. I actively dislike a majority of the songs, and even though a few songs towards the end like Black Hot Soup and Ya Love have some brilliant passages these tunes are too similar to certain tracks from Gumboot Soup and other projects. Despite a synthy overcoat the band aren't doing a huge amount in terms of new musical ideas and thus instead of exploring new territory the band are just reusing the same ideas with a different instrumentation.

Another aspect I dislike is the track to track transitions, many reviews describe this album as like a single piece but, it really doesn't operate well that way. The band have some great examples of tracks that flow into eachother really well but everytime they attempt it here it comes across as clunky and gimmicky which to be fair is a problem L.W. and K.G. also suffer from.

All in all, I give this album 2 stars as, a lot of people, for some reason, really really like this album (how is it at 4.15 at the time of posting!?) and there are a few new ideas it would be good to see the band develop. But overall I'd say this album is pretty bad.

 L​.​W. by KING GIZZARD & THE LIZARD WIZARD album cover Studio Album, 2021
3.54 | 62 ratings

BUY
L​.​W.
King Gizzard & The Lizard Wizard Psychedelic/Space Rock

Review by dougmcauliffe

4 stars L.W. follows up last years release of K.G. which continued the bands exploration into the middle eastern shaded psychedelic rock they started on Flying Microtonal Banana, which happens to be my favorite album by the band. I really enjoyed K.G. last year, to me it felt like maybe their most collaborative sounding album to date bringing a little bit of all their past styles together under the umbrella of microtonal instrumentation. I rated it 4 stars back then and i'd say I still hold it right around that 3.5-4 star range. To me it was a very solid record with a lot of good groove, but for some reason it just didn't have the same shelf life as some of their other records did for me. Now we have L.W. which seems to be the conclusion to this style, these two albums really go hand in hand with the closing track off K.G. flowing right into the opening track here with "If Not Now, Then When?"

Now it's important to mention K.G. came under fire from some fans and critics of the band for sounding like the band was treading water and repeating themselves. Personally though, I just thought musically start to finish the album was really solid and at the end of the day, I had a lot of fun with it. I don't think such complaints are unfounded, as when I listen to a song like Some of Us or Straws in the Wind, it sounds comfortably King Gizzard to me, but this certainly wasn't something I felt across the whole record. Personally I always judge an album on its own merits, if I like the songs, than we're chillin! Now the reason I bring all of this up is because this record is coming under even more fire from some camps for apparently being a worse offender than the last one and i'm seeing a lot of people completely write it off for this reason. However... I don't know.... I just think this album is pretty... awesome honestly! After several listens I absolutely prefer this one to K.G. and I think this delivers on the same level as many of the high points of K.G. but on a very consistent basis between its 9 songs. The tracks all jive really well together for me and it makes a really groovy, fun and relatively easy listen. This record falls heavily into their psychedelic rock camp, while still carrying some of the odd times and unconventional riffage they've picked up over time. I love the production value here and all the super psychedelic ear candy sounds scattered throughout the songs. Listening through, I just feel like I've delved into a big dusty cloud of psychedelia and I love it.

