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CARMEN

Prog Folk • United Kingdom


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Carmen biography
Founded in Los Angeles, USA in 1970 - Disbanded in 1975

In the early seventies, the British-American group CARMEN broke new ground in rock music, combining the British flair for progressive rock with traditional Spanish folk themes into a very fresh, energetic and powerful new mix. The sound is centered around guitar, keyboards are used subtly but to good effect. On the whole, they are a rather hard band to describe ... "They sound only like themselves, because it IS so unique". Some vague comparisons could be made to JETHRO TULL, MEZQUITA (some of the Spanish themes), and TRIANA (the flamenco/prog combination).

CARMEN released three albums only: "Dancing On A Cold Wind", "Fandangos In Space", and "The Gypsies". It's hard to say which of the first two albums is better, both are excellent starters. Two great tastes that taste great together. HIGHLY RECOMMENDED...!

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CARMEN discography


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CARMEN top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.84 | 127 ratings
Fandangos in Space
1973
3.73 | 78 ratings
Dancing on a Cold Wind
1975
3.12 | 38 ratings
The Gypsies
1975
3.50 | 14 ratings
David Clark Allen: Widescreen
2007

CARMEN Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

CARMEN Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

CARMEN Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.55 | 19 ratings
Fandangos In Space/Dancing On A Cold Wind
2006

CARMEN Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

CARMEN Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 Fandangos in Space by CARMEN album cover Studio Album, 1973
3.84 | 127 ratings

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Fandangos in Space
Carmen Prog Folk

Review by koresea

4 stars An album where Jethro Tull meets Spanish folk. this is a really fun album to listen to, with elements of hard rock and psychedelic rock cautiously incorporated into a flamenco/fandango style creating a truly original and cool experience.

The album opens with "Bulerias" and in the sequence "Bullfight", this is the "singles" material of the album, showing off all the talent and creativity of the musicians of the band. Here we can already feel the strong influence of Spanish music both in the instrumental and lyrics. The way the vocalist sing, incorporating the Latin feeling to the music is pretty dope.

"Stepping Stone" goes to a more "space-rock" direction, creating a nice change of pace in the album after the two similar songs that come later. The bass in this song is awesome, with louder chords that add a nice "funky" element to the song.

"Sailor Song" begins as what you expect for the name, is a common "sailor-theme" song, classic "slow hard-rock", but I must say that the emotion the vocalist (David Allen) put in here makes worth, in the half of the song the harmony shifts and we are back to the great classic progressive rock.

The next three songs are the "weak parts" of the album in my opinion, "Lonely House" and "Looking Outside (My Window)" are just the basic that is shown to us until now, it's not bad but I consider the other songs far superior. Tarantos is a good acoustic guitar solo, nothing of rock here just a good flamenco short song but without anything exceptional besides this.

The last part of the album is kinda like a mini-suite "Tales of Spain/Retirando/Fandangos in Space/Reprise Finale", and is THE SONG of the album, all the elements introduced before now are used at its full potential. The great vocals of the "Sailor song" are here again together with good backing vocals creating powerful choruses in all the songs. The instrumental is good too, every instrumentalist has their moment to show his skills and none of them disappoint.

Fandangos in space is a hidden gem inside prog-rock who must be listened to by all fans of the genre, especially those who like songs that "rocks" without losing the daring concepts and technical aspects. 4 Stars

 Fandangos In Space/Dancing On A Cold Wind by CARMEN album cover Boxset/Compilation, 2006
3.55 | 19 ratings

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Fandangos In Space/Dancing On A Cold Wind
Carmen Prog Folk

Review by VianaProghead
Prog Reviewer

4 stars Review N║ 420

Ahead of their time, even in the experimental early 70's, Carmen was unlike anything else on the prog scene, least of all the American scene. Allen siblings, David and Angela, were raised on flamenco, forming Carmen in 1970 as a way to meld their roots with their love to rock. Unable to find a label in the U.S., the band escaped to London in 1973, hooking up with Tony Visconti, who recorded the band's debut studio album "Fandangos In Space". Carmen released their sophomore studio album, "Dancing On A Cold Wind", recorded again with Visconti in 1975. Carmen released a third studio album, allegedly a more commercial album, "The Gypsies", before split up in 1975. The finalized form of Carmen took shape in 1973, after relocating from Hollywood to Britain. There, the band's line up was revised with a British rhythm section, which included John Glascock allowing the band to finally unleash its flamenco-infused prog rock.

