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TRADER HORNE

Prog Folk • United Kingdom


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Trader Horne picture
Trader Horne biography
Active only between 1969 and 1970; Reunited for a one-off show on 29 November 2015 at Bush Hall in London

One of those acid folk group around the turn of the 60's that is better known for having vocalist Judy DYBLE
(ex-Fairport and Giles, Giles & Fripp) and former Jackie Mc Auley (ex-Them and Belfast Gypsies) in their ranks. Their sole album Morning Way, released on the collectible Dawn label, contains a sometimes-progressive folk, sometimes acid folk, featuring mainly acoustic guitars and keyboards (among which a harpsichord) but also the odd flute (played by another ex-Them member Ray Elliot) and typical crystal-clear female vocals. As Dyvble left to found a family, she was replaced by another female folk legend Saffron Summerfield, Trader Horne folded rather quickly after the album's release. Most of the songwriting was McAuley's but Dyble dabbled with Steamhammer's Quintenton for the title track. Besides the album, Trader Horne also released two singles (one before and another after the album's release) which are included on the Cd reissue of the album.

:::: Bio written by Hugues Chantraine, Belgium ::::

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3.68 | 26 ratings
Morning Way
1970

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TRADER HORNE Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 Morning Way by TRADER HORNE album cover Studio Album, 1970
3.68 | 26 ratings

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Morning Way
Trader Horne Prog Folk

Review by Psychedelic Paul

4 stars TRADER HORNE were a short-lived British Prog-Folk duo consisting of Jackie McAuley (formerly of Them) on vocals, keyboards and guitars, and Judy Dyble (ex-Fairport Convention) on vocals, electric autoharp, recorder and glockenspiel. Their one and only album "Morning Way" was released on Pye Records in 1970 but didn't make much of an impact on the record-buying public at the time, but the album has since become a legendary lost classic and a real collectors item. The original LP album has been known to fetch incredibly high prices. It was subsequently re-issued on CD in 2008 with two bonus tracks added to the original thirteen songs on the album.

The album opens with "Jenny May", a lovely acoustic Folk ballad with Judy Dyble's gorgeous honeyed vocals floating like a warm summer breeze over the gentle bucolic melody. Altogether now, "Summer breeze, makes me feel fine, blowing through the jasmine in my mind." ..... This quaint sunny Folk tune does indeed make you feel fine and it sounds as quintessentially English as a game of cricket on the village green. The next song sounds very reminiscent of the old Christmas carol, "We Three Kings of Orient Are", which just happens to rhyme with the song title, "Children Of Oare". One of the charming things about this album is each song concludes with a brief but beautiful pastoral flute melody to interlink all of the songs together. The next exquisite piece of music "Three Rings for Elven Kings" is a soft and gentle instrumental number for flute and autoharp, with the autoharp resembling the sound of a harpsichord. Next up is "Growing Man", featuring Judy Dyble's delightful vocals right at the forefront with Jackie McAuley on backing vocals. The music sounds semi-classical, featuring a mini woodwind orchestra, and it's a song that could have had pride of place on an early Fairport Convention album, especially bearing in mind that Judy Dyble was the lead singer on their debut album. It's time now for some "Down and Out Blues", which is just what it says on the label - a mournful bluesy number where Judy Dyble does indeed sound down and out and penniless with these heart-felt lyrics:- "No nobody wants you, When you're down and out, In your pocket's not one penny, And all your pretty friends, You haven't any." ..... Cheer up Judy because the next song "The Mixed-Up Kind" is an altogether jollier tune which sounds like a lost classic which could have come right off Fairport Convention's illustrious first album. It's a truly beautiful melody carried along by the mellifluous strings of the autoharp with Judy Dyble's crystal-clear vocals sounding at their absolute best here. This tremendously appealing song represents the stunning highlight of the album so far and it's also by far the longest song on the album at over six minutes in duration. This song is six minutes of sheer beauty and joyous delight. It's as good as, if not better than anything Fairport Convention have ever done.

