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GALAHAD

Neo-Prog • United Kingdom


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Galahad biography
Founded in Christchurch, Dorset, UK in 1985 - Still active as of 2021

GALAHAD formed just for fun playing roughly half covers (GENESIS, ZEPPELIN, RUSH, SABBATH, FOCUS etc) and half original material. Galahad then supported a few fairly well known 'Progressive' bands that were coming up at the time including IQ, PENDRAGON, HAZE and later PALLAS and MAGNUM.
Then, after mixing it with the slightly 'bigger boys' GALAHAD decided take it more seriously, and began playing only original material resulting in the release of their first proper album in 1991, 'Nothing Is Written', which was purely self -financed and released independently but which went on to sell several thousand copies.

The success of 'Nothing Is Written' was also helped by the fact that the band received substantial air play on BBC Radio One, especially on the Radio One Rock Show hosted by the late, great Tommy Vance. The band then landed themselves with deals in the UK, Japan and Germany.

The band has now released fifteen albums including albums by main band offshoots such as GALAHAD ELECTRIC COMPANY and the GALAHAD ACOUSTIC QUINTET. The band has played hundreds of gigs in the UK, Europe and America over the last few years, at times in some very unusual venues!

In 2002 Galahad released 'Year Zero' which featured John WETTON (ASIS, KING CRIMSON, FAMILY etc.) on guest vocals.

In September 2006 Galahad released their debut DVD 'Resonance' , which was recorded live in Katowice, Poland in May 2006.

'Empires Never Last' , which features Karl GROOM (THRESHOLD)) on engineering duties, was released in 2007 and took the band in a heavier, more muscular, guitar orientated direction. This more contemporary, metallic approach seems to have worked as 'Empires' was a great success, both commercially and critically, and resulted in them winning album of the year at the 2007 Classic Rock Society awards. 'Empires' was also included in many top 10 album listings for 2007.

In the interim and whilst recording TWO new studio albums GALAHAD released a couple of live albums 'Sleepless in Phoenixville - Rosfest Live 2007' and 'Whitchurch 92/93 - Live Archives -Vol.2' (CD/DVD) plus a re-issue of their 1992 Year Zero album, which also contained bonus CD consisting of live versions of tracks from Year Zero.

'Battle Scars', again recorded at Thin Ice by Karl GROOM was released in April 2012 and took the band further in to a heavy/rockier direction but mixi...
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GALAHAD discography


Ordered by release date | Showing ratings (top albums) | Help Progarchives.com to complete the discography and add albums

GALAHAD top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

2.45 | 89 ratings
Nothing Is Written
1991
2.93 | 74 ratings
In A Moment Of Complete Madness
1993
3.33 | 46 ratings
Galahad Acoustic Quintet: Not All There
1994
3.51 | 122 ratings
Sleepers
1995
3.10 | 98 ratings
Following Ghosts
1999
2.08 | 25 ratings
Galahad Electric Company: De-Constructing Ghosts
1999
3.57 | 131 ratings
Year Zero
2002
4.13 | 449 ratings
Empires Never Last
2007
3.81 | 292 ratings
Battle Scars
2012
3.83 | 308 ratings
Beyond the Realms of Euphoria
2012
3.82 | 139 ratings
Quiet Storms
2017
3.92 | 314 ratings
Seas Of Change
2018
3.84 | 12 ratings
Galahad Electric Company: When the Battle Is Over
2020

GALAHAD Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.78 | 8 ratings
The Christmas Lecture
1993
3.17 | 17 ratings
Classic Rock - Live
1996
3.87 | 4 ratings
Two Classic Rock Lives
2008
3.88 | 21 ratings
Sleepless In Phoenixville - RoSfest Live 2007
2009
3.83 | 12 ratings
Whitchurch 92/93 - Live Archives vol. 2
2012
4.11 | 19 ratings
Solidarity - Live in Konin
2015

GALAHAD Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

3.83 | 42 ratings
Live in Poland - Resonance
2006

GALAHAD Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.14 | 14 ratings
Other Crimes and Misdemeanours
1992
3.05 | 21 ratings
Other Crimes And Misdemeanours II
1997
3.13 | 8 ratings
Decade
1997
2.62 | 19 ratings
Other Crimes And Misdemeanors III
2001
4.89 | 8 ratings
When Worlds Collide
2015

