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JUDY DYBLE

Prog Folk • United Kingdom


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Judy Dyble biography
The London-born Judy DYBLE was a typical English folk and folk-rock singer of the late-60's and early-70's, but unlike Sandy DENNY, Jacqui MCSHEE or Barbara GASKIN, she didn't really make her indelible mark on the scene back then, despite hovering in its centre for almost a decade. Having started as a teenager in the mid-60's as the Judy And The Folkmen on the North-London scene, with a cute librarian looks and her stunning autoharp that she carried around everywhere, she one day met Ashley HUTCHINGS who was building up a group. They soon formed a couple and she became the FAIRPORT CONVENTION singer, then in the West-Coast folk rock mode and their self-titled debut album was released in late 67, produced by the legendary Joe BOYD, a pivotal US figure of the UK folk-rock scene. The arrival of Iain MATTHEWS provoked some strains and Dyble eventually left before their second album, because all thought her voice was not matching the newcomer's. She would eventually be replaced by Sandy Denny, an ex-STRAWBS member, but Judy remained friends with her old band and was taken under the wings of a few notable musicians on the circuit in the following years.

She met an ex-army musician Ian MCDONALD, who was writing songs with a certain PETER SINFIELD. Soon enough all three would join the craziest GILES, GILES AND FRIPP group after the release of their Cheerful Insanities album and they rehearsed and recorded two demos. Alas, this line-up didn't work out and Judy left McDonald and the future Crimson King group. After a stint with Steamhammer's Quintenton, then a few more stints, she met THEM's Jackie MCAULEY and formed the quintessential English folk-rock band TRADER HORNE, named after John PEEL's maid. Their debut album Morning Way was released in 69 on the Dawn label, but sadly Judy couldn't handle the gruelling tour that ensued, and the group fell apart. She dabbled for some more time on the music scene, keeping up with old bandmates, even dabbling with avant-gardist Lol COXHILL and the MILLER Brothers Steve and Phil, but this project dissolved after a tour of Holland. She then re...
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Talking With StrangersTalking With Strangers
United States Dist 2013
Audio CD$11.21
$19.74 (used)
Flow & ChangeFlow & Change
Import
Imports 2013
Audio CD$12.08
$12.00 (used)
WhorlWhorl
Import
Talking Elephant 2006
Audio CD$31.07
$51.60 (used)
Enchanted GardenEnchanted Garden
Import
Talking Elephant 2004
Audio CD$87.01
$87.01 (used)
SpindleSpindle
Import
Talking Elephant 2006
Audio CD$49.99
$32.65 (used)
Live Atawm JazzLive Atawm Jazz
Import
Imports 2014
Audio CD$29.98
Talking With Strangers by Judy Dyble (2013) Audio CDTalking With Strangers by Judy Dyble (2013) Audio CD
United States Dist
Audio CD$39.88
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JUDY DYBLE discography


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JUDY DYBLE top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

4.83 | 3 ratings
Enchanted Garden
2004
3.50 | 2 ratings
Spindle
2006
4.75 | 3 ratings
The Whorl
2006
4.47 | 17 ratings
Talking With Strangers
2009
4.33 | 6 ratings
Flow and Change
2013

JUDY DYBLE Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

JUDY DYBLE Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

JUDY DYBLE Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

0.00 | 0 ratings
Songs From Spindle & The Whorl
2007
3.58 | 5 ratings
Starcrazy - An Introduction To Judy Dyble
2011

JUDY DYBLE Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

0.00 | 0 ratings
One Sure Thing / Take Me To Your Leader (with The Conspirators)
2008
0.00 | 0 ratings
Every Sentimental Moment (with Kings Cross)
2009
0.00 | 0 ratings
Fragile
2010
0.00 | 0 ratings
Grey October Day
2011

JUDY DYBLE Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 Enchanted Garden by DYBLE, JUDY album cover Studio Album, 2004
4.83 | 3 ratings

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Enchanted Garden
Judy Dyble Prog Folk

Review by admireArt

5 stars When the late night is falling, after all its frenzy, do yourself some good, dwell in this "Enchanted Garden".

