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GRYPHON

Prog Folk • United Kingdom


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Gryphon biography
Founded in 1973 - Disbanded in 1977 - One-off reunion in 2009 - Reformed in 2015

GRYPHON was founded by Richard HARVEY (recorder, keys) and Brian GULLAND (bassoon, krumhorn) after a stint at the Royal Acadamy of Music in 1973. They shared a vision of blending traditional English folk, Baroque instrumentation and Renaissance music in a modern format. The compositions resemble those of Gentle Giant but give greater emphasis to the authentic textures and sounds of the Renaissance period.

Harvey and Gulland were joined in 1973 by Graeme TAYLOR on guitar and singer/percussionist David OBERLE for their all-acoustic first album 'Gryphon'. Bassist Philip NESTOR was added to the line up in 1974 for their second effort 'Midnight Mushrumps', which featured an increased number of original compositions and leanings in a rock direction. Later that year their classic 'Red Queen to Gryphon Three' was released and has become a prog rock staple with its longer, somewhat more symphonic arrangements and courtly instrumental rock. The mid-1970s brought big changes to the band with new bass player Malcom BENNET taking over for Nestor. In 1977, guitarist Graeme Taylor left to be replaced by Bob FOSTER, bassist Jonathan DAVIE replaced Bennett, and Oberle switched to lead voice with Alex BAIRED taking over on drums. Tim SEBASTIAN was also brought in as a lyricist to complete the ever-growing unit. 'Raindance' was released in 1975 and 'Treason' in '77, establishing GRYPHON as a top-notch prog rock act.

With a seamless fusion of British folk and medieval rock, GRYPHON developed a strong sound all their own and a loyal following.


-- Atavachron (David) --

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GRYPHON discography


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GRYPHON top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.37 | 261 ratings
Gryphon
1973
3.74 | 275 ratings
Midnight Mushrumps
1974
4.16 | 699 ratings
Red Queen to Gryphon Three
1974
3.31 | 242 ratings
Raindance
1975
3.45 | 161 ratings
Treason
1977
3.88 | 114 ratings
ReInvention
2018
3.53 | 30 ratings
Get Out of My Father's Car!
2020

GRYPHON Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

1.75 | 11 ratings
Ethelion
1998
3.13 | 24 ratings
About as Curious as It Can Be
2002
3.43 | 21 ratings
Glastonbury Carol
2003

GRYPHON Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

GRYPHON Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.92 | 6 ratings
The Collection
1992
0.00 | 0 ratings
The Collection II
1995
4.07 | 15 ratings
Gryphon & Midnight Mushrumps
1996
4.23 | 28 ratings
Red Queen to Gryphon Three & Raindance
1997
3.17 | 8 ratings
Crossing the Styles - The Transatlantic Anthology
2004

GRYPHON Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

4.00 | 5 ratings
Spring Song
1977

GRYPHON Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 Get Out of My Father's Car! by GRYPHON album cover Studio Album, 2020
3.53 | 30 ratings

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Get Out of My Father's Car!
Gryphon Prog Folk

Review by kev rowland
Special Collaborator Honorary Reviewer

4 stars If ever there were a band who typifies all that is good and right about 70's progressive rock then it must be Gryphon, who managed to confuse the music establishment so much that they once had music played on Radio 1, 2, 3, and 4 all in the same week (which was when Radio 1 was mostly pop and some rock/indie, Radio 2 mostly easy listening and older music, Radio 3 was classical and Radio 4 was highbrow). Between 1973 and 1977 they released five incredibly important albums, and most music lovers were amazed when the band reformed for a new album in 2018, and now they are back with the next. Original members Graeme Taylor (acoustic & electric guitars), Brian Gulland (bassoon, bass crumhorn, baritone saxophone, recorders, piano) and Dave Oberlé (drums, percussion, vocals) have been joined again by Andy Findon (clarinets, saxophones, flutes) while there are two new members in Rob Levy (bass guitar) and Clare Taylor (violin, keyboards). Yes, you read that correctly, they use both crumhorn and bassoon in a rock(ish) band.

