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KEITH EMERSON

Crossover Prog • United Kingdom


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Keith Emerson biography
Keith Noel Emerson - November 2, 1944 (Todmorden, UK) - March 11, 2016

KEITH EMERSON is regarded by many as the most influential keyboard player on progressive rock, even acquiring the name 'Hendrix Of The Organ' for his organ stabbing routines on stage with both THE NICE and EMERSON, LAKE & PALMER during the Sixties and Seventies. Outside of Jerry Lee Lewis, keyboard playing is normally for quiet characters who stare fixatedly at the keyboard usually not even acknowledging the existence of the audience.Not so for EMERSON, who would jump on top of the organ, ride it across the stage and then throw it away once he had his 'evil' way with it in a grand display of over the top showmanship.Audiences lapped it up, while critics complained about ''Keyboard masturbation'' and ''pretentiousness''.

This all somewhat hides the fact that EMERSON was a serious musician. Studying classical music from an early age, he was fascinated by the relationship between classical music (like Bach) and rock music. He fully understood the importance of counterpoint as shown when The Nice performed 'Brandenburger'. The Nice were also quite happy to play live with orchestra as demonstrated by the 1969 Fairfields concert of 'The Five Bridges Suite'.

In 1970 EMERSON was to focus his attentions towards the recently invented Moog Synthesiser. ELP were one of the most significant innovators of this instrument in prog. Tracks like 'Lucky Man','Toccata' and 'Tarkus' showed EMERSON's prowess on the Moog. He worked closely with the inventor himself to develop new keyboards and to refine its use. Robert Moog was a great fan of EMERSON and regarded him as the foremost player of the instrument.

EMERSON, however, was still keen to pick up his classical/orchestral ambitions, and in the mid Seventies composed his first (and to date only) Piano Concerto. This eventually (almost by accident) found its way onto ELP's 'Works Volume One' as the prog trio ventured further towards classical/jazz and symphonic music. However, the emergence of punk brought further cries of 'self indulgence' from music critics. ELP were to crash and burn, but EMERSON was still justifiably proud of his classical creation. Not only aired on classical radio, this fine piece of music has even been adopted by professional orchestras.

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KEITH EMERSON discography


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KEITH EMERSON top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.22 | 49 ratings
Inferno (OST)
1980
2.93 | 51 ratings
Honky
1981
3.21 | 31 ratings
Nighthawks (OST)
1981
3.84 | 10 ratings
Best Revenge (OST)
1982
3.00 | 1 ratings
Harmagedon (OST)
1983
2.97 | 18 ratings
Murderock - Uccide A Passo Di Danza (OST)
1983
2.88 | 24 ratings
The Christmas Album
1988
2.09 | 4 ratings
La Chiesa [Aka: The Church] (OST)
1989
2.58 | 15 ratings
Iron Man - Vol 1 (OST)
1994
3.30 | 26 ratings
Changing States
1995
3.84 | 39 ratings
Emerson Plays Emerson
2002
3.59 | 87 ratings
Keith Emerson Band featuring Marc Bonilla
2008
3.43 | 40 ratings
Keith Emerson Band: Three Fates Project
2012
3.80 | 10 ratings
Beyond The Stars
2018

KEITH EMERSON Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

2.86 | 18 ratings
Keith Emerson - Glenn Hughes - Marc Bonilla. Boys Club - Live From California
2009
4.18 | 27 ratings
Keith Emerson Band Featuring Marc Bonilla - Moscow
2011
3.44 | 20 ratings
Live From Manticore Hall (Emerson & Lake)
2014

KEITH EMERSON Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

4.76 | 19 ratings
Keith Emerson Band Featuring Marc Bonilla - Moscow
2010

KEITH EMERSON Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

2.26 | 4 ratings
Chord Sampler
1984
0.00 | 0 ratings
The Emerson Collection
1986
4.00 | 1 ratings
Best Works Collection
1992
3.81 | 17 ratings
At The Movies
2005
3.15 | 10 ratings
Hammer It Out - The Anthology
2005
3.04 | 21 ratings
Off The Shelf
2006

