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COSMOGRAF

Neo-Prog • United Kingdom


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Cosmograf biography
Robin Armstrong - Born in Waterlooville (Portsmouth), England

COSMOGRAF is a progressive rock project lead by the multi instrumentalist Robin Armstrong. The sound is rooted in 70s classic rock with a contemporary and progressive twist.

Robin Armstrong (pictured) plays guitar, keyboards, bass and drums, sings, and records, producing himself and fellow collaborating musicians, in his home studio, 'The Trees', self built at the bottom of the garden. The project is now in it's third incarnation, with a number of talented musicians from the progressive rock community performing and writing on the new album 'When Age has Done it's Duty'.

'Neo prog' is about as close as you can get to a label but the occasional lapse into straight metal or even classical, often dumbfounds a catch all description. I've never been very talented in weaving the genres seamlessly together like 'Yes' would do. It's fairly clear where it's at though, when you listen to it.

Photo by Paul Johnson

I've always enjoyed music that polarizes audiences and demands attention. As a teenager I was captivated by Deep Purple's fusion of Heavy Rock with Baroque intros or lead lines. It's just fun, to throw in something that is completely unexpected but yet just fits.

I much prefer to write music around concepts. Progressive Rock allows you the freedom to span genres, stop and start in different tempos, insert mad sound effects and generally tell a story or simply create a soundscape with no real meaning. This creates a musical freedom far beyond the commerical rules and constraints of a 3min pop song.

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COSMOGRAF discography


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COSMOGRAF top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

2.99 | 52 ratings
End of Ecclesia
2009
3.75 | 179 ratings
When Age Has Done Its Duty
2011
3.88 | 256 ratings
The Man Left In Space
2013
3.79 | 193 ratings
Capacitor
2014
3.83 | 89 ratings
The Unreasonable Silence
2016
3.80 | 79 ratings
The Hay-Man Dreams
2017
3.63 | 95 ratings
Mind over Depth
2019
3.72 | 43 ratings
Rattrapante
2021

COSMOGRAF Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

COSMOGRAF Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

COSMOGRAF Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

COSMOGRAF Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

4.33 | 3 ratings
A Festive Ghost
2017

COSMOGRAF Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 Rattrapante by COSMOGRAF album cover Studio Album, 2021
3.72 | 43 ratings

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Rattrapante
Cosmograf Neo-Prog

Review by A Crimson Mellotron

3 stars Cosmograf is one of those modern prog rock bands that is releasing consistently excellent material, and yet remains in the shade of many bands that are not necessarily better, or rather, does not get the deserved attention and exposure. Despite this sad truth, this relatively new project has gradually become a very big favorite of mine, and the news of new material are always welcome. The one-man band led by multi-instrumentalist and producer Robin Armstrong released its eighth studio album 'Rattrapante' in March of 2021, on Armstrong's own tiny independent label, called Gravity Dream Music. Ever since he started in 2009-2011, this man has been busy releasing album after album every year or two, and needless to say, the content on the Cosmograf albums is pretty spectacular!

A strong Porcupine Tree flavor, mixed with some Floyd, and cast through a neo-prog prism would be an insufficient but relatable description of the music on 'Rattrapante' (and I would say, this applies for the band overall) - the most impressive aspect of it all, is that Mr Robin Armstrong does the vocals, plays the guitars, the keys and the bass, with a little help from Kyle Fenton on drums and backing vocals, and Chrissy Mostyn on co-lead vocals for one track.

It could be safely said that 'Rattrapante' is a concept album, and the idea behind the whole thing is well described by Robin Armstrong himself: "'Rattrapante' is a collection of 5 songs about our interaction with time; we measure it, but yet waste it more, it defines our existence and forms our memories. Some seek to beat it by being the first or the fastest and some can appear to outlive time itself through their achievements? The idea for the album was inspired from my work with mechanical watches. Rattrapante is a French word deriving from 'rattraper' meaning 'to catch up or recapture. A Rattrapante chronograph can simultaneously time 2 events such a lap split time and a final race time".