"Fandangos In Space/Dancing On A Cold Wind" is a compilation of Carmen and was released in 2006. This Angel Air release rescues Carmen from the oblivion. Given the music, it's not a difficult thing to do, but we give credit when credit is due. This double release includes the first two Carmen albums, on two separated discs, "Fandangos In Space" and "Dancing On A Cold Wind", with two favorable bonus tracks and a worthy booklet in the tradition of Angel Air Records.

As I've already reviewed these two albums previously on Progarchives, in a more extensive way, I'm not going to do it again. So, if you are interested to know, in more detail, what I wrote about them before, I invite you to read those my both reviews. However, in here I'm going to write something about them in a more short way. So, of course, I'm not going to analyze them track by track, as I made before, but I'm only going to make a global appreciation of both albums.

"Fandangos In Space": "Fandangos In Space" is particularly a very refreshing album. The band uses footwork and castanets to augment the sonic palette, in addition to a fine, well harmonized, vocal performance of both male and female vocals. Sure, the vocal harmonies and the hard rock-meets progressive textures are reminiscent of Uriah Heep, but they're enriched so well with flamenco-derived ideas that they manage to achieve a singularity of their own. Above all, though, it's the percussive punctuation with which everything is served that provides the album its unique, punchy, hard edge. At times, the tradeoff between the rhythmic approach and the compositions results in slight fragmentation, but the guiding hand of the renowned producer Tony Visconti certainly helped to round up the edges and emphasize the qualities of the music of Carmen. The rhythm section kicks upfront and more than once a wise synthesis of the synthwsizers and the Mellotron with the other instruments creates a noteworthy and original musical atmosphere. The final result of this is grandiose, yet natural, escaping of pompousness. "Fandangos In Space" also boasts a decidedly funky rhythm, and it's the album's shifting, intricate, and unique rhythms that further removed them from the pack.

"Dancing On A Cold Wind": "Dancing On A Cold Wind" continues where their first debut album left off. This album also features an expanded line up with some other guest musicians. "Dancing On A Cold Wind" has impressive electric and acoustic guitar playing, fuzz-rich bass sound and a spacey aura paint the earthly, human scenes with some exotic fascination. The songs flow better as a unit, half of which function as a lengthy love affair suite as is usual in all conceptual albums, and manage to sound less fragmented, but it lack to it some of the previous album's rhythmic vitality. "Dancing On A Cold Wind" was even more adventurous than their debut. The rhythms are more disjointed the styling more operatic and the sound more majestic. At points, the album meanders into prog rock, as Angela's spacey keyboard effects swoop across the grooves, elsewhere British influences strongly surface. Visconti's production understandably emphasizes the glammy feel of this set, the last one rocked. This one glitters in the vastness of the sparse arrangements. The fourteen songs are bolstered by a couple of hissy, but worthy, efforts. The main course is a smorgasbord of chorale pieces. It all rather merges into oneness by the end, but at the time that would've been nirvana.

Conclusion: Anyway you look at it, the Carmen material included on this release should be considered classic stuff, and is therefore highly recommended for all fans of the 70's progressive rock music, if only for the taste of heard something a bit different. Of the two albums, "Fandangos In Space" is the most "commercial" of both albums, so much of the songs could get airplay, even today. "Dancing On A Cold Wind", in contrast, is the most intriguing for the noodlers and lovers of the unique and original style of this band. Maybe we can say that it's, perhaps, more prog. With this excellent release, Angel Air reissued of the two albums together on two CD's releasing a couple of bonus tracks, Carmen returns with a passion and love for the good old prog days, the days of the 70's. This is highly recommended.

