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KINGSTON WALL

Psychedelic/Space Rock • Finland


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Kingston Wall biography
Founded in Helsinki, Finland in 1987 - Disbanded in 1994

This psych-rock trio inspired by the inventive guitar play of Petri Walli was formed in Helsinki in 1987. After a change of drummer, the permanent line-un consisted of Walli on guitar and vocals, new drummer Sami Kuoppamäki and bassist Jukka Jylli. Their influences are noticeably of the LED ZEP/ JIMI HENDRIX kind but they did manage to bring something new to the "stoner rock" sound. Releasing all of their albums on their own label (Trinity), they never really made it big but had a small cult following in Finland and Estonia. By the end of 1994, six months after the release of their third album, it seemed they were on the verge of breaking through when their leader, Walli, committed suicide by jumping off a church tower. That spelled the end for the band.

Their first album is perhaps their rawest whereas "Kingston Wall II", their most accomplished, features broader, more exotic textures, even some acoustic guitar. Also, the instrumental interplay is given freer reign than on the first album, allowing the pieces to stretch out more. It treats the listener to a variety of moods: soaring guitar pieces, quiet violin, LED ZEP-like blues and high-octane jamming. With the album "Tri-Logy", the band somewhat tried to distance themselves from hard-rock. It still features plenty of acid guitar but also includes drum machines; an interesting concept but perhaps not quite as convincing as "KW II". A word of caution: a fourth CD entitled "Freakout Remixes" was released in 2000. Don't expect to hear KW's fine play here: this is a kind of tribute by various artists who did a techno/trance remix of the band's material.

"Kingston Wall II" should appeal to fans of LED ZEPPELIN, PINK FLOYD, JIMI HENDRIX and JEFF BECK.

: : : Lise (HIBOU), CANADA : : :

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KINGSTON WALL discography


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KINGSTON WALL top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.51 | 116 ratings
Kingston Wall I
1992
4.17 | 201 ratings
Kingston Wall II
1993
4.12 | 138 ratings
III Tri-Logy
1994

KINGSTON WALL Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

4.02 | 24 ratings
Real Live Thing
2005

KINGSTON WALL Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

4.89 | 9 ratings
Kingtime
2015

KINGSTON WALL Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

2.14 | 7 ratings
Freakout Remixes
2000
4.27 | 6 ratings
The Essential
2011
4.75 | 4 ratings
King Size Box
2011

KINGSTON WALL Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

5.00 | 3 ratings
The Real Thing Radio Edit
1994

KINGSTON WALL Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 Kingston Wall I by KINGSTON WALL album cover Studio Album, 1992
3.51 | 116 ratings

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Kingston Wall I
Kingston Wall Psychedelic/Space Rock

Review by cloth canopy

5 stars Kingston Wall's debut one of my all-time favourite prog albums ever made, and since I am still young I will no doubt look back on it as a huge part of my teenage years, singing the guitar solos to Nepal in the shower or giving myself head pain for days after headbanging to And I Hear You Call. There is an identifying sound to the whole album (like Walli's guitar tones, the echoes often heard on the drums, and the loose, jamming feel to most of the songs) which is unlike anything I've heard on any other albums. The first time I listened to it, I was so enthralled that I listened to their other two excellent albums in a row right after. The band had already existed in some form for 5 years before the album was made and bassist Jukka Jylli said in an interview that this album was more like a collection of material they had made during that time because of the huge differences in "newness" of some of the songs.

With My Mind - Has the highest quality lyrical content on the album. Opens with a fantastic, slow riff before launching into some very psychedelic verses and slightly poignant choruses. Pete creates quite a catchy riff in the second half of his solo. Perfect song for an opener.

Used To Feel Before - The energy picks up in track 2. An short upbeat rocker with catchy chord progressions that almost disguise themselves as riffs. Walli cries about his love gone wrong in the verses but becomes a lot happier in the much catchier choruses. This song *was* my favourite on the album after the first few listens, so it's probably the most accessible number. The second half of the instrumental section has Pete really going for it on the wah pedal.

I'm Not The One - This song really is the first introduction to Pete's excellent guitar solo writing skills and the album's psychedelia. The lyrics are minimal and shouted, sandwiched between blocks of the song's main riff. Then, once the riff has been played enough times, Walli's solo begins only 1/3rd of the way through the runtime. The first section of it remains faithful to the groove they had in the first part of the song, but once they slow down at 2:10 it turns into one of this album's best moments. Indesipherable chatter occurs in the background while Pete plays a little trippy melody, and then they launch into an interstellar riff section lasting only 15 seconds.

