Progarchives, the progressive rock ultimate discography

SUPERTRAMP

Crossover Prog • United Kingdom


From Progarchives.com, the ultimate progressive rock music website

Supertramp picture
Supertramp biography
Formed in 1969 in London, England - Disbanded in 1988 - Reunited intermittently from 1996 to 2002 - Reformed in 2010/11 for European tour

A variant of progressive rock that some have called sophisto-rock. SUPERTRAMP is a sophisticated pop band that was able to continuously turn out very good songs. Their music has been described as whimsy, lighthearted, fluff and a million other variations on this theme. This music is the kind of thing that you will put on while you and your wife lounging around after dinner. Mellow and very good. One other thing is that they also have the ability to inject some humor into their music now and then. Althogh most of the songs on the album are rock radio staples. This is something that is hard to find.

For some of their best work you will have to look elsewhere. They had a remarkable change in fortune as "Crime of the Century" became one of the top-selling albums of 1974. The band had refined their keyboard-dominated sound and produced an album that was well-reviewed. The album "Even In The Quietest Moments..." is by far their best work. With over 18 million copies to date, "Breakfast In America" is one of the greatest melodic pop/rock albums of the seventies. After that album, SUPERTRAMP continued to develop a more R&B-flavored style; the change in direction was successful on 1982's "Famous Last Words", but they soon ran out of hits. SUPERTRAMP continued with occasional tours and infrequent albums. Their recent releases, however, have only found minor success.

See also: Roger HODGSON

SUPERTRAMP forum topics / tours, shows & news


SUPERTRAMP forum topics Create a topic now
SUPERTRAMP tours, shows & news Post an entries now

SUPERTRAMP Videos (YouTube and more)


Showing only random 3 | Search and add more videos to SUPERTRAMP

Buy SUPERTRAMP Music



More places to buy SUPERTRAMP music online

SUPERTRAMP discography


Ordered by release date | Showing ratings (top albums) | Help Progarchives.com to complete the discography and add albums

SUPERTRAMP top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.48 | 363 ratings
Supertramp
1970
2.67 | 267 ratings
Indelibly Stamped
1971
4.31 | 1703 ratings
Crime of the Century
1974
3.60 | 512 ratings
Crisis? What Crisis?
1975
3.98 | 644 ratings
Even In The Quietest Moments ...
1977
3.95 | 785 ratings
Breakfast In America
1979
3.20 | 355 ratings
Famous Last Words
1982
3.66 | 354 ratings
Brother Where You Bound
1985
1.86 | 206 ratings
Free As A Bird
1987
3.00 | 174 ratings
Some Things Never Change
1997
2.92 | 150 ratings
Slow Motion
2002

SUPERTRAMP Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.64 | 200 ratings
Paris
1980
2.34 | 29 ratings
Supertramp Live '88
1988
3.39 | 43 ratings
It Was The Best Of Times
1999
3.95 | 27 ratings
Is Everybody Listening?
2001
4.08 | 3 ratings
Alive in America
2014

SUPERTRAMP Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

2.60 | 23 ratings
The Story So Far...
1991
3.06 | 13 ratings
Inside Supertramp 1974-1978
2004
4.02 | 11 ratings
Gateway To New Horizons
2010
4.45 | 56 ratings
Live in Paris 1979
2012

SUPERTRAMP Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

2.58 | 25 ratings
The Autobiography of Supertramp
1987
2.09 | 10 ratings
Classics, Vol. 9
1987
3.43 | 37 ratings
The Very Best Of Supertramp
1990
3.09 | 27 ratings
The Very Best Of Supertramp - Volume 2
1992
3.32 | 36 ratings
Retrospectable - The Supertramp Anthology
2005

