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STEVEN WILSON

Crossover Prog • United Kingdom


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Steven Wilson biography
Steven John Wilson - Born 3 November 1967 (Kingston upon Thames, London, UK)

STEVEN WILSON, perhaps most widely known for his role as the frontman for the popular act PORCUPINE TREE , is an artist from the UK who, through his various side projects, has spanned a vast number of musical ideas and concepts. Some of the styles he has been known to utilize are heavy prog, psychedelic, electronica, post-rock, ambient music, drone, metal, and art rock. Furthermore, WILSON is intensely focused on production values, dynamic mixing and mastering, and all other sorts of building albums that sound best in high-quality systems. In short, WILSON has always been an artist that appeals to audiophiles and fans of meticulously produced music. This shows up strongly in each of his bands and projects, but it plays even more of a role in his solo efforts.

Photo by Lasse Hoile

Though some of his earliest musical recordings were demos that predated even Porcupine Tree, his solo releases did not truly start appearing until his "Cover Version" singles began in 2003. Essentially releasing one a year, each "Cover Version" contained a particularly unconventional song that WILSON chose to reproduce and one original song by WILSON. Also, in 2004, WILSON put out his experimental electronic album "Unreleased Electronic Music Vol. 1." Neither the "Cover Version" singles nor "Unreleased Electronic Music" feature any other performers, aside from some input from THEO TRAVIS on the latter.

⭐ Collaborators Top Prog Album of 2013 ⭐

⭐ Collaborators Top Prog Album of 2011 ⭐

That trend changed at the end of 2008, however, when WILSON released his first full-length, proper solo album, "Insurgentes." Featuring, among others, PORCUPINE TREE drummer Gavin Harrison, Prog bass legend TONY LEVIN, current DREAM THEATER keyboardist JORDAN RUDESS, and saxophonist/flautist THEO TRAVIS, "Insurgentes" proves rather quickly that it is not simply another ambient or electronic release. Toying with many of the styles that can be seen in PORCUPINE TREE, "Insurgentes" is a mature, laid-back album marked by less metal and more noise than PT's later albums. WILSON has stated that the album draws a lot o...
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STEVEN WILSON discography


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STEVEN WILSON top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.82 | 1079 ratings
Insurgentes
2008
4.19 | 1801 ratings
Grace For Drowning
2011
4.28 | 2156 ratings
The Raven That Refused to Sing (and Other Stories)
2013
4.30 | 1590 ratings
Hand. Cannot. Erase.
2015
3.52 | 499 ratings
4
2016
3.63 | 456 ratings
To The Bone
2017
2.68 | 26 ratings
The Future Bites
2021

STEVEN WILSON Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

4.35 | 191 ratings
Catalogue/Preserve/Amass
2012
4.59 | 44 ratings
Get All You Deserve
2017
4.46 | 41 ratings
Home Invasion (In Concert at the Royal Albert Hall)
2018

STEVEN WILSON Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

3.54 | 146 ratings
Insurgentes - The Movie
2010
4.61 | 313 ratings
Get All You Deserve
2012
4.68 | 59 ratings
Home Invasion : In Concert at the Royal Albert Hall
2018

STEVEN WILSON Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

2.83 | 115 ratings
Nsrgnts Rmxs
2009
3.00 | 5 ratings
Tape Experiments 1985 - 86
2010
3.24 | 129 ratings
Cover Version
2014
3.44 | 80 ratings
Transience
2015
4.25 | 8 ratings
To The Bone: Deluxe Edition
2017