GALAHAD Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

3.67 | 9 ratings
In A Moment Of Madness (Tape)
1989
3.40 | 5 ratings
Voiceprint Radio Sessions
1994
4.16 | 11 ratings
Seize The Day
2014
4.08 | 6 ratings
Guardian Angel
2014
3.92 | 5 ratings
Mein Herz Brennt
2014
4.71 | 5 ratings
30
2015
4.00 | 5 ratings
Empires Never Last (Orchestral Version)
2016
4.00 | 3 ratings
Galahad Electric Company: Open Water
2020

GALAHAD Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 Battle Scars by GALAHAD album cover Studio Album, 2012
3.81 | 292 ratings

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Battle Scars
Galahad Neo-Prog

Review by Sidscrat

4 stars Being an old proghead, I had never listened to anything from Galahad except an album much earlier in their career (can't recall which one). I remember that it didn't rate very high on the Excit-O-Meter at the time so I didn't purchase anything more by the band until Battle Scars. While not all the songs are massive euphoric revelations, there are some amazing moments.

My experience has been the longer a prog band has been around the less creative and groundbreaking their songs are; they become repetitive and worn out. This album blows that theory out the window. I would rate this their best album for freshness and originality.

"Battle Scars" is a great starter with the extensive rich symphonic opener and hard driving tempo. "Reach For The Sun" is a great rocker. "Bitter & Twisted", "Beyond The Barbed Wire", "Seize The Day" & "Sleepers 2012" are all very good entries. But hold the press, I haven't touched on the highlight.

The song that simply blew me away is "Singularity." I was mesmerized by the almost hypnotic rich sound and dramatic chorus. Baker's patches are perfectly melded throughout. Keyworth's guitar is gritty and strong where it is warranted but no solos stick out through this song. That is one reason the song is so incredible; its structure, tempo and overall sound are flawless. It gets my OH EM GEE rating (5 out of 5).

The production is clear and solid. Bass and treble are well balanced and it has a brilliant sound. Guitar wise, I prefer a combination of solid rhythm and lead playing. Keyworth's rhythm playing is excellent but he lacks in a lead role. Galleon is another band where the emphasis was more geared to keyboard and rhythm guitar but their album "Engines Of Creation" broke with that with the guitar becoming more prominent with some ripping great solos. As a rhythm player Keyworth is great and his effects most certainly define his sound. It works well here.

In all this album is a must have for proggers. They have a few other Galahad albums that are good but they do not have as many great songs on one album?? in my humble opinion.

 Nothing Is Written by GALAHAD album cover Studio Album, 1991
2.45 | 89 ratings

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Nothing Is Written
Galahad Neo-Prog

Review by A Crimson Mellotron

2 stars 'Nothing Is Written' is the debut album by British neo-progressive veterans Galahad, a self-released album that they put out in 1991, after six years of existence, touring, playing covers and occasionally writing original material that they collected in a one-hour record that went on to sell several thousand copies, surprisingly or not, and allowed the band to continue to pursue their musical needs ever since.

The band started out in the mid-80s and happen to be one of the so-called 'second generation' progressive rock bands. However, they did not release anything during this decade; in fact, they played some gigs and mostly supported other acts of the genre that were releasing records in the eighties, like Pendragon, IQ, Twelfth Night, so whether they are actually part of the 'second' or 'third' generation of British prog rock could be debated.

As for the album itself, it is a decent collection of 80s-sounding prog rock, strongly influenced by Fish-era Marillion and Rush, which are certainly the major influences on the early Galahad sound, as well as Genesis and possibly Yes. And this is the drawback of 'Nothing Is Written' - it sounds like an album released by a Marillion protégé, not very original, not very breathtaking, making the record sound quite dated and a bit tedious, with mostly forgettable songs which is probably the reason why one will hardly find songs from this record on any Galahad live album.

Interestingly, I could also describe 'Nothing Is Written' as promising, as the band (with the line-up consisting of Stu Nicholson on vocals, Spencer Luckman on drums, Roy Keyworth on guitars, Tim Ashton on keyboards, and Tim Ashton on bass) display some very decent skills, especially the guitar player whose style might be reminiscent of Steve Hackett or Steve Rothery but is still intriguing. Stuart Nicholson's voice is not as strong as it can be later heard on the band's 21st century albums but it is still recognizable, with a slight Geddy Lee nod to it.