Getting into the songs now, opening up is the aforementioned "If Not Now, Then When?" It opens with somewhat of an abrasive transition from The Hungry Wolf of Fate, K.G.'s closer. But it all fizzles out as this real crunchy clavinet comes in. When the rhythm section fires off it's a super groovy and satisfying payoff that I just have to move to while listening. Lot's of great melodies throughout, just a super solid opener and a pretty unique one for the band at that. Following that is O.N.E which reminds me of Automation off the last album because I feel they both serve a similar purpose, and that being getting the ball rolling and getting some momentum kicked off for the next suite of songs. This one opens with a bit of a hypnotic and floaty start, before kicking into that very driving rhythm section. Lot's of stuff to grab onto within this song with a cool little guitar breakdown in the middle. "Pleura," follows this up and this has a real headbanging riff to it, you kinda have to headbang in a weird rhythmic pattern though but it works. This ones got a pretty frantic feel to it, towards the middle it settles down a little into a slightly toned down sounding spin on the verse before calming completely down right before we hear a good ol' "woooOOOO" bringing us right back into that main riff coming through at full power. Awesome, high energy song. Supreme Ascendancy is where the album actually steps thing up a little bit for me, and I really feel it keeps the bar at this high level for the remainder of its runtime. It's got this super upbeat psychedelic Anatolian rock instrumentation opening things up, i'm actually having a little trouble describing it but for what that's worth, I think that's the mark of something pretty cool! Just a great vibe to this one, the instrumentals here are some of their most textured if you ask me with some nice organ coming through to accompany the main hook. The following track Static Electricity is easily one of the best songs, arguably the best for my money. It opens with this super menacing guitar riff backed by a real brooding electronic soundscape. The vocals got this ghosty tone to it while in the rhythm department I really feel the now singular drummer has really stepped things up and distinguished himself as a very key member of the band now that the two drummer dynamic is no more. Everything about this song just touches all the bases for me, I love the super earthy sounding passage at the 3:00 mark, the song reaches a sweet crescendo and playout towards the end, great stuff.

East West Link follows that awesome track up and keeps the album moving carrying a similar drive to Static Electricity. We see more nice subtle rhythmic choices with some bongos? Hell yeah! There's a really cool instrumental section around the halfway mark. On it's own, this is a song I have a little less to say about, but it fits like a glove in the context of a full album listen. The following track "Ataraxia," is another highlight and contender for the best song. The riffage in this song is tied for the best on the album for me, more on that later! When the full band comes in the main riff is just absolutely filthy and once again, I think a lot of credit for this can be placed on the drumming. When it suddenly moves right into the verse like a light switch, it's just so satisfying, pardon me for sounding like a broken record here but once again, the stars of the show here are the drums and bass seamlessly playing around the riffs and vocal melodies. I just cant rave about this track enough, a real mastery of rises and falls, build ups and payoffs. Now in the final stretch, "See Me" comes through next taking you through a dusty maze of music. It has a pretty bouncy feel to it with more of those uhhh... hard to describe psychedelic chiming instrumentals taking the lead. I'll group this one with East West Link as being less of a track you'll just throw on out of context, but in a full album listen, this is a nice bridge between two of the goliath songs. That brings me into the closing track, the familiarly titled "K.G.L.W" which ties these two albums all together. This song, clocking in at over 8 minutes King Gizzard pulls through with in my opinion, one of their best songs ever. Combing elements of Prog Metal, Doom/Stoner Metal and Pysch Rock, it's like a fever dream for me. I'd have to argue it's much more successful and original on all fronts than K.G.'s closer "The Hungry Wolf of Fate." The riffs are so crunchy throughout and these eight minutes and change just melt away as King Gizzard takes you on a hellish tour through evil L.W. land or.... something? One thing I really like about this song is that there's very little downtime and they come at you basically right out the gate with an aggression. At 2:07 it drops into this awesome rhythmic riff and I think the fact that it comes out of a stretch of 7/4 into this 4/4 section makes it a very enjoyable and hard hitting transition. Some of the more doomy elements follow with larger than life walls of muddy distortion followed by some sweet slow and fiery riffage. The band has proved to be more than competent at this style, and I'd love to see them embrace it more on a full album basis, even the fact that you could classify parts of this song as Progressive Metal makes me very excited. The prospect of King Gizzard tackling that style.... oh man.

So yeah, I just really love this record and I really can't really get behind some of the flak getting thrown its way. There's been times in the past where I feel like the band has missed the mark or undelivered a little bit, but that's just not the case for this album. Every song hits the mark, I have a ton of fun listening to this record on repeat and I think it stands sturdy and comfortably against some of their other really good albums! Thanks for reading, giving this one 4.5 stars. Am I going against the grain here? If so, that's okay, this bands got something for everyone in my opinion and I'm just happy that they're one of the premier modern rock bands and I get to be a fan during their reign! Cheers!

A solid 4 stars!