Fire - Not much to say for this cover, but the reggae breakdown that introduces the 3rd verse is very well arranged. Jylli said in an interview that he hated this song. Walli's solos feel more like noodling on a couple of notes rather than well written melodies.

Waste Of Time - Another piece with some nice lyrics, in the same vein as With My Mind. It's not amazing; the choruses drag on a bit and are quite slow. Also, once the verses and first two choruses are over, the bulk of the 2 and a half minute instrumental section is awful. It's just alternating between whispers of "it's just a waste of time" and some unimaginitive wah-ing on the guitar. The drumming is intense though. I guess this is the "immaturity" that many other reviews say is too frequent on the album. The very loud ending is great though, and works as a segue to the infinetely better track 6.

Nepal - My top song on the album. Opens with a key change, signalling a departure from WOT's dragginess. The first minute and a half is a noisy psychedelic jam, almost like a warm up for the musicians. The song's main riff is beautiful. The lyrics are few and don't really make any sense, but I enjoy that. The guitar-made bird noises Walli dubbed over the song give it an even more interesting texture. Walli's solos last upwards of 3 minutes. His first one introduces the Eastern themes he picked up on trips to India, and they are incredibly well written and make use of effect pedals excellently rather than just stepping on it on every note. After a good amount of listens, they become catchy and singable. Solo duties are passed over to Jylli during a break, which Walli starts quietly riffing over. Some chatter similar to that in I'm Not The One begins, which gives me goosebumps, preceding the intense second half of the guitar solo, which is just as well put together as the first. The song crashes down into another chorus and then ends with yet another new riff. Nepal is a phenomenal composition. According to Bassist Jylli in an interview, the band had already finished this song in 1989, three years before its release. This may be why it's so good as they had so much time to make improvements to it. The song title is probably an attempt to be like Led Zeppelin (with their song Kashmir, which is geographically close to Nepal).

And I Hear You Call - This one adds to the eastern themes and psychedelia; the lyrics tell a story of someone who presumably experiences auditory hallucinations after taking psychedelics. This is another favourite and is very danceable especially during the chorus. It's interesting how they don't go back into it after the solo. There's a very tight breakdown at 3:24.

Tanya - A instrumental for Pete's girlfriend at the time. It's pretty, but I don't listen to it unless I'm listening to the whole album.

Now, that's about 40 minutes! Now would be a nice time to end the album since there won't be any space left on the record. Nuh uh. This is the 90s and CDs have been invented, so such barriers are things of the past.

Mushrooms - A monster phenomenal suite of 8 extremely trippy pieces. I love spacing out to this one. Prelude - is exactly what the title says. Interestingly, I was watching a KW concert on youtube from a few years before 1992 and found out this song used to have lyrics that went like "Mushrooms! It makes you feel good!". They were very cringy and I'm glad they didn't keep using them. On My Own - is the only one that is a full song. I really like the way the pleasant riffs are written around the chords, which are really interesting. Also, during the verses, the song is in C# major, while Walli sings in the minor of the key. Something makes me wonder how they knew it would work. The instrumental that follows the second chorus is unique in that the drums slowly increase in volume so by the end its really quite intense but when it begins it's rather ambient. The live version on Real Live Thing introduces more phrases to the solo parts, and vastly overhauls the other instrumental section afterwards. Oh, also, the drum fill that introduces the final chorus is weirdly catchy for something that isn't even a melody. The Weep - Very strange vocals. There's a guy who sounds like he's mumbling in a huge hall through a loudspeaker and Walli weeps melodically over it. It's nice. Mushrooms - A song about drugs. I love the "da da ba ba" parts; they are very catchy and the bassline creates a really neat countermelody. The guitar solo at the end is insane! Especially the short riff at 2:25. Almost works as its own song. Circumstances - I [%*!#]in love this one. Walli repeats some groovy riffs while a backing track full of screaming and shouting plays in the foreground, with some hilarious lines that take close listening to decipher (for example, "WHAT does it all MEAN?", some vomiting noises and what sounds like a shopkeeper shouting anger while pursuing a thief!). The wind instrument in the second half makes it incredibly trippy. (This song is my alarm clock). Captain Relief - The first 45 seconds is my favourite moment on the Mushrooms suite. A very groovy chord progression opens it after a minute of bonkersness from the previous track and the funny instrument from Circumstances hangs around for a bit too. The solo is like a reprise of one of the ones on I'm Not The One. The second half slows down, and honestly I think it should've been separated in the middle (conceived as a different section). It's fun and trippy. More Mushrooms - A funny sketch between two gasping stoners. I love how Walli, who is the band's lead singer, admits to not being able to sing. Then it's an explosive reprise of Mushrooms. The Answer - A deceptively simple melody. Wish it had a proper ending instead of just fading out. But it's a good way to end the suite. 4.5 - Waste of Time sadly brings it down from being a perfect album for me.