SUPERTRAMP Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

2.00 | 1 ratings
Your Poppa Don't Mind / Rosie Had Everything Planned
1971
2.84 | 12 ratings
Dreamer / Bloody Well Right
1974
2.72 | 11 ratings
Land Ho / Summer Romance
1974
3.00 | 4 ratings
Lady / You Started Laughing When I Held You In My Arms
1975
3.91 | 2 ratings
Ain't Nobody but Me / Sister Moonshine
1975
4.00 | 2 ratings
Give a Little Bit
1977
5.00 | 1 ratings
Babaji
1977
3.08 | 3 ratings
Goodbye Stranger
1979
3.21 | 5 ratings
The Logical Song
1979
3.26 | 8 ratings
Breakfast in America / Gone Hollywood
1979
3.33 | 3 ratings
Take the Long Way Home / From Now On
1979
0.00 | 0 ratings
Take the Long Way Home
1979
0.00 | 0 ratings
Crazy
1982
3.09 | 4 ratings
It's Raining Again / Bonnie
1982
3.90 | 2 ratings
Don't Leave Me Now / Waiting So Long
1982
0.00 | 0 ratings
Still In Love / No Inbetween
1985
0.00 | 0 ratings
Better Days
1985
0.00 | 0 ratings
Cannonball
1985
0.00 | 0 ratings
Free as a Bird
1987
0.00 | 0 ratings
It's Alright
1988

SUPERTRAMP Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 Crisis? What Crisis? by SUPERTRAMP album cover Studio Album, 1975
3.60 | 512 ratings

BUY
Crisis? What Crisis?
Supertramp Crossover Prog

Review by VianaProghead
Prog Reviewer

4 stars Review Nš 441

'Crisis? What Crisis?' is the fourth studio album of Supertramp and was released in 1975. After the great commercial success of their previous third studio album 'Crime Of The Century', in 1974, the pressure was on for Supertramp to deliver a follow up, and the record company pushed them to begin work as soon as the live tour for 'Crime Of The Century' was finished. While touring the west coast of North America, Supertramp entered in A&M's Los Angeles recording studios to work on it. So, it was the first album of the band to be recorded in America. It seems that the title of the album was taken from a line of Fred Zinnemann, 'The Day Of The Jackal', a motion picture released by him in 1973.

'Crisis? What Crisis?' has ten tracks. All songs were written by Rick Davies and Roger Hodgson. The first track 'Easy Does It' which has lead vocals by Roger Hodgson is the shortest song on the album, and sincerely, it isn't the type of song that you can expect to open a Supertramp's album. It's a very nice, calm and mellow acoustic guitar based ballad, a kind of an introduction song to the album. This is a very beautiful song which gives to us a nice, pleasant and serene musical moment. The second track 'Sister Moonshine' which has also lead vocals by Roger Hodgson is the follow up song and is another acoustic guitar based song with very beautiful arrangements. It's a quite poppy song with great potential to be released as a single. This is s a song with very good musical performances by all members of the band, with a special mention to the sound of the harmonica that brings some extra colourful to the song. The third track 'Ain't Nobody But Me' which has lead vocals by Rick Davies is a very good musical composition basically combined with piano and vocals. It's a different song with more rock and jazz influences, and clearly with more progressive influences then the two previous songs on the album too. The fourth track 'A Soapbox Opera' which has lead vocals by Roger Hodgson is a classic and typical Supertramp's musical composition. It represents one of the highest moments on the album. This is a very melodic song, with orchestra and choir, and has also excellent progressive arrangements. It's one of the most beautiful songs created by this great band. The fifth track 'Another Man's Woman' which has lead vocals by Rick Davies is another song based on piano and vocals. It's another song on the album with more complex and progressive arrangements and the instrumental finale represents an excellent moment on their music. This is another great moment on the album. The sixth track 'Lady' which has lead vocals by Roger Hodgson is for 'Crisis? What Crisis?' what 'Dreamer' was to 'Crime Of The Century'. It's, without any doubt, the best known song of the album, especially for those who are unaware with progressive rock music. This is the only song on the album which was a big hit single. It's a song with a nice combination between piano and vocals. Personally, this is a song that reminds me strongly the music of Steve Harley & Cockney Rebel. The seventh track 'Poor Boy' which has lead vocals by Rick Davies is another song that explores basically the piano with a very unique and special chanting style, accompanied by a woodwind work. It's a song influenced by the sound of the old jazz. This is a song with less quality, and sincerely, it represents one of the weakest moments on the album. The eighth track 'Just A Normal Day' which has lead vocals by Rick Davies and Roger Hodgson is an unusual song with a nice vocal duet between Rick Davies and Roger Hodgson. It's a very calm, nice, peaceful and melancholic song, with good orchestration and with some interesting saxophone moments. However and despite that, this is the other weak point on the album. The ninth track 'The Meaning' which has lead vocals by Roger Hodgson is another very good and melodic song with an accentuated vocal line and some magnificent solos by the saxophone of John Helliwell. The tenth and last track 'Two Of Us' which has lead vocals by Roger Hodgson is the song that finishes the album in a ballad style. It's a song with a nice melody in which acoustic guitar and vocals prevail, with the organ's sound on the background. This is a nice way to close this very good album.