 Nonagon Infinity by KING GIZZARD & THE LIZARD WIZARD album cover Studio Album, 2016
4.39 | 88 ratings

BUY
Nonagon Infinity
King Gizzard & The Lizard Wizard Psychedelic/Space Rock

Review by dougmcauliffe

5 stars Nonagon Infinity is in my opinion, a landmark of modern psychedelic rock music. Though I think King Gizzard had previously struck gold with their records "I'm in Your Mind Fuzz" and "Quarters," in many respects Nonagon Infinity sort of irons everything out into one very cohesive and undeniably realized package. While this is a psychedelic rock album first, I feel there's some very strong elements of progressive rock in the forefront of the music. While there's certainly tons of odd meters across Nonagon Infinity, just the general sound of the band and the way all the songs jive together is like nothing i've ever heard before. Every track seamlessly flows into one another, including the last song into the first song, creating an 'infinite' loop of music. The songs are covered in melting, textured and fuzzy psychedelia, with real nasty driving riffage, very modern sounding keys and production values as well all sorts of varying memorable grooves. This album holds no punches and it takes you for a ride right out the gate with headbanging and explosive "Robot Stop." This song never fails to get me amped up within the first few seconds immediately just jumping head first into the rampaging main riff in 7/4. There's a lot of very subtle passages across this song and record where the drums will hold a steady beat setting the stage for the other members to unleash an onslaught of what can best be described as "King Gizzard noises" upon you. Super distorted guitar effects, raging harmonica, and punchy, often rhythmic synths and electronics. "Big Fish Wasp" keeps that same energy with a super earworm of a main hook. For me these first two tracks really go hand in hand and you can't have one without the other and they smoothly come together to create an awesome 10 minute block of music with no shortage of memorable riffs between them. I feel very similarly about the next two tracks which are two of my favorites on the album, the first of which being the headbanging "Gamma Knife." Every single vocal line in this song is unbelievably catchy, often mimicking or singing in unison with the guitar lines. I love the ending of this track where it comes into what I'd describe as a bit of a smooth landing where it strips down to just the guitars playing on top of one another building a slight sense of tension before the drums come back in and the song kicks back into full swing effortlessly segueing into "People Vultures." Stuff like what I just described is just an example of King Gizzards mastery of short but effective build-ups and payoffs. People Vultures was the first KGLW song that I heard and it immediately grabbed me with its real droning and menacing psychedelic intro that kicks into the absolutely filthy main riff. On this song and throughout their discography you get a taste of lyrics that just gush with creativity and personality, and the music videos add another layer to the very original and clever aesthetic their music brings. I really love the spacey synths in the latter half of this track, it's like I'm getting abducted by aliens mid song. The next track is the cleverly titled "Mr. Beat," which is a play on the words "Missed a Beat" as the song alternates between 4/4 and 3/4 (7/4, but for explanation purposes....). With this song, it's simply impossible to not move your body while listening to it. This track falls into the vein of the purposefully repetitive vocal based style that's become a bit of a King Gizzard trademark notably on songs like Rattlesnake and Trapdoor. There's some very punchy and bluesy organ work in the mix and a gorgeous main hook, with the last minute of the song fizzling out to set up the next track, another one of my favorites: "Evil Death Roll." I'll sound like a broken record but the main riff here is nasty and one of the first to come to mind when this record pops into my head. This ones really 7 minutes of straight headbanging action. The main hook is super effective, but my favorite park of the song is the super proggy and space rock tinged middle passage starting at 2:54. It kicks back into that odd meter with this awesome guitar/keyboard? melody over it that really grabs the ear before hitting you with these super distorted waves of sound continuing with the riffage in-between. There's all sorts of motifs and references to the other tracks on the record throughout this jam. "Invisible Face" is fantastic, I love that main riff and groove that opens this track as well as the pretty low register and distorted vocals on top of it. However after about a minute it totally changes pace morphing into full blown jazzy space rock bliss with flowing synths and light, subtle guitar playing. One of my favorite parts of the whole record for sure. Now in the final stretch, "Wah Wah," turns the headbobbing riffs back on, now in 5/4 with the harmonica and guitar trading off lead parts. In the verse there's some sweet acoustic guitar parts sitting in the background adding another layer of punch to the vocals on top of it. "Road Train," is the album closer, it kind of reminds me Deep Purples Hard Loving Man, because it's super driving and unexpectedly heavy considering it's the closing track, almost bringing forth elements of thrash metal which they would explore further on future releases. The bass sits in the forefront providing the backbone to this track, as it goes on several reprises and references from the previous tracks pop their heads in and out of the track. in the final 20 seconds you start to hear that familiar Robot Stop groove pick back up before things come to an end.... or.... don't, rather.

