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MANGALA VALLIS

Rock Progressivo Italiano • Italy


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Mangala Vallis biography
MANGALA VALLIS is a new progressive rock band from Italy, whose members are three well-experienced musicians: Gigi Cavalli Cocchi (drums), Enzo Cattini (keyboards) and Mirco Consolini (guitar and bass). Completely in love with the sound of the early 70's, MANGALA VALLIS is influenced by the music of that golden era, even if its music is filtered through its own taste and vision. Some symphonic prog lovers will notice that they mix styles of vintage GENESIS and GENTLE GIANT, while adding some Fish-era MARILLION and SPOCK's BEARD influences.

"The Book of Dreams" is dedicated to the memory of writer Jules Verne, and each track has lyrics based on one of his classic books (20,000 Leagues Under the Sea, Around the World in 80 Days, & A Journey to the Center of the Earth). Joining them are three great vocalists that reminiscent of Peter GABRIEL and Neal MORSE to name a few. All instruments are vintage and gives the overall sound a more classic feel rather than a retro sound. In closing, "Book of Dreams" is both a great debut and welcomed addition to any symphonic prog lovers collection. Don't miss this JEWEL !!!

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MANGALA VALLIS discography


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MANGALA VALLIS top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.55 | 52 ratings
The Book of Dreams
2002
3.57 | 60 ratings
Lycanthrope
2005
3.66 | 64 ratings
Microsolco
2012

MANGALA VALLIS Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

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4.67 | 3 ratings
Intergalactic Video Archives
2009

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MANGALA VALLIS Reviews


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 Microsolco by MANGALA VALLIS album cover Studio Album, 2012
3.66 | 64 ratings

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Microsolco
Mangala Vallis Rock Progressivo Italiano

Review by Second Life Syndrome
Collaborator Post/Math Rock and Crossover Teams

4 stars This progressive rock band from Italy has certainly gained my attention. Mangala Vallis is a prog rock band in the vein of neo-prog, and thus showcases lots of melody, synth, and eerie atmospheres. Their new album, 'Microsolco', is a solid album with tons to offer.

First off, the theme of the album is the fast pace at which we live today. It discusses a longing for simpler, more naturalistic times by introducing us to a hacker that has created a virus that will destroy all the world's digital memory on 21/12/2012. It's an interesting concept that I certainly relate to, but I must point out that this album would probably not be possible without the very things the band is decrying. In fact, the band has a Facebook page! I know it's just a concept, but I found it to be somewhat shallow.

The music, however, is anything but shallow. Their music certainly has some influences, such as Pink Floyd and Marillion, but I think the most obvious one is Spock's Beard. In fact, there are times on this album where I thought I was listening to a Spock's Beard album: They are very similar in many respects. With the silky smooth vocals and the outstanding synth solos, 'Microsolco' comes to life with impressive clarity. Every instrument is used to great effect and virtuosity, but I think that the synth towers above them all. The synth solo in 'Gods of the Xii Century' is pure gold, and I do believe this is the best track on the album, too. Every track on this album, however, is superbly crafted and always interesting and soulful.

Mangala Vallis has offered up a great album that, while not topping lists by any means, will certainly be an album that grows and grows on the listener. It has everything I could ask for in a neo-prog album, and I hope this band sees some publicity this year.

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 Microsolco by MANGALA VALLIS album cover Studio Album, 2012
3.66 | 64 ratings

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Microsolco
Mangala Vallis Rock Progressivo Italiano

Review by Gallifrey

4 stars Mangala Vallis - "Microsolco" 13/20

43rd place album of the year 2012

"Microsolco" is the latest album from Italian band Mangala Vallis, and their first full-length in 7 years. Judging from the lyrics, referencing the year and even the 2012 apocalypse, it is clear the band intended this to be released in 2012, in fact releasing it on the very first day of 2012. Despite often being lumped into the Italian Symphonic (RPI) subgenres, Microsolco contains a significant amount of neo-prog tendencies, as opposed to straight symphonic.

