Progarchives, the progressive rock ultimate discography

DELIRIUM

Rock Progressivo Italiano • Italy


From Progarchives.com, the ultimate progressive rock music website

Delirium picture
Delirium biography
Founded in Genova, Italy in 1970 - Disbanded in 1975 - Reformed in 2007

DELIRIUM is an important band in the history of Italian progressive rock music, having been active since 1970. They originally formed in Genoa during the late 1960s as I SAGITTARI and their line-up consisted of Ettore Vigo (keyboards), Peppino Di Santo (drums, vocals), Mimmo Di Martino (acoustic guitar) and Marcello Reale (bass). The later arrival of Ivano Fossati (vocals, keyboards, flute) completed the band, whose early musical style was a mix of the so-called Italian melodic tradition and UK progressive influences, in particular KING CRIMSON and COLOSSEUM.

Their first album, the rough-hewn ''Dolce Acqua'' (1971), was one of the earliest Italian progressive albums and is a conceptual suite with each of its eight movements being based on different human emotions. The album is mainly acoustic in nature and is dominated by Ivano Fossati, the prominence of whose flute has drawn comparisons with Ian Anderson. While ''Dolce Acqua'' undoubtedly has a strong folk atmosphere, Fossati's flute is really the only similarity with JETHRO TULL. It wasn't as successful as some of the other big Italian albums that were released in 1971, but the band enjoyed much better fortunes on the festival circuit. In 1972 they took part in the Sanremo song festival and had a massive hit single as a result of their televised performance. Fossati subsequently left to embark on a solo career and was replaced by English musician Martin Frederick Grice (vocals, flute, saxophone) who joined from THE BO BO'S BAND, a beat band that also included future members of AREA. DELIRIUM'S growing reputation was enhanced by further competition victories, television appearances and hit singles, but this commercial approach wasn't typical of the music on their albums.

After Fossati's departure and the arrival of Grice, DELIRIUM moved in a more progressive direction. Their second album ''Lo Scemo E Il Villaggio'' (1972) is notable for its blending of progressive and jazz music, and for Grice's liberal use of the saxophone. In spite of, or because of, this change of musical direction the album didn't enjoy the success it arguably deserved. Perhaps the public had expected another ''Dolce Acqua''. There was no such problem with their next release, ''Delirium III - Viaggio Negli Arcipelaghi del Tempo'' (1974). A work of great maturity that until recently was considered to be their masterpiece, it was also their mos...
read more

DELIRIUM forum topics / tours, shows & news


DELIRIUM forum topics Create a topic now
DELIRIUM tours, shows & news Post an entries now

DELIRIUM Videos (YouTube and more)


Showing only random 3 | Show all DELIRIUM videos (2) | Search and add more videos to DELIRIUM

Buy DELIRIUM Music



More places to buy DELIRIUM music online

DELIRIUM discography


Ordered by release date | Showing ratings (top albums) | Help Progarchives.com to complete the discography and add albums

DELIRIUM top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.83 | 115 ratings
Dolce Acqua
1971
3.69 | 81 ratings
Lo Scemo E Il Villaggio
1972
4.02 | 111 ratings
III (Viaggio Negli Arcipelaghi Del Tempo)
1974
4.10 | 144 ratings
Il Nome Del Vento
2009
3.64 | 46 ratings
L'Era Della Menzogna
2015

DELIRIUM Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.49 | 14 ratings
Vibrazioni Notturne - Live
2007

DELIRIUM Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

3.62 | 9 ratings
Il Viaggio Continua: La Storia 1970 - 2010
2010

DELIRIUM Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.00 | 1 ratings
Delirium
1978
2.09 | 3 ratings
Jesahel (Una Storia Lunga 20 Anni)
1996
2.48 | 3 ratings
Jesahel
1999
1.00 | 1 ratings
Jesahel/ Canto di Osanna
1999
4.06 | 9 ratings
'71-'75
2005
3.00 | 1 ratings
Le Pił Belle Canzoni Dei Delirium
2006
4.00 | 1 ratings
I Sagittari (pre Delirium)
2007

DELIRIUM Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

5.00 | 1 ratings
Jesahel/Kings Road
1972
3.00 | 1 ratings
Haum!
1972

DELIRIUM Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 III (Viaggio Negli Arcipelaghi Del Tempo) by DELIRIUM album cover Studio Album, 1974
4.02 | 111 ratings

BUY
III (Viaggio Negli Arcipelaghi Del Tempo)
Delirium Rock Progressivo Italiano

Review by zeuhl1
Collaborator RPI Team

3 stars This is the Delirium album many point to as the one to have, but I would not readily agree. Lead vocalist Ivano Fossati has now been gone for two years, and the band is still working on finding an identity.