KEITH EMERSON Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

4.00 | 1 ratings
Honky Tonk Train Blues
1976
3.00 | 1 ratings
Taxi Ride (Rome)
1980
4.00 | 1 ratings
Inferno
1980
4.00 | 1 ratings
Salt Cay
1980
4.00 | 1 ratings
I'm A Man
1981
0.00 | 0 ratings
Rum-A-Ting
1982
5.00 | 1 ratings
Children Of The Light
1983
4.00 | 2 ratings
The Christmas Single
1995
3.40 | 5 ratings
The Keith Emerson Trio
2015

KEITH EMERSON Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 Keith Emerson Band featuring Marc Bonilla by EMERSON, KEITH album cover Studio Album, 2008
3.59 | 87 ratings

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Keith Emerson Band featuring Marc Bonilla
Keith Emerson Crossover Prog

Review by black/note

4 stars Since the first lead vocals on Miles Away pt.1 & 2 you can see that KE had found in Marc Bonilla almost another Lake. To say nothing of A Place To Hide! Probably Lake's tones & peaks of voice are easy-to-imitate - i.e. that you can see in Atomic Rooster's 1970 second album Death Walks Behind You (...) - but his melodic textures moulded since King Crimson's "school-times" were always very personal, immediatly recognizable: so, we applaud (for) Marc Bonilla, who was able to peak Greg Lake's essential valid-ly re-making it in his own way! Obiouvsly, Lake's "phantom" appears very close also in The Art Of Falling Down, which reminds the EL&P rough moods of the early '70... But - in my opinion - in this beautiful 2008 EDEL issued album Marc's forte is the wary, subtle treatment of lead guitar lines: specialists & aficionados noticed that presence of guitar enriches & upgrades sounds of the EL&P derivative groups, whether in KE Band here & in 1995 (1989) Changing States played by Tim Pierce, or in Carl Palmer's 2014 EL&P Legacy played by Paul Bielatovic. On both situations, lead guitar effectively provides to sustain KE's melodic plots, high-lighting their characteristic shape!

All over Band Feat. Marc Bonilla Keith displays the whole range of his instruments, from Grand Piano to Pipe Organ, through the magniloquence of Hammond Organ & the update effects of his Custom Moog Modular Synth, always proving himself proud & rough & keen. Keith was from rare musicians able to get involved, to explore their limits, to cross/break them! Perhaps less spectacular & virtuoso than in EL&P fantastic live rides, surely more peremptory & authoritative, he always makes the point, then apparently disappears from the front line, at last re-emerges - as you can see for example on Marche Train - with his Moog or Hammond peculiar sharp shades!

In a few words: maturity, experience & enormous talent. KE this was! Therefore we all regret his sudden disappearance in 2016. The artistic heritage he leaves is immense, and - in my opinion - even today unexplorated, sometimes underrated by short-sighted persons, shelf-styled connoisseurs!

 Emerson Plays Emerson by EMERSON, KEITH album cover Studio Album, 2002
3.84 | 39 ratings

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Emerson Plays Emerson
Keith Emerson Crossover Prog

Review by black/note

4 stars Surely many albums feat. Keith Emerson, from the Nice to the EL&P, deserved major flavours in developing brilliant- burning-bursting IDEAS in a sort of Blade Runner's world, always on the ridge between different styles... with K's keyboard acrobatics, especially at the Hammond organ & the Robert Moog legendary synth.

Surely - on the contrary! - THIS album feat. KE only at the acoustic piano - i.e. usually a nine-foot Steinway Grand - reveals & demonstrates The Other Side of K's imagination: here he's maybe a finger-breaker, whether in the classical Creole Dance originally written by Alberto Ginastera, or in the boogie-honky tonk-ragtime inspired pieces, like Cajun Alley, Roll 'n Jelly, Hammer It Out; here he's certainly a sort of magic wizard, in depicting smooth paysages, imaginary landscapes of his vast mind not less than (of) his profound heart.