Here we have a group who have steadfastly refused to conform to any expectations of them as they mix folk, progressive and classical music in a way which is totally their own. They do not sound like anyone else, and it is difficult to think of many bands to which that applies. Gryphon in 2021 are very similar to Gryphon in the Seventies ? years may have passed, and many musical styles have come and gone, but Gryphon are still Gryphon and long may it continue. There is a light- hearted feeling to this album, from the title through much of the music, with "Suite for '68" a classic dance tune, while "The Brief History Of A Bassoon" tells the story of the instrument from the perspective of the wood from which is made. There are complex instrumentals, and we drop back in time to Baroque and medieval periods, all of which make perfect sense when in the hands of these guys.

This album is a breath of fresh air, light and refreshing with plenty of space and it acts like a time machine as it takes me back to the very first time I heard crumhorns. Is it classical? Is it folk? Is it something else together? Arguably it is progressive music at its very finest, as boundaries just do not exist in their environment and all one can say is that it is music of the very highest order, and an album I enjoyed immensely the very first time I played it and since then it has only got better.

 Red Queen to Gryphon Three by GRYPHON album cover Studio Album, 1974
4.16 | 699 ratings

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Red Queen to Gryphon Three
Gryphon Prog Folk

Review by Dapper~Blueberries

4 stars After their second album, Midnight Mushrumps, Gryphon had improved their sound dramatically from their lackluster first album, and they were very much, and clearly ready to take off their safety goggles and floaties, and dive deep into a more lush progressive sound with their third album, Red Queen To Gryphon Three.

This album is a lot more sophisticated than the last 2, having no vocals, and instead utilizes structural compositions to give the feeling of a game. This album doesn't just play a few notes, it plays a game. It's the chess of progressive rock, sophistication and smartness in all.

The first track, Opening Move utilizes this aspect very well, punching you head first into this album with a pretty high force I must say. No more of those songs with boring moments in between the keys and notes, instead we got a structural composition that knows what it wants out of you, the listener, and out of the band. They also don't try to do any funny business, everything is sound and nice to hear, and they never overstay their welcome. Already, this album has the best moments from Midnight Mushrumps and Gryphon and beautisized 10 times.

The second song, Second Spasm, keeps this ebb and flow continuously masterfully, however they practice a more chipper and livelier sound that isn't afraid to get excited and sometimes, a little weird. They also utilize the rock aspect a lot more than usual, having more elements of standard rock music rather than compared to their eclectic classical-ish sound, especially towards the end of the song.

Instead of building off from the previous track, Lament turns 360 degrees from a less bombastic piece to a more quiet and focused track. Like the album is still having fun, but is now serious, and ready to play it's game more thoroughly. Normally I'd find this rather boring, but with the more progressive and finely tuned structure this song brings, I cannot help but find it rather nice, but that's the first half, since the second goes straight back into the bombastic melody that the second song was most known for. A great shift in tone it is.

Lastly, the final track is Checkmate. This album is now fully in tune with how it is, no more messing around. This song tries many new things, each super well done. An epic sounding beginning, a quiet melody in the center, and a super crazy melody towards the end. This is when the band fully grasps the straws of a more progressive sound and played with them to the best of their abilities, and it worked out tremendously in their favor.

Now I have been giving this album a ton of praise, and for all the right reasons, but this album does fall a bit short. First off, while I didn't particularly care for the vocals of the last 2 albums, I do admit I do have a bit of nostalgia for them and seeing them nowhere near this album definitely makes me feel a bit lonesome. Again, I don't mind the lack of vocals, but it certainly feels a bit missed. And for some reason the production quality here isn't my favorite. The snare feels too loud, some of the keyboard playing is a bit muddy, and the lack of intention of the guitars makes it feel a tad weird, like it's in a weird zone where it's classical folk, but also rock as well, and sometimes it doesn't feel like a combination but rather a weird middle ground that feels a tad wobbly. Not something to be completely upset about, I am happier to hear this than what they did before, but either way I cannot help but notice.

Despite those shortcomings, I fully dig this album. This is where I feel Gryphon shines the most, and you can clearly tell the band was ready for a full oceanic swim, and they came out in tip top shape. I kinda cannot wait to hear their next release, I bet it'll be as good as this album, if not better.

 Midnight Mushrumps by GRYPHON album cover Studio Album, 1974
3.74 | 275 ratings

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Midnight Mushrumps
Gryphon Prog Folk

Review by Dapper~Blueberries

3 stars I was not too fond of Gryphon's first album. I thought it was dull and boring. However I definitely saw they had room to grow. Like mushrooms from the spores, they sure as hell did in a surprisingly good fashion. With this album I feel like they created a sort of middle ground with their medieval folk music and progressive rock, to create this very classy sort of music with very interesting introspectives.