Opening track Il Dono starts with syrupy string arrangements that elicited an audible 'uh oh' from this reviewer the first time I heard the album. Title track has some nice sax work from Martin Grice (not as prevalent as the previous album) but is hampered by a shrill chorus. It settles into a nice piano jam with first album style vocalizations and flute that give the first indication that this is still Delirium. Some cautious sax echoes of Bloomdido style Gong riffs are in there too. Side one ends with Dio Del Silenzio, an acoustic guitar driven song that fully sounds like older Delirium, with cadence and melody hearkening back to the Fossatti era, hampered only by unnecessary strings and an indifferent sax solo. Some flute on this one would have been a better choice.

Side two begins with a delicate 12 string guitar and synthesizer before the string arrangements overwhelm the proceedings. (La Battaglia Degli Eterni Piani). Once the strings cut out, a flute and guitar jam takes over but soon the strings are back creating a slight Starsky and Hutch vibe that isn't what they'd hoped for.

A nice nod towards subtle Gentle Giant vocalizations are a treat on side two before strings, wah guitar and sax create an unintentional prog homage to Shaft. (the drums through a ring modulator is a nice touch). Thunder crashes, rain comes down and the syrupy strings take us into the finale, Ancora Un'alba, an inconsequential 'orchestra with band accompaniment' denouement to side two.

Overall, this is a fairly dark album, like a richer but creepier version of Van der Graaf Generator, which is a decent comparison. They are a more complex version but perhaps not for the better, as some more of the specialness of Delirium has faded. But it feels like the band is unsure what direction to head in, so they tried several things to see what works. My original notes i just found said "Proto string infused doom metal with Shaft soundtrack meets Hatfield and the North." Hmmm. Perhaps this is their version of their King Crimson Red album. They've hit 1974, been through a ton of change, and are looking forward and backward at the same time. But the strings really get in the way of the whole proceedings and generally hinder rather than enhance any songs they are on (most of the album). Not a bad album by any means, but my least favorite of the first three. In a word: Uneven.

3 stars

 Haum! by DELIRIUM album cover Singles/EPs/Fan Club/Promo, 1972
3.00 | 1 ratings

BUY
Haum!
Delirium Rock Progressivo Italiano

Review by zeuhl1
Collaborator RPI Team

— First review of this album —
3 stars The followup to the huge hit Jesahel, Delirium opt to go towards a more commercial angle this time. They let their more pop sensibilities have the floor here, as they try to capitalize on their newfound fame. Unfortunately, Haum! lacks the magic of Jesahel, despite nods to that song with some call and response with the multi person chorus and the repetitive 'Ha--oom' chants throughout. It tries to capture the lightning in a bottle once again, but it's clear they are going after a different audience on this side. It opens with a catchy flute intro. Overall a nice follow up trying to balance their cool side with pop requirements. Will grow on you.

Side two is Movemento II (Dubbio) that starts with simple solo piano and recorder under Fossati's vocal. Harpsichord, acoustic guitars and an overwrought string outro flesh out a low key song from Dolce Acqua lp.

Anything with Fossati on it is worth getting for his unique vocal power and gifted flute technique. For Delirium fans, you probably need this. For non RPI fans, merely a curiosity.

3 stars for RPI fans, 2 stars for other prog fans.

 Jesahel/Kings Road by DELIRIUM album cover Singles/EPs/Fan Club/Promo, 1972
5.00 | 1 ratings

BUY
Jesahel/Kings Road
Delirium Rock Progressivo Italiano

Review by zeuhl1
Collaborator RPI Team

— First review of this album —
5 stars The single that broke the band from modestly successful to huge stars in Italy and Europe. They made the finals of the Sanremo festival in 1972 with this song, and it was partly the springboard that made the RPI scene take off from the heads and freaks and become better accepted into the houses of normal folks. This song hit number one in Italian charts in 1972, with the heavy flute and distinctive vocals of frontman Ivano Fossati.

There are some who call this out of character for the band, but in reality the essence of what made them what they were is contained in under four minutes here. Simple, catchy with acoustic guitar, repetitive and trance inducing chanting touches on almost liturgical moods. I've played this song for several people who have no idea who they are, and a common reaction is along the lines of "this is powerful and I don't know why but I like it" and "I feel like I am in church getting changed" It will get inside your head and not leave.