Prog is my Ferrari. Jem Godfrey (Frost*)

 Dancing on a Cold Wind by CARMEN album cover Studio Album, 1975
3.73 | 78 ratings

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Dancing on a Cold Wind
Carmen Prog Folk

Review by sgtpepper

3 stars Not necessarily much worse than the debut album, this one has less memorable songs, is also a bit more derivative of other bands in the prog-space but has the same instrumental quality. "Viva mi sevilla" keeps vocals to the minimum and displays strong keyboard, guitar and rhythmic skills by the band. After that, the flamenco influence is diminished until the final suite arrives, while progressive and folk elements remain. Anyway, I can't help myself thinking that Jethro Tull was listened to by the band members. The long suite at 23 minutes is a bit of a letdown due to low compositional and not exactly the depth that a progressive rock suite would be expected to bring. On a positive note, there are female vocals and a good melody.
 Fandangos in Space by CARMEN album cover Studio Album, 1973
3.84 | 127 ratings

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Fandangos in Space
Carmen Prog Folk

Review by sgtpepper

3 stars The music has more unique and interesting sound that it has its compositions. Very original blend of flamenco, folk rock and progressive rock. Singing is of acquired taste with average voice colour and not big range but harmonies save it quite often. The focus is on the feeling and flow more than on instrumental prowess and that is good so because the sound keeps its folky spirit and warmth. Rhythmically, especially the first track makes you want to dance and it certainly provide quite some dynamics - Bulerias with its Spanish lyrics is one of the highlights. "Bullfight" has some hard riffing but great folk harmony vocals and finally also a decent keyboard solo. The vocal intensity reminds a bit of Ian Anderson, we can all this track a true prog-rock work.

But then we get a simplified and poppy song like "Stepping stone" which create an obscure feeling. "Sailor song" has a perfect blend of folk charm, vocal harmonies and gorgeous melody. This is a well constructed track. "Lonely house" is a good ballad. "Tales of a spain" is quite a unusual signature - adventureous development of the composition but takes repeated listening. "Retirando" is a beautiful lyrical song that only goes for two minutes - they could have kept in instrumental. The title track is one of the most complex compositions but for me not particularly a stand-out.

Worth listening, maybe even a repeated one ;)

 Dancing on a Cold Wind by CARMEN album cover Studio Album, 1975
3.73 | 78 ratings

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Dancing on a Cold Wind
Carmen Prog Folk

Review by VianaProghead
Prog Reviewer

4 stars Review N║ 267

Carmen was a project of the Los Angeles based sibling couple Angela and David Allen, whose parents ran a Spanish restaurant on Sunset Boulevard, in which the flamenco guitar playing of David Allen was the main focus. In July 1970, they formed Carmen, which quickly became a popular local live act, but that couldn't land at any record company. So, in the early of 1973, a large part of the band moved to UK, where they stabilized as a quintet. There, the line up of Carmen was added by two British musicians, the future bassist of Jethro Tull John Glascock and Paul Fenton, an English drummer best known for his work with T. Rex. They managed to be produced by the famous Tony Visconti. Under his aegis, the first two Carmen albums emerged, 'Fandangos In Space' on 1973 and 'Dancing On A Cold Wind' on 1975, which can be attributed to the small genre 'Flamenco-Prog', otherwise that only can be founded in Spain, really.

The style of the music played by Carmen broke a new ground in the rock territory. It combines the British flair for the prog rock music with the traditional Spanish folk themes into a very fresh, energetic and powerful mix. The sound of their music is centered on the classical guitar. The keyboards are also used, subtly, but with a good effect. Carmen's stage performances featured Roberto Amaral and Angela Allen dancing on a specially amplified stage floor. So, their flamenco tap dance, 'zapateado', became an integral percussive addition to the music. The Spanish influences in their sound included acoustic guitar interludes in flamenco style, occasional Spanish lyrics, themes of betrayed love reminiscent of Federico Garc'a Lorca, and castanets, all supported by a traditional and very rich rock rhythm section.