Some of the better songs on 'Nothing Is Written' include 'Face to the Sun', 'Chamber of Horrors', 'Aqaba' and 'Motherland' but the rest is very generic and stereotypical neo-progressive rock, making this album not too good overall. Promising, yes, but also too conventional, badly produced and poorly mixed.

 Empires Never Last by GALAHAD album cover Studio Album, 2007
4.13 | 449 ratings

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Empires Never Last
Galahad Neo-Prog

Review by A Crimson Mellotron

4 stars Galahad's sixth studio album is an eerie, haunting and thoughtful masterwork, facing with witty hopelessness the themes of power, faith & the mind's machinations, full of throbbing riffs, masterful songwriting, reflective lyrics and sincere dread; a truly wonderful album that stands along the milestones of 21st century British progressive rock.

This Dorset-based neo-prog outfit decided to go full-power on 'Empires Never Last', a critical reflection upon the mischievous world of the ones in possession of power and a finely crafted musical journey that spans across seven suspense-ridden tracks that fall well within the realms of the epic and the haunting with fascinating complexity, embracing the 'metallization' trend typical for this period of the 80s-born neo-progressive rock sub-genre.

The line-up consists of the great Stu Nicholson on vocals, Roy Keyworth on guitars, Dean Baker on keyboards, Lee Abraham on bass, and Spencer Luckman on drums, the same line-up that released the live album 'Resonance (Live in Poland)', around a year before 'Empires' release, and in whose playlist, one could hear five of the seven tracks of the band's sixth studio album.

The album opens with 'De-Fi-Ance', a choral piece that turns into an instrumental overture preparing the listener for the intense ride that this record is. The second track is 'Termination', a song that could easily let the listener mistake Galahad for a seasoned prog metal band, with this very Dream Theater-ish edge to it. Certainly, this version of the band has nothing to do with the early 90s Fish-era-Marillion-like protégé. Next on the track list is the 14-minute 'I Could Be God', which could be simply described as masterful and compelling, undoubtedly one of the best neo-prog epics in existence. 'Sidewinder' is an 11-minute song about politics, prophets, promises and false heroes, and another fantastic track with mind-shattering instrumental sections. Then comes 'Memories from An Africa Twin', a complex but enjoyable shorter instrumental, compared to the other songs' lengths, transitioning into the heavy title track, another one of Galahad's finest. Finally comes 'This Life Could Be My Last?' to top all things heard so far; from the somber and acoustic intro, the song unfolds into an emotive, atmospheric and anthemic epic piece that contains one of Nicholson's best vocal performances on a studio recording.

'Empires Never Last' certainly deserves all the praise it gets from the progressive rock community, so it is no surprise that this is considered by many Galahad's finest hour - emotionally and sonically, this is a tremendous album on which the band gracefully mix the heavier riffs and the dazzling electronic elements with the neo-progressive rock sensibility, resulting in a very intense and atmospheric piece of work with no weak spots.

 Live in Poland - Resonance by GALAHAD album cover DVD/Video, 2006
3.83 | 42 ratings

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Live in Poland - Resonance
Galahad Neo-Prog

Review by A Crimson Mellotron

4 stars 'Resonance' is the second (or third, depending on who you ask) live album by British neo-proggers Galahad, released in 2006 and recorded in Poland. This Dorset-based band has had an interesting history, starting in 1985, releasing their debut studio album in '91 and going on to release some fairly well-received and respected modern progressive rock records, the most special of which is probably the one that came right after this live album/DVD, and is also prominently featured.

The decision to play almost the entire 'Empires Never Last' album before its official release is a bold and interesting decision that must have surely helped to promote it and to 'pump up' the audience for this behemoth of an album that was going to be released. What is even more pleasant about this recording, is the fact that the band is on top of their game and play flawlessly throughout the entire 90 minutes of length - exactly what one expects from a seasoned prog band, especially if we consider the live album as a snapshot of where the band is at this point in time of their career; and this strong release showcases in just what good form Galahad was around 2006-07, a band that I would say is not easy to get into.

The MVP of this album has to be, if I could put it that way, Stuart Nicholson, the band's enigmatic vocalist. His performance is pretty spectacular, just as it is on the following studio release that I already mentioned. His range and voice fit perfectly the music that these people create, which is a good reason to name the rest of the band: Lee Abraham on bass and backing vocals, Roy Keyworth on guitars, Dean Baker on keys and backing vocals and Spencer Luckman on drums.