The entire album, musically, is fantastic. The melodies are strong, the solos are inventive, but I feel it's the entire instrumentation of symphonic prog that pulls it back here. The retro instruments are actually a hindrance to any atmosphere, and often sound comical. Anyone could take the music here and make some truly beautiful stuff, which sometimes happens, like in the latter half of "Easy Empire", but the primary focus of symphonic arrangements pulls back most of the album, the same problem I find with artists like Neal Morse.

The more neo-prog sounding parts of the album are the nicest, in my opinion; with "Gods of The XXI Century" containing the obvious synth solo, but never loses its atmosphere because of it. "Plastic Paradise" is my personal favourite on the album, also devoid of the 'retro' sounds, with a really fantastic chorus.

Now, to the REAL reason I don't like this album as much as the music dictates I should. The lyrics are atrocious. Absolutely horrible. The album writes about something to do with the apocalypse and "everyone believing it would happen". A really weak topic for an album, especially considering everyone had forgotten about it come June. And it seems the band specifically waited for 2012 to release it, because of these lyrics, which seems like a bit of a waste.

The music on this album is great, very good choruses and solos, excellent use of time signatures, especially the 13/8 one in "Welcome to the New World", but the old-fashioned sounding instruments and awful lyrics mean that after a few listens you're very sick of it. Definitely worth a listen, but maybe not much more.

Originally written for my facebook page/blog http://www.facebook.com/neoprogisbestprog

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 Lycanthrope by MANGALA VALLIS album cover Studio Album, 2005
3.57 | 60 ratings

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Lycanthrope
Mangala Vallis Rock Progressivo Italiano

Review by apps79
Special Collaborator Neo Prog Team

3 stars In 2003 the Mangala Vallis trio had expanded to a solid quintet with the permanent addition of Bernardo Lanzetti on vocals and Riccardo Sgavetti on bass.Lanzetti became also the lyricist of the band and Mangala Vallis begun writing material for a second album.''Lycanthrope'' saw the light in 2005, originally a product of Tamburo A Vapore, with a few guest musicians on guitars and choirs, among them Mr. David Jackson from Van Der Graaf Generator, who adds saxes in a pair of tracks.

The sound of the band has not changed a bit compared to the very good ''The Book of Dreams'', the only difference is Lanzetti's vocals, which are all over the place this time.Mangala Vallis insist on playing nostalgic Symphonic/Progressive Rock with strong GENESIS and PREMIATA FORNERIA MARCONI influences with endless bits of Mellotron throughout and very solid guitar work.The arrangements are very nice with a great balance between instrumental and vocal parts, mostly with a symphonic approach, where Enzo Cattini shines with his work on organs, Mellotron and pianos, while Consolini delivers a good number of sensitive guitar performances.There is also some nice switches between rhythmic keyboard-driven themes and more atmospheric soundscapes, while Lanzetti's presence adds the GABRIEL-esque voice of a veteran, who knows how to sing.The smoother moments remind a lot of his days with PREMIATA FORNERIA MARCONI (''Chocolate kings''-period) with nice acoustic textures to surround him.The overall performance of the band is professional, confident, without any serious flaws, but the album lacks the killer track or the personality to make an instant impact.

Definitely an album, which will end up among the favorite ones of Symphonic Rock, Italian Prog, Retro Prog or Classic Progressive Rock's fans.But also anyone who has a leaning towards the modern scene should give Mangala Vallis a chance for the good mix of melodic guitars and clear production with analog keyboards.Strongly recommended...3.5 stars.

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 The Book of Dreams by MANGALA VALLIS album cover Studio Album, 2002
3.55 | 52 ratings

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The Book of Dreams
Mangala Vallis Rock Progressivo Italiano

Review by toroddfuglesteg

3 stars The label says Italy and Rock Progressivo Italiano. My taste buds says Symphonic Prog and USA.

The debut album from Mangala Vallis is one of the notable albums from the recent Rock Progressivo Italiano revival. It is also one of the more untraditional albums too. Untraditional because of it's sound. A sound that takes me to USA. But I will not repeat myself (like I always do).

The sound is as big as the Mid-West prairies. The music is also very big with a lot of lush classic symphonic prog'ish melody lines. Plenty of mellotrons and other vintage tangents is dominating the airwaves. They are supported by some really good vocals, guitars, bass and drums. References is many of the US symphonic prog bands, a bit of pomp rock and the final two Genesis albums with Steve Hackett.