I never thought that Judy Dyble's first "solo" work, will turn out to be this good. A masterpiece of creativity by its own. It travels through highly inspired compositions, solid as ethereal, unique as daring and yet completely unpretentious. Flawless as the song by song count goes. It not only offers "one style" pen written compositions, opposite to that, it is rich in musical proposals and ideas, full of heart felt emotions, blended naturally in all kinds of intriguing musical "twists and turns", which sublime simplicity into masterworks. And of course every single second of the work, is backed up by masterful and completely compromised performances by the "ALL Star" musicians in this project.

Pure, unpretentious, yet infinitely detailed flawless arrangements, that are constantly moving forward in ascending progressions, all brought down to planet Earth by Mrs. Dyble's exquisite (not sweet), unique vocals. She sings her personal "astronomical" and intimate poetry, but never sacrifices music to do so. Opposite to that, she enhances and gives scope to the amazing songwriting and performances. WOW!!

Really, give yourself a moment with this woman, she will not dissapoint you, far from that, you will return enlightened from the experience. (The Prog/Folk tagging sells it short, considering the diverse musical directions of the compositions and the sometimes completely electrified performances, do not expect Prog/Folk as such!!)

*****5 "Masterpiece" PA stars!!

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 Flow and Change by DYBLE, JUDY album cover Studio Album, 2013
4.33 | 6 ratings

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Flow and Change
Judy Dyble Prog Folk

Review by DrömmarenAdrian

4 stars Judy Dyble has been around and singing for a long time. She was born 1949 in London and 1967-1968 she was the main singer of folk rock band Fairport Convention. She participated on their first record "Fairport Convention" and I think that is what she is famous for. There has been a lot of talk about Sandy Denny, and she has gained a lot of acknowledge, but I think Judy Dyble should have got more attention. Well, as late as 2004 she did her debut solo record "Enchanted Garden" and 2013, this record was released "Flow and Change". It features a lot of instrumentalists, as much as eighteen without her. We have instruments such as flute, cello, french horn, oboe, clarinet and violin, along with more common ones. Of course Judy sings and now I am going to tell you how well she does it.

She does it very well. I am happy because this music has the same great aura as the late 60s brittish folk rock. This isn't very far from for exampel Fairport Convention, though is this less rock. Still Dyble has her own originality kept and her songs are poetic and wonderfully composed. The record has anice artistic cover of a girl looking down on something.

The first song "Black dog dreams" is perhaps the album's best. Here there's no doubt this is progressive. I got the symphonic feeling, not far from Renaissance, and it's also wonderfully folky and who can do anything else than love the brigth voice of Judy Dyble(10/10). The second best track is "Crowbaby" which is calmer and more varied but almost as beautiful(10/10). I must of course mention the long "The Sisterhood of Ruralists" which also is progressive, a long tale with sweaping song and interesting influences from far away. It is very English and I like that(8/10). Otherwise this is contemporary (but not dated) folk which interferes with both history and foreign places. "Featherdancing" and "Head full of stars" must also take place here (both 8/10) as lovely songs.

Beside of those three first songs I mentioned this music isn't so progressive but not less good. I can honestly say this voice Judy Dyble has is very unusual and amazing. This is a dreamy world to take part in as listener. I will give this record four stars. It doesn't contain so many perfect songs, but the record is even and I love the folk style and especially Judy's lyrical voice.

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 Flow and Change by DYBLE, JUDY album cover Studio Album, 2013
4.33 | 6 ratings

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Flow and Change
Judy Dyble Prog Folk

Review by progshachar

5 stars She is back! The great Judy Dyble with her beautiful voice. What a great album, a follow up to the acclaimed former album - talking with strangers. In my opinion Judy Dyble is one of the great singers of our era. From Fairport convention, early King Crimson period with her astonishing "I talk to the wind" version, the amazing Trader Horne album and to our days with all the great albums she make. Her new album is very quiet I would say magical. The starter Black Dog Dreams is a powerful beginner, followed by Featherdancing ? a wonderful song about 3 sisters who wanted to dance. Beautiful Child is a sweet song followed by the powerful Crowbaby. The last song is 11 minutes long and is a great closer to this magnificent album. I can't stop listening and I wish Judy Dyble will keep on singing and bring us joy. This album is somewhat progressive in the veins of the great prog folk albums of the 70's like Trees, Fairport Convention, Pentangle with the unique undistinguished voice of Judy Dyble. Enjoy.