The suspense is all over the place, the setlist is well-though out, focusing on the band's epics and on the new material. 'Montagues and Capulets' by Prokofiev opens the set, just to be followed by one of Galahad's masterworks, 'I Could Be God' from 'Empires'. 'Year Zero' comes next, a sort of medley, containing the so-called 'Parts 1-4', a very epic and atmospheric track that embraces the listener in the setting of this concert, followed by 'Bug Eye', a great muscular song from the band's then-previous studio album. Then they set into 'Sidewinder', another fantastic 'new' song, followed by 'Sleepers' from the band's eponymous album, and the set finishes with three more excellent tracks from 'Empires Never Last' - the title track, 'Termination' and the astonishing 'This Life Could Be My Last?'.

A well-recorded album, slightly quiet mix but clear enough to hear all that is happening on the stage. Moreover, a really great selection of songs to fit into this hour and a half, and a stellar performance to top it all. I consider this live album truly excellent.

 Galahad Electric Company: When the Battle Is Over by GALAHAD album cover Studio Album, 2020
3.84 | 12 ratings

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Galahad Electric Company: When the Battle Is Over
Galahad Neo-Prog

Review by kev rowland
Special Collaborator Honorary Reviewer

4 stars Back in the Nineties there were a couple of Galahad side projects, with the Galahad Acoustic Quintet staying fairly close to the original band except moving in a more folky direction and even including some reimagined Galahad numbers. However, the Galahad Electric Company album, 'De-Constructing Ghosts', saw members of the band plus various remixers making a new album using 'Following Ghosts' as a starting point. Although the Acoustic Quintet has yet to make a reappearance, 2020 saw a new album from Galahad Electric Company. However, instead of giving tracks out for people to play with, what we have this time is an album from singer Stu Nicholson and keyboard player Dean Baker, comprising real songs in a mix of electronica and progressive rock.

In many ways this album has been a very long time coming, in that Dean and Stu have performed as a duo in the past and have a strong friendship and working relationship. When Dean joined the band, he was the third keyboard player in as many albums, yet he has now been there for more than 20 years and has been a huge part in the move away from the neo-prog tag they were given in their early career. Given that this has mostly involved the band becoming much heavier in many areas, it is somewhat strange to hear this release, which is moving in areas far away from riffing guitars. There are times when it seems quite strange to hear Stu's vocals over the top of electronic keyboards, and then there are others when one can imagine the full band taking on the song and crafting it into something quite different, such as "The Inquisition (intermezzo)" which starts off quite experimental before moving into quite a different area.

I must confess that the first time I played this album it just did not feel right to me, as although Stu is singing as well as ever, I was not used to his vocals being over the top of a style of music I rarely listen to. I mean, "Letting Go" feels like a single from the Eighties from the likes of Yazoo, not quite in the same musical area as the 42-minute-long "Seas of Change". But the more I kept playing it, the more I got inside it and enjoyed it for what it was. This is not a Galahad album, yet there are similarities here and there, and hopefully there will be plenty of people intrigued to hear what this is like. Stu has told me there is another album coming soon, and I for one am looking forward to that one as well.

 Following Ghosts by GALAHAD album cover Studio Album, 1999
3.10 | 98 ratings

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Following Ghosts
Galahad Neo-Prog

Review by kev rowland
Special Collaborator Honorary Reviewer

4 stars A while back Stu told me that the band were going to be releasing a special edition of 'Following Ghosts' and perhaps I might be interested in saying a few words about it. Of course, I agreed and delved back into the original which for some reason I had not played for some time. Strangely enough, I discovered that even after all these years I still find the introduction to the album charming, and it makes me smile each and every time I play it. I scribbled some thoughts and sent them off, and then some time later a package arrived containing the triple disc set. In some ways this was like reliving the old vinyl days, as there are stacks of information here to read which explain what was going on with the band at the time, a booklet containing snippets of reviews from back then (including yours truly), detailed commentary from both Stu and Dean, as well as my thoughts plus more from Polish reviewer and legend Artur Chachlowski. Then on top of that there is information culled from Andrew Wild's book and newsletters from back in the day, all to conjure up a picture of what was going on. As for the music? The set includes a remixed and mastered version of the original care of Karl Groom, one CD which contains either remixed alternate versions or brand-new recordings by the current line-up of the band (so this is the first appearance of Mark Spencer on bass), plus a re-mastered version of 'De-constructing Ghosts'.