The quality is very good throughout. Although this album has some great melody lines, there are no real killer tracks here and that is the difference between the stars for me. I am not fully embracing this album. But it is nevertheless a very good album well worth checking out.

3.5 stars

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 Lycanthrope by MANGALA VALLIS album cover Studio Album, 2005
3.57 | 60 ratings

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Lycanthrope
Mangala Vallis Rock Progressivo Italiano

Review by seventhsojourn
Special Collaborator RPI

3 stars Other members of the site have beaten me to the punch with their reviews of this album so I'll keep my comments short if not sweet. ''Lycanthrope'' contains some nice tunes but it's just a tad too derivative. If it's not the seemingly ubiquitous Dave Gilmour slide guitar then it's the Chris Squire bass, and if it's not the Emerson-inspired Hammond organ flourishes then it's the unashamed references to ''Watcher Of The Skies''. Mangala Vallis aren't the only Italian band to have borrowed from this song of course, but come on, not on three of the opening four tracks on an album. And they don't so much borrow from Genesis as rob them blind.

Now all that would be bad enough but the coup de grace arrives courtesy of singer Bernardo Lanzetti, whose gruff vibrato makes him sound like a heavily accented Roger Chapman. The difference with Chapman is that his voice suits Family's blues-inflected brand of music. Furthermore, the daft wee voices that Lanzetti occasionally uses make it seem that Mangala Vallis simply wants to be taken for a Genesis tribute band.

Plus points? The elegiac ''Call Me Alias'', despite its lack of originality, features some exquisite Mellotron (think of Crimson, circa ''In The Wake Of Poseidon''). Actually, the album features shed-loads of Mellotron, real or otherwise, and that's always a bonus in my book. These guys are apparently working on their third album and, given that this one is even more of a Genesis clone than their debut, they're certainly setting a worrying trend with their releases. If their next album is to be anything other than a pastiche of the seventies giants then a change of direction might be in order, but I'm not holding my breath on that particular score.

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 The Book of Dreams by MANGALA VALLIS album cover Studio Album, 2002
3.55 | 52 ratings

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The Book of Dreams
Mangala Vallis Rock Progressivo Italiano

Review by seventhsojourn
Special Collaborator RPI

3 stars Neat Neo. Ropey RPI.

Mangala Vallis are a modern Italian band whose 2002 debut album was inspired by the father of modern science fiction, Jules Verne. The French author's novels have influenced other progressive artists of course, such as Rick Wakeman and Genesis; the Charterhouse alumni themselves provide the main musical inspiration for ''The Book Of Dreams''. Analogue keyboards and 12-string guitar are very much the order of the day with bassist Mirco Consolini doubling-up on guitar and keyboardist Enzo Cattini deploying a variety of analogue instruments, namely Hammond organ, Mellotron and Mini-Moog. The album is in fact a real Mellotron fest, with the machine's strings and choirs dominating all but the brief opening instrumental track ''Ouverture''.

Mangala Vallis don't have a regular singer and instead rely on several guest vocalists, with varying degrees of success. All the vocals are in English and here is the disquisition. While English-language vocals in themselves aren't an issue, when they are combined with the style of music here then Mangala Vallis' RPI credentials might be on a bit of a shoogly peg.

''The Book Of Dreams'' is certainly a highly polished, albeit highly derivative, slice of seventies flavoured prog. Take for example the middle section of ''Is The End The Beginning?'' which sounds like Genesis' ''Apocalypse in 9/8''. Then there are the Yes- inspired vocal harmonies of the title-track, while ''The Journey'' features slide guitar that has me thinking of Pink Floyd. Returning to the vocals, Bernardo Lanzetti's accented singing doesn't fit with the other guest vocals although fortunately he only sings on one track. Matteo Setti and Vic Fraja, who sounds a bit like Fish without the East Coast of Scotland accent, seem more suited to the style of music. Actually, I have to keep reminding myself that these guys are Italian.