So, 'Dancing On A Cold Wind' is their second studio album and was released in 1975. This is a conceptual album, with a cheesy story about a prostitute turned into a dancer that lost her lifetime love. It opens with a fantastic track called 'Viva Mi Sevilla'. The vocal part features references to the track 'Bulerias' from the first album. After the vocals, the track goes into a bunch of instrumental passages and ends with a beautiful synth vibe theme that builds up to an incredible powerful finale. It has rousing flamenco percussion and a crashing bass that provides a great energy. In the following 'I've Been Crying' the flamenco elements comes to the fore again, but the catchy vocal harmonies dominate. A pumping bass, which competes with the emotional castanets, provides a considerable increase in dynamics. From the hidden, a symphonic undertone emerges. Unctuous mellotron surfaces languish briefly together with a delicate percussion. At the end, John Glascock lets it sound almost like a Chris Squire and puts a dynamic end to the elegiac insert. It sounds to me almost like a flamenco version of Curved Air, with catchy vocal harmonies. In the ensuing ballad 'Drifting Alone' a sweetish pathos unfolds. Here the transfigured and romantic component is worked out. 'She Flew Across the Room' is a more laidback acoustic track that floats into each other without any Latin elements. Carmen indulges in atmospheric harmony in the title 'Purple Flowers'. Powerful bass lines mate here with an ethereal romantic string processing and elegiac key pads. In the background, the mellotron languishes in buttery sounding string sound, while catchy vocal lines testify to a song oriented origin. It includes some very heavy bass lines and the usual flamenco influences in the middle of the track. The second side consists of 24 minute 'Rememberances (Recuerdos De Espana)'. It's a very vocal orientated piece with few instrumental parts, but the themes and melodies are all really nice. This suite characterizes the penultimate album of Carmen as a sprawling long track and unites all the strengths of the band. It has catchy grooving vocal harmonies, crisp rhythm lines, dreamy uses of the acoustic guitar and gently built in symphonic smouldering unite here to form a small epic. Angela Allen, sister of bandleader David Allen, who is responsible for the dance element and delicate keyboards, contributes more convincing lead vocals in self confident mania. The Flamenco also appears, but only sporadically in this finale, which is characterized by emotional contrasts. Her voice remembers me sometimes the voice of Sonja Kristina of Curved Air. Overall, the individual parts flowing into each other also lack a bit of the connecting element in order to produce the right dramaturgical coherence on the second part of the album.

Conclusion: 'Dancing On A Cold Wind' remains, for me, a very good album. I'm not sure about the album I like most. 'Fandangos In Space' is more immediate and more catchy than this second is. But, perhaps, 'Dancing On A Cold Wind' be more 'serious' and prog than the previous one is. Overall, this album is more complex then the first one, but as a whole, is less enjoyable. It has also less influences of Flamenco and more influences of the traditional prog rock music. Having said this, I'm perfectly convinced this album have enough positive energy to satisfy even more the most critical prog fans, than their debut. But, can you prefer more this second album or their first one, 'Dancing On A Cold Wind' is the excellent companion to 'Fandangos In Space'. So, I highly recommend the double CD with both albums.

Prog is my Ferrari. Jem Godfrey (Frost*)

 Fandangos in Space by CARMEN album cover Studio Album, 1973
3.84 | 127 ratings

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Fandangos in Space
Carmen Prog Folk

Review by VianaProghead
Prog Reviewer

4 stars Review N║ 266

Carmen was a British/American progressive rock band active from 1970 to 1975. Carmen was possibly one of the most original progressive rock bands that you ever heard. Their music combined progressive rock with a strong flamenco influence and it was all performed in a very fresh, energetic and powerful way. Adding to their distinctiveness was the fact that during long instrumental passages, members of the band would dance on stage, adding those sounds to the instrumental mix. The instrumentation included vibes, castanets and lots of flamenco dancing. The sound is centered on guitar and keyboards are used subtly but with good effect. However, the keyboards are limited to some mellotron and spacey synths, here and there. So, the flamenco prog, apparently a pretty ridiculous idea, happened in 1973, really.

Carmen was founded by David Clark Allen, a Mexican/American Californian trained in flamenco guitar. Originally, a seven member band in Los Angeles, the band relocated to London, in January 1973, where the members soon stabilized as a quintet. The line up on the album is David Allen (lead vocals, electric guitar and flamenco guitar), Angela Allen (lead and backing vocals, synthesizer and mellotron), Roberto Amaral (lead and backing vocals, vibraphone and castanets), John Glascock (backing vocals, bass guitar and bass pedals) and Paul Fenton (drums and percussion).