The first track here is their 18+ minute suite, Midnight Mushrumps. This track is very well done. Instead of most Prog suites where they constantly build and build into the next part with big crescendos and vocal ranges, they instead go for a more textural and scenic sound. Already when I heard this song, I knew they improved massively from their sound on Gryphon, and you can tell their creativity has reached an explosion of sound. However I definitely can say it can get a tad boring due to it not trying to be ginormous like tracks like A Plague of Lighthouse Keepers or Tarkus.

The next track is The Ploughboy's Dream is much like a lot of tracks on Gryphon, however it feels like the best elements on that album is now fully realized with this song, and it makes for a nice folk track to listen to. It's definitely not the best song on the album, but I'd wouldn't mind hearing this song on a playlist.

The next track after that, The Last Flash of Gaberdine Taylor, is much like the former, however it's instrumental, but it fits the same niche the previous 2 tracks had, being a nice folk song that I wouldn't mind to hear.

The next track, Gulland Rock, is sadly a very weak track. It's very boring and a bit too quiet. Obviously their sound isn't meant to be loud and bombastic, but even then I feel a bit skewed on this track in terms of the rest of the album's sake. It feels a bit too long, and a bit too dull in a lot of unnecessary areas. Honestly this song is very skippable.

After that sludge, we got my favorite song off this album, Dubbel Dutch. It's just very joyful and playful, but it brings way too more calm and scenic sounds. It's super nice to hear the improvement from their last album to this album with this song alone. It's very much full of great creativity and beauty that cannot be dismissed.

Well, after that, where can the band go from here? Well in a weird territory. This is when I feel like they fully went Prog. This track has the same scenic folk sound, but has a ton of weird sounds and instrumentation, giving this very odd medieval folk tale that kinda sounds a bit creepy. I definitely like it a lot, though they clearly have some elbow grease to work up in terms of truly becoming progressive rock.

So this is a major improvement from their last album. Definitely isn't the best due to the sound getting a bit boring here and there still, but I won't deny this album doesn't have a lot more to enjoy than something you'd might hear from their last. Definitely one of their better works already.

 Gryphon by GRYPHON album cover Studio Album, 1973
3.37 | 261 ratings

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Gryphon
Gryphon Prog Folk

Review by Dapper~Blueberries

2 stars There is something kinda eccentric when hearing a folk band like Gryphon. Progressive Folk and Progressive Folk Rock is an odd genre, with the uses of more acoustic instruments and woodwinds to send you back in the times of olden farms medieval valleys, or take you into a scenic woodland area filled with big mushrooms and bigger red wood trees. It is certainly an interesting genre of Prog I feel is a tad underrated, aside if you talk about bands like Jethro Tull. However I was fairly interested in tackling this band, Gryphon. I felt like they could be fairly interesting to hear, especially since 2 years ago they released their most recent album, and I felt like it was as good a time as any to check what this band could be about.

To be frank here, I'll definitely say I like the medieval aesthetic this album brings. It sounds like I am being sent into a time machine to the dark ages in an olden farm town currently having a festival. It's rather intriguing to say the least. Kemp's Jig is definitely one of the highlights here with an interesting woodwind sound and an almost festival- like charm. They clearly captured the old English folk feel on this album really well, and it definitely does sound milquetoast.

However, even then this album is very boring to me. Tracks like Estampie, Crossing The Styles, and Juniper Suite are just insanely boring. Even for folk music, this is rather dull.

Much of this comes from the lack of any beats or high moments on this album. Obviously this is the type of progressive folk where it's a lot more folk than Prog, which I guess is not a bad thing, but definitely isn't what I really want for a Prog album. It's clearly meant to reflect the olden days of music, but I just don't dig it.

But this album does do something right, and it's how varied the songs are. Sure most are boring, but at least they have some kind of differences between one another so I can at least get my ear's worth in that fact.

So, if you cannot tell, I do not like this album. It's dull, boring, but you know, I cannot be too hard on this album. It's their first and they were clearly trying to find their shoes in this album, and it definitely has a neat folk charm too it. So I can respect the album, but it doesn't stop me from not liking it.