If you are looking for an alternative to your usual Genesis or Marillion fix then this just might be right up your alley, whereas those expecting the typical Italian shenanigans will probably be disappointed. Mangala Vallis undoubtedly have promise but the bottom line is that there's barely a ha'porth of originality on this album.

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 Lycanthrope by MANGALA VALLIS album cover Studio Album, 2005
3.57 | 60 ratings

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Lycanthrope
Mangala Vallis Rock Progressivo Italiano

Review by Mellotron Storm
Prog Reviewer

3 stars I agree 100 % with tszirmay's thoughts on this album. Like him I really enjoyed MANGALA VALLIS' debut, but this one does little for me. The ex-PFM vocalist Bernardo Lanzetti is definitely not an upgrade, in fact it's the oposite. The mellotron on the debut was fantastic but according to PlanetMellotron it's not real here, it's sampled. Bottom line though is that the songs just aren't as good. Sure there are those moments, but overall it's probably not an album i'll play again. Heck even David Jackson playing sax on a couple of tracks doesn't save it.

"Echo Absolute" features samples of different sounds including a siren before synths and organ wash in to end it as it blends into "Cosmotrafficjam". Organ leads the way in this uptempo intro. Vocals and mellotron after a minute as it settles. The tempo and mood continues to shift. Some passion in those vocals at times. Nice guitar after 5 minutes, synths follow. It settles with piano 7 1/2 minutes to the end. "Call Me Alias" opens with floating organ. Lots of atmosphere here. Strummed guitar 2 minutes in followed by fragile vocals and mellotron. Taseful guitar 5 minutes in as vocals stop. "Lycanthroparty" builds with synths and drums. A good rhythm a minute in then vocals join in. It's ok. "Hum / Animal Song" sounds really good with the atmosphere and tasteful guitar. Vocals come in sadly. No I mean sadly.

"The Boy That Howls At The Moon" needs some help desperately. It opens with wolves howling until mellotron takes over. A beat then vocals follow. A change before 3 1/2 minutes as organ comes in. Guitar 4 minutes in and later before 5 1/2 minutes followed by organ. More prominant guitar 10 minutes in. Vocals and organ late. "The Mask" is uptempo early with organ and drums leading the way. It settles with vocals 2 1/2 minutes in. Organ and nature sounds before 6 1/2 minutes. Nice beat 8 minutes in followed by mellotron and guitar. Good song. "The Transparent And The Obscure" is laid back as reserved vocals, acoustic guitar and organ come in. Drums follow as it builds. Passionate vocals 4 1/2 minutes in with some backup vocals to follow. Themes are repeated. Nice guitar late.

This is barely 3 stars.

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 Lycanthrope by MANGALA VALLIS album cover Studio Album, 2005
3.57 | 60 ratings

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Lycanthrope
Mangala Vallis Rock Progressivo Italiano

Review by Tarcisio Moura
Prog Reviewer

4 stars Lycanthrope is Mangala Vallis sophmore release and shows the band developing their own sound even more than on their already excellent debut. Not that they are dropping out all their 70's explicit references: in fact, right on the starting of this CD you will hear hints of Genesis Watcher Of The Skies-like mellotron, ELP's style Hammond organ and mini mogg riffs and, later on, some brief, but very familiar Steve Howe's guitar lines. But again this is less a case of copycats and more of a homage to their heroes. This disc is very much Mangala Vallis sound, even if soaked with that era influences. Nothing very original, I know, but I like it!

While their first album featured as much as 3 lead singers, for this one the band stuck solely with veteran vocalist Bernardo Lanzetti (ex PFM and Agua Fragile). Not too many prog fans seem to like his style. Ok, he still has some Peter Gabriel maneirisms on some (few) parts, but it must be reckoned that the guy developed a lot over the years and found his unique way of delivering the notes which, fortunatly is the majority here. There are some really touching moments when his passionate vocal lines are fantastic (just hear The mask). I know it's not everyone's cup of tea, but I think he fitted in well. The musicicanship of the band is, of course, flawless: they are now a tight unit, with some great keyboards passages (with delicious waves of mellotrons, Hammond and analog synths), tasteful guitar lines, fine bass and some very inventive drums.