To place the album into the context of the time, Galahad were going through a rough period. This was to be their third consecutive CD with a new keyboard player, founder member and guitarist Roy Keyworth had already told everyone this was going to be his last recording, and the band had nearly been destroyed by the painful experience that was 'Sleepers'. I am sure many bands would have thrown in the towel by then, but Galahad, and Stu and Spencer in particular, have staying power and sheer stubbornness, which has seen them get through many travails ? these were not the first, and certainly not the last ? but they are still going today, and still releasing wonderful albums.

It is interesting to look at reviews of this album written some time after the fact, as they are incredibly inconsistent with some fairly scathing and others quite positive. But those of us actually writing at the time were all of the same opinion, that Galahad had got past everything and were deliberately moving at speed into new directions. Looking at my review from August 1998 I said, "This is not the same band that produced 'Nothing Is Written' and won the Radio 1 Rock Wars. This is a band that has come of age and matured like a fine wine". Later I said, "Galahad have progressed in the truest sense of the word, with an album that hits many musical bases, and is all the better for it." More than twenty years later I still stand by those words and listening to this in 2021 it is interesting to realise that unlike their earlier albums this does not sound at all dated. Part of the reason for this is that the guys were really looking to change, which including bringing on board a keyboard player who had no idea at all of what progressive rock was all about, plus using guests, with Sarah Quilter in particular having huge impact. Fast forward to 2018's 'Seas of Change' and there is Sarah still helping out on songs when required, as she has been doing ever since this album, and that new keyboard player is still onboard as well. In fact, Dean set up a studio in his garage and Stu used to go over and work with him on material for this release, something which continues to this day.

Musically this album had a band searching around for the right direction, trying desperately hard to break away from the neo-prog tag which Stu in particular never liked. In bassist Neil Pepper they already had someone interested more in the dance scene, and he wrote and performed "Ocean Blue", with Stu adding his vocals over the top, and this showed a very different direction as in songs like this they were moving much more into the area of Pet Shop Boys than Genesis. However, the album also contains two songs in excess of fourteen minutes, where Galahad allow themselves to play with dynamics, moving and switching styles, and in "Myopia" they have one of the catchiest chorus hooks ever. Karl Groom has long been recognised as a wizard in production (as well as on guitar), and he has really brought the old songs back to life, providing clear separation for all the instruments which allows us to really enjoy Neil's bass which switches from complex to simple depending on need, Spencer's drumming which is always controlled and on point, never overplaying but providing the flourishes when the time is right. Roy's guitar and Dean's keyboards are given the right amount of focus, but Galahad are one band where everything is geared towards the vocals, and Stu never disappoints. I have always enjoyed his style, and his control and range are always what the band needs.

Just having the original remastered would be enough for me, but then we have another version of the album as well. This is a mix of new recordings featuring Lee and Mark, plus a few remixed featuring Roy. Here the guys are staying true to the original, but adding a little more sparkle, a little more depth, while staying true to the original. They do not deviate too far away from what was first released but have put their own stamp on it. I guess this would have become a major part of the touring set for 2020 if something had not got in the way, but maybe next year.

Then we have the re-mastered 'De-constructing Ghosts', which is probably one of the most controversial releases from a prog band in the last 20+ years. A throwaway comment in a studio led to Stu handing over a bag of DAT tapes, allowing different people (including Dean and Neil) to use the album as a basis and then create something totally different in the dance space. Some of the tracks keep much of Stu's vocals and little else, while others are almost impossible to tie back to any of the songs on the album. At the time Galahad released it as a separate album, under the name Galahad Electric Company (keeping it separate both from the band and also their previous side project, Galahad Acoustic Quintet), and it was not exactly a resounding success. Many applauded Galahad for trying to do something different, while not enjoying the final version. I must confess I am the same and can honestly say that playing it for this review was the first time since I played it to review when it was originally released. It is not a style of music I understand or enjoy, yet at least Galahad were trying to push the envelope.