 III Tri-Logy by KINGSTON WALL album cover Studio Album, 1994
4.12 | 138 ratings

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III Tri-Logy
Kingston Wall Psychedelic/Space Rock

Review by Gallifrey

4 stars Listening diary 13th January, 2022: Kingston Wall - III - Tri-Logy (psychedelic progressive rock, 1994)

An album that perhaps should not work. Does mid-90's psych-prog really get anyone out of their seat? Coupled with the fact that it's partly influenced by psytrance? There were a few artists kicking around doing this sort of thing in the 90s, but not many that I can say do it as convincingly as Kingston Wall. And it's all because they write good songs first, before they go and drop acid and jam out the instrumental passages. If this was half the length and all the weird psych bits were removed, it would be a passable alt-rock album with strong melodies, good performances and memorable hooks. The psych doesn't necessarily detract from that - it's more the fact that all piled together there's 70+ minutes of stuff here. But when it's good, it's some of the best that 90's prog got to.

6.8 (5th listen)

Part of my listening diary from my facebook music blog - www.facebook.com/TheExoskeletalJunction

 Kingston Wall II by KINGSTON WALL album cover Studio Album, 1993
4.17 | 201 ratings

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Kingston Wall II
Kingston Wall Psychedelic/Space Rock

Review by bartymj

5 stars There's a strange amount of the reviews here lauding that track seven, I Feel Love, sounds like a dance track played by a prog band.... Well as most of you know, that's what it is, and hopefully Donna Summer approves because it's done very very well. The rest of the album bounces around between space rock styles, Pink Floyd-esque motifs and catchy jams. There's nothing wrong with "copying" the Pink Floyd style, not every prog album has to bring something completely new to the table. Kingston Wall take it, put their spin on it, and do it brilliantly. Recommend picking it up on Spotify these days, for a good upbeat album.
 Kingston Wall I by KINGSTON WALL album cover Studio Album, 1992
3.51 | 116 ratings

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Kingston Wall I
Kingston Wall Psychedelic/Space Rock

Review by BrufordFreak
Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

4 stars The debut album one of Finland's major gifts to rock music: guitarist extraordinaire Petri Walli (the reincarnation of Jimi Hendrix!) and his band KINSTON WALL.

1. "With My Mind" (4:39) nice wall of sound but the vocals feel lacking in authentic enthusiasm. Even some impressive lead guitar wah-pedal soloing can't really make up for the dullness of the rest of the song. (8.25/10)

2. "Used to Feel Before" (4:02) very bluesy, HENDRIX-like foundation for a rockin' song. Perhaps this is the song that planted the "the reincarnation of Jimi Hendrix" seed in my brain--(though not the chorus). Definitely a late 60s blues-rock vibe going on here--Zeppelin or maybe even a little Black Sabbath; no, definitely Hendrix. (8.5/10)

3. "I'm Not the One" (3:43) another Hendrix-like tune with a BEASTIE BOYS-style choral vocal delivery. The guitar playing is smokin' hot but nothing really new or innovative--until the third minute when echo-guitar is accompanied by background crowd chatter noises. I wonder if Omar Rodriguez-Lopez ever heard Petri or the Wall's music before they formed The Mars Volta. (8.5/10)

4. "Fire" (2:58) an actual Hendrix cover! Petri does not (yet) have the vocal capacity to pull off a Hendrix song but in the guitar department he is making it his own! (8.5/10)

5. "Waste of Time" (6:26) again, the blues-rock bands of the 60s immediately come to mind--those bands who were exploring the loud, proto-"metal" sounds and styles at that time. Even the melodies feel and sound like that old era (Bowie, Spirit). The wild fourth and fifth minutes display the first exposition of the Wall's all-out, no-holds-barred excellence! This is rock excellent--the future of Kingston Wall! The band is playing so tight--as one! (8.75/10)