Just five songs comprise this 50-minute record, but every single one is very enjoyable, memorable, and intriguing. Kicking off the album, we have the nearly 13-minute 'In 1985', menacing memorabilia about some better times; This one has an anthemic, almost Queen-like character, while maintaining the strong Cosmograf personality. Then comes the title track, a heavier number from the band, and one that has one of the best and most infectious melodies I have ever heard. 'I Stick to You', the third song on the album, happens to be the shortest one; It is a beautiful love poem, well-written and charmingly memorable. 'Memories Lie' is a more typical Robin Armstrong acoustic number and 'Time Will Flow' is the grand finale epic that concludes in the most dramatic possible way this excellent album.

British prog rock is alive! Cosmograf is the proof, this band/project is too exciting to be missed out on; the mixture of heaviness and gentleness, the masterful song-crafting, the thoughtful lyrics, the puzzling concepts, and the crisp production, are among the facets of not only the band, but also their very good 2021 release 'Rattrapante'.

 Rattrapante by COSMOGRAF album cover Studio Album, 2021
3.72 | 43 ratings

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Rattrapante
Cosmograf Neo-Prog

Review by alainPP

4 stars COSMOGRAF, known since 2011, which distills a good prog rock à la Barclay James Harvest, Pink Floyd in a planing variation, is releasing its 8th album here, to make up for lost time? Robin Armstrong almost did it on his own in his studio, this album smacks of neo, prog metal, progressive rock, vintage 80's or even 70's sound with Hammond and Rainbow in focus; he himself says he adores this era of the legendary Deep Purple; I find there a little of the sounds of the great Genesis and the sound snippets of the Martian voice of David Bowie, for a musical and dramatic mishmash of pandemic time unique in our history.

"In 1985" opening à la Gilmour at first, 2'30 "dream then explosion and riff à la" Kashmir ", muffled percussion, languid keyboards and the high-pitched voice of Robin; a track which unfolds, which remains predictable, as if cut for the scene cruelly absent in these uncertain times, wink with crowd noises from the live Aid of 85; spatial instrumental break, synths worthy of a Europe, it smells of the 80's; the tortured Blackmore guitar solo, sublime for a final à la "The Trial" sinking notes like this drums. "Rattrapante" for a punchy rock with an undulating organ à la Genesis, a rhythm dated by the lonely bass and guitar, usual backing vocals; text on speed records, staged on the station wagon with sound effects from President Kennedy then voices from NASA; return of the original rhythm as on 'The Return of the Giant Hogweed' which seems to never stop. "I Stick To You" with Chrissy of the Blackheart Orchestra for a dark song ballad on a spleen side with acoustic guitar; a bit of the soaring Porcupine Trees from the start here. everything is beautiful, romantic, haunting, from another age; a title that stretches like the sensation of a man stuck in time, tragically and inevitably seeing his loved ones disappear. "Memories Lie" piano at the entrance then moving text on our programmed degradation; a sound that reminds me at times of the King Crimsons or even the Barclay James Harvest, the Hammond organ is beautiful and airy, a little acoustic guitar like on "Animals" to put Robin's voice; a majestic guitar solo, dreamlike and filled with warm spleen comes here to increase the emotion and distort our reality with the impression of an endless tune. "Time Will Flow" and already the end on a magnificent moving piano-synth intro, it goes up on a chorus to melt, it draws on the Porcupine Trees, the narrator Tommy adds a little mystery, oral vibration, progressive sensitivity ; it is latent, the synth remains alone in space until Robin arrives, whose voice seems logical; a tune which undoubtedly refers to 'In 1985' with an overly predictable crescendo, but perhaps this is the aim of this melodic and symphonic title keeping the clichés of the genre.

Note 3 short bonuses of 'i stick to you', time will flow 'and rattrapante' which make it possible to account for melodies that are more elaborate than they seem. A vintage sound that gives off a better sensitivity over listening thanks to the contemporary approach to tunes and instruments that may make you dive into it; this Cosmograf there coming out on CD, vinyl and digital is worth more than my first listening, becoming bewitching and nostalgic.