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 The Whorl by DYBLE, JUDY album cover Studio Album, 2006
4.75 | 3 ratings

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The Whorl
Judy Dyble Prog Folk

Review by admireArt

5 stars Judy Dyble has the rare touch of voice that is impossible to let pass by. Once you hear her voice it will remain in your personal "archives". AND the most exquisite part is the way she can possess the song she sings in, either hers or when covering someone elses´s song. I always have thought of her to be more progger-than folk. Of course the whole disclosure of the environment and instruments are completely Folk oriented, BUT the composition process offers a lot of space for experimentations. I myself think; that is the reason; considering her voice talent; she has been somehow overlooked; for more conventional "folk" aesthetics.) Her non conventional songs "freer" a la "King Crimson" impros and experimentations are really not that close to folk even the prog one. So here a lot of experimentation happens, BUT the songs do not divert to anywhere and nowhere; as it happens usually with experimental music. No; this woman as referred can possess the song as to let it progress for the purpose of itself not for the experimentation as such; no cheap tricks or detours. For me the mere fact of her as a true progger is undeniable. More experimental in its musical-language also; lets say this is not exactly "Fairport Convention" like melodies nor hard-rock/folk like the "Tull". They are closer to the ECLECTIC/prog-folk aesthetics. Judy Dyble is quiet appreciated by many founders of the first wave of Proggers. She normally gathers a very interesting crowd to the recording sessions (Robert Fripp-Lead Guitar, Effects [Soundscapes) in this one, among others). Her choice of songs to cover, give-out her root essentials (I Talk to the Wind" an early- KingCrimson song) and her songs (co-written with Swordfish) are very deep and intimate but also OBSCURE. Which turns them into an un-earthly experience more than an earthly/folk one. I myself greet this musician as a an example; both as a woman and a musician in this universe of Prog-Music *****5 "tough to choose between 3 very good Judy Dyble albums-close to masterful" Stars

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 Talking With Strangers by DYBLE, JUDY album cover Studio Album, 2009
4.47 | 17 ratings

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Talking With Strangers
Judy Dyble Prog Folk

Review by Eetu Pellonpää
Special Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

5 stars Judy Dyble was familiar to me from the charming debut of Fairport Convention, her work with Giles, Giles & Fripp along with the interesting but in my opinion bit unbalanced Trader Horne album. I was interested to learn her being again active on music making and tried to find her albums. Sadly I soon noted these 21st century released albums were quite hard for me to find, released mostly on CD's, and some lonesome Syd Barrett cover songs I found from the internet didn't appear so interesting. However I was stunned as I found her originally 2009 released record as new vinyl reissue from a local vendor, and grabbed this album decorated with Jackie Morris new illustrations pleasing my eyes more than the pictures I had seen from the earlier release. After some spins on my turntable I was awestruck by its dramatic power and sensuality; the shy appearing folk singer from the past had grown as singular artist, mesmerizing deep emotions from the cozy firesides away from the hectic centrals of music industry.

I felt the album title "Talking with Strangers" referring to the songwriter/musician's dialogue with listeners trough her work - the intimate feelings and thoughts shared with audience, which will react and break the soliloquy through various repercussions on the art via different channels. This album felt strongly autobiographical, sincere and touching from its lyrics or me. Music carries the tradition of 1960's as undercurrent, but it is filtered to contemporary sounds through modern day recording and mixing techniques, along with post 1970's musical ideas grown from the popular music culture. Conceptually the physical vinyl record has diverse sides, first carrying six shorter compositions, which prepare the listener for the catharsis of second side's nineteen minutes epic. Despite this dualism, the songs form a very solid flow of music and lyrical tale for the listener; The Stranger.