Does it have the swirling prog attributes of symphonic Italian rock? No. Would it fit perfectly on their Dolce Acqua album? Absolutely. Like the Beatles, Delirium hid some of their magical stuff on 45.

The b-side, King's Road, will please more prog fans-instrumental and complicated, it shows where they can go as musicians if they aren't constrained by pop expectations. String section and piano introduction lead to an energetic ELP-ish piano/bass/drums jazz workout with an extended flute solo and then mellotron led outro. Similar to some early instrumental Focus. When you say Delirium in Italy, Jesahel is the one song that people remember.

Highly recommended. 5 stars.

 Lo Scemo E Il Villaggio by DELIRIUM album cover Studio Album, 1972
3.69 | 81 ratings

BUY
Lo Scemo E Il Villaggio
Delirium Rock Progressivo Italiano

Review by zeuhl1
Collaborator RPI Team

4 stars A band in transition. After losing frontman and lead singer/flautist Ivano Fossati, it would appear to many that the departure of so large a personality might cause the band to pack it in. Delirium luckily did not make this mistake, and adding Martin Grice on sax and flute, shifted gears towards a more symphonic prog sound. Lead vocals were now shared a la PFM with no real defined lead singer and frontman.

Opening song Villaggio is one of the stronger pieces, but as an instrumental, it noticeably avoids the sea change within the band without Fossati. Some attempts at sounding like the first album like the catchy Mia Pazzia sound like an unused song from their debut: it could have been a good follow up to Jesahel and Haum for their pop followers. It has the catchiness of Fossati's style captured well. Sogno attempts to capture the same vibe, but less successfully so-starting off perilously close to 70's era muzak, but culminating in a nice Crimson Islands era jazz breakdown.

Some of this is disjointed in feel and some pieces seem like they are patchworked bits they had kicking around that they wove into a suite. Drums step up, and the injection of sax gives them a new developing sophistication that isn't quite there yet. It still sounds like Delirium, but something is missing. It sounds like they know it too. Album closer Pernsiero per un Abbandono ties the proceedings together in the first really well done synthesis of their former and currently developing style. Sonically, the recording doesn't have the dynamics of the first album, and is lacking in low end oomph overall with the bass nearly non existent.

Gatefold vinyl wrapped in a nice acid doodle cover.

Reference points: This time it is a bit easier to compare what they are up to: Van der Graaf Generator style horns are prominent, a new sound for them. Blasts of horns from Wake of Poseidon or LIzard from Crimson are also in there. The first PFM album creeps in as an influence in the second half. A work in progress. Closer to 4 stars than 3.5.

 Dolce Acqua by DELIRIUM album cover Studio Album, 1971
3.83 | 115 ratings

BUY
Dolce Acqua
Delirium Rock Progressivo Italiano

Review by zeuhl1
Collaborator RPI Team

5 stars Although many people point to Delirium III as the one to grab, I need to point out that there is something very important missing from Delirium's second and third album: frontman, lead vocalist and flautist extraordinaire Ivano Fossati.

One cannot underestimate how much of Fossati's personality and talent went into this band. In two short years he brought them to the top of the charts in the Italian scene on the back of their monster hit 'Jesahel', a finalist in the Sanremo Music Festival in 1972. Furry freaks on national TV entered into an establishment music festival/contest? What?

His departure (drafted, perhaps intentionally, into the army) on the cusp of national and European fame threw a large monkey wrench into the plans, as Delirium was starting to blow up big. Them surviving at all was in doubt, like Genesis continuing after Gabriel quit-unthinkable they'd survive.....hmm.

Which left us with their only album with Fossati, the excellent Dolce Acqua. Acoustic guitars, heavy use of flute and Fossati's remarkable ability to construct memorable melodic hooks make this an essential album for any RPI collection. Like Jesahel, some of this stuff gets inside your head and runs on repeat it is so catchy. What makes this record so satisfying is the unifying cohesiveness contained within, something lacking in their second and third releases. A warmth surrounds every song, like the band had been playing these songs hundreds of times in many settings. This stuff just makes you feel good in a way that their later albums can only hint at. Fossati's vocals (in Italian of course) are some of my favorite in the whole scene, distinctive, impassioned without overwhelming. Some might hesitate at sixties era tinges in backing vocals, but that is all part of the charm of this album.

Reference points would be wide and varied-acoustic folk with jazz tinges and Italian classical leanings? Donovan sits in with Genesis in 1971? Hard to pin down, this one is an original.