 Red Queen to Gryphon Three by GRYPHON album cover Studio Album, 1974
4.16 | 699 ratings

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Red Queen to Gryphon Three
Gryphon Prog Folk

Review by Argentinfonico

5 stars 1. Opening Move (4/5): A formidable beginning, which suggests that the album will be carried out through Nordic melodies? heavily influenced by Renaissance (mainly Ashes Are Burning). The instrumentation is as sublime as the production. There are no moments of aggressiveness, but rather they have decided to save it for later and start this work in the quietest and most leafy way possible. A beautiful combination of string instruments with wind instruments. Originally it would be 3.5 but I decided to add that half point to it because of the freshness of the harmonies and because the sound is more than decided from the beginning. It lacks a bang or an extraordinary lapse. Gryphon has understood that his specialty is the instrumental field and has made it very clear in songs like this.

2. Second Spasm (3.5/5): This is where the album starts to get aggressive. I honestly don't have much to say about this song. It is a beautiful continuation of the first. Beauties and natural progressions and rhythm changes, involving the guitar. I love the characteristic sound of the crumhorn, it makes the band an emblem of progressive Renaissance music. I would say that this song has certain subtle overtones of Gentle Giant.

3. Lament (4.5/5): When listening to this song at the beginning I have started to think about how difficult it is to release an album only instrumental. Gryphon on this album carries the melody very maturely, like surfing a wave that is fortunately very long. This song makes a wonderful pause (at approximately minute 3) to take the work to an intense and chimerical terrain. I feel like it's a very difficult song to compose. There are parts that I have no idea where they got them from, but they look great. This song is not tedious at any time. They are 10 minutes versatile and can be enjoyed a lot. The best part of the song is the ending, as the melody turns into beauty until it reaches the maximum point of subtlety and romanticism. It is a pity that it ends up hiding little by little and not with a definitive ending. For that reason the song does not get the 5 stars. Even so, it is a true work of art that gives this album all 5 stars.

4. Checkmate (4/5): The song that closes this masterpiece has a messy beginning with a very extravagant pattern and where finally the percussion can be the protagonist for a moment. In the middle of the song, a succession of major and minor notes occurs where the bassoon has its highest (and, unbeknownst to the listener, most desired) span. I perceive it as a genuine mixture of the spirit that brings together melancholy and hope in a single pot, also showing that unwavering love for traditions. The ending is quite experimental compared to the whole album, but it has its magic. Gryphon has managed to keep the instrumental level constant during these (almost) 40 minutes, and has managed to combine 4 songs very similar in instrumentation but different in meaning. A mastery of sound expression very difficult to compare. My respects.

The songs give me the average of 4 stars, but it deserves the plus of the fifth for the neat sound they have achieved and the wonderful concept that seems to have come naturally. The album deserves to be recognized as an essential work.

 Red Queen to Gryphon Three by GRYPHON album cover Studio Album, 1974
4.16 | 699 ratings

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Red Queen to Gryphon Three
Gryphon Prog Folk

Review by Beautiful Scarlet

3 stars A purely instrumental affair that should appeal to fans of classical music. The rock or pop elements I enjoy in Progressive Rock are simply not found on this album. It's like playing a well arranged version of literal classical music. While Gryphon was trying to obtain this sound, it is one that I do not find engaging. It's more then the lack of vocals that does this, it is the compositions themselves.

Overall I think the general sound of Gryphon is somewhere in between Gentle Giant and Happy The Man. Really a fine album, just one that my ears attuned moreso to Canterbury Scene and Crossover find dull.

 Spring Song by GRYPHON album cover Singles/EPs/Fan Club/Promo, 1977
4.00 | 5 ratings

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Spring Song
Gryphon Prog Folk

Review by Matti
Prog Reviewer

4 stars GRYPHON is one of the finest prog folk bands ever. Their wholly instrumental third album Red Queen to Gryphon Three (1974) is a unique prog masterpiece. The following Raindance (1975) is very uneven in comparison, and some of its short tracks frankly feel like mere fillers. I haven't entirely listened to the next and final album before breaking up, Treason (1977) which this single represents. The key members Richard Harvey, Brian Gulland -- both experts in Old Music -- and vocalist-percussionist David Oberlé are joined by three new members: guitarist Bob Foster and the rhythm section of Jonathan Davie and Alex Baird. Treason is more electrified rock than Gryphon's earlier albums and it contains less experimenting or folk ingredients.