In my book, an essential rock album of the 2010s. Nonagon Infinity is always such an enjoyable and rewarding listen that myself, and I'm sure many others will be playing and talking about for years. 5 Stars.

 K.G. by KING GIZZARD & THE LIZARD WIZARD album cover Studio Album, 2020
3.86 | 62 ratings

BUY
K.G.
King Gizzard & The Lizard Wizard Psychedelic/Space Rock

Review by dougmcauliffe

4 stars King Gizzard returns off the back of two 2019 releases. One of which I loved a lot, Infest the Rats Nest, and Fishies for Fishies which I thought was just alright. As this album got hyped up and singles were dropping I started to get a bit nervous cause I found that I was a little lukewarm on the songs that were coming out. After finally getting to sit down and give the album several spins, my worries and expectations were absolutely shattered. This album is fantastic! As usual we get a set of great songs with memorable hooks, riffs, on top of a nice, comfortable runtime. However, on this album I find the songs.... especially good, even for their already high standards. They cover a multitude of styles expanding on the previous venture into microtonal experimentation, which happens to be my favorite King Gizzard album. All the tracks flow into one another creating a very satisfying and fulfilling listen when taken in as a single piece of music. The thing I really like about this as well is that they actually put a lot of effort into the transitions and every song typically delivers something fresh and interesting as it gets ready to head into the following track. From a production standpoint I think this is their strongest yet, the album is pure ear candy and they sound as full and as dialed in as they ever have. This is probably their most psychedelic release in a long time, however the elements of metal and prog they've picked up over the last few years are very much present. I love the 3-punch combo this album opens up with. You got the menacing "K.G.L.W" which sets the dusty middle eastern mood kicking right into the heavy and headbanging "Automation" which just kicks ass! One thing I find within this album is that there is a greater emphasis on the grooves and the drum sound just packs so much punch, there's a lot of awesome odd times in the mix as well. Automation flows right into "Minimum Brain Size" which keeps the energy going and offers some nice breathing room before kicking into a sweet jam at the 2:45 mark. I'm not sure whose singing on this track, but I really dig the softer and more melodic vocals on this one. "Straws in the Wind" was one of the singles that flew over my head and like the others, it really sounds so much better in the context of the album. It has a real trancy feel to it with pretty punchy acoustic guitar playing throughout. There's also some sweet heavier psychedelic sounds coming through in the latter half. The next track, "Some of Us," is a really sludgy venture that hits you with an awesome wall of melting riffage and melodic guitar/vocal lines. The distorted clavinet playing at the end is just so damn cool. It's after this song where the album really takes off for me packing what are probably my three favorite tracks in succession. "Ontology" is a super groovy, driving and mesmerizing track. The main instrumental hook is a harmonica-led celebratory ear worm that alternates comfortably between 7/4 and 6/4. In the last minute and change of this track it hits you with a nasty hypnotic guitar solo. "Intrasport," which seem to be the most talked about track is another favorite of mine. I love the electronic instrumentation, vocal effects and dance-like grooves within it. Towards the middle it sort of fizzles out and strips down before slowly building back up and dropping right back into the main motif delivering an awesome payoff. "Oddlife" follows this and it's incredible. It's super hypnotic and once again, the drum parts sound great. Especially as they're overlaid with crisp psychedelic instrumentation and effects. This song is particularly dense, there's so much going on and I find myself constantly picking up on new details upon every relisten. "Honey" was my favorite of the singles and I still really enjoy it. It's a pretty simple song, but it's very pleasant and warm with memorable bass work in the mix. Closing the album is "The Hungry Wolf of Fate" and it is FILTHY! Wow! The riffs and guitar tones are totally face-melting, and the contrast between soft and heavy in this track creates a really satisfying dynamic. Even during the quieter sections, you can feel something brooding bubbling beneath the surface. The song ascends during the final minute with a illegally heavy playout closing out the album.