 Mind over Depth by COSMOGRAF album cover Studio Album, 2019
3.63 | 95 ratings

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Mind over Depth
Cosmograf Neo-Prog

Review by A Crimson Mellotron

4 stars Cosmograf, the project masterminded by British multi-instrumentalist, songwriter, and producer Robin Armstrong. He has been very busy in the last decade, releasing six studio albums under this moniker. The sound of Cosmograf is rooted in 70s progressive and hard rock with Armstrong's own twist which gives this band a very intriguing personality.

'Mind Over Depth', the latest addition in his catalogue, is absolutely bombastic. It is an album that is shocking in the most positive of ways, intertwining within itself a blend of heavy prog, heavy metal, and electronica, thus deviating this record from the Neo-prog label. This is much more of a Heavy prog album, if we have to speak in sub-genres.

A concept album exploring the dark places in which the human mind can go, with quite moving, very introspective and introverted lyrics. But maybe I should quote Armstrong himself who explains the album thusly: 'Everything going on in our minds ' every thought, feeling, sensation, everything we are aware of ' is in fact happening only in our private internal worlds. Our reality is defined by the attention we give to these thoughts and the negative ones can inevitably lead to us feeling out of our depth''.

The strong lyrical content, of course, complements the incredible music here. It would not be wrong to draw comparisons with Porcupine Tree, with all the crushing riffs topped by passages of electronica, melodic and catchy choruses, and adventurous song build-ups. Another superlative to this album is its length ' Armstrong managed to keep it quite tight, containing five songs within 45 minutes of music. This results in very convincing compositions, giving a strong feel that there are no wasted notes.

Overall, this is an excellent album that grew quickly on me when I first heard it. Cosmograf is certainly one of the more interesting modern British progressive rock acts and this powerful album is the very proof.

 Mind over Depth by COSMOGRAF album cover Studio Album, 2019
3.63 | 95 ratings

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Mind over Depth
Cosmograf Neo-Prog

Review by friso
Prog Reviewer

3 stars Cosmograf is the project of multi-instrumentalist Robin Armstrong and his 2019 effort 'Mind Over Depth' should definitely be taken into consideration for listeners of progressive metal, alternative prog metal and neo-prog. I haven't listened to earlier efforts of this artist, but after this acquaintance Cosmograf has my attention, especially because of the earlier albums that are said to be closer to the neo-prog genre I often like.

This album mostly sounds to me like a Porcupine Tree album with an emphasis on broad symphonic landscapes and a lot of those absent-mindedness (or deeply spiritual if you will) vocals. The electric guitars riffs sound heavy and modern, though in a small production like this one will never get that mind-blowing 'oomph' or punch. Some of the darker riffs are really solid and have strong contribution to the post-apocalyptic feel of the music - especially in the second halve of the album. The pallet of modern electronic keyboard sounds is well chosen and recorded properly, giving the album a nice broad sound. Whereas Cosmograf doesn't use the keyboards for lead sounds they don't add much to the humanity of the music - for which individuality of performance is needed. Some of the themes, like the opening of 'A Million Choice' cast that sense of imminence - which I like. Some of the modern electronic sounds remind me a bit of Galahad, though the impact is different here.

Where the album doesn't succeed in arriving at where it clearly aims to get to is with the vocals of Armstrong. His voice often sounds like being on the brink of breaking down - forcing himself to sing precisely what this genre its rules prescribe; long wailing 'out there' lines in a high register. Most of the opening song is made a bit uneasy to listen to because of this. Its a pity, because his voice actually ain't that bad and way more personal when he sings shorter old-David-Bowie-like bursts (like on the verses of my favorite 'Sharks'). I also feel like he wants to imitate Marillion's Steve Hogarth on a song like 'Godspeed' of which his talents fall short. Mixing his voice down a bit and relieving himself from epical vocal duties would have helped here. I myself - for instance - like how a vocalist like Metamorphosis' Jean-Pierre Schenk deals with his limitations.

