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ETERNAL WANDERERS

Neo-Prog • Russia


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Eternal Wanderers biography
ETERNAL WANDERERS is a progressive rock band from Moscow, formed by the Kanevsky sisters in 1997. Since the very beginning of their activity the musicians have been working with complex musical structures, trying to reproduce in sound everything that they love in progressive rock. In 1998 the band gave their first concert, after which they became an essential part of Moscow's underground scene, attracting the people with the uncommonness of their live performances, like using psychedelic slide shows on a big screen behind the stage. In 2006 the band's lineup finally stabilized, so soon after EW entered the studio to record their first full-length album, "The Door To A Parallel World", which took them more than a year. All the songs on this concept disc are lyrically uniform, telling of parallel worlds, fantastical planets etc. Musically it ranges from Prog-Metal instrumental passages to dreamy New-Age soundscapes. EW play Psychedelic Neo Prog with female vocals and may interest fans of MOSTLY AUTUMN, KARNATAKA, MAGENTA, PENDRAGON, THE BLACK NOODLE PROJECT, BLACKFIELD etc.

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ETERNAL WANDERERS discography


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ETERNAL WANDERERS top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.31 | 29 ratings
The Door To A Parallel World
2008
3.86 | 39 ratings
So Far And So Near
2011
3.81 | 70 ratings
The Mystery of the Cosmic Sorrow
2016
3.83 | 30 ratings
Homeless Soul
2020

ETERNAL WANDERERS Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

ETERNAL WANDERERS Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

ETERNAL WANDERERS Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

ETERNAL WANDERERS Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

3.00 | 2 ratings
Journey Out of Time (Unreleased Album)
2017

ETERNAL WANDERERS Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 Homeless Soul by ETERNAL WANDERERS album cover Studio Album, 2020
3.83 | 30 ratings

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Homeless Soul
Eternal Wanderers Neo-Prog

Review by Matti
Prog Reviewer

4 stars This band comes from Moscow, it was founded in 1997 by sisters Elena and Tatyana Kanevskaya, who have also written all music on this fourth album (my introduction to them). While there are a lot of female fronted neo prog groups, especially in England and Poland, it seems to be all too rare to find one that's sovereignly led by women.

Three members of this quartet are multi- instrumentalists and have produced the album together. The fourth one concentrates on drums and percussion -- and is excellent at that. Both ladies play keyboards, Elena is also the main vocalist and Tatyana plays primarily guitars. The keys-oriented sound is truly finely produced, it is clear, spatial and full of dynamics.

The brief opening track begins with echoed a cappella vocals, the synth background gradually growing. I like the female vocals that are relatively deep and strong. I have no good reference in mind, perhaps it's something like Alannah Myles with a folky hint of Lena Willemark? 'Eternal Wanderer' with an emphasis on chorus is clearly the song that most sticks to the listener's mind, whether it's a good or a bad thing. The third track is a powerful and proggy near-instrumental. Imagine Rush teaming with, say, Jordan Rudess. Oh yes, if you thought that women make only music that's sensitive, emotional, mellow, etc., this band widens your horizon.

'The Cradle of a Hurricane' is an intense prog instrumental with a metallic edge, and it's followed by poppier and softer 'I Wanna Give My Love for You'. Dmitry Shtatnov throws in some sitar! In fact this hour- long album is so diverse and eclectic in its wide spectre between accessible pop and psychedelically flavoured prog intensity that Neo Prog label is an understatement.

Spacey instrumental 'In Search of the Antiworld' may be fave track. I'm not fond of 'Homeless Soul' featuring the (treated) main vocals of Dmitry, but as a whole this is such an exciting, original and well made album.

 Homeless Soul by ETERNAL WANDERERS album cover Studio Album, 2020
3.83 | 30 ratings

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Homeless Soul
Eternal Wanderers Neo-Prog

Review by nick_h_nz

4 stars [Originally published at The Progressive Aspect]

Samsara. A word in Sanskrit that means 'wandering'. The aimless wandering through successive states of mundane existence. The endless cycle of birth, growth, decay and death. Eternal wandering of a homeless soul. It seems obvious, but I have to admit it didn't occur to me at all before listening to the music. I made no connection from the band name to the album title, or from either to the idea of Samsara. The album artwork appeared to imply a more science fiction inspired tale ' and, indeed that tale is told ' but the opening track of this fourth album from Russian band Eternal Wanderers almost immediately opened my mind. A quick look through the lyrics (something I almost never do, and even less often before having listened to the music), and although the cosmic story was there, it seemed to me to be an allegorical tale. Samsara.

