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BETWEEN THE BURIED AND ME

Tech/Extreme Prog Metal • United States


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Between The Buried And Me picture
Between The Buried And Me biography
Founded in Raleigh, North Carolina, USA in 2000

Originally formed in 2000 by members of Prayer For Cleansing, Between the Buried and Me play an unpredictable combination of countless styles, generally centering around an extremely complex variety of metalcore with death metal influences. Their constantly shifting song structures and tight musicianship have combined with intense agression and remarkable variety to gain them a noteworthy following. Their style of extreme metal was introduced on their debut album in 2002 and began to gain increased attention with 2003's The Silent Circus. The aftermath of this release saw drastic lineup shifts in the band, with only vocalist/keyboardist Tommy Rogers and guitarist Paul Waggoner remaining from their previous lineup. The group's new cast of musicians included Glass Casket guitarist Dusty Warring and drummer Blake Richardson, as well as bassist Dan Briggs, recording and releasing Alaska in 2005 to critical acclaim.

In 2006, the band released an album comprising of bands that influenced Between the Buried and Me.

Their 2007 release, Colors, was also released to much critical acclaim and saw most of the metalcore/hardcore influence in their sound done away with.

The band also released their first ever DVD in 2008, Colors_Live, a live DVD featuring the whole of the album Colors played from beginning to end.

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BETWEEN THE BURIED AND ME discography


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BETWEEN THE BURIED AND ME top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

2.84 | 74 ratings
Between The Buried And Me
2002
3.55 | 95 ratings
The Silent Circus
2003
3.57 | 137 ratings
Alaska
2005
2.87 | 70 ratings
The Anatomy Of...
2006
4.03 | 363 ratings
Colors
2007
4.04 | 274 ratings
The Great Misdirect
2009
4.15 | 273 ratings
The Parallax II - Future Sequence
2012
3.93 | 263 ratings
Coma Ecliptic
2015
3.59 | 49 ratings
Automata I
2018
4.09 | 37 ratings
Automata II
2018

BETWEEN THE BURIED AND ME Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.00 | 5 ratings
Coma Ecliptic: Live
2017

BETWEEN THE BURIED AND ME Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

4.33 | 42 ratings
Colors LIVE
2008
3.80 | 15 ratings
Future Sequence: Live at the Fidelitorium
2014

BETWEEN THE BURIED AND ME Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

2.67 | 6 ratings
Best Of
2011

BETWEEN THE BURIED AND ME Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

0.00 | 0 ratings
Demo
2001
3.83 | 92 ratings
The Parallax: Hypersleep Dialogues
2011

BETWEEN THE BURIED AND ME Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 Colors by BETWEEN THE BURIED AND ME album cover Studio Album, 2007
4.03 | 363 ratings

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Colors
Between The Buried And Me Tech/Extreme Prog Metal

Review by wheres my prime 4

5 stars COLORS

This album is one hell of an experience, and this album isn't afraid to remind you. It gets you pumped up by its brutal energy and masterful technicality and calms you down by its somber& beautiful acoustics and even utilizes some jazz and even bluegrass influences, making the albums kaleidoscope more musically diverse and progressive.

The energy and soul can be felt throughout every single track. From the build-up from 'Foam Born (A) The Backtrack following towards the complex and formulated masterpiece that is '(B) The Decade of Statues'.

The building riff that comes after the drums & bass and the chilling guitar harmonies in 'Informal Gluttony' give me goosebumps every single time I listen to it and so does the dooming outro with the repeating lyrics "Feed me fear.. (informal..) Feed me fear.. (gluttony..)"

Sun of Nothing is a beautiful progressive piece about a man contemplating his own life and leans towards the voyage of death. There is a lot of emotion in this track, whether it could be due to its serious topic (which they handle it very professionally) or the many progressions from absolutely crushing to acoustically gloomy but still full of hope.