6. "Nepal" (8:37) a long intro of wah-pedal electric guitar soloing and crashing cymbals open the first 90 seconds of this before a structured song is actually established--one that is much more sedate and smooth that the opening would seem to indicate. Cool bird sounds coming from a second track of Petri's guitar. Again, the band feels pretty tight, pretty jazzed up--as if the album's first four songs were just warmups and now they're really fully engaged, fully entrained--though not quite as tight as the second half of that previous song. Petri is in the zone--going off into the cosmos--until surprisingly relinquishing the lead to the bass player. I love the psychedelia shouts and cryptic phrases in the background--and then he steps to the fore again--this time urging the bass and drum players to flash and shine at the same time. A little THIN LIZZY-like multi-instrumental regurgitation of the main melody before everybody crashes to the finish. (17.5/20)

7. "And I Hear You Call" (4:55) a decent song with an odd almost Caribbean feel to the rhythm tracks, yet the melodies feel almost Greek, while Petri's guitar showmanship pushes over the edge into new territories. (8.5/10)

8. "Tanya (3:51) slow-picked echoed and distorted electric guitar notes open this. Bass notes, drum hits, and background reverbed scream/wails join in. A very bluesy, JEFF BECK-like song--an instrumental with a BEATLES-like melody line--that seems to sing a tale of woe and tribulation. (8.25/10)

- "Mushrooms" (21:09) (34.5/40): 9. I - Prelude (1:18) - intentionally strummed guitar chords and cymbal play support Petri's wailing-echoed guitar play. (4.25/5) 10. II - On My Own (6:50) - steady rumba beat over which Petri sings in a URIAH HEEP-like melody about wasting time. Great chorus. Great song that could have been even better with better background vocals and more "in the pocket" drumming. I like the bass player exploring his own trajectory while Petri solos in the fourth minute. Then there is an odd shift into a space-dreamy sequence of effects and musical waves rising and falling (which feels as if it should have been designated with its own sub-title), but then we return to the "I wanna be" chorus for the final minute. (13.25/15) 11. III - The Weep (2:01) - gentle guitar and cymbal play over which two very odd vocal tracks compete for dominance: one that is wailing, almost crying, the other that is like an indecipherable squawk coming from a PA system voice. Interesting dichotomy. (8.25/5) 12. IV - Mushrooms (3:04) - a return to the Beastie Boys form of singing over staccato syncopated music eventually smooths and flattens out for the poppy chorus. There is absolutely no pop, no fluff, in Petri's ensuing guitar solo, though: this is all rock at it's Alvin Lee/Ronnie Montrose kickin' tops. (9/10) 13. V - Circumstances (2:18) - similar rhythm as the previous section with pseudo-Islamic chant-wailing over the top--accompanied by wild sax play (that sounds like it came from Vietnam or Mecca). Protends of Koenji Hyakkei? (4.5/5) 14. VI - Captain Relief (2:15) back to Western rock--Petri let's loose and he is on fire! Even when the band quiets down, Petri's solo is psychedelic majesty! (4.5/5) 15. VII - More Mushrooms (2:07) a conversation between two druggies gives way to the Beastie Boys theme and choral vocals of the previous "Mushrooms" section. Here Petri plays a bottleneck/slide for the lead, until ? (4.25/5) 16. VIII - The Answer (1:16) an awesome sonic landscape to finish with. (4.5/5)

Total Time: 60:20

Plenty of flashes of the rise to virtuosic levels of instrument mastery are on display here--but they aren't quite there yet--even Petri has some growing to do (unbelievably). But the power and walls of sound are there--definitely there. An excellent album of late-60s sounding psychedelic blues rock.

B/four stars; an very good addition to any prog lover's music collection--especially if you like A) Hendrix, B) hard driving psychedelic rock, and/or C) later Petri Walli/Kingston Wall albums.

 Kingston Wall II by KINGSTON WALL album cover Studio Album, 1993
4.17 | 201 ratings

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Kingston Wall II
Kingston Wall Psychedelic/Space Rock

Review by BrufordFreak
Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

4 stars Petri Walli & Company mature and polish, try a little more adventure, unfortunately it's Petri who has done the most work, the most growing; Jukka and Sami are really not in the same league. Petri's guitar has so much to say that almost every song has to go over six minutes just to fully express himself.