That said, I must say I imagine this album to be quite attractive to a lot of progressive rock listeners! I do dig the darker atmospheres cast on tracks like 'The Smoke and the Flame' and 'Sharks'. Furthermore, there's some nicety to metal infused neo-prog, whereas that magical dystopian vibe really resonates with the heavier guitars. I only wished the whole of the album would have sounded more like its (for me) stronger second halve.

 Mind over Depth by COSMOGRAF album cover Studio Album, 2019
3.63 | 95 ratings

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Mind over Depth
Cosmograf Neo-Prog

Review by TCat
Forum & Site Admin Group Eclectic / Prog Metal / Heavy Prog Team

4 stars Cosmograf is a Neo-Prog project from multi-instrumentalist Robin Armstrong from England. Armstrong plays most of the instruments on his albums, but often recruits guests to help out on occasion. He has released 7 full length albums under the Cosmograf moniker since 2009. The 7th album is called "Mind Over Depth" which was released in April of 2019 and it features guests Colin Edwin (Porcupine Tree) playing bass on the first 2 tracks, and also Kyle Fenton on drums and backing vocals. The music on the album centers around using the power of the mind to help us rise above our status in life. There are 5 long tracks that have a total runtime of over 45 minutes.

"A Million Choices" opens the album with the longest track at over 11 minutes. It fades in slowly with processed spoken vocals and a mysterious sounding atmosphere made by various synths and keys. It slowly builds with a cinematic feel until heavy power chords from guitars and drums kick in after 2 minutes. The guitar takes the melodic spotlight and bring in vocals. Vocals continue until after 5 minutes after which the guitars continue with a heavy prog sound not unlike Porcupine Tree's later sound. Later sung vocals and the same spoken vocal style from the beginning trade back and forth while the guitars thump along and eventually take over with a solo. Just before the 10 minute mark, things calm down and become atmospheric with symphonic sounding synths and wordless vocals and the volume builds again to finish off with another guitar solo.

"Godspeed" starts pensively with keys and vocals before a slower beat starts and pushes things forward. This 9 minute track again has that PT style and, as expected, heavy guitars and rhythm soon take over, but keeping things at a moderately slow tempo. Robin's vocals are more unique however, and can become quite solid at times while other times can be somewhat vulnerable sounding. An echo effect is used on his vocals as later as the track continues. There are also some nice harmonies on the choruses. Things get suddenly darker before the 6 minute mark, and guitars and bass churn out a solid and ominous sound. Vocals also continue during this time and play a more important part than on the first track.

"The Smoke and the Flame" is a more standard sounding song which starts with a guitar/synth introduction with a straightforward sound and theme, then calms before the vocals start. The singing is backed by sustained synth notes and a somewhat softer rhythm section, the chorus being a bit more intense, but still seeming to hold back a bit. Again calm returns with a Gilmour style guitar and spoken words in the background. When the 2nd verse comes in, the same pattern repeats. After 5 minutes, a heavy and excellent guitar driven section comes in after which the chorus repeats and the track soon ends.

"Sharks" goes back to a heavy, dark sound starting with strong guitars, then calming, staying dark and ominous when the vocals start. Alternating heavy and soft sections continue, things remain dark, synths give things a symphonic feel and the track remains dynamic and changing, alternating from a Neo sound to a more Heavy Prog sound, but always retaining that mysterious and dark texture. There is a layered vocal "slide" downward in there that is pretty effective in the overall sinister feel of the track. This is a great track with some effective dynamics throughout.