On the album 'Spring Song' is a powerful 10-minute prog composition with some notable influences from YES (whom Gryphon had toured with). Especially the electric guitar has sometimes a Steve Howe -like sound during the Treason album. The single version is shortened to 4 and half minutes which naturally changes the composition's character quite a lot. Gone are the extended instrumental sections (ie. intro and outro) pointing at grand-scale symphonic prog. The track starts with a bright piano playing reminiscent of classic Renaissance songs such as 'Can You Understand', joined soon by Oberlé's vocals and the other instruments. The melodies are slightly moody but vivant like a spring brook. The chorus easily lingers in your mind afterwards. The reeds that were essential to the earlier Gryphon sound are in a minor role; I think there's only a brief bassoon solo and perhaps a little of English horn. A prog listener will undoubtedly prefer the full version, but also this tight version is very nice, and in some sense more coherent.

'Fall of the Leaf' (4:25) is another melodic song from Treason, romantically mellow and folky but not in a slow tempo. The acoustically oriented arrangement is very elegant, slightly comparable to some quartet era Genesis songs such as 'Ripples', plus the bassoon again adding old chamber music flavour typical for Gryphon.

A pretty pleasant single indeed, makes me want to hear the source album.

 Get Out of My Father's Car! by GRYPHON album cover Studio Album, 2020
3.53 | 30 ratings

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Get Out of My Father's Car!
Gryphon Prog Folk

Review by siLLy puPPy
Collaborator PSIKE, JR/F/Canterbury & Eclectic Teams

3 stars As pretty much the only 70s shining example of Medieval chamber prog, GRYPHON stunned the world with its self-titled debut release in 1973 which crazily crafted a bizarre mix of English folk music with medieval and Renaissance music spruced up with the energy of rock. After a couple of progressive folk albums the band enjoyed extensive touring opportunities with bands like Yes, Steeleye Span and even the Mahavishnu Orchestra. All that exposure to the more progressive forms of rock rubbed GRYPHON in all the right ways and the band was influenced heavily as heard on the band's most lauded prog folk and rock release "Red Queen To Gryphon Three" but just as soon as the band ascended the ranks so too did it fall after a couple of less magnificent following albums.

After the dismal response of 1977's "Treason" GRYPHON called it a day and was pretty much written off as a flash in the pan from the early 70s but in 2018 the three original members Graeme Taylor (guitars), Brian Guilland (bassoon, crumhorn, sax) and Dave Oberle (drums) stunned the prog world by releasing its first album 41 years later with the critically acclaimed "Reinvention" which served as a summary of the band's five album career that straddled the mid-1970s. While many may have thought this might be a one-off project, GRYPHON returns in 2020 to prove that not only would that be a false assumption but that it didn't require another four decades to gestate another batch of material to unleash on the prog world and much like the legendary mythological creature that was known for guarding treasures and priceless possessions seems to have uncovered a wealth of new inspiration.

Yeah GRYPHON is back but with a different lineup and a completely different style unlike anything they have tackled in the past (well for the most part). This is a much leaner lineup with not only the three original members but the return of Andrew Findon on flute, piccolo, soprano crumhorn, soprano sax and the clarinet. New to the family is Rob Levy on bass and Clare Taylor on violin and keyboards. At first glance of the band's seventh album GET OUT OF MY FATHER'S CAR! one is struck with an abrupt WTF reaction as the album cover deviates from the band's cover art depicting mythological scenarios and instead sports what resembles some kind of poster art that might have been seen during the Summer of Love in the Haight-Ashbury neighborhood of San Francisco. Oh no! This is gonna suck! (my first thought). Well, you can never judge a book by its cover so after all is said and done i have to say that it's not as bad as i was fearing however this one is unfortunately a few steps down from "Reinvention" not only in its inconsistency but in its deviation from the crazy prog folk charm of what makes GRYPHON so unique (well, for the most part).

The title track gets off to a funky festive start as it sounds like Earth, Wind and Fire have joined the band for a funk fueled romp that includes some deviations into some extremely proggy territory. Oh yeah, now we're talking! While unlike anything GRYPHON has crafted before, the intricate tradeoff of all the various instruments on board fortified with crazy time signature and even genre skipping is actually quite beautifully done but after a couple of minutes of instrumental wankery, the band adds some funny lyrics which breaks immediately takes the album into a silly nary a care mood. After that rollicking roster of unorthodoxy, the album takes on a more serious mood with the following "A Bit Of Music By Me" which sounds more like classic Gryphon at its peak with beautiful folk motifs laced with the sultry sounds of woodwinds and of course that classic crumhorn!