This is an album that is often overlooked in the Galahad canon, as it is the one between 'Sleepers' and 'Year Zero', but hopefully this extensive reissue will do something to correct those wrongs. I have certainly been playing it a great deal, and it is something that fans of their more recent albums really should go back and discover.

 Beyond the Realms of Euphoria by GALAHAD album cover Studio Album, 2012
3.83 | 308 ratings

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Beyond the Realms of Euphoria
Galahad Neo-Prog

Review by VianaProghead
Prog Reviewer

4 stars Review Nº 375

"Beyond The Realms Of Euphoria" is the tenth studio album of Galahad and was released in 2012. As happened with their previous two studio albums, their eighth and ninth studio albums "Empires Never Last" and "Battle Scars", respectively, Galahad invited once more Karl Groom, the guitarist of Threshold to produce this new album from them.

"Beyond The Realms Of Euphoria" is, unfortunately, the last studio album on which their bass player Neil Pepper participates, because he sadly passed way in September 2011, after loosing his battle with a cancer. Neil Pepper was the bass player of Galahad between 1992 and 2002 and between 2009 and 2011. He was substituted, in 2012 by the new bass player Mark Spencer. So, the line up of "Beyond The Realms Of Euphoria" is "Stuart Nicholson (vocals), Roy Keyworth (guitars), Dean Baker (keyboards), Neil Pepper (bass) and Spencer Luckman (drums).

"Beyond The Realms Of Euphoria" has eight tracks. The first track "Salvation I ? Overture" is a great and bright track to open the album. It's a very powerful instrumental song with a less symphonic approach being essentially an electronic track with some heavy guitar performance. It works very well because it seems to be a kind of a curtain to what is to come next. The second track "Salvation II ?Judgement Day" is another extremely powerful track with a truly amazing work by all band's members. It's a song full of countless changes of tempo and instrumental passages, contributing in the end to an immense final sound. This is a track where Nicholson provides his very own trademark contribution and that in some moments his voice reminds me the voice of Peter Nicholls of IQ. The third track "Guardian Angel" continues the general riveting and very powerful mood of the album. This is basically a neo- prog song with some solid heavy metal guitar sound magnificently headed by an excellent and unique keyboard work and with a very frantic and pulse rhythm. This is a perfect example how we can use the modern applications on the music and how it can work so well and result perfectly in creating a new sound of a band. The fourth track "Secret Kingdoms?" is another extremely powerful track, but this time it's a very heavy track that enters, in some moments, in the progressive metal music. It has a massive guitar work and a very impressive keyboard performance. We are in presence of an astonishing track where the guitar and the keyboards make a perfect and balanced harmony with Nicholson's voice very well seconded by the bass work and the drum machine performance. The fifth track "?And Secret Worlds" is another great song with a truly completely surprisingly intro led classical piano performance that shows clearly the new direction of Galahad's music. The track is build around the guitar and the piano running parallel lines through all the entire melody. Like Tszirmay, I can also see some presence of Brian May and Freddie Mercury of Queen on the track, especially the piano and the guitar parts. The sixth track "All In The Name Of Progress" is another very powerful and frenetic track with a truly amazing and brilliant vocal performance of Nicholson. It's a very aggressive song with Keyworth riffing with his guitar in the true Brian May's old tradition style and where we can even heard Nicholson growling like a wolf towards the end of the song in the dead metal style. The seventh track "Guardian Angel ? Reprise" is very melodic and grandiose like the entire album. Baker's flowing piano and church organ, angelic chorus and the tender voice of Nicholson take the track to a continuous and growing ethereal musical level. It represents the return of the previous track and it brings the album to a gentle and beautiful conclusion. The eighth and last track "Richelieu's Prayer 2012" is a CD version bonus of an original track from the band. It represents a revisit of a song originally released on their debut studio album "Nothing Is Written". As happened with their previous studio album "Battle Scars", the band has continued on its policy of reviving their past epic tracks. Like "Sleepers" of that album, this is a more powerful and heavier version of the original song in the same line of their new sound. This is a great version, more modern and fresh, that sounds better than ever.