The last track is "Goodbye to All Illusions". It fades in with a bubbling synth loop and atmospheric guitar in the background. There are some mysterious sounding spoken vocals that retain the dark sound of the preceding track. Soon, a deep synth pushes towards a sudden increase in intensity as more guitar comes in and churns along supporting another guitar playing a theme. At 4 minutes, things calm again and some nice keyboards take over, changing the texture to a more plush sound and an electronic drum beat comes in while falsetto vocals come in, and then the heavy guitar comes back in to support the singing. The track returns the mysterious style as it comes to a close.

This is the first album I have heard from Cosmograf, but apparently this album is more guitar driven than the previous albums by the project. I do know that it does have that Heavy Prog sound that seems to be similar to Porcupine Tree's later music, but there are times when a more Neo Prog sound does come in. There are some very strong tracks here that I consider the highlights, those being the first two tracks and "Sharks". The other two tracks are a bit weaker, but not terrible by any means, just not as interesting. Overall, this is a good effort and a decent album, and those that love the Heavy Prog sound will love this, but some Neo-Prog fans might find it a little too guitar heavy. There isn't anything really groundbreaking here, but there is still some really great and strong music which mostly stays on the dark side as far as texture goes. Anyway, it's an effort that is well done, and manages to make a 4 star level.

 The Hay-Man Dreams by COSMOGRAF album cover Studio Album, 2017
3.80 | 79 ratings

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The Hay-Man Dreams
Cosmograf Neo-Prog

Review by shaunch

4 stars It is winter here in New Zealand but I am a teacher with two weeks off in the school hols and time to listen and absorb this new offering from Robin Armstrong and guests. I have to say that I would probably give" The Hay man Dreams" 4.5 star rating with a view to maybe the full 5 stars in the future. I don't think this is supposed to be a masterpiece, unless you can accept that a "less is more" approach is enough to warrant any album this title. This collection of songs flies in the face of the overused term "progressive" and it is reassuring that it does. I have been frustrated by much of the anticipated music over the last 7 months and if it wasn't for a recent UK trip which momentarily side stepped market towns, castles and fine ales to an IQ concert and the Marillion weekend, I would have some serious withdrawal symptoms. Personally, I would say that any music that has twists and turns and darkness and light alongside thoughtful ideas, concepts and lyrics does it for me, it doesn't need to progress beyond that. There is not a weak moment on this album and is a great follow up to last years "unreasonable silence" although they are different but equally effective. One thing that I have enjoyed is the confidence in the singing of Robin Armstrong which was not always present in the past. He is able to convey his emotions in a number of guises ranging from that quiet almost spoken word of Ian Anderson or Fish to the melancholy of Steve Hogarth to the angst of Roger Daltrey. The minimalist approach of the music is it's strength as it doesn't try too hard to be anything but a solid rock album, this is most evident in the tracks; "Trouble in the forest", "Cut the corn" and "Melancholy death of a gamekeeper" which is the main catalyist for the theme of the album. How could the themes, I guess, of loss and yearning be better portrayed than with restraint and melancholic beauty. This restraint is all over the album, in the offering from guest musicians who never try to take over , the backup and lead vocals from Rachel Hall which just add a sense of dreaminess and almost ghostly affect, to the narration which is never guilty of over staying it's welcome; instead it actually adds to the overall feel and continuity, not unsurprising as these are words are spoken by David Allan who was the BBC continuity announcer for almost 30 years.

A teacher who must save their best verbal attacks for the best possible affect, this is also apparent in this album, which let's loose on three occasions, opening with "Tethered and bound", the raucous rock build up in 'The motorway" and during the climax in the title track before restraint is resumed. The feeling built up is frustration and a longing that has become too much for the Hay- man, and you can feel it.

This album is not the best by Cosmograf but not the worst either,it is just different, does that make it progressive for Cosmograf? I am more than happy to keep listening to this style of music and thumbs up to Cosmograf who have given the first album for a while that has had me going back to it on multiple occasions for quite a while.