Homeless Soul is bookended by Invested With Mystery, the abbreviated version of which opens the album, suffixed as a prologue. It sounded reminiscent of Indian music, even though there was no noticeable Indian instrumentation. Even that alone would likely not have made me make the mental leaps required to join the dots, had I not listened to several albums already this year that play upon the theme of Samsara. Kala by Mobius, Metempsychosis by hubris. and The Return by Deep Energy Orchestra all recreate the idea of Samsara musically. Golden Caves use Samsara as a reverse allegory in their song of the same name, further describing the theme of their album, Dysergy ' addressing the idea of dysergy in oneself, of not feeling complete, of being disconnected or in discord with oneself or the world. Eternal wandering of a homeless soul.

If it were not clear to begin with, when the album ends with the full version of Invested With Mystery, all that seemed missing from the prologue is included, in all its glory. Although the theme is instantly recognisable from the prologue, it is completed by the inclusion of the sitar. It's fuller and brighter, and the additional verses provide final recognition that this may be an end, but it's not the end, and the cycle continues. But I'm getting ahead of myself, as an awful lot goes on in between these two parts of Invested With Mystery ' and what a trip it is!

I'll admit that the track Eternal Wanderer doesn't do a lot for me, and I find it the least interesting, musically. I won't go so far as to say I find it boring, but it does come close, and if I weren't reviewing the album, I might not have ventured past it. For that reason alone, I'm glad that reviewing made me persist, as the album becomes very good very quickly from this point on. Transformations is an amazing piece, largely instrumental, and some very classy symphonic space prog, showing the prowess of all four members of the band. The second instrumental part, after the brief vocals, is easily one of my favourite passages on the album.

Meteor, which follows, is beautiful. After the intensity of Transformations, it provides a change of pace, while maintaining the spacey feel. The bridge after three minutes is simply gorgeous, and guest musician Andy Didorenko's violin is sublime. But all that has come before is pretty much now blown away by album centrepiece, and longest track, The Cradle of a Hurricane, an instrumental suite comprising six parts. It's marvellous. It reminds me a little of Progenie Terrestre Pura ' though without the blast beats and black metal.

And as Meteor provided the comedown after Transformations, so does I Wanna Give My Life For You ' at least, to begin with. It's a twisted mix of Abba balladry and psychedelic spaciness that really ought not to work as well as it does. It builds and builds, and has some wonderful almost ambient soundscapes breaking the intensity briefly, before a triumphant return. This track really does allow the Kanevskaya sisters, who write the music and lyrics for Eternal Wanderers, to truly shine ' with both their vocals and their playing. I Wanna Give My Life For You surprised me by quickly becoming one of my favourites on the album, as it's definitely not in my normal comfort zone. There was so much potential for this song to be cringeworthy, but it's simply brilliant.

Chaos of Reason is a little anti-climactic afterwards, but, as with the preceding song, this is deceiving. It's length proves to be its advantage, as although it may not feel so exciting to begin with, it's hard not to be swept away, especially when the song kicks up a gear after around two and a half minutes. At this point, the song becomes almost entirely instrumental, including a very nifty jazzy passage, before some quite beautiful wordless vocalisations, which I find more enjoyable than Pink Floyd's similarly spacey Great Gig in the Sky. One final verse, and then it's back to another enjoyable instrumental ' In Search of the Antiworld. Again, the band excel.

And it's back to the beginning. The album began with Invested With Mystery and Eternal Wanderer, and ends with Homeless Soul and Invested With Mystery. Two title tracks of a sort, bookended by a track which is the end of the beginning of the end' Homeless Soul is infinitely more interesting for me than Eternal Wanderer, though. I absolutely love the twisted and distorted spoken word. I wouldn't want to hear a whole album of this style, but it sure provides an impact after the beautiful vocals of the Elena and Tatyana Kanevskaya. The music, too, is twisted and tortured. Until finally, Invested With Mystery provides, if not resolution, resignation. The cycle of life and death is eternal. Samsara. Eternal wandering of a homeless soul.