From a such a chaotic outro the song follows into the next song 'Ants of the Sky'. A complex song that knows when to stop its complex madness to seek into its major blues &jazz influences and becoming more intense and slowly creating the anticipation for the hopeful and blessed chorus around 8-minute mark.

'Prequel to a Sequel" feels happier than the rest of the songs but isn't afraid to show its inner magniloquent nature. I don't relisten to this song as much as the ones before this, but every chance I give to it I begin to appreciate it more.

From the jazzy and beautifully chilling 'Viridian' goes into the monstrous finale that is 'White Walls' The song embodies the feeling after finally finishing a book you really enjoyed or watching the ending credits of an amazing movie and the end of the song replicates this feeling, almost as if they wanted to capture that feeling for the listener. Everything from the chillingly crushing riff to the amazing outro solo around the 10-minute mark.

FINAL SCORE: 99.98/10.00 A must - listen to any fan of complex pieces or any prog head of that matter

 Automata II by BETWEEN THE BURIED AND ME album cover Studio Album, 2018
4.09 | 37 ratings

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Automata II
Between The Buried And Me Tech/Extreme Prog Metal

Review by tempest_77

5 stars Automata II is definitely the better half of the Automata series. There's a lot more variation in the sounds and it feels more explorative than the first record, including what sounds like a banjo on the opening track. The album is also less heavy handed in the death metal realm than Automata I, with few blast beats, and more melodic and/or innovative passages behind the death metal vocal sections.

"The Proverbial Bellow" is the longest track in the Automata series at almost 13 and a half minutes. It's a sprawling piece with great energy and diversity, and opens with a heavy riff backed by organ, almost reminiscent of Haken on The Mountain. The opening section is carried up and down varying levels of energy, before finally breaking into a blast beat part in classic Between the Buried and Me fashion. The whole opening sequence of this piece is one of the greatest moments of either album, as it brings in new energy but maintains their classic sound. This song really shows some great exploration, with a whole section that sounds quite like Porcupine Tree in their psychedelic moments. It's filled with exhilarating guitar riffs, and an energy that flows between the constantly changing grooves. The death metal sections are still more prominent than on Coma Ecliptic, but the overall sound is still more melodic than their earlier albums. Definitely a high point in the Automata series, and the most progressive in terms of extended and detailed composition, though that's pretty much due to its length. The energy comes down near the end into a beautiful soft piano section, over which Tommy Rogers' distant voice emotionally sings, "Please pick up / Pick up the phone / It's been ringing." This section releases into a full band, melodic chorus, similar to some of Spock's Beard's choruses. The chorus leads into a heavily composed section, with odd time signature riffs doubled between two guitars, and reinforced by the organ?again showing some similarity to Spock's Beard?before shifting back to 4/4 for a guitar solo. Waggoner does a great job combining the technical side of the solo with true feeling, echoing solos like Tosin Abasi's on Tempting Time. The solo ends with a seemingly abrupt break of militaristic snare drum, similar to the end of California Über Alles, only much much shorter, before the band crashes into a final hit for the ending. The organ sustains its chord, and fades into...

"Glide" is a very quirky piece; it's an carnival/cabaret style song that starts with an accordion section. It shifts to a more laid-back piano section, backed by organ, and then repeats both, this time with added percussion and vocals. It's a short piece, but it serves as a wonderful prelude to the next song, as it switches to an upbeat swing feel at the end, and segues into...