1. "We Cannot Move" (4:39) let the Indian influences begin! (8.5/10)

2. "Istwan" (4:02) acoustic guitar picking with droning strings leads into a kind of BEATLES/BEACH BOYS C&W song style. Interesting! (8.5/10)

3. "Could It Be So?" (5:52) back to psychedelia: guitar drenched heavily in reverb leads of and solos from the get go. This is HENDRIX/Frank MARINO heaven! And the band does very well to keep up with Petri. (Maybe they've finally awakened.) And he's singing about reincarnation! A top three song for me. (9/10)

4. "And It's All Happening" (6:07) slowed down, spacious blues-rock instrumental. Pure Hendrix or maybe Gilmour amped up by ten. Masterful and emotional. (8.75/10)

5. "Love Tonight" (6:40) though the electric guitar is bleeding over from the previous song, strumming acoustic guitars, Indian-sounding percussion, and either bowed electric guitar or violin establish a TRAFFIC or Alvin Lee-like song structure before Petri begins singing and then turning full on LED ZEPPELIN. Amazingly piercing electric guitar playing during the solo section. And then he's holding back--turns to strumming for his lead work! Absolutely amazing! (8.5/10)

6. "Two Of a Kind" (6:23) returning to the Arabian deserts with acoustic guitar strumming, joined by odd synth-sounding bass before Petri starts singing and the rest of the band joins in. During the first instrumental section, Petri's solo is full-on HENDRIX. It's as if he's channeling the master! Drums get a chance to show off (nice job Sami!) before second verse of singing starts. Another blazing, faster-than-light guitar solo follows. Wow! (8.5/10)

7. "I Feel Love" (6:39) Yes! THE "I Feel Love"! Done Euro-Petri-style! It almost works! (8.25/10)

8. "Shine On Me" (7:05) introduced with a heavy, bluesy picked electric guitar chord progression accompanied by soloing saxophone, Petri's almost-whispered voice delivers the first verse as the band's rhythm track kicks in, before the first guitar solo. Sax does a great job of dancing around Petri's vocals--and the bass and drums intensify nicely after the second verse, encouraging Petri to amp it up for his second guitar solo. Unfortunately, it's rather blues-rock solo by the numbers--the sax is actually outshining the guitar! The music tones down significantly after the third verse, paving the way for a much more sensitive, bluesy GILMOUR-like solo. (13.25/15)

9. "You" (10:11) the opening feels like something from an AL DiMEOLA album. The Latin flavor soon diminishes (@1:15) as electrified guitar sound amplifies. Petri's vocalise and Jukka's bass play are strongly entrained. Then everything backs way down for a spacious, more RY COODER-like acoustic guitar section before electric guitar reenters in a dramatic fashion. Soft, spacious in the fifth minute as Petri finally starts to sing--in a soft, relaxed, Robert Plant-like way. Amped up drums in the sixth minute signal a shift in dynamics: bass and guitar take off, with Petri's wah-ed lead taking us through some Pete Townsend moves before settling on a more staccato approach. Around 7:40 it begins to sound as if there are multiple guitar tracks contributing. New Spanish chord structure at 8:00 leads to another round of Petri alternating between vocalise and lead guitar. Then, at 9:00, we switch back to the soft, spacious motif for Petri to finish the singing off. (17.5/20)

10. "Palékastro" (4:54) a fast paced instrumental rocker to finish off the album unfortunately showcases the discrepancy in skill level between Petri Walli and both of his band mates. (8.25/10)

Total Time: 76:36

B/four stars; an excellent step forward for this guitar god--the possible reincarnation of Master Jimi.

 The Essential by KINGSTON WALL album cover Boxset/Compilation, 2011
4.27 | 6 ratings

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The Essential
Kingston Wall Psychedelic/Space Rock

Review by tigerfeet

4 stars When writing about and reviewing Kingston Wall one always has to bear in mind the reason the band existed, the history about the lead singer/guitarist (Petri Walli), his vision for the music and songs of the band and how they merged into one another.

While not necessarily a themed or concept album based band, in essence, their third album 'Tri-Logy' did evolve into a concept album. One could go as far to say that there was a lot of deliberation put into the track order and feel on all 3 of their first albums.

Petri Walli had become more centered around mysticism and Scandinavian folk law, as well as far-eastern, and Hindu influences. When visiting India he had become friends with Ior Bock, a Finnish actor, mythologist and eccentric. It was this relationship that had some affect on the third album Tri-Logy and the concept related to it. The details of this relationship actually makes for a very good read and does for sure give some insight into some thoughts, perhaps, of Petri Walli.