 Homeless Soul by ETERNAL WANDERERS album cover Studio Album, 2020
3.83 | 30 ratings

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Homeless Soul
Eternal Wanderers Neo-Prog

Review by kev rowland
Special Collaborator Honorary Reviewer

4 stars I have been fortunate to hear quite a lot of Russian progressive rock over the years, and in many ways the scene over there makes me think a great deal of the Polish prog scene in that there are some amazing bands which many in the west would really enjoy if only they knew about them. A case in point is Eternal Wanderers who are now back with their fourth album, which for any proghead should be a time for much celebration. I first came across them was Andy Didorenko (Lost World Band ? another great Russian outfit) put them in touch with me when they released their last album, 'The Mystery of the Cosmic Sorrow' and I enjoyed it so much I went backwards and discovered the others as well.

The group was formed by the Kanevskaya sisters Elena (lead vocals, keyboards, synthesizers, samplers, theremin) and Tatyana (guitars, backing vocals, keyboards, synthesizers, samplers), more than 20 years ago while Elena's husband Dmitry Shtatnov (bass, keyboards, synthesizers, lead vocal on "Homeless Soul", backing vocals, samplers, sitar, custom DSP algorithms) has also been there since the early days while this is the third album for Sergey Rogulya (drums, percussion). So the line-up has been incredibly consistent in some ways, but the flute has historically been an important instrument to the band and now they have settled down to just the core quartet with some additional vocalists on one song and a violin on one more.

Musically this is easily their most vast and compelling album to date. There are times when it sounds like a science fiction soundtrack, while at others it is almost modern classical with pretty much everything in between with pop, rock, prog, avant garde and even ethnic thrown into the mix. Elena is a wonderful singer, yet strangely for a band who has such a powerful weapon in their arsenal it is used rather sparingly and there are large areas in the album where the band operate as an instrumental quartet. Sergey is an expressive drummer who knows his way around the whole of what sounds like a very large kit, dramatically changing his attack according to what else is going on, while Dmitry is a multi-instrumentalist who changes what he is doing according to the need (the sparing use of sitar is both surprising yet fits perfectly in the context). Then there are the sisters. Elena is of course the main keyboard player, but with two others also adding to the mix there is a wide range of keyboard sounds and styles at play, yet it never seems massively over the top (and everyone loves a theremin, even Sheldon!). But what cuts through this bank of sound is not only the rhythm section but the guitar of Tatyana, who approaches the music in many different styles. She can be staccato and choppy, allow herself to provide Hackett-style influences, or even come at it in a few heavier manner altogether. It is the huge amount of musical styles on show which makes this such as compelling album, yet always with a cinematic quality which makes me think of 'Blade Runner', and "Homeless Soul" in particular would have been a perfect fit, even though it does seem rather strange to hear it as Dmitry here is providing the lead as he plays the part.

This is an album which takes the listener on a journey, one where the destination is unknown, as is the route one is taking to get there, but it is a case of sitting back and enjoying the ride. It may have been a few years since the last album but there is no doubt this is their finest to date, and one which I heartily recommend. If you have yet to come across the wonderful progressive sound of Eternal Wanderers then start here.

 The Mystery of the Cosmic Sorrow by ETERNAL WANDERERS album cover Studio Album, 2016
3.81 | 70 ratings

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The Mystery of the Cosmic Sorrow
Eternal Wanderers Neo-Prog

Review by Windhawk
Special Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

4 stars Russian band ETERNAL WANDERERS were formed by Elena and Tatyana Kanevskaya in 1997. For a number of years they remained the only permanent members of the band, but at some point they solidified into a quartet of musicians that have remained the core of the band ever since. The band have three albums to their name so far. "The Mystery of the Cosmic Sorrow" is the most recent of these, and was released through Russian label MALS Records in 2016.

If you haven't come across this double CD by Eternal Wanderers yet, "The Mystery of the Cosmic Sorrow" is a production many should take a closer look at. It may not have the widest general appeal, but at least among those who tend to enjoy a band being expressively eclectic, this is a production that most certainly merits a spin or three. A captivating, and in some respects, unique album by a modern day progressive rock band.