STEVEN WILSON Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

3.76 | 49 ratings
Cover Version
2003
3.66 | 47 ratings
Cover Version II
2004
3.70 | 47 ratings
Cover Version III
2005
3.45 | 56 ratings
Unreleased Electronic Music
2005
3.81 | 44 ratings
Cover Version IV
2006
3.46 | 48 ratings
Cover Version V
2008
4.47 | 77 ratings
Harmony Korine
2009
3.51 | 60 ratings
Vapour Trail Lullaby
2010
3.61 | 55 ratings
Cover Version 6 plus full collection bundle
2010
3.33 | 9 ratings
Demos
2010
4.04 | 48 ratings
Postcard
2011
3.84 | 25 ratings
Cut Ribbon
2012
4.00 | 127 ratings
Drive Home
2013
4.50 | 10 ratings
Luminol / The Watchmaker
2013
4.20 | 15 ratings
Happiness III
2016
3.48 | 25 ratings
Last Day of June (Game Soundtrack)
2017
2.92 | 12 ratings
Permanating
2017
3.33 | 9 ratings
Song of I
2017
3.64 | 11 ratings
Pariah
2017
3.27 | 11 ratings
The Same Asylum as Before
2017
3.63 | 8 ratings
Refuge
2017
3.11 | 9 ratings
Nowhere Now
2017
3.32 | 19 ratings
How Big the Space
2018
2.67 | 18 ratings
Eminent Sleaze
2020
2.69 | 20 ratings
12 Things I Forgot
2020
2.87 | 15 ratings
The B-Sides Collection
2020
3.00 | 7 ratings
King Ghost
2020
2.83 | 6 ratings
Personal Shopper
2020

STEVEN WILSON Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 The Future Bites by WILSON, STEVEN album cover Studio Album, 2021
2.68 | 26 ratings

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The Future Bites
Steven Wilson Crossover Prog

Review by prog_traveller!!

1 stars The latest album from Steven Wilson The future bites represents truly the worst work that he has done, it really does not matter that he changed the sound on this album, what matters is that this is not good at all. Boring songs filled with synth pop elements. I will not spend much time on this review, but I find it really sad that the first big release of the year is this album, being that I'm a fan of Steven Wilsons previous work and I consider him one of the biggest names in modern day prog I find that this is one of the worst albums ever recorded, huge disappointment.
 The Future Bites by WILSON, STEVEN album cover Studio Album, 2021
2.68 | 26 ratings

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The Future Bites
Steven Wilson Crossover Prog

Review by ComaEcliptic

4 stars The Future Bites has been teased for the past 2 years and this is the result of waiting for about 4 years after To The Bone, the album that has grown on me quite a bit. The tone and genre of this album is much more elegant and synthpop than the previous album, the previous was much more a Tears For Fears type album.

I actually really really enjoyed this album, very very much. This was definitely not a prog album by any means of the imagination, but still damn good.

UNSELF: A very nice intro with ambiance and amazing guitars, well done. 2.5/2.5

SELF: Amazing continuation on the track unself, really well done yet again. 2.5/2.5

KING GHOST: Loved this track a lot, its soft, catchy, the production on this track is absolutely through the roof. 5/5

12 THINGS I FORGOT: Probably my favourite track on this album, I love the tone of this track, its just a beautiful track, even though it sounds like a track from the previous album To The Bone, still amazing. 5/5

EMINENT SLEAZE: Well, still good but not amazing, I'm just not that much of a fan of this track. This sounds like if Pink Floyd and Michael Jackson came together to make something moderately ok, still good but not amazing. 4/5

PERSONAL SHOPPER: Hmmm... ok, so the longest track on the album just happens to be the worst track in my opinion. So its good, but just too long for the way its done. I love the harmonies and the acoustic guitars in the middle of the track, its very Steven Wilson but not that great because its just too long. 6/10

MAN OF THE PEOPLE: Amazing amazing amazing, love this track a lot! Its like Pink Floyd's Welcome to the Machine mixed with Keane's Sunshine. Amazing. 5/5

FOLLOWER: Not bad, just again not my favourite, not very memorable, altogether, one of the lesser tracks. 3/5

COUNT OF UNEASE: Loved this track so so much, its slow, longer, atmospheric, just a great great track. 5/5

Overall I think this album was a great introduction to 2021.

Total Grade: 34/40 Percentage Grade: 85% Rating: Excellent addition to any prog rock collection

 The Future Bites by WILSON, STEVEN album cover Studio Album, 2021
2.68 | 26 ratings

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The Future Bites
Steven Wilson Crossover Prog

Review by Soul2Create

3 stars Finally, this is it, the new Steven Wilson's album. A year later and with more than half of the songs released as singles. So, what does it sounds like?