"Neverknowing" summarizes quickly what possibly happened to Judy after departing the music business at early 1970's, and continues directly to a poetic impression about "Jazzbirds", The musical feminine characters giving so much for mankind but with a price. This song is driven by both harpsichord and charming flute lines, flautist Ian McDonald later also shining on many parts with his saxophone tones, certainly matured due age from the savage roars of legendary but rustier iconic heyday recordings. Lake and Sinfield composition "C'est La Vie" gains the ultimate interpretation on this album, haunted by most angelic goddess choir of mademoiselles Celia Humpris, Jacqui McShee and Julianne Regan. Rachel Hall's violin also rises as very meaningful tonal element on this tragic crystallization of beauty's values. The name song of the record resides on classic piano and voice duo, standing at the centre of the record, trying to lure the dreamy memories return from the Avalon. The melancholia continues with gently cradling "Dreamtime", composition finding really pretty vocal harmonies and melodic solutions arranged with ethereal sensibility. "Grey October Day" dives to the heart of the constantly conjured melancholic depths, minor key slow jazz passages echoing with Ian's saxophone's sorrowful sounds.

The second side's "Harpsong" seems to gather all this together as the powerful appraisal to sentimental forces of creativity. This gently rolling apparition of seraph's memories strikes to the core singer's memories of her past, and gathering her performer companions from the late 1960's allows a sensation of sacred truth, not bigger than life but sized as the curve of human experience itself. Guitar genius Robert Fripp and his drummer friend Pat Mastelotto join in creation of magical soundscapes and contrasting dynamic twists to this celestial epoch, which synthesizes elements of art rock, classical music, folk rock and modern new-age shades.

Though written biographies can be touching, I believe the sensation of both music and memoirs mingling together work as yet more emotionally affecting mixture. It is also great to hear how much there istrust in the future and detect the realization of human's constant growth during the ages. I guess life is a great riddle and everybody has to find their own answers. I believe Judy's choice of escaping the swinging London of seventies to the peace of countryside for a family life was a great understanding, allowing to live a full human life and leaving the choice for artistic expression for lesser pressure. If there was any difficulties in finding this path is not my business, but I firmly believe time had shown here the wiser; The serenity of the gardens and human emotions of life with devoted love shimmers from this album so more powerfully than any drug boosted market products could ever. These yearnings and sorrow has humble aura of humanity instead of hate of losses disguised as sadness.

There were few songs from the "Talking with strangers" sessions omitted, now available in US CD reissue and as EP "Fragile". I have not heard those though, but will close the content of this original album within my heart. Thus I find this album as an essential recommendation for anybody interested of real human emotions and alternate sidetracks, trekked by a beautiful kin to those, whom many reached for stardom. Alas those, who often met the Icarus' fate either from traps of fast life or forced pressures of publicity and capitalist greed; The curses flattening art as failed portraits of innovation and beauty, crumbled to dust of time. It is kind of healing experience, that this album is coronized by the league of numerous friends from the singer's artist friends from past, who made trough that purgatory surviving each on their ways. There is faith for this moment and tomorrow, and there is an invisible circle which curves as an unbroken divine sphere. Luckily this album is not the end of the dialogue for the strangers, as Judy's following album "Flow and Change" has been announced to be released later during the year of this writing. May the human kindness and fate's enchantress bring assurance for that "nothing can go wrong".

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 Starcrazy - An Introduction To Judy Dyble by DYBLE, JUDY album cover Boxset/Compilation, 2011
3.58 | 5 ratings

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Starcrazy - An Introduction To Judy Dyble
Judy Dyble Prog Folk

Review by Sean Trane
Special Collaborator Prog Folk

4 stars Not an album per se, this is a compilation that came with one of those Classy Crock Present Prog magazine, and I must say that this is from far the best thing (read CD) they've distributed with their glossy mag. Indeed, after a disappearance lasting over three decades, Judy came back in the mid-00's with a string of low-profile albums, despite some extra-stellar guests? This compilation was taken from her first four or five (depending on how you look at it) and will give a fairly good idea of the new-millennium musical visage. Yes, she's still a folkie ? I'd even say a hippie-folkie ? at heart and her musical creation is probably much more meaningful than in her Crimson Fairport Horne days, because back then, she often appeared as a beautiful librarian that had been catapulted at the front of the stage of folk groups. Despite that lengthy motherhood eclipse, Judy had managed to keep most of her musical friends as friends, and when she decided to come back, most of them lent her a willing hand. This includes some old Crimson buddies (Fripp & McDo), but also some newer generation-stalwart like Tim Bowman.