Highly recommended. Five stars and a foundation album of the whole RPI scene, pre dating PFM. Get the triple gatefold lp if you can find one for the period piece artwork. The CD usually contains Jesahel, but the lp does not as it was a 45 only release.

 Dolce Acqua by DELIRIUM album cover Studio Album, 1971
3.83 | 115 ratings

BUY
Dolce Acqua
Delirium Rock Progressivo Italiano

Review by Cymbaline98

5 stars "Dolce Acqua" is for me one of the best works of the Italian Prog scene. Back in '71, Delirium, led bt the famous singer Ivano Fossati, released this as their first LP, and the following year the album was reprinted with Delirium's new hit, "Jesahel", a very enjoyable song, even if it belongs to the beat/pop universe of those years, and not strictly to prog. Every track is very beautiful, and the ensamble creates an unique work. "Preludio (Paura)", "Movimento I" and "Movimento II" open the album with some good examples of what prog could offer even without suites and long tracks: deep lyrics, with the flute and the special voice of Fossati, elaborated musics, with Vigo's piano and Di Santo's drumming, and the chorus, that contribute to the atmosphere. "To Satchmo, Bird and other unforgettable friends (Dolore)" and Sequenza I e II (Ipocrisia-Veritą) change the style and bring us to some very enjoyable jazz-rock sonorities, with the flute leading the tracks with elaborated melodies. "Johnnie Sayre (II perdono)" and "Favola o storia del lago di Kriss" focus on the lyrics: the first one translates a poem from Edgar Lee Masters's "Spoon River Anthology", while the second one has a very deep meaning. The LP ends with "Dolce Acqua" ("Sweet Water" in English), a short instrumental track (expect for the end of the song) which really absorbs you (or, at least, so does with me!).

As an Italian, I do really appreciate the lyrics, and I suggest to read the translations while listening to the album: even if I believe that an album can be very beautiful without good lyrics, but not viceversa, I think that, in this case, understanding the words make the tracks even more interesting.

 Jesahel (Una Storia Lunga 20 Anni)  by DELIRIUM album cover Boxset/Compilation, 1996
2.09 | 3 ratings

BUY
Jesahel (Una Storia Lunga 20 Anni)
Delirium Rock Progressivo Italiano

Review by andrea
Prog Reviewer

2 stars "Jesahel - Un viaggio lungo 20 anni" should probably be considered an official studio album by Delirium but reading the book by Mauro La Luce that is dedicated to the history of the band (Il lungo viaggio, Zona Music Books, 2018) I noticed that he even omitted to name it. It's not because of inaccuracy, the omission was deliberated. It's a fact that many prog sites do not list it at all or consider this work just a compilation album... Of course, it's not an essential album for a progressive rock fan, but why deny its existence? Why the band disown it?

The album was originally released in 1996 on NAR Records and later re-released with a different cover and a different title (Delirium, 2004, NAR International 11404-2). The line up here features three historic members of the band: Rino Dimopoli (vocals, keyboards), Pino Di Santo (vocals, drums) and Marcello Reale (vocals, bass). During the recording sessions they were helped by Alberto Radius (guitars), Stefano Previsti (keyboards), Andrea Bianchi (sax), Claudio Alifranchini (flute) and Alfredo Golino (drums). Together they re-recorded, with the new arrangements by Alberto Radius and Stefano Previsti, five tracks from the early seventies: two from the debut album "Dolce acqua" ("Dolce acqua" and "Favola o storia del lago di Kriss") and three from singles of the same period ("Jesahel", "Haum" and "Canto di Osanna"). The other pieces are brand new songs, four signed by Dimopoli - Di Santo - Reale ("Jerico", "Signora della notte", "Musicalitą" and "Pił tempo per sognare") and one by Dimopoli - Cassella ("Sola"). The focus is all on the pop side of Delirium's repertoire and prog fans would be deeply disappointed by the result. The new versions of the old tracks miss the charm of Ivano Fossati's vocals and the energy of the originals while the new tracks are just melodic pop songs...

Probably the release of this album in 1996 was just an attempt to put the band together after many years of inactivity and a way to try to have a new go but the project was ephemeral and this line up did not last long. As I said before, despite the great competence of the musicians involved, this is not a great album and for sure is not a progressive rock one. Nonetheless, it exists and apparently there would be no reason to disown it. Well, probably the problem is that its existence originated the ground for future painful legal issues.