It is a right of passage for some of the great musicians to either stay with us in this life or move to the next before their natural time. It is as though they know some secret or have witnessed the beginning of the universe, and wish to hurry and process the finalities of this life's formalities.

Petri Walli was one of those greats, and of course, like millions of undiscovered musicians, not well known in most popular musical spheres. Nevertheless, he is to many, a John Lennon, Jim Morrison, Marc Bolan, Janis Joplin, to name a few.

I am of course an avid fan, but also i feel the need to express certain things when it comes to releasing the 'Best of" kind of albums.

There has been 2 releases from Sony label. This one in 2011, The Essential Kingston Wall, and a in 2014 one called "The Goods'. Both the The Essential Kingston Wall and The Goods have the same tracks in the same order. The difference is that the first was more expensive and the art work was more subdued.

The thing with making a best of kind of compilation, it does miss the mark, and does leave out many songs that gave another the album it's purpose. It takes the poetry out of the atmosphere.

I started to write about each song as it appears on this album, but I felt that it took away from the 'feel' of each of the 3 albums they were taken from. Each song does feel out of context on it's own. It is like wearing different shoes, or mismatched clothing. I am certain there is no order these songs could have been listed that would feel like you are really getting into the nitty gritty of what Kingston Wall was about.

Yes, they are all great songs. The best of Some of the songs from a great band.

Would this album make someone who had no knowledge of KW go out and listen to the first 3 full albums?

I am not sure if it would. It feels like a homogenized/abridged 'Best of Pink Floyd' albums, which incidentally, I feel pretty much the same way about.

In short, the best way to understand Kingston Wall is to listen to their 3 albums, and in track order.

The Essential Kingston Wall is really for collectors, or perhaps those who wish to take some of the songs on this album and add them to a play list.

I would rate it an Excellent Addition, however the album 'The Essential Kingston Wall' is not necessarily Essential.

 III Tri-Logy by KINGSTON WALL album cover Studio Album, 1994
4.12 | 138 ratings

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III Tri-Logy
Kingston Wall Psychedelic/Space Rock

Review by BrufordFreak
Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

5 stars On 28 June, 1995, Finnish singer-songwriter Petri Walli climbed to the top of a church tower in Helsinki and jumped to his death. The incredibly talented leader of psychedelic progressive rock band Kingston Wall was 26 years old. To hear Petri's catalogue of songs is truly a religious experience. His little known three piece band sounds as if it was the reincarnation of The Jimi Hendrix Experience, twenty years after Jimi's death. The first Kingston Trio album is a bit raw and show the band (and Petri)'s lack of maturity in all categories--songwriting, playing, and studio recording techniques. The second album, II, came out just a year later but shows extraordinary growth in all areas. This is one jaw-dropping album. The third album, yet another year down the road, was much more studio processed, as opposed to the "plug-in and push record" approach to the previous two albums. Tri-logy thus has a much more experimental sound to its psychedelia--but is no less brilliant. Fellow band members say that they could feel as if Petri was on a mission--that his suicide shortly after made perfect sense with the way he approached the recording of Tri-logy. The lyrics of several of the album's songs even give portend to his choice to leave the planet early, of his own accord. What an amazing talent was lost. Thankfully, we have these three albums as testament to his gifts.

Side One (A continuous suite of songs)" 1. "Another Piece Of Cake" (3:48) amazing guitar and great drumming over a kind of standard song. (9/10) 2. "Welcome to the Mirrorland" (3:46) really an intro to "I'm the King, I'm the Sun", the song opens with a cymbal crash before didgeridoo, jews harp, bagpipes, hand percussion, and far background guitar soloing establish the HENDRIX-like before Petri's voice conspiratorially whispers his lyric to us. By the second half drums, synths, and strumming acoustic guitars have moved forward, forcing Petri to speak more openly, insistently. The song then bleeds directly in the next song. (8.75/10) 3. "I'm the King, I'm the Sun" (4:56) feels very PINK FAIRIES-like with vocals and synths. (8.667/10) 4. "The Key: Will" (1:07) coming out of the "King/Sun", the music reverts to digderidoo and jew's harp as Petri sings his final message in a low monotone. More of an interlude. 5. "Take You to Sweet Harmony" (3:24) opens with spacious spaceyness (coming from the didgeridoo and jew's harp of the previous three songs) like a PINK FLOYD song, but then with the mystical almost-spoken vocal it turns kind of Reggae ? except the guitar. Wow! Can Petri wail! I don't really like the song, but the guitar pyrotechnics are undeniable and so worth listening to! (8.75/10) 6. "Get Rid of Your Fears" (2:56) another song that bleeds over from its predecessor, the blues space wah-guitar solos Hendrix-style over a relatively slow, deep, semi-Reggae rhythm foundation. A bit CAN-like, the odd deep vocal that is spoken ominously over the second minute turns whispery-singing over the final guitar chord strums. I really like the drum/percussion work on this one. (8.667/10) 7. "When Something Old Dies" (1:21) the breakout rocker from the previous song. (4.25/5) 8. "Alt - land - is" (5:12) becomes a vehicle for a fast drive on a country road while Petri autodidacts a continuous story as if he's stream-of-consciousness talking. The drumming, bass playing, and synth work is quite active, quite propelling. In the fourth minute Petri finally breaks out of his conspiratorial whisper and sings Robert Plant-like as his guitar work becomes more filling and active. (8.75/10)