"Voice of Trespass," clocking at 8 minutes, is the weirdest song on either Automata record, and also probably my favourite. Imagine a swing song from a musical. Then add death metal. That's Voice of Trespass. The song starts with the same feel as the end of Glide, but with a heavy down-tuned guitar leading the way. Complete with a horn section and a classic swing turnaround, the intro comes down into a more traditional feel, with hi-hat and bass filling the space. When the piano comes in at the top of the verse, it almost feels like flat out swing, but snarl in Rogers' vocals reminds us that this is the heaviest swing song we've ever heard. It's reminiscent of The Dear Hunter's Act II and Act III, where Casey Crescenzo mixes jazz, swing, tango, and more into the band's post-hardcore-tinged progressive rock. And that's just the first half of the song. The second half of it switches into a straight 4/4 section with another blast beat part, and eventually comes down into slow, heavy, doom metal-esque section. It's a great release of tension after the whole piece has constantly kept moving under the relentless swing feel. The vocals in this section recall the previous Automata record ("We are hollow / Condemned to the gallows"). The song ends with double time section that reintroduces the horn section, and eventually climaxes with the drums adding a rapid double bass part to the beat. With its heavy riffs and hit sections every four bars, its almost reminiscent of Thank You Scientist, another post-hardcore/prog rock that fuses their sound with jazz, particularly funky jazz fusion. The song ends with an distorted ambient section of people's voices under a piano part. The piano holds a final chord, which leads into the drum build up for...

"The Grid" starts out with a melodic section, similar to the end of "The Proverbial Bellow". The death metal is quickly introduced, and before the energy drops briefly, they mix the two together for an interesting effect. The first half of the song features a few brief mid-volume sections with a lot of tension, reminiscent of verses in certain Tool or TesseracT songs, combined with the band's melodic death metal sections, along with a few melodic clean vocal choruses. The first part of "The Grid", just under 6 minutes long, is definitely the least explorative part of the record, in the sense that it is most similar to their previous material on Automata I and Coma Ecliptic. That's not necessarily a bad thing, though: there's a reason Between the Buried and Me are a progressive death metal band. The second melodic chorus closes out the first section of the song, as the second section starts with an acoustic guitar alone, setting a significant contrast from the first part. A piano and clean electric guitar come in, reinforcing the acoustic, as do the vocals, with the final line of the song, "We are in this together," sung for the first of several times. The drums build up and come in, playing a swung 4/4 (or just 12/8, who knows) feel, but they come in with just the bass?no distorted guitars?indicating the beginning of a gradual and dramatic build up. The harmonies and backing vocals come in, along with atmospheric strings, until, almost at the 8 minute mark, the lead guitar finally comes in, with Waggoner playing another wonderfully emotional solo, even better than the one in "The Proverbial Bellow", which is harmonised by Waring. The song climaxes and comes to a final crash, clocking in just under 10 minutes, with the guitar sustaining and ending the album with snarly distortion fading out. The ending is the only part of the album I thought wasn't the strongest; I think they should have brought in the rhythm guitar and extended the ending from where the acoustic guitar started. They had an opportunity to make it really anthemic and epic, which I think they missed a bit. However, being a progressive death metal band, ending with an atmospheric section like that, which is almost reminiscent of some of Plini's earlier, less heavy work, is a bold move, which I have to commend them for.

All in all, I think the two albums are really at their best when they are combined into a single entity; the dark, heavy, and undeniably death metal first record needs somewhere to release its energy, and it feels much more satisfying to have all of that tension and aggression pour out on the second record. The story doesn't feel as short, and the sounds on the two albums compliment each other wonderfully. I would definitely recommend anyone interested in the Automata series to consider them one album, and to listen all the way from the first record through this one.

While Automata II isn't perfect, I thought it was much better as an individual record than Automata I was. I gave Automata I 4 stars, and while Automata II isn't a solid 5 on it's own, I'm giving 5 stars anyways, because it definitely deserves an extra star over the first record, and when combined, the whole series is quite a masterpiece. I'd say Automata II is probably about a 4.4/5, and if the whole series were one record it would probably be a 4.6/5.