 Capacitor by COSMOGRAF album cover Studio Album, 2014
3.79 | 193 ratings

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Capacitor
Cosmograf Neo-Prog

Review by BrufordFreak
Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

3 stars Once again Cosmograf has come up with a gorgeous sounding concept album--with a very intriguing topic and some very cool incidental samples used to help string the songs together. However, I find, as I have on previous Cosmograf albums, that there is just something lacking to really draw the listener back for more. Once the story's been heard, the music is forgettable. The ambience of the incredibly well-engineered music is dreamy--great for background music, but Robin Armstong has brought very little new or exciting to the prog table. Instead, he's served up a meal of sumptuous flavor but nothing we haven't had before.

Favorite songs: the album's opener, "The Spirit Capture" (7:37) for its excellent set up of the album's story (8/10); the most memorable and varied song of the album with its beautiful melodies and simple instrumental support, "The Drover" (6:37) (10/10), and the guest party jam; "Stuck in the Wood" (6:27) (8/10).

3.5 stars rated up cuz this is, IMO, Cosmograf's best, so far.

 Capacitor by COSMOGRAF album cover Studio Album, 2014
3.79 | 193 ratings

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Capacitor
Cosmograf Neo-Prog

Review by ExLibrisPetri

4 stars Sometimes, when listening to a new album, your first impression, from the heart not the head, sticks. Even after repeated listens, this a prime facie impression of Capacitor is "they nailed it!". Although Cosmograf aren't "they" (it's a one-man-band augmented by more than a little help from his friends), it's the the whole of all the contributors that exceeds the sum of their parts, so to speak, Damned, did they nail it! It's dark, it's addictive, it's hard prog rock with an edge. Floydian for sure, but then again with Porcupinian (mmmm... he's with his head in The Trees) and Radioheadish flavors that together serve a tasty dish of haute cuisine prog. My favorite track(s) is The Drover / White Car binary so(u)l system. Although not exemplary for the albums as such, and I don't know why, it just resonates at a cosmographic level. As a concept album, capturing the soul in an electro-magnetic contraption, it fully succeeds in terms of coherence and continuation. With really astounding musicianship! This album deserves a solid 4 star rating without a shadow of a doubt, but it certainly has the retrospective capacity to evolve into a 5 star shining victory. Time will tell whether essence or essentiality will free this soul album from it's electrifying shackles. I'm still captured, one way or the other.
 When Age Has Done Its Duty by COSMOGRAF album cover Studio Album, 2011
3.75 | 179 ratings

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When Age Has Done Its Duty
Cosmograf Neo-Prog

Review by apps79
Special Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

3 stars The journey of Mr. Robin Armstrong continues in 2011 with the album ''When age has done its duty'', after Cosmograf was signed by the Festival/F2 label.Armstrong was inspired for this concept by a loss within his family circle and the album deals with the process of ageing.While he handles again multiple instruments and sings, this work features also some great guests: Huw Lloyd-Jones (vocals), Simon Rogers (guitars) and Steve Dunn (bass) from Also Eden, It Bites' drummer Bob Dalton, Luke Machin (guitars) of The Tangent and Maschine fame, Galahad's Lee Abraham on guitars/bass, Steve Thorne on lead and backing voices as well as drummer Dave Ware.

It seems that such a living concept, a real personal experience, was what Armstrong needed to fully develop his talent as a composer.''When age has done its duty'' contains some impressive dramatic passages and melancholic movements, really suitable to such a dark and deeply emotional concept, divided in eight tracks, most of which are longer than seven minutes.The album appears to a be a nice tribute to the history of British Progressive Rock, covering the years of the symphonic-oriented groups, giving respect to the thrilling vibes of PINK FLOYD, visiting the rural soundscapes of the British lands and transmitting the modern echoes of bands like ARENA and PORCUPINE TREE.Once more an album by Cosmograf serves the need for atmospheric soundscapes, but two years of added experience have showed Robin how to do this properly.The album features some great, Classical-drenched preludes on organ, bucolic GENESIS-influenced acoustic passages and the heavier/modern tunes of contemporary Prog, displayed on the edgy electric guitars and the mascular synthesizers.ALSO EDEN are also among the bands, which Cosmograf recall of, while the love for old Prog is also evident in a couple of Mellotron samplers and the RICK WAKEMAN-like organ showering.Armstrong has given space to some instrumental maturity, but his lyrical moments belong also among the album's highlights.