01. Unself (9/10) - Ok, it is short and it stops when it reaches the high point, and yet is one of the best songs of the album. If only...

02. Self (6/10) - Right in your stomach, the beauty of the first track is destroyed by this experimental-electronic-indie piece. not bad, but not good either.

03. King ghost (7/10) - Another electronic piece, this one with a very powerful chorus. What I don't like are the processed vocals and the spoken words.

04. Twelve things I forgot (7/10) - This one changes the mood and we are taken to the pop territory. Too much. I would have appreciated a small psychedelic twist, or at least a good guitar solo.

05. Eminent Sleaze (7.5) - Back to the synth pop. Here the voice of Steven reminds me of John Frusciante's in one of his solo albums. I love the verses and the rythm, but in the end the whole song feels like it could have much more potential.

06. Man of the people (9.5/10) - This is the SW we all know. Even with the synthesized drums this is the best song of the album. Great crescendo towards the end.

07. Personal shopper (7.5/10) - The longest song of the album is just an illusion. A well constructed piece of synth pop that again feels undeveloped. Catchy chorus though.

08. Follower (8/10) - Modern pop with few interesting experiments in it.

09. Count of unease (7.5/10) - A good ambiental track, with Wilson experimenting with some sounds in the second half.

Overall, a decent album, and sadly, for SW it means that this is his worst.

 To The Bone by WILSON, STEVEN album cover Studio Album, 2017
3.63 | 456 ratings

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To The Bone
Steven Wilson Crossover Prog

Review by Necrotica
Prog Reviewer

4 stars For years, I was of the opinion that the quality of Steven Wilson's work largely died off after Porcupine Tree's breakup (or what we initially thought of as a hiatus). Sure, Grace for Drowning and, to a lesser extent The Raven Who Refused to Sing, had their moments of fantastic songwriting and craftsmanship. But the emphasis on making 1970s progressive rock throwbacks seemed to distance me from what made Wilson's work so distinct in the first place? that is, throwing progressive rock into more modern musical settings. Ever since the late 90s, alternative rock and pop influences became somewhat of a muse for Wilson as he explored the sonic landscape of each new Porcupine Tree album, generating a mixture of the accessible and experimental. And truly, the album that brought his "modern vs. traditional" approach back in full force was 2015's Hand. Cannot. Erase., which ranks among his finest albums from any project he's dipped his hand into (no pun intended). But, in all honesty, it's hard to know where to even place its successor To the Bone in regards to Wilson's other material. All I know is that it's both a great pop album and a great rock album.

This is Wilson's wholehearted dive into singer-songwriter waters, right down to the rather individualistic (even somewhat egocentric) nature of the artwork and rediscovering the "art of writing songs." As far as the songwriting goes, this is pretty much an art rock record with various layers of pop aesthetics. For those who have worried that this may be too much of a departure from his old work, fear not! It's still the same Steven Wilson we know and love (?), just approaching his craft from a less familiar point of view than usual. Basically, catchy hooks and big pop choruses are the new order of the day (at least more than usual for Wilson), and the longer and more experimental tracks have now become the exception to the regular songwriting patterns Wilson is expressing. But that art/prog element still rears its head once in a while. After all, we still have a 9-minute powerhouse of a track known as "Detonation" - a piece filled with varied dynamics and extended solo work - to look forward to near the end of the experience. This is directly followed by a gorgeous and subdued piano ballad with subtle rhythms and wispy choir, "Song of Unborn," proving that Wilson's penchant for melancholy and complex emotional baggage is still there in spades.