That's The Project KEY! Recorded in different times, the 22 short pieces we found in this album can be distributed per genres/styles: jazz efforts, in which B&W Blues literally overwhelms a clumsy, mechanical Summertime; soundtrack traces, from the Best Revenge series and Lucio Fulci's 1984 italian thriller Murderock; early jazz oriented rags - i.e. Jelly Roll Morton, Eubie Blake, Meade Lux Lewis - including Honky Tonk Train Blues recorded in 1976 with "monster" Oscar Peterson (!) at BBC TV Piano Party Programme; a true GEM, the Creole Dance by Alberto Ginastera - i.e. Keith re- arranged it... with rough/sincere composer's & his wife's approval (!); live pieces - i.e. For Kevin (Gilbert) recorded at Gorge at George, Washington 1996 and Close To Home, Royal Albert Hall, London 1992.

At last - but they connect & amalgamate - not less than eight meditative & introspective pieces, seemingly piano improvisations... but they aren't (!) Here Keith, afar from sleight-of-hands demonstrations, is more than once Close To The Edge, that's always on the ridge between music & painting, playing nothing but the essential - i.e. the Vagrant is a dedication by Keith to his Steinway Grand Piano which is "vagrant" as him... and the Outgoing Tide contains an evident quote from Ludovico Einaudi piano work.

In a few words, Plays Emerson isn't a typical K's album: it's one that classical pianists (!) - especially the ones who dig jazz roots & american composers of the XX century - can esteem & appreciate more & more! nb. Sleeve Notes by Keith are translated in German & in Italian too...

 Changing States by EMERSON, KEITH album cover Studio Album, 1995
3.30 | 26 ratings

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Changing States
Keith Emerson Crossover Prog

Review by black/note

4 stars Remastered for the Esoteric 2014 edition, originally issued in 1995, three years after EL&P's Black Moon, but recorded BEFORE it in 1989, Changing States is probably the finest album of complainted great keyboard master & wizard Keith Emerson: he was a visionary! man, he was able to interlace baroque music & Bob Dylan's favourites, romantic symphonies & barrelhouse pianos, jazz efforts & classical suggestions. He composed, wrote, played, IMAGINED memorable suites of pieces, like the Three Fates, Pictures at an Exhibition from Musorgskij, Tarkus, the Endless Enigma, Karn-Evil... To say nothing of the Nice! In CS we actually can see true moments of KE's transistion from the EL&P - more & more Lake-oriented - to the new band featuring talented musicians such Kevin Gilbert & Mark Bonilla, in the '90 years so far from us... CS is a sort of molecular improvement, seemingly a strange fruit of inspiration where "disco" "classical" "jazz" & many other styles can "kaleydoscope" one into another. That's the KEY for this intriguing KE's project! Surely sustained & inspired by skilled guys as guitarist Tim Pierce & especially Kevin Gilbert - who suddenly & tragically died in 1996 at the age of 29 - Keith fully developes his imagination & technique, not only for the sparkling brilliance of the Hammond organ, but also for the IDEAS spread all over the pieces... In Shelter From the Rain & The Band Keeps Playing the band featuring Kevin Gilbert... keeps playing a sort of up-to date "disco" seemingly "Hair" inspired. In Ballad & Interlude KE's piano is prominent, but soft & meditative. In Montagues & Capulets - Romeo & Juliet in Black Moon - and also in Abaddon's Bolero form Trilogy, classical suggestions are evident, as tipically in KE's work from the Nice to the EL&P - i.e. in Hebrew tradition Abaddon is the Despoiler, the Destructor, the Angel of the Abyss, finally the Evil, the Inferno... Dulcis in fundo, Another Frontier - Changing States in Black Moon - & especially The Church - main theme for Dario Argento's 1989 horror movie - deserve major flavours: great essays of KE's Hammond treatment, with breathless descending chord progressions in Frontier, & many running shades & rotating blades in The Church solo, which Keith notices was remaked in better, insisting Kevin! However, what's noticeable is probably the Album Project, which admirably alternates "disco" tracks seemingly "musical" inspired, smooth & meditative ballads/interludes mainly for the piano, "classical" inspired themes, the "gem effort" George Gershwin's standard jazz - i.e. KE wasn't properly a jazz pianist! Finally the two astounding aforementioned originals Another Frontier & The Church: they both abundantly worth the price of the entire album!
 Taxi Ride (Rome) by EMERSON, KEITH album cover Singles/EPs/Fan Club/Promo, 1980
3.00 | 1 ratings