Conclusion: It's commonly accepted that the best four studio albums of Supertramp are the third album 'Crime Of The Century', the fourth album 'Crisis? What Crisis?', the fifth album 'Even In The Quietest Moments'' and the sixth album 'Breakfast In America'. Of all those albums, 'Crisis? What Crisis' is also commonly accepted as the least good of the four. Sincerely, I've some doubts about that. It's clear, for me, that 'Crime Of The Century' and 'Even In The Quietest Moments'' are, without any doubt, their better studio works. However, I probably disagree that 'Breakfast In America' be a better album than 'Crisis? What Crisis?'. 'Crisis? What Crisis?' may not have given to the band the great commercial success as 'Breakfast In America' did, but it helped and cemented their sound and it did help them to capture a solid fan base. By the other hand, 'Breakfast In America' is an album made with a more commercial objective than 'Crisis? What Crisis?' and sounds more poppy than this one. Maybe is better produced but surely is less prog.

Prog is my Ferrari. Jem Godfrey (Frost*)

 Indelibly Stamped by SUPERTRAMP album cover Studio Album, 1971
2.67 | 267 ratings

BUY
Indelibly Stamped
Supertramp Crossover Prog

Review by Beautiful Scarlet

3 stars It ain't bad. Supertramps debut saw the young fellas try their hand at a lovely artsy kind of music that unfortunately did not do well. So, for their followup the reformed band put together a more commercial album. This too was a stinker. While not good like the debut this is still not a bad album. It also doesn't sound like some random 70s hard rock band but Supertramp. What you get with this album is our classic Supertramp ballads (Travelling, Forever) and some rockier numbers with less sophisticated lyrics then those to come and preceding (Potter).

Overall this is a solid album and if you like Sipertramp you should absolutely give this a spin. If you don't like supertr amp your better off starting elsewhere although starting here isn't bad either.

 Supertramp by SUPERTRAMP album cover Studio Album, 1970
3.48 | 363 ratings

BUY
Supertramp
Supertramp Crossover Prog

Review by Beautiful Scarlet

4 stars Sometimes I forget how much I like Supertramp. Such beautiful music, so gentle and memorable. This album is five stars for me, I really recommend the album. Some people say it bears no resemblance to their later works. I disagree and I've actually heard every Supertramp album and Hodgsons solo work so yeah.

Anyways this album is different then some others I'll review as it is personally quite significant. I first heard this album at around fifteen, I really liked it listening to it on repeat at school all the time. I hated school and didn't have any friends, this album was my one respite from a dull life. Most of the times lyrics are something I don't listen to, here an exception occurs. The lyrics of the music are touching, "Nothing To Show For Love Has Never Been" "Why Bruise A Heart that isn't broken, it can't be broken, it can be broken." In short the lyrics on this album by Richard Palmer are excellent and deeply touching lyrics that spoke to me when I was young,

Overall this is an excellent album that manages to successfully provide intrigue through a mix of haunting ballads, angsty tracks, short interlude and a powerful epic. Can't fault the album and I listen to it a lot, it has great elements and I'd recommend over any other Supertramp album. Cross over masterpiece, start to finish.