9. "Party Goes On" (4:25) another song that reminds me of PINK FAIRIES. Nice shift at 0:45. Petri's support crew is truly top notch--and so tight! (8.667/10)

10. "Stüldjt Hĺjt" (8:59) very cool psych rock. I hear nods to The Who, Led Zep, AC/DC, even some jazz fusion (in the bass). Petri's vocal performance is very entertaining--as is his searing lead guitar work and the crazed free-jazz bass and drum work. At the four minute mark we fall into another five-chord PINK FAIRIES motif while Petri "narrates" a newscast before falling back into his Hitler-esque repetition of the "Stüldjt hĺjt" march mantra. The message must be quite powerful as the music and performances all seem to be set to 11. The song's decay over the final 70 seconds is quite entertaining and ingenious--almost as if the world is exploding. (18/20)

11. "For All Mankind" (6:17) drone and didgeridoo open this one as amazing lead guitar riffing and Animal-like drumming slowly fade in as if coming from the Underworld or somewhere equally nefarious. (How else could a guitarist be this good, this dynamic, this confident?) Add to this a great vocal with amazing lyrics and you get my favorite song on the album and my favorite Kingston Wall song of all-time (this despite it being rumored to have been Petri's suicide note to the world). (10/10)

12. "Time" (7:07) slow Petri down and he could definitely be the reincarnation of one Jimi Hendrix. Jaw-dropping guitar play on this bluesy Band of Gypsies-like song. (13.25/15)

13. "The Real Thing" (18:02) (34/35) = 9.71

Total Time: 71:38

The Kingston Wall experience is all about hearing, trying to make sense of, the astonishing and mesmerizing guitar play of Petri Walli. Though he committed suicide shortly after the release of this album and the Petri-ordained breakup of the band, Petri is among the greatest guitarists I've ever had the privilege of hearing. Another reason that I am so grateful for the Internet/WorldWideWeb and the music database of ProgArchives: otherwise, I would have never heard of this band or this extraordinary artist.

A-/five stars; a minor masterpiece of powerful, dextrous, well-composed and well-executed psych rock. What a finale to this short-lived, high-powered band! What a tragic loss!

 Kingston Wall I by KINGSTON WALL album cover Studio Album, 1992
3.51 | 116 ratings

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Kingston Wall I
Kingston Wall Psychedelic/Space Rock

Review by tigerfeet

5 stars I personally rate Kingston Wall I as a momentous debut album, with its simplicity, raw energy, and naivety.

It has all the right ingredients, from a wonderful opening track, 'With My Mind', to a wild and groovy 2nd track 'Used to Feel Before'.

The 3rd track 'I'm Not the One' is a classic rock riff which leads in to a great cover of Hendrix's 'Fire'.

The 5th track takes us up an emotional notch and we begin to see the inner workings of KW and Petri Walli, again, loud, and epic. A lot more to this song than meets the ear, as most of the songs on this album.

The 6th track Nepal leads us through a bazarre and into something special and deep and flowing and almost heart breaking.

The 7th track 'And I Hear You Call' remains on the same eastern theme with a complex turn-around and intricate drumming sequences.

The 8th track 'Tanya' explores the mind and soul and a small reprieve until we get to the 9th track "Prelude' which moves into one of the best songs on the album, 'On My Own'.

'On My Own' is the last regular track on the album, as if saying well ok you got the point now we're gonna do what we want for the remainder of the album.

The 11th track 'The Weep' is the end of the prelude portion and into the most psycadelic portions of the album followed by the aptly names "Mushrooms'.