Side Two opens cheerfully with "Better Than Today", and what could be better than listening to this charming pastoral Folk melody today, or any day come to that. There's some truly beautiful harmonising between Judy Dyble and Jackie McAuley on this lovely Folk song. The next song "In My Loneliness" is a mournful ballad (just as the song title implies) featuring weeping violins and with Judy Dyble sounding at her most imploringly passionate best here. There's a change of pace for "Sheena", an up-tempo and uplifting melody that swings along exuberantly on a wave of eternal optimism, in the style of some of the best music from the sunshine state of California. In contrast to Side One, where all of the songs concluded with a brief pastoral flute melody, all of the songs on Side Two conclude with a brief tinkling of the ivories. The next song "The Mutant" is a doleful melancholy ballad with Jackie McAuley taking lead vocal duties for a change. And now we come to the title track "Morning Way", a song with trippy lyrics which probably comes closest to the Psych-Folk that Trader Horne are sometimes labelled as. Again, there's some gorgeous multi-tracked harmonising to be heard on this four and a half minutes of musical magic. It's time now for "Velvet to Atone", a solo piano piece with Judy Dyble's crystal-clear vocals gleaming with all of the sparkling beauty of a crystal chandelier. The album concludes with "Luke That Never Was", which opens to the sound of a solemn church organ, although this is just a prelude to a good old-fashioned happy-clappy tambourine song to sing along to in church. If only they really DID sing rousing spiritual songs as good as this in the local parish church, the vicar would surely approve.

"Morning Way" is a charmingly beautiful, one-off gem of a Folk album that we can all treasure for posterity half a century on from it's initial release. Trader Horne's marvellous album is a very pleasant reminder of why we just love those bygone halcyon days of the 1970's, which often brings to mind the poignant refrain, "They don't make music like this any more." ..... which is a shame. Trader Horne are sometimes labelled as Prog-Folk and occasionally as Psych-Folk, but it's basically just an all-round good English Folk album with no strings (or labels) attached.

 Morning Way by TRADER HORNE album cover Studio Album, 1970
3.68 | 26 ratings

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Morning Way
Trader Horne Prog Folk

Review by Eetu Pellonpaa
Special Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

3 stars I hunted down this album as a part of my personal conquest for hippie folk rock pastoral sequences, and I was particularly motivated to hear this after earlier delighted experiences of Judy Dyble's beautiful vocal tones, heard from the first Fairport Convention record and earlier version of King Crimson's "I Talk to The wind" song. I admit I was slightly disappointed with my expectations, as though there are lovely tracks on the album, it doesn't work very well as a complete LP entity in my opinion.

The album focuses mostly to medieval mood creation with rawer approach, the feminine elements more counterbalancing the masculine middle-age themes, and not being on the spotlight of the arena. Jackie McAuley leads the vocals of many songs, and the rustic acoustic flavors are supported with light chamber orchestra instrumentation. Psychedelic musical solutions appear as vocal effect treatments and abstract sonic collages binding the songs - these in my opinion dispensable sonic constructions reminding the post-production solutions of "From Genesis to Revelation" record. There are also some visitations to different musical styles, like Judy's sung old school "Down and Out Blues", American folk rock beat of "Sheena" and light bossa nova chill-outs of "Better than Today".

Some of my own favorite songs of the album were "Three Rings for The Eleven Kings"; a short instrumental airy fairy vision from the glades, and the following "Growing Man" being a great composition and having nice short baroque string theme. "In My Loneliness" also shimmers with pretty sphere of purity and romantic feminine symphonic folk touch reminding the sound of The Gentle Soul. The title song "Morning Way" has also very attractive melodic progressions and Jackie's and Judy's vocal dialogue, uniting to harmonic duo at the end. From the CD bonus tracks covering the original singles, "Here Comes The Rain" is also a charming Beatlesque folk pop rock gem. Though I found this as a quite sympathetic vintage progressive folk recording, it still did not fit completely to my own tastes, and appeared to have slightly unbalanced quality. However warmhearted kind songs from the past days are most usually positive things in a cold, calculated world of violence.

 Morning Way by TRADER HORNE album cover Studio Album, 1970
3.68 | 26 ratings

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Morning Way
Trader Horne Prog Folk

Review by progshachar

5 stars Another great prog folk album that was hiding and now that we found it, we can admire it day after day. Trader Horne is a Duo : Judy Dyble, who was singing in "Fairport convention", and Jackie McAuley,played the organ for the "theme". Their first and only album - "Morning way" was released in 1970. It had 13 songs + 2 good bonus tracks. From the first song toward the end you are in a majestic journey of lovely, warm, enjoyable folk music. The first song "Jenny May" is a great song, then there is the beautiful "Morning way" - the title track and many other. It's a bit like children music, therefore the album cover looks like it's taken from that genre. I think that anybody who liked "Mellow candle" - "Swaddling songs", "Agincourt" - "Flyaway" and "spirogyra" music , will love this album. Both singers sing in this album and the combination of their voices is unique. It's one of the best folk rock music that I have ever heard and I heard a few. Try it and you won't be disappointed.
 Morning Way by TRADER HORNE album cover Studio Album, 1970
3.68 | 26 ratings