 So Far And So Near by ETERNAL WANDERERS album cover Studio Album, 2011
3.86 | 39 ratings

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So Far And So Near
Eternal Wanderers Neo-Prog

Review by kev rowland
Special Collaborator Honorary Reviewer

4 stars

2011 saw the second album from Eternal Wanderers, and by now they had increased to a quintet with the addition of Dmitry Drogunov on flute, plus some guest musicians. To my ears this album is more complex than the debut, with Tatyana providing some wonderful guitar runs which show just how important rock can be to the progressive scene. Yes, she knows how to provide widdly widdly with the best of them, and can also provide basic backing when it is time for Elena to move to the front, but she has a mastery of many styles outside those normally used within the progressive scene and the album is all the better for it.

Having an additional melodic instrument in a flute has also allowed the band to spread their wings musically, while Elena also seems to be far more comfortable providing string keyboard solos when the need is there. If anyone wants an example of just how powerful these guys are then just listen to track two, which not only is the title cut but is a ten-minute long instrumental. Using a variety of keyboard sounds (some of which are very Eighties), and complex interplay between the two sisters, it is surprising in some respects at just how well Dmitry and Sergey manage to keep the music grounded, while also playing multi-faceted combinations of their own. They can go from blistering complex symphonic prog with neo elements to Camel at the drop of a hat, then revert into an arrangement that contains multiple layers but is never over-crowded or muddy.

Elena tells me that they hope to have the fourth album out inside the next few years, and I really hope that is the case as they are one of the strongest bands I have heard out of Russia, and all their albums are well worth investigating.

 The Door To A Parallel World by ETERNAL WANDERERS album cover Studio Album, 2008
3.31 | 29 ratings

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The Door To A Parallel World
Eternal Wanderers Neo-Prog

Review by kev rowland
Special Collaborator Honorary Reviewer

4 stars

I was having an email conversation with Andy Didorenko (Lost World Band) one day, and told him that I had recently heard 'The Mystery of the Cosmic Sorrow' by Eternal Wanderers, and how impressed I had been with it. Shortly afterwards I opened my inbox to find an email from singer and keyboard player Elena Kanevskaya as he had kindly passed on my details to her. We had some conversations, and not long afterwards she sent me their first albums to see what I thought. This their debut was released in 2008, with Elena joined by her sister Tatyana, her husband Dmitry Shtatnov (bass, also in Quorum) and Sergey Nikonrov on drums (with Sergey Alyamkin providing drums on one song). I have been fortunate enough to hear quite a lot of Russian progressive rock music this year, many of which bring in influences from their homeland, but that is not the case with these guys as they are looking far more to the West, although I am not surprised to find the mighty Polish band Collage mentioned in some reviews.

Much is often made of the fact that the although the rhythm section is male, both the keyboard player/singer and guitarist are female, and that they are sisters. But it never matters the gender/race/sexual orientation/age of anyone in a band, it should always be about the music, and right from the beginning one can only be impressed by this. Sergey provides complex drums patterns, while Dmitry uses many different styles to produce not only the notes but also different inflections. Tatyana sometimes riffs in a good old-fashioned neo prog style, although there are others where she provides a melodic lead, while Elena sometimes uses modern sounds and at others looks back to The Nice and Keith Emerson. She has a wonderful voice, but the band are also comfortable as an instrumental unit which sometimes means long passages with no vocals.

The use of a recorder and jew's harp at the beginning of 'Too Close To Heavens' is another example of how they can mix and match styles, as this leads into some delicate bass while Elena has some reverb placed on her voice and is very much to the fore. This ballad is quite reminiscent of Camel, and shows understanding of the power of restraint and the requirement for space within music to allow the layers to flow and breath. This is quite a superb album, and one I have enjoyed immensely.

 The Mystery of the Cosmic Sorrow by ETERNAL WANDERERS album cover Studio Album, 2016
3.81 | 70 ratings

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The Mystery of the Cosmic Sorrow
Eternal Wanderers Neo-Prog

Review by kev rowland
Special Collaborator Honorary Reviewer

4 stars

This album is my first introduction to the music of Eternal Wanderers, the Russian band led by sisters Elena (lead vocals, keyboards) and Tatyana Kanevskaya (guitars, backing vocals). I wandered over to their site and discovered that earlier this year they played a gig with another of my favourite Russian groups, Lost World Band, and I bet that would have been quite interesting as in many ways they are similar yet also very different indeed. What we have here is a double CD that has very much a science fiction feel to it, so much so that it reminded me less of Tangerine Dream (who have obviously been a major influence), than of Hibernal who in some ways is following a similar musical path. Apparently, the double CD set comes with a fully illustrated booklet (I only have a digital copy), and there is lots of information on the website (which thankfully can be turned to English by clicking on the Union flag) about each song, and what they are about: given that many are instrumental that is certainly a useful facet.