Finally, Robin has found its own, inspired way to offer his music ideas.Contemporary Progressive Rock with atmosphere, passion and sensitivity in full display.Strongly recommended...3.5 stars.

 Capacitor by COSMOGRAF album cover Studio Album, 2014
3.79 | 193 ratings

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Capacitor
Cosmograf Neo-Prog

Review by Second Life Syndrome
Prog Reviewer

4 stars Last year, I was blown away by an album that seemed to come out of nowhere. Cosmograf's "The Man Left in Space" captured my imagination with not only its sharp riffs and piercing keys, but also its undressed humanity and its emotional climax. Now, only a year later, Robin Armstrong has again brought his one-man project to my ears. Of course, it's not so much a one-man project anymore, as he's brought many guests once again to help make his music diverse and stunningly performed. Guests include Matt Stevens (whom also released an amazing solo album this year), Andy Tillison, Nick Beggs, Nick D'Virgilio, and others. As you can see, this new album from Cosomograf is almost a "who's who" of modern progressive rock!

"Capacitor" is a very different album from its predecessors, but is somehow instantly familiar, too. Armstrong's signature guitar sound is woven throughout the album once again, ranging from strong riffing to solos and acoustic sections. His guitar is impeccable. Though not as striking as before, the keys on this album also create a wonderfully fluid environment for the rest of the music to mature. The occasional keyboard solos are worth the price of admission themselves. I could go on and on, but you get the idea. The musicianship on this album is basically as good as it could ever be. With the heavyweights adding their parts, the instruments are tight, unified, and mind blowing at times. Everything from the bouncing bass lines to the organic, precise drumming is pure perfection.

This album has an interesting concept that somewhat directs the style of music. The concept is the storage of the human spirit, and how we leave an imprint behind both spiritually and technologically. Therefore, the album is again full of voice-overs that seem to allude to Tesla and Edison and the like. The time when science almost seemed like magic is a strong influence on this album. It's a good theme, though I don't enjoy it as much as the desperation of "The Man Left in Space". The latter directed the music in a spacier, more sci- fi sound, but the theme of "Capacitor" lends more to a more colorful, rockier atmosphere. There is nothing wrong with this, and I think that the music proves that. However, I just prefer the more atmospheric approach.

"Capacitor" has some very strong songs, though they do blend together a bit. They certainly have less individual personality. However, they are excellent nonetheless. If there is a continuing theme through the music of Cosmograf, it would certainly be darkness. I find it throughout this new album. The album begins with a voice-over heavy track of grounded technological wonder, but soon dives headfirst into the darkness of which I spoke. "The Fear Created" is a great song with dark guitar-drive movements and feelings that leave quite an impression. My favorite song on the album, however, is the sublime "White Car". This track is saturated with emotion and is so incredibly clear on its lyrical content that it will bring tears to your eyes. The music is moody, careful, and elegant, but the emotional impact is raw and bold.

The second half of "Capacitor" is probably the better half, as I feel that the third and fourth tracks somewhat lose their way and their charm. After "White Car", however, the album doesn't lose steam, as the last two tracks cover much ground, ranging from heavy rock to the especially moody heartache of "Stuck in the Wood", a song so full of guests and inspiration that it almost bursts out of my headphones to grasp my eardrums.

Much of this album does feel alive, almost like the spirits are stored within its very files. It does have a supernatural, yet somehow mechanistic, feel: somehow both strikingly cold and real and also electric and brilliantly metaphysical at the same time. "Capacitor", then, is a rock solid follow-up to an album that I consider a masterpiece, and it is with great respect that I salute Robin Armstrong for his undying ability to be creative and compose music from his heart.

Thanks to toroddfuglesteg for the artist addition. and to Quinino for the last updates

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