Conclusion: With "Beyond The Realms Of Euphoria", Galahad continues their very own and solid path adding truly new pages into the neo-prog sub-genre. With this studio album, Galahad consolidated their new neo-prog musical approach, proving, that in this moment, they're probably one of the most prog band of that sub-genre. If with "Empires Never Last" and "Battle Scars" we could clearly see the change of the progressivity of the group, with "Beyond The Realms Of Euphoria" the band consolidated definitely their new style and showed that Galahad is a band that we need to count in the next future. "Beyond The Realms Of Euphoria" is, in my humble opinion, a perfect album without weak points. It's definitely more balanced and cohesive than "Battle Scars", and it's, for me, the natural and great successor of "Empires Never Last", despite it has never reached the brilliance of that album, and became as one of the essential prog pieces, nowadays. So, "Beyond The Realms Of Euphoria" remains, for me, as a very fine studio piece of music.

Prog is my Ferrari. Jem Godfrey (Frost*)

 Battle Scars by GALAHAD album cover Studio Album, 2012
3.81 | 292 ratings

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Battle Scars
Galahad Neo-Prog

Review by VianaProghead
Prog Reviewer

4 stars Review Nº 355

"Battle Scars" is the ninth studio album of Galahad and was released in 2012. As with their previous eighth studio album "Empires Never Last", Galahad invited once more Karl Groom, the guitarist of Threshold to produce the album. As the result and as happened with "Empires Never Last", the final sound of the album is a bit more guitar oriented with a slight metal edge. It offers a dark sound which adds modern electronic beats to their standard neo- prog approach.

"Battle Scars" is one of the two last studio albums on which their bass player Neil Pepper participates, the last was "Beyond The Realms Of Euphoria", because he sadly passed way, in September 2011, after loosing his battle with a cancer. Neil Pepper was the bass player of Galahad between 1992 and 2002 and between 2009 and 2011. He was substituted, in 2012 by the new bass player Mark Spencer. So, the line up of "Battle Scars" is Stuart Nicholson (vocals), Roy Keyworth (guitars), Dean Baker (keyboards), Neil Pepper (bass, keyboards and guitar) and Spencer Luckman (drums).

"Battle Scars" has eight tracks. The first track is the title track song "Battle Scars". It's a song with a classical musical overture with a gentle choral work and some moody orchestrations that makes a perfect prelude for the entrance of Stuart's voice and the rest of the band. This is an excellent and very powerful track to open the album and where we can feel the real mood of the rest of the album. The second track "Reach For The Sun" made a perfect and magnificent transition of the previous track and continues the mood of the beginning of the album with another very powerful track. It's a very fast progressive track with a very powerful guitar performance and also with a kind of a certain subtle keyboard work. This is a track with a true musical moment of rage and violence that shows perfectly what is the path of Galahad for the entire album. The third track "Singularity" is an extraordinary track and represents, for me, the greatest highlight of the album. This is a song with an excellent and delightful combination of sounds, a sublime catchy melody and with a very expressive and impressive beautiful vocal work that reminds me very strongly the vocals of Peter Nicholls of IQ. It also deserve special mention the interesting and clever guitar work and the delicate piano performance that ends the song. Concluding, the all harmony of the song is absolutely sublime and the final result is a perfect track. The fourth track "Bitter And Twisted" is another excellent and very powerful progressive track that reminds me their previous album "Empires Never Last" and that could fit very well on it. This is another song with great Stuart's vocal performance, an excellent choral work, very well supported by a massive guitar playing, nice keyboards and great drumming. The fifth track "Suspended Animation" is a track that sounds a little bit different from the rest of the album. I must confess that in a first impression it didn't touch my heart. However, after few other hearings I changed my opinion about it. This is truly a progressive track very intricate full of great keyboard and guitar works, but especially the bass work of the deceased Neil is absolutely unforgettable. The sixth track "Beyond The Barbed Wire" is another track that isn't so appellative, for me, as almost all the album is. Sincerely, in my humble opinion, we are in presence of a good song but with less quality and less creativity than other songs on the album. However, this is a very gentle and nice song with gentle vocals, an aggressive and repetitive guitar riff, a nice mellotron work and a modern drum beat. The seventh track "Seize The Day" was, for me, an astonishing track when I heard it for the first time. It's another extremely powerful track very colourful and with a very impressive work by all band's members. However, the highlight on it is the tremendous Dean's modern keyboard work that proves that he is a man with very skills. The eighth and last track "Sleepers 2012" is a CD version bonus of an original track from the band. It represents a revisit of the title track song originally released on their fourth studio album "Sleepers". This is a more powerful and heavier version of the original song in the same line of their new sound. This is a great version of that song that sounds modern and better than ever.