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Taxi Ride (Rome)
Keith Emerson Crossover Prog

Review by SouthSideoftheSky
Special Collaborator Symphonic Team

— First review of this album —
3 stars The best of Inferno

I don't normally rate singles unless they offer something different from the full-length album from which the music in question was taken (like a single edit, alternative mix, or a non-album track), but I make an exception on this occasion as I think that this single deserves a higher rating than the Inferno soundtrack album overall. While the album is a largely orchestral affair, this single release brings together two of its perhaps "rockiest" tracks. The excellent a-side Taxi Ride (Rome) features drums, bass, and synths in addition to piano, and the track would not have been out of place on an ELP album. The b-side Mater Tenebrarum is equally strong, and features a gothic choir and organ. These are my two favourite tracks off the Inferno soundtrack, and I enjoy them in isolation a great deal more than I do the soundtrack album as a whole. Which is why I award an extra star to this single compared to the album.

 La Chiesa [Aka: The Church] (OST) by EMERSON, KEITH album cover Studio Album, 1989
2.09 | 4 ratings

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La Chiesa [Aka: The Church] (OST)
Keith Emerson Crossover Prog

Review by SouthSideoftheSky
Special Collaborator Symphonic Team

2 stars Go to hell

This official soundtrack album for the Italian horror movie La Chiesa ("The Church") features four pieces performed by Keith Emerson. These are The Church (Main Theme); Prelude 24 (From Well Tempered Clavier); The Possession, and The Church Revisited, all four of which have also been included on the Keith Emerson "At the Movies" 3CD set. Emerson's contributions add up to about 13 minutes of music all in all.

The rest of the music on this soundtrack is by other artists, including several tracks by Italian Prog band Goblin (who specialized in movie soundtracks). On their own the Goblin tracks do not stand out, but they work rather well in between Emerson's. (However, it would have been more interesting if they had worked together on the same pieces.)

Had we been spared the vocal tracks by Zooming On The Zoo and Definitive Gaze, which are both downright awful, this album would be a much more enjoyable listen. Since Emerson's contributions are by far the best here, I would recommend the At the Movies release instead.

 Keith Emerson Band featuring Marc Bonilla by EMERSON, KEITH album cover Studio Album, 2008
3.59 | 87 ratings

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Keith Emerson Band featuring Marc Bonilla
Keith Emerson Crossover Prog

Review by TenYearsAfter

4 stars Prologue: Jimi Hendrix changed the rock with his electric guitar, Keith Emerson changed the prog, with his Hammond organ. And due to his legendary Moog solo in Lucky Man the world got familiar with that sensational synthesizer sound. But recent years Keith Emerson couldn't cope with his hand injuries and the negative remarks on the Internet, he had turned into a very unlucky man, deeply depressed. And what a cynical similarities with the Lucky Man lyrics: Keith was also a wealthy man who died with a bullet in his head, after committing suicide in his house in Santa Monica, USA, on March 11, 2016. This review is dedicated to Keith Emerson who became only 71 years old, but is considered as a progrock legend who made so many progheads happy with his jaw dropping work on the Hammond and Moog and with his sensational stage antics.

Chapter 1: In 2006 Keith Emerson and his band appeared on the the Moogfest 2006 festival, watching the DVD I was blown away by their performance, what a powerful sound, what a splendid interplay! And what an awesome extra dimension Marc Bonilla delivered, a big hand for this killer guitar player. But it is also stunning to watch Keith Emerson on his Hammond, Moog and modern keyboards, he looked like reborn. How sad that ten years later he decided to commit suicide, only 71 years old. After the acclaimed Moogfest 2006 gig Keith Emerson made an album with his band, again featuring the excellent Marc Bonilla. I have bought the limited CD/DVD edition.