 Automata II by BETWEEN THE BURIED AND ME album cover Studio Album, 2018
4.09 | 37 ratings

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Automata II
Between The Buried And Me Tech/Extreme Prog Metal

Review by javajeff

4 stars Automata Part II is a big step up from Automata Part I, but the combined effort is still lower than their masterpieces. The Proverbial Bellow and The Grid are standard, well executed, Between The Buried And Me tracks that can fit with their best albums. Glide is a filler track, and the standout on this EP is Voice of Trespass which sounds like something Diablo Swing Orchestra would have created. I do not have an issue with them copying the style as it has been done by other groups. They did a stellar job with the track, creating the most complex arrangement on the EP. Most important with this release is that it has the energy that was missing from Automata Part I. Can it elevate Part I? Maybe. Now that we have a complete album, it will take some time to evaluate it as a whole. I really do not like this two part release process and wish they would have waited until the entire album was done. Also, I wish it was available on Bandcamp like their other albums. With all of that being said, it is another quality release that can only be marred by the stellar releases it follows.
 Automata I by BETWEEN THE BURIED AND ME album cover Studio Album, 2018
3.59 | 49 ratings

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Automata I
Between The Buried And Me Tech/Extreme Prog Metal

Review by javajeff

4 stars This is half of an album, so it is hard to judge until it is complete. But they put it out there, so it is fair game. I can start off by saying they are a favorite of mine that I listen to often. If you do not know about Between The Buried And Me, you must get Colors immediately. Automata: Part 1 is easily one of my least favorite Between The Buried And Me releases. It lacks the magic of some of the other albums, but that could be because it is just half of an album. It is a step down from Coma Ecliptic, and probably on par with the debut album or The Silent Circus. With that being said, more Between The Buried And Me is always a good thing. Automata: Part 1 is a good listen, although short, and has some quality tracks like Blot and Condemned to the Gallows. But we are back to the question of "What is it?" The second half of this album which is expected to drop this year can be a game changer. Maybe we end up with a masterpiece when the two halves are finally united. I am not sure if releasing albums in two pieces is a new type of cash grab or an artistic process. 3.5/5 stars for now.
 The Parallax II - Future Sequence by BETWEEN THE BURIED AND ME album cover Studio Album, 2012
4.15 | 273 ratings

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The Parallax II - Future Sequence
Between The Buried And Me Tech/Extreme Prog Metal

Review by Warthur
Prog Reviewer

4 stars The Parallax II finds Between the Buried and Me plotting a strikingly fresh course after spending their previous few releases engaging in a controlled flip of their sound; whereas Colors had been a metalcore album infused with prog sensibilities, the Future Sequence finds the group putting prog metal first and foremost, with metalcore motifs and textures being merely part of a staggeringly diverse portfolio of tools and techniques available to them. Metalcore purists may feel somewhat left behind, but if you liked the prog elements on Colors you'll be well-served here. Conversely, if in the end you found that Colors wasn't quite to your tastes due to the residual metalcore influence, you may find that The Parallax II is more your speed.
 The Anatomy Of... by BETWEEN THE BURIED AND ME album cover Studio Album, 2006
2.87 | 70 ratings

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The Anatomy Of...
Between The Buried And Me Tech/Extreme Prog Metal

Review by thwok

4 stars THE ANATOMY OF... is one of those albums that really makes me wish that the ratings system allowed for half stars. I'm going to round up and give this covers album 4 stars for its progressiveness, and the high regard for BTBAM among reviewers. If "progressive music" is a definable term, it should describe groups that combine disparate elements in new and interesting ways. I don't know a lot of BTBAM's music, but they seem to fit the bill.

As the Allmusic review of this album suggests, these cover versions stick pretty close to the originals; I would have preferred more changes. The song choices result in a wide variety of styles throughout. The band clearly demonstrates that they can play it all skillfully. In particular, Tommy Giles Rogers should get his due. I'd argue that he's possibly the most versatile singer in the extreme metal world. Since I didn't know a lot of these songs before listening, I prefer unfamiliar tracks like "Territory" and "Malpractice" from the second half.

Incidentally, the CD includes interesting statements from the band members about why they chose these songs. BTBAM won't be one of my favorite extreme metal bands. Though I live for variety, their approach is too kitchen sink for my tastes. However, they are generally praised here at PA. That should matter in assigning a rating. If THE ANATOMY OF... leads listeners to seek out the original bands covered, that's a very good thing.