Conclusion: "Battle Scars" is, without any kind of doubts, a great prog album. When I reviewed their previous studio album "Empires Never Last" I thought that I hoped wouldn't happen with Galahad the same thing that happened with Pallas. That Galahad wouldn't fail with their next studio album after "Empires Never Last", as Pallas failed with "XXV", their following album after their masterpiece, "The Dreams Of Men". It seems that fortunately it didn't happen with Galahad. "Battle Scars" continues the path of "Empires Never Last" offering a new heavy sound of Galahad with an impressive and modern electronic sound that shows their new neo-prog musical approach. However, I agree with Conor Fynes when he says that the album has probably some little inconsistency and, for me, it's less cohesive than their previous album is. Nevertheless, with "Battle Scars", Galahad proves that they're a great force in the neo-prog scene.

Prog is my Ferrari. Jem Godfrey (Frost*)

 Seas Of Change by GALAHAD album cover Studio Album, 2018
3.92 | 314 ratings

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Seas Of Change
Galahad Neo-Prog

Review by friso
Prog Reviewer

2 stars Since I fell in love with Galahad's 'Empires Never Last' album of 2007 I've been going through their discography. Their latest record 'Seas of Change' was also released on vinyl, and I was really willing to give this album a fair chance. I must however admit I find this album very hard to appreciate.

Galahad is known for its neo-progressive style with a distinct electronic sounds (sometimes almost trance-genre like) and its gentle metal guitars. On this album guitarist Roy Keyworth is replaced by Lee Abraham, which has lead to a way less guitar-driven rocksound.

The symphonic opening parts with added political speech fragments (for instance by G W Bush) never seem to end. When the guitars finally kick in, they sound mandatory and without the usual urgency. Galahad has always displayed a lack of adult understanding of world politics in its lyrics, but here the naive pretentiousness really becomes a terrible burden on the music. After the ten minute intro the band just partly succeeds to pick up its pace its known for. The lack of real catchy and interesting ideas becomes immanent and the orchestrations by keyboardist Dean Baker and additional wind-instruments by Sarah Bolter can't save the day. At its core, good progressive rock needs solid interesting ideas.

On 'Battle Scars' and 'Beyond The Realms Of Euphoria' the band got away with its rather simplistic brand of progressive rock because it could still rely on its solid song-writing ideas and thriving heavy guitars. On this album there's simply too little left to reward the band with even a three star rating, in my opinion.

 Empires Never Last by GALAHAD album cover Studio Album, 2007
4.13 | 449 ratings

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Empires Never Last
Galahad Neo-Prog

Review by friso
Prog Reviewer

5 stars This album by Galahad is among the highest rated neo-progressive records and I must say; I already loved this record before I really got to know it. It has this great dark sound. A bit muddy in a mysterious way, yet so bright and detailed. By the way, I own the recent 2LP vinyl remaster. The great a capella opening reminds me of the soundtrack of the movie 'Ghost in the Shell' and the main riff of 'Defiance part 2' is simply amazing. After that the band just keeps on firing these songs in which I can't find a single original idea - but holy mother of god do they hit the right notes! On 'Empires Never Last' the band just can't seem to do anything wrong, which is precisely what separates it from all other Galahad albums.

The band combines heavy metal guitars, symphonic/melodic lead guitars, eighties vocals (AOR, metal and more Fish-like), modern electronics (trance) and gothic sounds of the more traditional neo-prog pallet. The lively vocals of Stuart Nicholson, whose performance outshines the poorly conceived political engaged lyrics, give every song those truly catchy & compelling moments. Another key element to the succes of 'Empires Never Last' is the aggressive performance of the heavier parts. The electronic music arrangements work really well because the band itself doesn't sound mechanical at all. I don't think I would have come to see this album as a neo- progressive record without others labeling it as such, to me it sounds closer to - for instance - 'Epica'-era Kamelot. Symphonic metal with a progressive twist.

The packaging and artwork of the 2LP is among the best I've ever seen. The bonustracks on the fourth side are even quite charming, especially the orchestral version of 'Empires Never Last'. Despite its flaws, this is a compelling and brilliant sounding album for me. I find myself waiting for a perfect moment to play this record. Five stars.

Thanks to kev rowland for the artist addition. and to kev rowland for the last updates

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