In fact, in 2001, on the initiative of Pino Di Santo, came to life another incarnation of the band, the one that signed a deal with Black Widow Records and released some excellent prog albums such as "Il nome del vento" or "L'era della menzogna". Meanwhile Rino Dimopoli and Marcello Reale persisted in carrying on the melodic flag of the repertoire with new musicians. The branch with Pino Di Santo and other historic members such as Ettore Vigo and Martin Grice in the line up added the words International Progressive Group to the name Delirium while Dimopoli's band was simply called Delirium Project, kept on performing live and in 2016 released an album in a pop rock vein entitled Con i nostri occhi on K1 Records...

For prog fans Delirium IPG are the "real ones", those who really matter but if you are interested in melodic pop and like bands such as I Nomadi...

 Il Nome Del Vento by DELIRIUM album cover Studio Album, 2009
4.10 | 144 ratings

BUY
Il Nome Del Vento
Delirium Rock Progressivo Italiano

Review by TenYearsAfter

3 stars In 2006 Delirum pleasantly surprised the progrock world with a stunning reunion gig, one year later the band released a live album, in 2009 a new studio effort entitled Il Nome Del Viento and in 2015 a second studio album named L'Era Della Menzogna. This review is about their first new album since III - Viaggio Negli Arcipelaghi Del Tempo, from 1974!

Listening to this new album is listening to the best elements of their Seventies albums but on a higher level. To me the compositions sound more mature, more elaborate and more captivating, thanks to their experience over all the years. And there is a perfect balance between the instruments (from woodwind instruments to vintage keyboards and rock guitar), between the mellow and more dynamic parts and between folk, symphonic rock and jazz/jazz-rock. Especially in the tracks Dopo Il Vento (very dynamic and wonderful colouring with guitar, flute, sax and piano) and Cuore Sacro (great tension between parts with powerful organ and warm piano). Also interesting is the use of a string quartet in some songs and I am very pleased with the Italian vocals, I always prefer native vocals.

In a Dutch music magazine one reviewer wrote about 60+ musicians still making music as 'rollator' rock, well, Delirum makes excellent 'rollator prog'!

My rating: 3,5 star.

 Il Nome Del Vento by DELIRIUM album cover Studio Album, 2009
4.10 | 144 ratings

BUY
Il Nome Del Vento
Delirium Rock Progressivo Italiano

Review by nikitasv777

5 stars This legendary Italian band delivered four outstanding studio-albums in the Seventies but I prefer their Il nome del vento 2009. Sound is amazing, jazz influences are obvious and tasty. The general mood of the music is varied and intriguing with beautiful sax, flute, keyboards and String quartet. There are also interesting guitar solos. All trecks my favourites from this very good album, exept ''Luci Lontane'', ''Profeta Senza Profezie", ''Ogni Storia''. Many times classic artists record new music, and seem to be trying to recapture past glories. Delirium return with a release Il nome del vento is a very solid piece of art. The music is delightfully pleasant. It is very beautiful. As whole one of the best Delirium's albums and one of the best italian progressive albums. So - 5 stars!!!
 L'Era Della Menzogna by DELIRIUM album cover Studio Album, 2015
3.64 | 46 ratings

BUY
L'Era Della Menzogna
Delirium Rock Progressivo Italiano

Review by BrufordFreak
Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

3 stars Italian prog masters DELIRIUM are back with another collection of solid progressive rock/RPI songs. Diversity is again the name of the game with this band as one can find female operatic voices (on "L'Angelo el Fango") along side the gravelly voice of lead singer Alessandro Corvaglia, nice keyboard work through out and the nice touch of flute throughout. This is seasoned, well-constructed, nice to listen to prog, Delirium's music is actually quite difficult to place--though it does have that theatric presence common to so much of Italian progressive rock music--but their mix of old, retro and modern keyboards with unusual recording, engineering and mixing choices is quite distinctive and . . . unique.

Favorite songs: 1. "L'inganno del potere" (6:26); the emotional Gregorian-chant presence in 8. "Basta" (5:17); 5. "La deriva" (3:54); the beautiful "L'angelo della fango" (3:45) and the Latin-tinged "La voce dell'anima" (3:31).

Not as strong as 2009's Il nome del vento, but a decent, enjoyable collection of well-constructed songs.

Thanks to ProgLucky for the artist addition. and to Quinino for the last updates

Copyright Prog Archives, All rights reserved. | Legal Notice | Privacy Policy | Advertise | RSS + syndications

Other sites in the MAC network: JazzMusicArchives.com — jazz music reviews and archives | MetalMusicArchives.com — metal music reviews and archives

Donate monthly and keep PA fast-loading and ad-free forever.