Chapter 2 - The CD: The album starts with a 15-piece suite (30 minutes) that is based upon the horror novel The House Of Ocean Born Mary, it turned out that both Keith as Marc had read this book. Keith Emerson delivers a wide range of keyboard sounds: from 3 short pieces featuring the majestic pipe organ and tender Grand piano to bombastic work on the Hammond and Moog. I love it and I am delighted about the dynamic and powerful rhythm- section. In my opinion Keith Emerson couldn't have made a better choice with guitarplayer (and singer) Marc Bonilla: he is outstanding, from wonderful twanging electric guitar with melancholical vocals (somewhere between Greg Lake and John Wetton) and sensitive soli with howling runs to fiery and heavy work with rock as the main ingredient. He is also a very strong counterpart to Keith his bombastic and virtuosic keyboard sound. In the dreamy Miles Away Pt 3 he blends acoustic ' and electric guitar, followed by a strongly build-up solo with a fiery undertone. This suite is concluded in a very exciting way with the piece Finale featuring fluent and swinging rhythms with captivating work on guitar and keyboards, culminating in an end with biting guitar, a propulsive rhythm-section and swirling Hammond, like Seventies ELP, great! Then four compositions with each another atmosphere. The pretty polished rock song The Art Of Falling Down featuring a sensational synthesizer solo and fiery guitar work. Flashy and bombastic keyboards and powerful guitar in the fluent Malambo. Swinging piano and strong in the catchy Gametime. And a great build-up in the final track The Parting that starts mellow but gradually turns into more compelling (with the focus on Keith his Hammond organ).

Chapter 3 - The DVD: One can divide this DVD into 3 sections: first 7 songs that deal about the making of the album, then a section that features 10 minutes with color and black and white pictures and finally a live concert in Hungary (2006).

The first part (25 minutes) shows the musicians in the studio and their stories about the album (like Keith tells how he met Marc and we can enjoy a hilarious part with the burning Grand piano in a desolate landscape, even the fire brigade visited this happening). The next part is about pictures that were made in the studio, during the concert and in the landscape where the burning Grand piano stood. Very beautiful and I was very pleased with the live shots featuring Keith Emerson on his modular Moog and with the sensational Moog ribbon controler, like the early ELP days! The final part contains a 20 minutes version of the 2006 Hungary concert with four songs: the exciting Welcome Back with propulsive guitar and Keith on his Hammond, the sensational Piano Concerto 3rd Movement with jaw-dropping interplay between Keith and Marc (what a chemistry), the powerful rock song Living Sin and finally the swinging Bitches Crystal with Keith freaking out on the piano. And lots of smiling faces because of that, great to see how virtuosity and humor are combined, that doesn't happen very often in progrock.

To me it often looks or Keith and Marc are brothers: the one loves keyboards, the other guitar and both understand each other perfectly, that is a great factor you can discover on this CD/DVD set. Keith Emerson had founded a great band, created strong music and discovered a stunning guitar player, highly recommended!

Epilogue: During the Fallen Angels tour in 2017 Eddie Jobson paid tribute to Keith Emerson (and John Wetton) with an earthshaking Moog synthesizer solo during Lucky Man, accompanied by Marc Bonilla, full circle!

 Best Revenge (OST) by EMERSON, KEITH album cover Studio Album, 1982
3.84 | 10 ratings

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Best Revenge (OST)
Keith Emerson Crossover Prog

Review by proghaven

4 stars Every artist (musician, poet, painter, writer etc) applies to the audience and expects a feedback. Keith Emerson was one of the greatest and most influential musicians of the 20th century but got a very strange feedback from his audience. The first four studio albums and one live album from ELP collected megatons of delights from listeners, and after that it looked like listeners suddenly lost their capacity to express delight.