"Fandangos In Space" is the debut studio album of Carmen and was released in 1973. The first track "Bulerias" is divided in "Cante", "Baile" and "Reprise". This three-part song is a true roller coaster of sharp complex rhythmic prog and flamenco. The future Jethro Tull member John Glascock's bass work is simply amazing. The piece establishes the main musical motif that will come back later in "Looking Outside" and on the the closing track "Reprise". The second track "Bullfight", despite all the exuberant energy in the form of a symphonic bombastic song, a more rock component comes to the fore, which blends beautifully with the castanets. The sound proof lead vocals are always happy to mate with polyphonic support. Roberto Amaral's typical falsetto vocals are put to good use on this track. The third track "Stepping Stone" is a compact track, a kind of a psychedelic ballad, which gets full marks for inventiveness in a short time frame. It's actually quite pretty with a great intro. The mellotron here ensures a pro- rock shimmer. The fourth track "Sailor Song" is anchored in the traditional rock spirit and yet has a very mainstream feel. It reminds me strongly Jethro Tull. It has another great intro and it's probably the most emotional song on the album and the most beautiful song too. It makes a perfect use of the group's falsetto. The fifth track "Lonely House" is a very beautiful acoustic song. This ballad with ingratiating harmonies is clearly rooted in a soft rock harmony. Despite the flamenco prog rock of Spanish origin, this song proves that Carmen is also too committed to their Anglo-Saxon origins. The sixth track "Por Tarantos" is a very short traditional flamenco song. It's an acoustic solo instrumental piece played with the traditional acoustic six string guitar, proving that David Allen is an excellent performer on classical guitar. The seventh track "Looking Outside (My Window)" is divided in "Theme", "Zorongo" and "Finale". It has an emotional exuberance even almost a certain hit potential and sounds as if taken from a musical. In front of their eyes, the listener is able to see almost a whole armada of flamenco dancers. The eighth track "Tales Of Spain" opens beautifully and manages to have an infinity of mini-songs all over it. The male and female harmonies are amazing, while the guitar and mellotron duet are also great. The ninth track "Retirando" is a very short song. It's a nice song supported by a symphonic element, but its main purpose is to flow us into the title track. The tenth track is the title track "Fandangos In Space". The closing title track is another extraordinary song that opens with a very frantic instrumental that leads us, once more, to some more intriguing multi-part harmonies, like some other previous tracks. Again, we have another great chorus and the final of the song takes way too many twists and turns that works magnificently in the end of it. The eleventh track "Reprise Finale" is another beautiful very short acoustic piece nicely played on acoustic guitar by David Allen. It closes the album nice and calmly.

Conclusion: "Fandangos In Space" introduced to the world the one of a kind blend of flamenco music and progressive rock. It's hard to point out any highlights here, because this is a very even album. But, some of the best includes, "Bulerias", "Bullfight", "Looking Outside (My Window)" and the title track. There are also some shorter and less progressive tracks, like the beautiful acoustic "Lonely House", "Sailor Song" and the catchy "Stepping Stone". Vocals are great and the harmonies are gorgeous. Overall, this is a worth listening album. In most of the time the compositions can be traced back to a rock solid element. The band was able to combine the traditional flamenco and the symphonic rock structures in an authentic and credible way. In conclusion, this is a very tasty and highly unique album, a must for all prog rock fans, one of the genre's unsung classics, which should must be in any progressive rock fans' collection.

Prog is my Ferrari. Jem Godfrey (Frost*)

 The Gypsies by CARMEN album cover Studio Album, 1975
3.12 | 38 ratings

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The Gypsies
Carmen Prog Folk

Review by Progfan97402
Prog Reviewer

3 stars As I now own all three Carmen albums, I have to agree this is by far the least good of their three albums. Also there's a couple of songs with that somber tone like "Dedicated to Lydia", "Siren of the Sea" and "Joy" with the latter actually getting pretty joyful (no pun intended) towards the end. I absolutely can't stand "Come Back" it's by far the worst song Carmen ever done, I almost wondered if the warning I received about this band (by someone I used to know) being cheesy back in 1994 came from this album? Luckily the album has some winners, I do very much enjoy "Shady Lady", sounds like the band attempting a hit, and the title track is amazing. But in the end, the album, except for the godwaful "Come Back" isn't bad but this album really does pale compared to their past triumphs. It's as if the band was following the trends of 1977 in 1975 by going a more simplified direction. But between Paul Fenton and his horse riding accident and the band exhausted from hectic touring, little wonder they broke up with John Glascock joining Jethro Tull and Angela Allen singing backing vocals on "Crazed Institution" and "Big Dipper" on Tull's Too Old to Rock and Roll, Too Young to Die. So it's clear that Fandangos in Space is a must have, so is Dancing on a Cold Wind, but the Gypsies is the one to worry last as it's pretty spotty, but has its moments.
 Dancing on a Cold Wind by CARMEN album cover Studio Album, 1975
3.73 | 78 ratings