The 13th track 'Circumstances' is fun track and has a nice grove going.

The 14th track "Captain Relief' continues the whacked out and the crazy, with superb use of the Wah and control of the flow and movement of the feel of the song.

Track 15 'More Mushrooms' is a a a flashback to the 12th track "Mushrooms.

The last track 'The Answer' sums up what is an exciting journey of an album and a wild experience.

What is so good about this album is that it gets better the more you listen to it. If you get a chance to drive for an hour on a long journey, turn up the volume, give up your preconceptions and enjoy the ride.

I highly recommend this album and for being a first album is extremely accomplished and well produced.

 Kingtime by KINGSTON WALL album cover DVD/Video, 2015
4.89 | 9 ratings

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Kingtime
Kingston Wall Psychedelic/Space Rock

Review by tigerfeet

5 stars I received my Kingston Wall, Kingtime DVD order from Svart Records, Finland last Christmas, and it is indeed a must watch/listen for any Kingston Wall fans out there.

Disc 1 - if you pop it in the DVD player and just press INTRO when the menu system appears, it starts out very well with a live version of 'With My Mind' playing in the inset as you also get to read about the early days and early evolution of the band. This version of With My Mind is one of the best they played and really captures the bands very essence. At this point i was extremely excited for what the rest of disc 1 held in store.

I then went back to main menu, and pressed PLAY ALL. It started a little on the messy side, and if i have been new to Kingston Wall i would have been a little put off at this point as basically, they just split the play list of the band up into sections of live performances year by year and it felt like a little bit confusing.

After a couple of songs I eagerly ejected disc 1 and put in disc 2 and boy, was i glad i did !! (but i will come back to disc 1 in a moment ;-)

Disc 2 seemed to me like the obvious place to start IMO for a any newcomer or indeed longtime KW fan. I pressed the first item on the dvd menu - 'Petri Walli in Memoriam' and was immediately engaged by the way it was presented and edited. It gave me a sense of getting to know Petri and the band through footage from the band live and studio versions of songs. I even felt my eyes welling up when a segment played one of their best known songs, ISTWAN.

I then went back to the menu and watched some of the interview sections, which were very nice and made me feel closer to the band members.

I then watched the Freakout Club sections of KW and pre-KW- Basically what the band really were about, just playing music, and not caring what others thought. They were all musical technicians but had flaws, which made them special.

I then finished up the the EXTRAS section and felt in the mood to go back to disc 1.

Now i was prepared for disc 1 mentally, and watched the entire disc in one sitting. It was excellent and i thoroughly enjoyed every minute.

Overall, Kingtime is very well presented and a nice glossy feel to the presentation. The DVDs are well made and labels look as good as anything out there. It came with pull out insert/booklet and they threw in a few small KW mementos in the package.

The 2 DVDs are extensive and time consuming and that makes for a good re-visit from time to time wherein i always seem to find something new or enlightening.

5 stars from me, even though the flow of the content could have been reorganized - but the actual content was amazing. A fun DVD to watch all in all.

 Freakout Remixes  by KINGSTON WALL album cover Boxset/Compilation, 2000
2.14 | 7 ratings

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Freakout Remixes
Kingston Wall Psychedelic/Space Rock

Review by Modrigue
Prog Reviewer

2 stars Sometimes looking at a cover art gives you an idea of its content. This affirmation is rather true for KINGSTON WALL's studio albums, this time makes no exception either. "Freakout Remixes" is a tribute compilation composed of techno/trance remixes of the band's songs, made by electronic finnish artists.

The big beat remix of "And I Hear You Call" is a bit lazy and does not bring much novelty to the original song. "We Cannot Move" is easily the worst passage of the record. It mainly consists in trance pulses over a speeded up version of the original track. The effect sounds quite ridiculous. "I'm Not the One" has an old-school breakdance beat. The song is just barely recognizable but the music itself is not too bad.

The ambient "With My Mind" is surprisingly nice. Its modern electro/hip-hop beat and hazy atmosphere results in a cool trip-hop remix. The best track of this compilation. On the contrary, "Used to Feel Before - Incoming" is just another irritating trance remix. "Palékastro" is a rather strange messy collage that goes in many directions. Some parts of the original song can be heard, but the overall is quite uneven.

As most people could have expected, "Freakout Remixes" won't please KINGSTON WALL lovers. However, a few remixes should be appreciated by 90's electronic music fans.

Thanks to ProgLucky for the artist addition. and to Quinino for the last updates

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