That said, it's not like the lyrics are exactly high art or anything. This is pretty typical of a Steven Wilson product anyway, and at least the words fit the context of a pop-driven record like this a bit more, but they're still pretty damn cringey from time to time. One could perhaps forgive the nonspecific joyousness of the peppy piano-pop number "Permeating," and the intimate love-oriented lyrics of the slow guitar-centric interlude "Blank Tapes" are nicely executed when Wilson and Ninet Tayeb sing them in a convincing duet. But yeah, that "I'm tired of Facebook" line from "Pariah" is pretty [%*!#]ing hard to give a pass. A shame, too, because "Pariah" still manages to be one of the album's highlights because of the beautiful acoustic balladry and post-rock climax that anchor such amateur lyricism. But, as far as I'm concerned, what really gives To the Bone its charm and beauty is that Wilson really sounded like he was enjoying himself on this one. Even in interviews surrounding the release, he seems more eager and excited than usual to put out this collection, and it shows when you get down to listening to the effort involved. I must admit that this is one of the first Wilson records that actually blindsided me because of some of the risks that he attempted. The best one? The ending of the power ballad "Refuge," in which jazzy piano chords and a harmonica solo collide in one of the most beautiful moments you'll hear this year. Also notable is the grungy hard rock banger "People Who Eat Darkness," which ends up sounding like Wilson's take on Foo Fighters (not that I'm complaining about that). And yes, some moments are a tad too familiar as well. "The Same Asylum as Before" suffers the most from this, sounding like a boring mix of Porcupine Tree's own "Prodigal" and something you'd hear from a mid-career album like Stupid Dream. But thankfully, this recycling is usually kept to a minimum.

Whether To the Bone will be considered among Steven Wilson's best material or not, it does seem like the necessary way to move forward in his career. Hearing his usual tropes and motifs so stripped down and emotionally charged like this can be breathtaking, even if the songwriting isn't always bringing his A-game. There have been a lot of jokes recently about calling Steven Wilson an "international popstar" and all that, but if he got that successful off an album like this, I wouldn't mind that at all. A pop/rock record this beautifully organic and well-crafted deserves to reach many ears, and Wilson should be proud of its many merits as one of 2017's most thoroughly enjoyable experiences.

 Hand. Cannot. Erase. by WILSON, STEVEN album cover Studio Album, 2015
4.30 | 1590 ratings

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Hand. Cannot. Erase.
Steven Wilson Crossover Prog

Review by SoundsofSeasons
Prog Reviewer

5 stars The true last Porcupine Tree album. No PT required.

I don't believe that Wilson and boys will ever come back together under the moniker PT. Maybe there is still hope for a project where Steven goes at it with my boy Gavin Harrison again, I'll keep that hope alive. But I doubt we will see another PT studio album ever grace this world again. With my pre-ordered copy of, as Steven puts it 'Limited Edition Box Set' of his latest coming out 2021, I'm moving backward through his solo discography again. This is the album I think we all thought would be the natural progression Porcupine Tree was going, rather than the incident that was 'The Incident'. Not to say that 'The Incident' was a bad album, but it was a strange ending to the studio career of PT, and would have made more sense as a side project. All I'm saying is that if this album had changed places with 'The Incident' that would have made more logical sense to me. Anyway, what we have here is a tightly written piece of art rock with progressive structures that extend just outside of what was done on some of the more proggy songs from the PT trifecta 'In Absentia/Deadwing/FoaBP'. This one is structurally built just like some hate to love, some love to hate, and some just love, and some seem to just hate - this is a catchy hooky art rock album sitting on a foundation of prog-lite fundamentals. But that was always how Porcupine Tree (and Steven, my point) liked it. In retrospect sitting here in 2021, as a Steven Wilson solo album, this one is a bit strange because we can see the direction he is going now. Steven is paying homage to his love of 80/90's electronica and pop with some of his latest, but this album took everything he learned from his career with a full band. I can differentiate between solo Steven and full band Steven, maybe you know what I mean?

 12 Things I Forgot by WILSON, STEVEN album cover Singles/EPs/Fan Club/Promo, 2020
2.69 | 20 ratings

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12 Things I Forgot
Steven Wilson Crossover Prog

Review by A Crimson Mellotron

3 stars '12 Things I Forgot' is a collection of all the singles supposed to promote Steven Wilson's 'The Future Bites' album, commenting on modern society's extinguishing values and the raging influence of consumerism upon it. With Wilson, however, the listener can never really predict how an album will sound like just based on a single, or two. This EP, as I believe it is, would be good for someone who doesn't want to listen to the whole album, but just half of it. As for the songs, they are quite different and interesting, leaving some of Steven Wilson's fans in a phase of eagerness about another different direction he takes, and some in disappointment, for the very same reasons.
 Insurgentes by WILSON, STEVEN album cover Studio Album, 2008
3.82 | 1079 ratings