Given that two songs and more than twelve minutes have elapsed before Elena starts singing, it came something of a surprise to hear what a strong singer she is, more alto than soprano, and with plenty of power and emotion. For some strange reason these guys are listed on ProgArchives as neo prog, but they would much better fit within the Crossover genre, although I am sure that Eclectic would love to lay claim to them if they could. What I like so much about this album is that it is just so enjoyable from start to end, and the ninety minutes just flies by: it really is music to get lost inside. The keyboard sounds are all over the place, bringing in quite a few that would normally be at home more in electronic, while the guitars can be there just to provide some counter harmonies or leads, or to crunch out riffs in quite a metallic manner.

There are some amazing bands coming out of Russia at present, and Eternal Wanderers is one that every proghead should be looking out for.

 The Mystery of the Cosmic Sorrow by ETERNAL WANDERERS album cover Studio Album, 2016
3.81 | 70 ratings

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The Mystery of the Cosmic Sorrow
Eternal Wanderers Neo-Prog

Review by BrufordFreak
Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

3 stars Pleasant synth-founded prog with a spacey sci-fi kind of feel and message to it. I find myself reminded of PINK FLOYD and TANGERINE DREAM at it's spaciest as well as ALAN PARSONS PROJECT and LISA GERRARD and MARTHA AND THE MUFFINS/M + M (because of the similarities of voice of Elena Kanevskaya to M + M singer Martha JOHNSON and Ms. GERRARD [though not quite as strong]). But, then, I also hear 80s techno pop/disco (e.g., the "Funky Town" themes in 2. the title song) and too many Neo Prog cliches in many of the sounds and riffs used.

The music is competently crafted and performed yet something is seriously lacking in the sound engineering department as mixes, levels, effects, and the blending of the instruments and voices are very inconsistent and variable--even within individual songs. Plus, this being a concept album, the musical styles and instrumental sounds should, I think, have more continuity from song to song. The drums are very, very well performed and recorded, whereas some of the computer keyboards and synths feel outdated or not of top quality (or not filtered/treated adequately in the engineering department). At the same time I love the ambition, dreams and drive these musicians have and only look forward to the growth and improvements that they will doubtlessly show in the future. I do believe that the band's affinity for leading edge science and science fiction is serving them well and that deriving their inspiration from such should be continued. At 90 minutes in length, this is an amazingly ambitious project (which is one of the reasons it has taken me so long to review despite my having the music in my possession for over four months now.) With no offense directed at any single member of the band, I have to admit that I find that Disc 2 presents quite an improved and more seemlessly engineered set of songs/music.

CD1

1. "Message From Space" (3:50) opens the album with a lot of promise. (8.5/10)

2. "The Mystery Of The Cosmic Sorrow" (8:30) (7.5/10)

3. "Methane Rain" (8:18) (8.5/10)

4. "Gamma Waves" (5:30) (8.5/10)

5. "Born To Suffer" (10:09) full of cliches and poor sound choices. (7/10)

6. "Silent World" (8:50) (8/10)

7. "Valley Of Oblivion" (6:03) (8.5/10)

CD2

1. "Following A Neutrino's Flight" (9:29) a modern classic of Berlin School electronica. (10/10)

2. "The End Of The Satellite Age" (23:26) a masterfully conceived and rendered soundtrack score! The computer- produced 'orchestration' is realized to perfection! Amazing! Kudos, Dmitry! (and Tatyana). Even the wild and quirky middle section is fitting and interesting. I am glad, however, for the return to more of a MIKE OLDFIELD territory for the final five minutes. Brilliant song! (10/10) I. "Hard Times II. "The Great Dance III. "It Went The Wrong Way IV. "Brand New Program V. "Falling Down

3. "Space" (6:02) a fairly nice bluesy, Kate Bush-like tune with some great melodies, bass and sax play. (9/10)

An excellent addition to any prog lover's music collection--especially the second disc.