This album has really blown me away. As I said before, Flying Microtonal Banana has been my favorite King Gizzard album since I first heard it and without a doubt in my mind, I believe this is a very worthy follow-up. It's still too soon to call, but this is already one of my favorite King Gizzard albums. Who knows? Maybe it'll even take the crown... but i'd have to do some revisiting to say something like that for certain. K.G. doesn't tread the same water as FMB, rather it explores different sounds with instrumentation that just happens to be microtonal, and that's its greatest strength. A very comfortable 4 stars!

 Polygondwanaland by KING GIZZARD & THE LIZARD WIZARD album cover Studio Album, 2017
4.24 | 108 ratings

BUY
Polygondwanaland
King Gizzard & The Lizard Wizard Psychedelic/Space Rock

Review by dougmcauliffe

4 stars King Gizzards Polygondwanaland to me, is one awesome album and quite notable for a few reasons. For one, I believe it explores new territories with a sweet somewhat ghosty sound as well as production choices that are very uniquely King Gizzard. On the other hand, it's an extremely popular modern progressive rock album (Well.... except on progarchives I suppose). I'm a younger guy and I have a lot of friends who are big into music but not exactly progressive rock outside of the usual culprits of Pink Floyd and King Crimson. However, we share one thing, and it's a love for this album. It's hard to pin down what genre King Gizzard is because they're constantly doing complete genre hops. Listen to Paper Mache Dream Balloon and Infest the Rats Nest. Yep, same band. It's on Polygondwanaland where they strap down and make a full blown prog album, though one could argue Murder of the Universe, Microtonal Banana and Nonagon fit into that genre comfortably (a sentiment I agree with). On Polygondwanaland we're just taken on a trip through twisting polyrhythmic mazes, creative and inspired song writing, and layers upon layers of very tasteful and interesting intertwining instrumentals. I think towards the middle and end it starts to lose a little momentum and sound just a bit "samey," but it's never bad and it really pulls it all back together with the closing track. The opening track Crumbling Castle is just a fantastic piece of music with not a dull moment across its nearly 11 minute runtime. Going from beautifully hypnotic, to menacingly heavy, to straight wall-melting sludge, this is a very dynamic and incredible piece of music that I think every prog fan, new or old, needs to give a listen to. We have mind bending guitar interplay on top of time signature galore, and what also needs to be highlighted are the unique throaty backing (and lead towards the end) vocals used all over this track. The title track is another very memorable tune with a gorgeous atmosphere driven by passionate vocals and acoustic guitars, especially in the final minute. Many of these tracks flow right into one another, tis the case here with The Castle in the Air kicking off straight out of the title track. The intro always brings a smile to my face because I just love this sound and vibe to this album and the little spoken word passage in the first minute is just one of those moments that exemplifies that. The verse kicks in and it's just once again a very unique and offbeat set of instrumentals and vocal deliveries that sounds like music from the future. Though this song is short, there are so many memorable passages within its brief runtime. Deserted Dunes Welcome Weary Feet is a very heavy and driving song in 7/8, once again great. The little synth breakdown towards the end is groovy as hell and in a way it scratches the same itch as the middle of Lunar Sea by Camel, but with much more a modern touch. Inner Cell is another monster of a song with a very dark and stomping feel to the instrumentation also including a very pretty chorus. Filled with strange and unconventional grooves, they manage to always make it feel seamless and never forced at any given moment. My second favorite song on the album. Loyalty/Horology are two tracks I generally consider to be as one both being on the shorter side flowing into one another. Loyalty has these crisp, piercing synths before the band comes together. The final minute of this song is amazing with these daunting vocal melodies and harmonies. Horology has a really cool windy palm muted guitar riff as well as these slick, somewhat breathy and ghosty vocals throughout. Tetrachromacy changes things up a bit with subtle middle eastern tinges, psychedelia and somewhat of a western feel to it on top of some staple elements of the album we're familiar with at this point. Searching is just a brief ambient journey into orbit, sort of like gong with more texture and modern production flourishes. The closing track The Fourth Color is my third favorite track on the album due to a really groovy main riff and general high energy throughout. I love the off the wall nearly acapella vocals towards the 2- minute mark almost channeling Gentle Giant for a moment. However, what they do with these disjunct vocals is just so damn cool, the drop right back into that nasty main riff I mentioned but the vocals keep going on top of it creating a grin-enducing polyrhythm. The song appears to end, but in the final 45 seconds there's a hidden track where they bring back what I think is a motif from Nonagon Infinity, it certainly has that energy. Essentially tying this album into a multi-album concept known as "The Gizzverse." Don't ask me to elaborate because i'm just as lost as you are :D