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Insurgentes
Steven Wilson Crossover Prog

Review by Devolvator

5 stars The very first and most radical. Crazy, creepy, uncompromising, brave, desperate. Underline all of the above. Thank God, in our time (it was in 2008) there are madmen who can leave their "comfort zones" and release a hard and unexpected disc. And exactly the disc, for Steven Wilson is a vinyl devotee. The band's approach to writing music is more typical of the 70s rather than the 00s. Insurgentes is the most laconic of Steve's albums: here fears and hopes are expressed by the music, and the lyrics are just a spectacular frame for the record. Another plus of the album is its incredible improvisational component - you never know where the improvisation is, and where - the well-adjusted hourly long-term studio work. Everything is so vivid and high quality that it is simply impossible to see the edge. Furthermore, recording is practically completely devoid of "semitones": where one minute ago there were quiet and alarming mutters, sharp eerie overloads and breakdowns immediately burst in. In general, the entire album is a sharp jump into the psychological abyss. No, Steve did not fall under drugged fear from the window of his house, like the legendary Robert Wyatt from Soft Machine, but emotionally collapsed even worse and deeper. However, there is no evidence of Wilson's mental disorder in nature, since he was not noticed for using drugs or alcohol. But he was a terrible innovator and even cynically indifferent, which arouses even more interest in this frank album. The recording is a kind of creepy, caricatured outsider confession of a man who has severed all ties with the outside world. From the first to the last note, the disc sounds like one terrible hysterical cry of a man stepping into the unknown, into his fears. Although, perhaps, this is an attempt to escape from the dungeon of the inner nightmare. Everything is taken to the extreme here, while maintaining clarity and conceptual dimension. I hate to be in the shoes of the person who could have composed "Abandoner", but it's great to have the chance to listen to that! Constriction, fear and pursuit, smoothly turning into something indefinite, light, end in an icy drone nightmare, where the guitar is overloaded so much that it leaves the musical plane. It is followed by the heavy tread "Salvaging" - a more traditional continuation of the previous song. The author spits out each phrase with such anger that it feels like he has finally reached the "assemblage point", adding loads of guitars and heavy drum shots. It is followed by "Veveno Para Las Hadas (Poison for Fairies), almost hovering above the clouds in an icy void, a sad elegy that expresses the autistic alienation of a hero who lists the simple absurdities of being. the role of a brilliant visionary showing the savagery and catastrophe of the future ... It was followed by the magnum opus, which for a long time became a kind of "can opener" for opening performances. Eerie incremental improvisation, where each of the musicians can have a full time, showing their skills and ruthlessness. The density of music, drums, guitars and keyboards, is worthy of the best times of the Canterbury scene. Furthermore, the experienced combat machine gunner Gavin Harrison, from a subtle improviser, in a few minutes turns into a ruthless machine capable of smashing a studio to pieces, not to mention a drum kit: it seems that he is tearing his hands to pieces, and his life depends on his pace! The musicians accelerate so much that everything turns into an eerie rumble, which is cut off by Steve's quiet whisper ... The text here makes no sense: the track is in its purest form a tribute to the rock avant-garde of the 70s. True, it is skillfully woven too to the canvas of the album. No, this is not an electrical mess: only very smart and advanced musicians can do such things. And in fact, the album closer "Get All You Deserve" - ​​"Get a fascist grenade", I would leave this free translation, as it is better suited to this context.