After another prog folk winner in the form of "Percy the Defective Perspective Detective" the album showcases another stylistic shift with the Celtic folk ballad style of "Christiana's Song" which unfortunately derails the fun made all the more so by several songs of this style punctuating the jocular festivities and prog folk dynamism. "Suite For 68" starts off as an oom-pa-pa polka waltz but finds resolution in a sombre crumhorn fueled folk melody. "The Brief History Of A Bassoon" brings back the humor with Dave Obele providing vocals singing about being a tree! "Krum Dancing" is also mined from GRYPHON's distant past with meideval and Renaissance flavors teased out into prog folk splendor. "Normal Wisdom from the Swamp. (A Sonic Tonic)" follows suit but in the end, there are just too many gosh darned sappy Celtic ballads on this one! The closing "Parting Shot" ends up sounding more like an Irish James Taylor than anything remotely GRYPHON.

Ultimately GET OUT OF MY FATHER'S CAR comes off as a bunch of aging hippies blowing off steam rather than an attempt to craft a serious progressive folk album in the vein of the 70s output or even the lauded comeback "Reinvention." The playful and oft ludicrous humor is actually quite refreshing in a genre that is renowned for taking itself too seriously but the album is bogged down by several earnest tracks that dwell too much on traditional Celtic folk sounds. In the end GRYPHON should've just made a really funny comedy album in the spirit of the title because those are the tracks that work the best here. Tracks like "Christiana's Song," "A Stranger Kiss" and "Forth Sahara" for example just seem like an insipid tribute to Clannad or some other long lost folkies from the late 60s. A good enough album for sure but inconsistent and a step down from the beautiful "Reinvention." Hopefully this was just a fluke and the band has a few zingers left in them.

 Gryphon by GRYPHON album cover Studio Album, 1973
3.37 | 261 ratings

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Gryphon
Gryphon Prog Folk

Review by Lupton

5 stars Predictably, Prog fans tend to zero in on Gryphon's third album "Red Queen To Gryphon Three" with its combination of instrumental doodling and lengthy tracks and total absence of vocals and general sense of seriousness.The group's eponymous debut is by far their most enjoyable partly because of the musicians refusal to take any thing they do too seriously while still displaying serious musical chops. And make no mistake- all four musicians are absolute virtuosos. Richard Harvey is a phenomenal recorder playe as displayed towards the climax of the album's opener- Kemp's Jig,Brian Gulland is an expert on the crumhorn and his wayward accompaniments add to the creative whimsy.Guitarist Graeme Taylor playing is extremely tasteful throughout and is almost jazzy in places especially on "The Astrologer".Dave Oberle plays an assortment of drums while taking on most of the vocal duties. While the album is dominated by the group's quirky takes on medieval and Renaissance tunes they also incorporate their own medieval inspired instrumentals. The best of these by far and by far my favourite track on the album and infact my favourite ever Gryphon track is "Juniper Suite". I remember being totally smitten when I first heard this wonderfully intricate Prog Classic (yes that is Prog with a capital P)and have never stopped enjoying listening to it. It is a shame that the group were almost impatient to abandon the quirky approach of the first album although the final Transatlantic album saw them recapturing some of the magic of their debut. A wonderful album. A full 5 stars
 Red Queen to Gryphon Three by GRYPHON album cover Studio Album, 1974
4.16 | 699 ratings

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Red Queen to Gryphon Three
Gryphon Prog Folk

Review by sgtpepper

5 stars The English lads got on the peak of their progressive driven folk as they equalled contemporary progressive rock with their folk renaissance past. Apart from the classical music instruments, the band mastered also the 70's instruments, especially multiple 70's synthesizers. Textures in the 4 long songs are fantastic, layer after layer and undisputed experimentation are on full display. Keyboards, crumhorn and bassoon take the first seat. Bass guitar is also pretty good. You won't find another better example of the renaissance progressive rock with this mix. The good thing is that the band refrained from singing to keep focus on instruments - that won't held true on the next album. Also, look at the marvellous front cover. I am happy I finally acquired an original CD years after hearing it for the first time on the progressive rock radio. A highly recommended album for those who prefer solid composing and playing over abundance of aimless soloing.

Thanks to ProgLucky for the artist addition. and to Quinino for the last updates

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