I can't wait to see what else King Gizzard has in store in the future. Rumor has it their new album should be out towards the end of this year, and allegedly, they have 3 coming in 2021. Who knows? Stranger things have happened, for example: 5 albums in 2017!

7.5/10

 Flying Microtonal Banana by KING GIZZARD & THE LIZARD WIZARD album cover Studio Album, 2017
4.16 | 88 ratings

BUY
Flying Microtonal Banana
King Gizzard & The Lizard Wizard Psychedelic/Space Rock

Review by BrufordFreak
Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

4 stars The prolific Aussie jam band is experimenting with Middle Eastern microtonalism.

1. "Rattlesnake" (7:48) run-of-the-mill, straightforward lyrics-driven rock. (12/15)

2. "Melting" (5:27) hypnotic SANTANA-like music. A top three song. (8.75/10)

3. "Open Water" (7:13) interesting and engaging in a MOTORPSYCHO-kind of way. The insidious repetition runs the chance of boring me musically until the guitars cut out at the 4:15 mark and then a very interesting ADRIAN BELEW/TALKING HEADS section begins. Cool! My second top three song. (13.25/15)

4. "Sleep Drifter" (4:44) good modern psychedelic rock with some classic "Southern" rock chord structures and soundscapes. I like the pause and slow restart at 2:40?it really sets apart the microtonal inputs that everyone talks about. There's a little CAN-like Krautrock feel to this, as well. (8.5/10)

5. "Billabong Valley" (3:34) same CAN-like beat and pace from the previous song with the unusual singing voice of a female(?) The song slows down in the second half and then the presence of the zurna makes it interesting. (8.5/10)

6. "Anoxia" (3:04) Here the zurna feels like it's coming from its own separate universe while the pretty standard rock music supports the guitar-and-choral vocal approach the band used to use a lot back in 2014. (8.5/10)

7. "Doom City" (3:14) odd slow blues riff opens before it switches to New Wave-like rhythmic styling. Zurna and choir take the band down the slow blues riff for the choruses. Very strange! Stu's untreated voice, sung in the mid-range, sounds so unusual. (8.25/10)

8. "Nuclear Fusion" (4:15) Very interesting, curious, yet catchy soundscape and weave. A top three song for me. (8.75/10)

9. "Flying Microtonal Banana" (2:34) an instrumental with congos, djembe, and marimba with guitars and multiple tracks of zurna. Eventually they create a kind of chorus out of the chorus riff from Jesus Christ Superstar song "The Temple." Whereas the rest could come from PETER GABRIEL's Passion Sources. I have to say, when these guys choose to do instrumentals, they do them well. My favorite song on the album. (4.75/5)

Total Time 41:53

B/four stars; a nice excursion into KG&TLW's excursion into Middle Eastern-influenced psychedelia. Recommended for your own exploration--especially if you're into following this band's evolution.

Thanks to rivertree for the artist addition. and to Quinino for the last updates

Copyright Prog Archives, All rights reserved. | Legal Notice | Privacy Policy | Advertise | RSS + syndications

Other sites in the MAC network: JazzMusicArchives.com — jazz music reviews and archives | MetalMusicArchives.com — metal music reviews and archives

Donate monthly and keep PA fast-loading and ad-free forever.