The composition begins with terrible radio interference, recorded so well that you immediately feel the feeling of a huge space where something bad is happening ... Then primitive piano sounds creep in to the point of banality - and Steven's bored voice, paired with classic electric organs. "Get what you deserve" - ​​he repeats this to the music, which becomes more diverse, scarier and harder, until it reaches the point of complete rupture and dissolves into the noise. This is a kind of mini-album in one song. Like a look through the eyes of a person who is going to destroy a lot of people with him. This is a vendetta to the world, senseless and merciless. It closed many of Wilson's concerts when he stood in the smoke in a gas mask. Under the bright red light - it looked ominously cool! A person who is plotting something unkind in the world where something is wrong. Everything is hopeless - death, fumes, emptiness ... And the album ends with a quiet piano ballad "Insurgentes" - like an awakening from all this nightmare, albeit vague and pensive. Well, I almost forgot the "elephant" - the superhit from Steven Wilson titled "Harmony Corine", with an incredibly beautiful melody and a gorgeous surreal video, I really hope that this is not what awaits us all. The song is kind of a promo video for the album, and it features everything that is on this gorgeous and dark record. There is not much optimism here, but the spirit of the disc corresponds to the image of the author: this is how he is this gray, ordinary-looking man with glasses, with a voice like sour milk, although not devoid of singing charm. Complex, scary, black to unpleasant, condensed, but certainly talented and attractive, the album belongs to the big world of rock music. Despite the description, it may seem that the recording of "Insurgentes" as a whole is some kind of inaudible experimental routine, but this unpredictable disc is skillfully inscribed in classical and melodic forms, even orthodox, if I may say so. The cover of the album also deserves attention, reflecting the idea of ​​depersonalization by war and, therefore, was published without any identification marks. Who is this erased and alienated person? He has no name, no destiny, no belonging. Victim or Executioner? Steve himself or someone else? Someone very inconspicuous, but extremely dangerous. Or maybe any of us wearing a mask. A creature from a shattered world, rapidly disappearing into darkness. Well, the lineup of the "rebels" is awe-inspiring: Gavin Harrison - drums (Porcupine Tree 2002-2010, The Pineapple Thief 2015 - today). Jordan Rudess - keyboards (Dream Theater) Tony Levin - bass, stick (King Crimson, Peter Gabriel) And of course the maestro himself - voice, guitars, synthesizers, programming and much more. However, it is better to listen to it yourself once.

 Hand. Cannot. Erase. by WILSON, STEVEN album cover Studio Album, 2015
4.30 | 1590 ratings

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Hand. Cannot. Erase.
Steven Wilson Crossover Prog

Review by Devolvator

5 stars "The Dark Side Of The Moon" level album. To date, the pinnacle of Steven Wilson's tremendous creative journey. Unfortunately, the last album leaves much to be desired, and the freshest opuses are hardly worthy of any attention at all. Heavy, airy, powerful, energetic, dirty, crystal-clear, rough, melodic, beautiful, scary, splendid, ugly. Probably, any epithets can be balanced in it, despite the fact that this is a dense conceptual canvas. Shake, this is the pinnacle beyond which neither Steve nor neo-progressive in general will ever rise. In terms of scope and beauty, it simply has no competitors. The recording dates back to 2015, and here we are talking about a woman found dead in her own apartment, but not just dead, but forgotten, in front of the TV on. As the booklet says, the story was real. The album rather resembles a person's diaries, his routine experiences, both adolescent and mature. Steve shows himself as a poet of the highest quality and as a conceptual artist, touching on the problems of abandonment and alienation in the modern world. Absorption of a routine that interferes with development and self-improvement. The main line is the author's worries about his unrealized human potential, and the second side is short human memory. The ability of people to forget quickly those who were once near. The voice is in great shape and the lyrics blend perfectly with incredible and non-trivial music. Which is revealed in ALL facets: from heavy metal to airy, almost intangible angelic chants, coupled with a huge palette of musical instruments. From acoustic guitars to hard syncopated metalized drums. Everything is extremely incredible and laconic, and does not contain a single passing note, let alone a composition. What I love Steven Wilson for is his humanity and ability to turn a rather soulless and cold direction into something clear and tangible, while not slipping into the vulgarity of "commonplaces". Isn't this genius? To describe each track, whole notebooks are needed, and it is better to hear everything yourself. But you can dwell on the basic. The leitmotif of the album can be considered "Perfect Life", which is absolutely not like anything at all, but it contains a simple and terrible thought: "Each of us has our own Perfect Life", and we are the creators of our alienation. Towards the end of the song, the chorus of "We Have Got a Perfect Life" grows into a huge number of voices, as if every one of hundreds of people is in this "perfect" state. This is the very creepy "Perfect Imperfect", catching everyone in their chains and forcing them to forget about everything and everyone. First, opera singer Ninet Tayeb testifies in a cold voice about her dead and forgotten sister. And it is no coincidence in the phrase "Hand. Cannot. Erase." after each word a dot - it turns out that life and destiny can be deleted from our consciousness, because each of us has our own perfect life. Well, the composition "Transience", in strength and beauty, is incomparable with anything, except perhaps with the best albums of the 70s. Powerful, tragic, eerie, majestic. This is a whole rock opera in 12 minutes, which reflects a whole universe of ideas and styles. Well, the ending of the album "Happy Returns", Merry Christmas. An unsent letter found near the deceased. However, no matter how I describe this album, all the metaphors pale in comparison with the original source. Better to hear it once. p.s. We have got, we have got a perfect life...
 The Raven That Refused to Sing (and Other Stories) by WILSON, STEVEN album cover Studio Album, 2013
4.28 | 2156 ratings