The production is quite good, even if it could be a little better. As for the songs themselves I must say that the band has a different sound from most italian prog bands: is closer to UK 70's synphonic groups than to their own most famous colleagues (this feeling is enhanced by the english lyrics). Sometimes they border the neo prog. Lycanthrope is one of those CDs you have to listen several times to fully get a glimpse of its richness and beauty, but it is worth it. There are no fillers. The songwriting skills of the band members is matching their musical prowness. A band to watch for. Rating: something between 4 and 4,5 stars.

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 The Book of Dreams by MANGALA VALLIS album cover Studio Album, 2002
3.55 | 52 ratings

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The Book of Dreams
Mangala Vallis Rock Progressivo Italiano

Review by Tarcisio Moura
Prog Reviewer

4 stars Very impressive debut album by this italian band. A friend was visiting my hometwon and told me about them, saying Iīd like them, based on my personal taste. And he was right. First of all I must say they donīt sound too much like other prog bands from Italy. the first track after the short introduction surprised me a lot for the heavy sounds and american styled harmony vocals. Itīs a good track but hardly their best on this CD and clearly a wrong tune for its opening.

But from then on things run pretty smoothly: great progressive music with outstanding playing, tasteful and creative arrangements, plus some fine vocals (all done by 3 guest singers, including Bernardo Lanzetti, once a member of PFM). It was good fun to see that the band does not even try to show how much they adore early Genesis: the title trackīs rhythm section is based unshamely on I Know What I Like. Fortunatly Mangala Vallis is way too good to let it be a hindrance or anything like that. Their songwriting habilities let them do tricks like that without risking to fall into plagiriarism. The song becomes more of a homage to Genesis since, like Magenta or Marillion, they have a very own strong personality .

Certainly The Book Of Dreams is not a perfect CD in any way, but as a first efford itīs an excellent start: fine melodic guitar solos (yes, there is some Hackett-like lines), fantastic analog keyboards (yes! lots of moogs and vmellotron waves included!) and a solid rhythm section. Oh, by the way, no, the singers donīt sound like Gabriel or Collins (except for Lanzetti, but he is only featured on the last track) Most of all those guys know how to write great, catchy tunes. Very addictive Iīd say. Ok, nothing too original, but certainly they have the potential to go very far soon.

A four stars affair, at least. Another fine prog gem from Italy. Donīt miss it!

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 The Book of Dreams by MANGALA VALLIS album cover Studio Album, 2002
3.55 | 52 ratings

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The Book of Dreams
Mangala Vallis Rock Progressivo Italiano

Review by apps79
Special Collaborator Neo Prog Team

4 stars One of the greatest entries of the new millenium,MANGALA VALLIS are an Italian symph prog rock band,formed in 1998 in Reggio Emilia.They begun as a trio,featuring experienced musicians like Gigi Cavalli Cocchi on drums/percussion,Enzo Cattini on keyboards and Mirco Consolini on guitars/basses.No less than three singers helped with the recordings of their first album,among them we meet ex-''Acqua Fragile'' and ''P.F.M.'' vocalist Bernardo Lanzetti.The debut ''The book of dreams'' came out in 2002,based on the novels of the famous French writer Jules Verne.

The admiration of MANGALA VALLIS for 70's progressive rock becomes clear from the very first note of the album,especially GENESIS' influences are constantly in the repertoire.Eight memorable compositions are what MANGALA VALLIS have to offer,delivering amazing keyboard work,sensitive guitars and excellent vocal arrangements.SPOCK'S BEARD also come to mind with these nice grooves, multi-vocal parts, moog soloing and alternating acoustic/electric guitars,while Matteo Setti sounds a lot like NEAL MORSE.The second vocalist in the line,Vic Fraja,sounds a lot like PETER GABRIEL at his best,while his voice backed up by the shining mellotron parts and Hammond organ are on of the most enjoyable and inpiring parts of the album and exactly when GENESIS stick in your mind.Lanzetti needs no introduction,his magnificent voice in the beautiful ''A new century'' is a highlight of progressive rock.A very balanced album filled with beauty,sensitivity and positive energy,''The book of dreams'' is a work straight coming out of the 70's ,that will please every prog fan out there.Simply awesome and absolutely essential!

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