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Dancing on a Cold Wind
Carmen Prog Folk

Review by Progfan97402
Prog Reviewer

4 stars I found this LP in a $1 bin at a local Eugene, Oregon record store, an original UK pressing on Regal Zonophone (unlike Fandangos in Space, this was never released in the States). Basically, much of the stuff in that bin being frequent thrift store staples: easy listening, '70s singer songwriters, and AOR acts. So it's a trip to see a Carmen LP sitting next to a bunch of James Taylor, America, Captain & Tennille, Dan Fogelberg and Linda Ronstadt LPs. I wondered why it was being sold for so cheap? The disc don't look warped. Side two did feature this unsightly fingernail scratch, so they thought they'd never sell it for going price. I brought it home and the darn LP plays at Near Mint, even that scratch you can barely notice it, if at all (I was expecting loud pops or even skips, given I only spent $1 and pleasantly surprised that didn't happen). The cover is inspired by a pack of Gitanes cigarettes. Funny how their labelmates Procol Harum had a cigarette pack spoofed on one of their albums, A Salty Dog spoofing Player's Navy Cut.

Being familiar with Fandangos in Space, it's really no surprise the music on Dancing on a Cold Wind is in a similar vein. Same unmistakable blend of flamenco and prog. The foot dancing from Roberto Aramal and Angela Allen really sounds great on this disc. I wasn't expecting John Glascock to crank up the bass to give it a full fuzz effect like he did on the opening cut, "Viva mi Sevilla". It's almost as if Jannick Top of Magma stepped in. Regardless, it's instantly recognizable as Carmen, even a revisit of "Bulerias" from Fandangos in Space is quoted. Angela Allen is one of the very few female Mellotron players out there (the other being Virginia Scott of Beggars Opera who put one to great use on Waters of Change, but not Keiko Kumagai of Ars Nova as she used early tron samples). Side two is taken up with a suite, which is clearly the most ambitious thing they ever did. There's even a brief flirtation with medieval music, but that's because Tony Visconti played recorder on that part (as he did with Gentle Giant and even David Bowie). Still a very good record, but it may be a notch below Fandangos only because it doesn't quite match that album's intensity, while there are some intense parts, there are more calm and relaxed parts. Finally glad to own the second Carmen album. So I'm with popular opinion: a notch below Fandangos but still worth it if you dig what this band does.

 Fandangos in Space by CARMEN album cover Studio Album, 1973
3.84 | 127 ratings

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Fandangos in Space
Carmen Prog Folk

Review by GKR

5 stars So, Carmen, aye?

I will strongly defend a solid 5 stars to the two first Carmen' albums. The motives for such a high score I will probably construct through several revisions of this reviews.

First, we do have to take in consideration the fact that Carmen is actually a live performance band. With flamboyant stage clothes, numbers of dancing and a complete stage performance with artistic interventions for each song. The combination of elements, music styles and artistic aproach is already a total comprehension of art group that deserves our attention.

Although a little bit poorly recorded, the vocals of John Glascock e David Allen are always in sintony and Glascock basslines always present and even with distorsion in some tracks. The compositions ("Saylior Song" and "Stepping Stone") and the repetition of the first melodies in the end of the album is remarkably.

Five stars to the Caballeros of Prog Rock!

 Fandangos in Space by CARMEN album cover Studio Album, 1973
3.84 | 127 ratings

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Fandangos in Space
Carmen Prog Folk

Review by Warthur
Prog Reviewer

4 stars Carmen promises Fandangos In Space and that's exactly what they deliver in this exciting mashup of flamenco rock and space rock. With lyrics in English betraying their origins as a combination of British and Mexican-American talent, it's a very different approach to the flamenco rock concept than homegrown Spanish bands would deploy (for one thing, Carmen could avoid the censorious attention of the Spanish regime of the age, whilst the Spanish flamenco rock bands had to more carefully judge when to toe the line and when to defy it), and also a great opportunity to hear John Glascock in action prior to his more famous work in Jethro Tull.
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