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The Raven That Refused to Sing (and Other Stories)
Steven Wilson Crossover Prog

Review by Devolvator

5 stars Some kind of a sluggish tired autumn this year. Very entropic and bursting - people are immersed in their problems and in many ways disoriented. Feeling of inner spiritual mess.

Yes, and I somehow undertake the writing of this review with a feeling of deep melancholy, because you cannot let her win - you need to do something, otherwise everything will stop again ...

Before us is Steven Wilson's album titled "The Raven That Refused To Sing" - the third one in his solo discography. The disc was released at the beginning of 2013. In those years, I simply did not perceive such music. But later I listened to this disc over and over again till it was completely "driven". As a result, it has lost its former emotional strength for me. Perhaps this gloomy autumn will allow me to correlate my inner state with the presented music.

It is the most accessible LP from Wilson, making it the most popular of all discography. To begin with, Steve strengthened the song component, while not forgetting about the "progressive" part. Only now everything is clearer and does not flow from one to another. The record is produced by none other than Alan Parsons, who took care of the sound while working on The Dark Side of The Moon. The record refers in form and sound to the music of the seventies and bears (judging by the booklet) the character of a dark comic book.

The title track "Raven That Refused To Sing" is a magnificent piano ballad about an old man trying to make a crow sing, which is supposedly the spirit of his deceased sister. Steve sings at the end of the song in a hysterical, dark voice "Sing to me ...", which can move you to tears. This can hardly leave anyone indifferent.

The sentimental and melancholic "Drive Home", which tells the story of the loss of a man of his beloved, is stuffed with a great long guitar solo inside. In fact, the song is a continuation of the song "Heartattack in a Layby" from the album titled "In Absentia", only less successful, but with a great video.

My favorite track is "Holy Drinker".

In principle, apart from delight, all the songs evoke nothing, as well as the fantastically beautiful edition of the disc.

You just need to hear it, but it is better to buy it into the collection

 The Raven That Refused to Sing (and Other Stories) by WILSON, STEVEN album cover Studio Album, 2013
4.28 | 2156 ratings

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The Raven That Refused to Sing (and Other Stories)
Steven Wilson Crossover Prog

Review by boa

2 stars I really tried to listen to this with a positive starting point. I've heard so much good things about this album.. but i really can't understand what the fuzz is about. There are good parts, and the actual sound is good - even though it does sound too sterile and modern in my opinion. It doesn't really help though, since the compositions and melodies are rather mediocre. Sure, the playing is very good - technical and so on, but take for instance the drums: just the sound it so sterile and soulless that it basically could be a drum machine. There's no signature sound, it just sounds like all other technically good drummers these days.. For me this goes for every element of the record. Take the mellotron; it sounds like a cheap and bad sample - all in perfect pitch, which for me takes away the magic of the instrument. The positive thing about the vocals, is that the English pronunciation is good (dah), and that it doesn't have the embarrassing blues heavyness many of these modern prog groups have. Also i like that it's not super positive, like The Flower Kings and so on, which often makes me wanna vomit in my mouth. That being said, this is all rather sad and almost emo, without any light and shade, just shade.

To me this sounds like Kenny G goes prog (with reference to that annoying soprano sax all over the place).

Thanks to Dean for the artist addition. and to Quinino for the last updates

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