No I cannot say that the audience rejected Emerson's newer ideas... but I also cannot say that the audience accepted them. Emerson offered his brilliant Piano Concerto No. 1 - but the public obviously preferred him to produce a new Tarkus. Emerson wrote his excellent Memoirs Of An Officer And A Gentleman - but the public wanted a new Trilogy.

Perhaps that's why in most of Emerson's later works, no matter more or less successful, no matter symphonic, jazzy, rocky or poppy, apart from the great talent, also some embarrassment can be heard. It looked - and sounded - like the musician was in doubts about what the audience expects from him, and tried to guess what, instead of doing what he wanted to do himself. Though most likely he did guess that he'd better make another Brain Salad Surgery to satisfy customers, but he supposedly lost interest to all the brain salad surgeries in the world before that. Maybe it would be going too far to say that the audience in response turned away from Emerson after 1974, but the listeners definitively weren't loyal enough to follow his creative searches.

And probably that's one of the reasons why no 1980s and later Emerson's effort reached the status of a masterpiece: the author did his work constantly glancing behind his audience and their possible reaction, instead of giving creative freedom to himself. His early 1980s albums, not only this one but also Inferno and Nighthawks, show that he'd prefer to explore the area of orchestral (symphonic) music in detail, but the public waited for a new Karn Evil 9 and enjoyed remembrances about Emerson's cooperation with Robert Moog.

Maybe I'm wrong but it seems to me that some... well, I'd say some constraint of the music of Best Revenge and other (not only soundtrack) 1980s and later albums is partially because Emerson constantly failed to guess what the public wanted from him. So, perhaps the best way to enjoy Best Revenge is to forget about The Three Fates, The Endless Enigma and Tank, and try to guess what the musician wanted from us.

 At The Movies by EMERSON, KEITH album cover Boxset/Compilation, 2005
3.81 | 17 ratings

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At The Movies
Keith Emerson Crossover Prog

Review by SouthSideoftheSky
Special Collaborator Symphonic Team

3 stars Playing for keeps

Keith Emerson At The Movies is a three disc compilation featuring tracks that Emerson recorded for various films between 1980 and 2004. Rather than opting for a chronological presentation, the music is ordered geographically with each disc holding music from American, Italian, and Japanese films respectively.

I will start from the back and discuss disc three first as I think that is by far the most valuable of the three discs. This disc is primarily devoted to music from the 2004 film Godzilla Final Wars which, as far as I am aware, is not available in this form as a standalone release but can only be found on this compilation (an "official soundtrack" is available but, as far as I understand, that one also has music by others interspersed with Keith's music). The Godzilla album occupies tracks 7-20 of the disc and my advice is to separate out these tracks and listen to them in isolation from the rest. Here Keith is in good form and this music is generally enjoyable and at moments even fairly ELP-like despite the programmed drums and absence of vocals.

The first six tracks of the third disc is from an animated Japanese film from 1987 called Harmagedon. These tracks are, I suppose, also hard to get hold of outside this compilation. The original vinyl release had one side of Emerson's music (while the other side was devoted to music by someone called Derek Austin). These tunes are generally great, perhaps the best being Challenge Of The Psionic Fighter which features a killer synth solo. Children Of Light is a vocal track but the rest is instrumental.

Moving on to the second disc which features music from Italian movies, we have music from the films Murderock, La Chiesa, and Inferno. In the case of the latter, the entire album is featured including the bonus track from the standalone CD release. Inferno occupies tracks 1-16 of disc two. The Inferno music is predominantly orchestral in nature (similar in style to Keith's Piano Concerto from ELP's Works Vol. 1.) and as such it is not my cup of tea. There are however some non-orchestral tracks like Taxi Ride which is pretty good. The following four tracks are from La Chiesa which means "the church", and not surprisingly it includes church organ. This music too is available on a separate release but that one features music by other people in addition to Keith's contributions. It is nice to have just Emerson's music concentrated. Murderock is almost complete here but a few tracks are omitted compared to the standalone release (which I have reviewed separately).