 The Mystery of the Cosmic Sorrow by ETERNAL WANDERERS album cover Studio Album, 2016
3.81 | 70 ratings

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The Mystery of the Cosmic Sorrow
Eternal Wanderers Neo-Prog

Review by Tarcisio Moura
Prog Reviewer

4 stars Nikols, the enfant terrible of the russian prog scene, asked me to write a review about this very interesting band from Moscow, led by sisters Elena (keyboards, vocals) and Tatyana (guitars) Kanevskaya. Lately I was a bit too busy in my office to write often, but I decided to give it a shot since all the acts Nikols asked me to review were very good ones. And Eternal Wanderers is no exception. This ambition concept double album about the story of the universe is indeed a tripping album. Why this is labeled as "neo prog" here on PA, however, is beyond my comprehension: at least on this CD there´s absolutely nothing even close to what is commonly called neo prog as far as I am concerned. Eclectic prog or crossover prog would be a much more fitting category and would not mislead some people to what should be expected of their music.

For eclectic they are! The sound this band produces here is mostly is space rock/electronic/psychedelic prog with just about everything else thrown in: jazz, classical music, avant guard, movie soundtracks. krautrock, pop melodies, concrete music, sound effects, symphonic rock, blues, acoustic/heavy guitars, you name it! The ending results are really good, individually excellent, although this band does not seem to gel all the elements into building a unique and cohesive product overall. They come quite close, though. One thing that they do have to unite some of the tracks are Elena´s vocals: although this is mostly an instrumental album, she proves to have a strong, bluesy voice that is quite original and powerful, capable of holding any style and doing that quite well. On the other hand the band is absolutely great instrumentally: the group members handle all the swirling cornucopia of styles with apparent ease and the album never gets too chaotic or pointless like so many experimental bands do. Even at their most bold (like the 23 plus instrumental epic The End of The Satellite Age is a good example) Eternal Wonderers´s music has a discernible structure and never gets too far out, which is really good. And they know how to write great tunes.

Every time I head this CD I found some new textures and subtleties I had missed before: definitely this is a grower. The production is excellent. Vocals are in english. Tatyana´s guitar playing is a highlight, very tasteful. Do not get down by the long (3:50ms) boring intro Message From Space. The rest is pure gold.

In the end I must say I was mesmerized by The Mystery OI The Cosmic Sorrow: every track is a quite good on itself and although this album is not a very unified piece of work I cannot close my eyes (and ears) to their strong songwriting, the powerful performances and the sheer energy of Elena´s voice. If you want something refreshing and varied, this is for you!

Rating: 4 strong stars. A band to watch for!

 The Mystery of the Cosmic Sorrow by ETERNAL WANDERERS album cover Studio Album, 2016
3.81 | 70 ratings

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The Mystery of the Cosmic Sorrow
Eternal Wanderers Neo-Prog

Review by snobb
Special Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

4 stars "The Mystery Of The Cosmic Sorrow", the third album from Russian crossover prog band Eternal Wanderers in a few minutes returned me back to the time when I was much younger (and yes - the grass was greener). Bombastic tuneful songs with female vocals full of analog synths, long compositions combined of some very contrast parts without even try to connect them properly, ambitious double-CD format (for studio album)... It smells like eighties (not seventies though - lot of new age like arrangements and more-modern heavy guitars sound transfer the listener back to the time of later Camel and Caravan recordings).

It is not really easy to pin a genre tag to "The Mystery's..." music - eclectic mix of psychedelic rock, symphonic prog, electro-pop ( sometimes with note-by-note citation from extremely popular in 80s Latvian pop-electronics band Zodiaks), spacey new age effects, Pink Floydish guitar hordes, analog electronic effects (kind of popular on early stage of electronic music oscillators and generators) all in one used not at once, but in a form of sound miniatures,changing each other every few minutes.

On paper it probably looks like dangerous mix, but there are no even traces of chaos in band's music - somehow all this collection of (sometimes contrast) components are placed in order and sometimes balancing on the edge still sounds attractive.

That's true, no-one these days can be wondered by nice but obviously over-exploited tricks borrowed from rock golden funds but Eternal Wanderers doesn't sound as a cliche. Probably kind of aliens on modern days scene, they radiate idealistic positive optimism, they don't copy or pretend of "being prog-rockers". It looks they believe in what they are doing, and - what important as well - it looks they really enjoy playing their music.

Not the music for prog purists or those interested in innovations, this album is really enjoying listening for believers that time machine exists and bands like Caravan can make their grass look greener transferred right to nowadays.

Thanks to Igor; Eric Walker for the artist addition. and to torodd for the last updates

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