Opening on the fabulous and haunting Heart Of Stone, this compilation is simply one of the best witness if what modern prog-folk can be. There is an amazingly beautiful hypnotic and tense side to this outstanding track, and the Miles-like muted trumpet and flute only adds mystery to the soundscape. There is definite psych-folk ambiance in the following Jazzbirds (well there is a bit of a jazz feel), an amazingly haunting piece that opens on morning birdsongs and harp, a very pastaural (pun intended! ;o)) track that slowly grows in intensity. Judy's voice doesn't have the crystal-clear vocal timbre of what the early-70's era presented as the norm, but it's all for the better, because her softer delivery drives shivers down your spine as will that trumpet and flute again. Oddly enough the birdsongs open the following Crystal Voices, where Judy revisits with her harp and old voice her previous golden era.

The only weak track in this compilation selection will probably her highest-profile cover (Floyd's See Emily Play), which I find particularly twee and out of place in the present album. The other cover is rather better, but it's hard to confirm that A better Side Of Her is indeed so, because it's overwhelmed by string arrangements (most likely synthesized) and is a bit cheesy. The delicate-sounding The Last Time is again in the same tonal frame (all three versions are demos), but still full of charms with his pipes in the background. The compilation closes on a 19-mins stunning epic that forms the spine of her previous album (Talking With Strangers), with the first guitar-dominated movement slowly segues to a piano-driven second section with some lengthy spell-binding soundscape before a Porcupine Tree-like guitar interrupts a bit abruptly to let the an insane musical quagmire make inroads into your sanity. While the track never really climaxes, there are plenty of superb moments that should please all progressive folkheads.

Well, I'm not a big fan of that glossy bi-monthly mag, but then again they managed sometimes to pleasantly surprise me (Harper, Pentangle and Fairport were also on the menu), so you'd better jump on that issue to get an earful of freaky folk-prog, or else you might have to get one of her last two albums (apparently her brand-new is still not out), which I'm sure will be quite charming? I will most-likely indulge in the near-future.

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 Starcrazy - An Introduction To Judy Dyble by DYBLE, JUDY album cover Boxset/Compilation, 2011
3.58 | 5 ratings

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Starcrazy - An Introduction To Judy Dyble
Judy Dyble Prog Folk

Review by toroddfuglesteg

3 stars This is a nice surprise, enclosed with Classic Rock Presents Prog # 16. Unfortunate for those of you not living in the UK, you have to pay some $$ for this compilation album.

Judy Dyble looks like a lovely old lady. She is also listed in the Prog Folk genre. So some acoustic guitars backing up her voice, then........?

Wrong !

This is anything but acoustic guitar & a wonderful female vocals type of music. Judy Dyble has a very modern sound backing up her wonderful voice. Acoustic guitars ? There are some, but they are a part of soundscape counting tangents, various acoustic instruments, woodwinds, bass and various percussions.

The music is based on prog folk, yes. But add a lot of eclectic prog too. Not to mention symphonic prog and some world music. Her take on Pink Floyd's standard See Emily Play is both great and very temporary.

In short, Judy Dyble does not live in the 1970s and resting on her very impressive work with Fairport Convention and others. She has both her legs in 2010-11 and she is also looking forward to 2012, 2013......... The two long songs at the end also more than justifies her inclusion in ProgArchives. Is it just me or does others also hear a lot of Soft Machine aka Fifth in the last track on this sampler; Harpsong ? Good Lord !!! Harpsong is a good nineteen minutes long workout.

The quality is good throughout and bordering to great at times. Judy Dyble may have old age pensioneer buspass. But she still sounds like a youngster and she still has a lot to offer.

3.75 stars

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Thanks to sean trane for the artist addition. and to Eetu Pellonpää for the last updates

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