 The Parallax II - Future Sequence by BETWEEN THE BURIED AND ME album cover Studio Album, 2012
4.15 | 273 ratings

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The Parallax II - Future Sequence
Between The Buried And Me Tech/Extreme Prog Metal

Review by Luqueasaur

4 stars Shout from the top of your lungs, "we're not just crappy metalcore", BTBAM...: 8/10

BETWEEN THE BURIED AND ME's metalcore tendencies fuse with a hyperactive technical death metal to create dynamic tracks that stray far from generic metal on THE PARALLAX II. I was truly apprehensive about giving them a shot because their annoying fan base kept idolizing them and "metalcore" scared me. But, as Wicket puts it on his review, BTBAM has a particular way of making non-metalcore fans enjoy their music, regardless of the listener's distaste for the genre. Mostly because they just take certain characteristics of it; their music is rooted on metalcore, but it also offers several other influences that, all fused together, stray far from the sameness, fake emotionality or immaturity the genre can connote.

Over an hour long, its dynamism and metamorphic rhythms, patterns, arrangements, and melodies - albeit not really different among themselves - was able to keep me actively hooked and particularly entertained. Granted I had little idea of what was going on, mostly due to the confusing lyrics or disorientating, boastful wall of textures, but it genuinely a good experience. Assuming I had been tortured by a "musical crisis" (I was having a hard time genuinely enjoying music) and they took me out of it, it's safe for me to assume that their output is pretty entertaining.

The band clearly opted to separate their avant-garde (due to lack of better term) highly technical extreme metal expression on the longer tracks, which are pretty obviously the limelight of the album. Highly eclectic, sonically intense and offering a vast array of sounds, there's no sleepy moments while listening to them, mostly because if you ever felt lightheaded the powerful lead guitars or the melodic rhythm ones would blast you back to your place, awake and well. The shorter tracks are mostly there for conceptual purposes, functioning as a tool of cohesion. They offer profound lyrics, perfect as a tool of immersion on the context BTBAM constructs. Musically, though, they fall short, I don't feel the band works well with softer music.

All's good so far, but I do have a critic. I felt the concept was poorly expressed. The lyrics are convoluted and cryptical, I barely could understand the general idea they were trying to propose. In my opinion, concepts, at least at its very fundamental level, should be easily identifiable on the first spin. Naturally, there's no issue with details being harder to spot, but the problem is that both the very structure PARALLAX II is based upon, as well its details, remained shady to me even after I finished the album.

THE PARALLAX II should be listened in its entirety at once. I can't imagine trying to give the songs a shot on shuffle, or individually, I feel as if its magic and pompously noisy capacities wouldn't be enjoyed to the max if done so. And, pretty obviously, more than one listen is imperative to really absorb it (although roughly all prog albums are like that so I'm sure you're aware of this condition). Nonetheless, I highly recommend giving it a shot. At once, or not, as you will, really, but just don't let the "this is metalcore" or "this is too long" prejudices fool you. BTBAM is pretty dope.

 The Parallax II - Future Sequence by BETWEEN THE BURIED AND ME album cover Studio Album, 2012
4.15 | 273 ratings

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The Parallax II - Future Sequence
Between The Buried And Me Tech/Extreme Prog Metal

Review by FragileKings
Prog Reviewer

5 stars This album has been a real treat to listen to and it has remained on my iPhone ever since I brought it home a couple of months ago. I had heard of the band Between the Buried and Me before and at some point I decided to give them a listen. I don't remember why 'The Parallax II: Future Sequence' became the album I checked out on YouTube, but when I gave a quick ear to some random parts and heard the aggressive and technical playing along with the shouted vocals, I figured this was an album to keep for the right time, for when I was ready for it. A year or so later, I found my music preferences leaning towards the extreme metal persuasion, and before long the album finally joined my collection.