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Morning Way
Trader Horne Prog Folk

Review by Concentration Moon

4 stars This album is a delightful album that will please any fans of Fairport Convention, Trees, and other prog folk albums from the late 60's and early 70's. Like many prog folk albums of the time, Morning Way is filled with male and female vocals, soft strings and percussion, and a variety of soothing wind instruments.

"Children of Oare", the second track of the album, stood out to me. The male and female vocals blend very nicely in particular in this song. The short wind solos are played well. The background sound of waves also has a nice touch near the end of the track. The ending is also a very nice xylophone-type solo.

The entire album flows right along, each track complementing the previous one. Each song sounds as though it is from a very long time ago, as many in the genre sound. If you wish to listen to less common mellow folk, Morning Way by Trader Horne is an excellent suggestion.

 Morning Way by TRADER HORNE album cover Studio Album, 1970
3.68 | 26 ratings

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Morning Way
Trader Horne Prog Folk

Review by greenback
Special Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

4 stars Judy Dyble sung for Fairport Convention, so that the album here sounds a bit like Fairport Convention, except that it is rather folk than blues or hard rock; she is seconded by male singer Jackie McAuley. The overall music is not extremely progressive, although it is enough to classify it as prog folk. There are some good mini-symphonic string arrangements. The drums and the bass are very timid, often being completely absent. The style is very acoustic & folkier. There are some percussions of the xylophone family, mostly in the beginning of the album. The keyboards remain rare and discreet: the piano seems the most played one, and a short passage seems to act as a repetitive interlude. The album is neither really psychedelic nor spacy. Some tracks are sad and melancholic, but the album is not globally depressing. There are a couples of more catchy tracks. There are no fillers in my opinion.
 Morning Way by TRADER HORNE album cover Studio Album, 1970
3.68 | 26 ratings

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Morning Way
Trader Horne Prog Folk

Review by Sean Trane
Special Collaborator Prog Folk

3 stars This sole record is of interest mostly to progheads for two reasons: the first being that the record presents a rather pleasant folk rock with enough strange twist and some odd instrumentations that it can be classified as progressive (all things being relative, here). The second reason is that if you are a late 60's buff, you know that Judy Dyble was the first Fairport Convention singer and she tried out for Giles, Giles And Fripp and almost made the cut for King Crimson's first line-up - this is documented in GG&F's Brondesburry Tapes album. For years, I associated this album closely with another folk-rock album Tudor Lodge.

However, this group was mostly the project of Jacquie McAuley - of THEM fame (Van Morrison's group who made two excellent psych albums after Van left them) and the main songwriter here - and Judy handles only part of the vocals. The music is rather na´ve (but it is part of the charm of such a record) folk rock that even back in 1970 was largely outdated except to a few unconditional folk purists that have kept the value of that vinyl high enough to guarantee a few counterfeits and now a Cd release on "iffy" label Akarma (the Italian copyright laws not being very strict to say the least) but of late, this label seem to have commercialised widely some early 70's rare UK records on a very luxurious vinyl versions and vinyl-replicas Cds of many groups. So I suppose some agreement has been reached and Author's Rights and royalties are respected. One of the main gripe I have with Akarma is that those mini-Lp Cds are not quite up to par with their Japanese competition, but the superb, yet-weird original artwork is fully respected here - however the quality of the foldouts covers is not perfect.

A very pastoral mood, dominated by an acoustic guitars and some flute (not always well played), and the tracks glides smoothly but rather unremarkably until the sixth one: right from the first notes, the Mixed-Up Kind (the longest of the album clocking in at 6.5 minutes) stands out a bit with a fuller ensemble of instruments including drums and harpsichord. On the second side, one of the highlights is The Mutant, but one of the rare Dyble-written track (the title track) also holds much interest. The two bonus tracks come from a separate single and the two non-album track fit quite nicely the rest of the album.

Certainly one of the lost interesting album in the plethora of late 60's-early 70's period but of limited interest to progheads.

Thanks to ProgLucky for the artist addition. and to Quinino for the last updates

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