The first disc of At The Movies is devoted to music from films coming out of the USA. The soundtrack to Nighthawks, which is also available separately, is included in its entirety and occupies tracks 1-11. This music is towards the jazzier side and is not very impressive to my ears. Tracks 12-15 and track 18 of this disc are from a film called Best Revenge. The latter soundtrack too was released separately, but it is very hard to find. Comparing to the standalone release the running order is different and one track from the original release seems to be missing (I say "seems" because I'm only comparing with the entry for that album here on Prog Archives, I have never heard the original). I don't know why the running order was altered but I recommend reproducing the original track order when you listen (even though one track is, as I said, not included). In particular I think you should listen to The Dreamer and The Runner in that order as these two tracks seem to be made for each other. Together with Wha'dya Mean these three instrumentals are pretty good. The origin of tracks 16 and 17 is unknown to me but I presume they come from the same sessions as the Best Revenge material.

Strangely, nothing at all is included from Keith's soundtrack for Iron Man.

Overall, this is a rather nice collection to have with lots of good music on it as well as some less good music. However, I think that reproducing the stuff that is already available separately was unnecessary. Perhaps it would have been better if they had focused on making the standalone releases of these various soundtrack albums more widely available in their original and complete from on CD. The Godzilla music too would have deserved a standalone release with just Keith's music.

Deciding on a rating for this collection isn't easy, but discounting those inclusions that can be rated separately I think that three stars is appropriate here primarily on the basis of the material on the third disc.

 Iron Man - Vol 1 (OST) by EMERSON, KEITH album cover Studio Album, 1994
2.58 | 15 ratings

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Iron Man - Vol 1 (OST)
Keith Emerson Crossover Prog

Review by SouthSideoftheSky
Special Collaborator Symphonic Team

3 stars Data In, Chaos Out

Iron Man is one of Keith Emerson's several soundtrack albums, this time for an animated superhero film. The album is subtitled "Vol. 1", but I don't know if any further volumes where planned at the time. Even though I am personally not familiar with the Iron Man comic or with the film for which this music was created, I think that Emerson has captured the superhero feel here in musical form quite well! The music definitely comes across as "heroic". The brief opening number is only just over a minute and it presents the main theme which recurs many times throughout the album.

Completely instrumental and featuring only Emerson's keyboards and some programmed drums, this music reminds me of Geoff Downes excellent mid-80's "New Dance Orchestra" album The Light Program. However, even if there are many strong melodic ideas here, Emerson's Iron Man is sadly not as well structured as The Light Program. The biggest drawback is its excessive length. Clocking in at over 70 minutes I think it could have benefited considerably from being cut down to, say, 45 minutes. In that way the many good musical ideas present here could have been condensed into a stronger cocktail instead of being slightly diluted.

Still, despite being a bit rough around the edges I really do enjoy listening to Iron Man Vol. 1. Despite the absence of proper drums, bass, and vocals, there are several ELP-like moments and fans of that band and of Emerson should not miss out on this obscure keyboard fest!

 Murderock - Uccide A Passo Di Danza (OST) by EMERSON, KEITH album cover Studio Album, 1983
2.97 | 18 ratings

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Murderock - Uccide A Passo Di Danza (OST)
Keith Emerson Crossover Prog

Review by SouthSideoftheSky
Special Collaborator Symphonic Team

3 stars Don't go in the shower!

Murderrock is the title of an Italian film for which the present album is the official soundtrack. I have not seen the film (which I'm guessing is some kind of horror movie), but I was positively surprised with the high quality music found here. Of course I am a massive fan of Emerson, Lake & Palmer, but I was never much impressed with Emerson's solo output until I came across this very nice soundtrack album. The best that I have so far heard from Emerson's solo works (not counting the Keith Emerson Band).

If you are a fan Alan Parsons Project you might like this album which has a similar mixture of electronic instrumentals and vocal numbers featuring different singers. The vocal numbers are certainly a bit on the cheesy side, but the instrumentals are mostly great! Some themes recur throughout the album.

I enjoy this!

Thanks to raff for the artist addition. and to Quinino for the last updates

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