I was prepared for the fast and highly technical playing. I was prepared for the heaviness and the brutal vocals. I did not in any way expect the remarkable progressive side of the band. Clean vocals, beautiful melodies, acoustic guitar, synthesizers, and rapidly changing music; it was all such a treat. I almost considered that the album would be better without the emphasis on the aggressive side, but then the progressive side would probably not shine so brightly.

I can't speak for any other albums by Between the Buried and Me, not just yet anyway, but this album keeps pulling at my attention. There's so much happening in the songs here, so much creativity and all of it coming at ultra-high paces so that the music keeps changing like a person with hyperactive disorder on speed. If you're not paying attention, you'll miss something. The music is mainly divided between the two main approaches of technical metal and progressive rock but there are so many little things that get added that crop up unexpectedly and make the listening experience that much more entertaining.

The opening track, 'Goodbye to Everything' features strummed acoustic guitar and clean, melodic vocals. It sounds like a modern British prog band might have come up with this. However, 'Astral Body' begins to sound more like something from the Devin Townsend Project, especially once the screamo vocals come in at 1:53. The guitars and drums play some wonderfully complex music like Dream Theater. There's some clean guitar with a style that makes me think of System of a Down for some reason, even though I'm not so familiar with their music. 'Lay Your Ghosts to Rest' is ten minutes long and largely speedy, technical, heavy music with shouted vocals. Catch how from 5:43 to 5:45 the jaunty but brief guitar riff sounds like it's coming through a transistor radio. After over six minutes of pummeling aggression, the song slows down to a waltz with clean guitar and vocals. 'Extremophile Elite' is another long progressive/aggressive technical track which at 4:23 abruptly changes to an orchestral bit that sounds like a score from a Tim Burton movie before going back to the heavy technical music at 4:53. 'Autumn', 'Parallax', and 'The Black Box' are all very short tracks that are transitional pieces between the longer tracks.

'Telos', 'Bloom' and 'Melting City' form a wonderful suit of three segued tracks that speedily cover such an array of aggressive music but also includes a laid back part that reminds me of Pure Reason Revolution in 'Telos' and an rushed technical/progressive take on 50's twelve-bar blues based rock and roll in 'Bloom'. 'Melting City' concludes with a wonderful bass-led instrumental section that slowly builds to a climax when the vocals return. These three tracks make up such an amazing display of this bands talent. 'Silent Flight Parliament' is the longest track at over 15 minutes and continues to be packed full of head-spinning technical, progressive metal/rock. The album wraps up with 'Goodbye to Everything Reprise', a track with a very suitable slow closeout.

You'll need to be one to handle the speedy, technical and aggressive side of the album before you can appreciate and enjoy what 'The Parallax II: Future Sequence' has to offer. But if you can take that side of the band, then this album will continue to reward after several listens. Prepare yourself by listening to Dream Theater, Devin Townsend, Haken, and maybe just a little uneXpect.

 Alaska by BETWEEN THE BURIED AND ME album cover Studio Album, 2005
3.57 | 137 ratings

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Alaska
Between The Buried And Me Tech/Extreme Prog Metal

Review by siLLy puPPy
Collaborator PSIKE, JR/F/Canterbury & Eclectic Teams

4 stars After "The Silent Circus" there was a mass exodus of band members leaving only Tommy Rogers (vocals and keys) and Paul Waggoner (guitars) as original members. On ALASKA the third release of BETWEEN THE BURIED AND ME, Dan Briggs replaced Jason King on bass, Dustie Waring replaced Nick Fletcher on rhythm guitar and Blake Richardson replaced Mark Castillo on drums which would remain the permanent lineup up to the present. While three of the five members are new to the club, i can't say that there is a substantial change between this album and the last. ALASKA is very much in the style of the two preceding albums with only the ratio of ingredients being shifted around randomly.

The first thing that's noticeable is that BTBAM are back to putting emphasis on the metalcore elements with their signature progressive magical touches changing things up on a regular basis. While this album pretty much has the same ingredients as the last, there is substantial less sidetracking into totally non-metal genres and the progressive rock, space rock and alternative metal parts play more minor roles. It seems that the band wanted to make the statement that despite 3/5 of the band being newbies that they were intent prove they were keeping the hardcore principles that were laid down in the beginning intact and that the new members had to prove themselves as metalcore behemoths with relentless intensity.

While not much included on ALASKA manages to distinguish it from the previous two albums, there are a few elements that stand out. There are moments of electronica, post-rock (on the short but sweet instrumental track "Breathe In, Breathe Out") and the finale "Laser Speed" is an instrumental Brazilian bossa nova / samba track that sounds absolutely like nothing else on the album. Overall there isn't anything new on this one to reel in any fans who weren't captivated by the first two albums but if you dug those two then this one is a decent followup and somewhat of a bridge between "The Silent Circus" and "Colors" in that it does manage to refine the disparate elements in a somewhat more organized fashion but more often than not this is an extreme metal earache inducing monster fusing metalcore with tech death, alt and prog metal.

 The Silent Circus by BETWEEN THE BURIED AND ME album cover Studio Album, 2003
3.55 | 95 ratings

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The Silent Circus
Between The Buried And Me Tech/Extreme Prog Metal

Review by siLLy puPPy
Collaborator PSIKE, JR/F/Canterbury & Eclectic Teams

4 stars Although their debut album was already a very progressive form of metalcore, BETWEEN THE BURIED AND ME really upped their game on their second release THE SILENT CIRCUS. Part of this was in the drumming duty exchange of percussionists as Will Goodyear parted ways and Mark Castillo joined the noisefest, but the biggest change is in the inclusion of various other metal and non-metal styles to the mix. On this one there are unexpected outbursts of all types of bizarre contrasting genres that can last for a few seconds (like marching band drumming) or go off into a whole lengthy sequence (such as atmospheric indie rock). If that wasn't enough the music just seems more extreme and the songwriting is better as well although i personally find the debut eponymous release to be of fairly high quality in the songwriting as well, it's just that the band managed to find new ways to spice up the music and make the tracks stand on their own unlike the debut where the formula became a tad repetitive by the time the end neared.

This is the typically progressive metalcore that BETWEEN THE BURIED AND ME delivers on all their earlier albums but with more weirdness than the debut. There are moments of extreme metal riffs that have the most messed up time sigs possible, moments of the bass slinking up and down the scales like a possessed caterpillar from hell and Tommy Rogers screams like an alien is bursting out of his stomach. This is really as extreme as this type of metal can get and that's exactly why i like it so much! While upon first listen this may sound like the typical metalcore with a few tricks and gimmicky trinkets thrown in for good measure, the band manages to create a huge variety of riff attacks, bass lines, drum rolls and screaming frenzies with various genre hopping escapes into clean vocal alternative metal, atmospheric space prog reminding me a bit of Porcupine Tree with bluesy melodic guitar solos and then can hop, skip and jump into extreme mathcore such as by headache masters Psyopus.

A giant leap in their technique proved BETWEEN THE BURIED AND ME weren't just your run of the mill extreme metal band. They display all the fury and energetic prowess of the most hardcore bands in the biz but they equally show off their love of progressive rock and pull it off with ease, both in playing the prog and metal simultaneously and apart. All these meanderings keep the album from getting stale and one dimensional throughout the entire ten tracks. While the tracks can seem jittery and ever changing, the final track "The Need For Repetition" offers a nice groove metal type of riff that repeats and casts a hypnotic spell. One of the things i dislike about this album is that it has one of those annoying pointless hidden tracks after track ten and several minutes of silence which is basically just a rant with some thrash metal and a guitar solo backing up the riffs. Not as good as later albums like "Colors" but still an excellent album for those who like their metalcore decorated with nice proggy frosting.

Thanks to Bryan for the artist addition. and to Quinino for the last updates

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