 Supertramp by SUPERTRAMP album cover Studio Album, 1970
3.48 | 363 ratings

BUY
Supertramp
Supertramp Crossover Prog

Review by Umeda

4 stars Even though being overlooked the way it is, mainly because it wasn't realeased in the US until 7 years after its release, this is in my opinion, a very satisfying beginning for Supertramp, considering the band is labeled under the progressive rock genre. They were still trying to find their sound, here. And they have done it in a very good surprising way. This album features well constructed pieces of music, such as "Words Unspoken" with its melancholic feeling and "Maybe I'm A Beggar", with a well fitted flageolet introduction and a screaming guitars section. Oh by the way, this album has plenty of flageolet sections that fit really well with the darker atmosphere of the album. Of course, they still weren't as confident as they would be in the production of their more successful albums, and the lack of Davies vocals is also a weak spot of this album, which is a mark of the typical Supertramp album. Still, this album is very worth taking a try, especially for hardline symphonic prog fans and rather pretty interesting for the fans.
 The Logical Song by SUPERTRAMP album cover Singles/EPs/Fan Club/Promo, 1979
3.21 | 5 ratings

BUY
The Logical Song
Supertramp Crossover Prog

Review by Heart of the Matter

3 stars On face A, "The Logical Song" is a slightly shortened edit from the track in the blockbuster album "Breakfast in America". It sounds to me like some a bit more energic take on the McCartney's "Fool On The Hill" theme of the individual alienated from society because of his unconventional (or non-logical) way of thinking. Great vocal interpretation by Roger Hogdson, that simple but personal electric piano emerging to the fore of the collective pop consciousness, and the sax solo, so dated, but still, always lovely.

And on the B side, tell me people, with an album almost full of so good songs, couldn't they find anything better for the flip?

 Goodbye Stranger by SUPERTRAMP album cover Singles/EPs/Fan Club/Promo, 1979
3.08 | 3 ratings

BUY
Goodbye Stranger
Supertramp Crossover Prog

Review by Heart of the Matter

3 stars Nice pairing the one that we are considering.

I have to say that the greatest progressive value is in the side B to be found. "Even in the Quietest Moments", taken from the eponymous 1977 album, presents marvellous natural ambiance in the beginning, great twelve string acoustic guitar arpeggios preparing for the melody sung by Roger Hodgson, and gorgeous touches by John Anthony Helliwell on clarinet.

"Goodbye Stranger", coming from Supertramp's 1979 album "Breakfast in America", is a good light-hearted pop song sung by Rick Davies, with a catchy chorus in falsetto. Pay attention to the nice electric guitar duty reaching the end.

 Ain't Nobody but Me / Sister Moonshine by SUPERTRAMP album cover Singles/EPs/Fan Club/Promo, 1975
3.91 | 2 ratings

BUY
Ain't Nobody but Me / Sister Moonshine
Supertramp Crossover Prog

Review by Heart of the Matter

4 stars A fine coupling coming from ""Crisis... What crisis?, fourth album by the English band Supertramp, released also in 1975

On the A face, we have "Ain't Nobody But Me", a mid-tempo slightly bluesy tune sung by Rick Davies, and significatively augmented with impecable big-band like saxophones by John Anthony Helliwell. Edited from the original album track, which is aproximately one minute longer

Inexplicably on the flip side, shines "Sister Moonshine" with vocals and acoustic guitar (nice slide touches too) by Roger Hodgson. A highly accomplished folk tune, wrapped in a trippy ambiance suggested by the vocal harmonies and the mellotron subtle incursions.

 Crisis? What Crisis? by SUPERTRAMP album cover Studio Album, 1975
3.60 | 512 ratings

BUY
Crisis? What Crisis?
Supertramp Crossover Prog

Review by sgtpepper

3 stars "Crisis" is indeed far from any Supertramp crisis; it marks development in the band's sound, writing style. I think that songs are more radio friendly but that does not mean that the band were resting on their laurels. I can hear country influences, the sound of harmonica, early funk elements - you wouldn't find this on the previous album.

The songs are mainly melodic, accessible and very soft occasional traces of progressive rock are minimized. The band shows actually that it can rock, too - listen to the slow grooving rock'n'roll of "Ain't nobody but me". "A soapbox opera" is a pleasant melodic a bit poignant violin decorated number, a hidden pop champion. "Another man's woman" is the only so-so song with more complexity - piano lines, different sections and rhythm, nice instrumental section with multiple instruments - something like rock/orchestra opera. "Lady" has a clear commercial melody grooves but the ending instrumental loose part saves it a bit. "Just a normal day" is an impressive balad with some ancient chord sequences that remind me of the 20-30's. "Two of us" is another ballad, even more smoothing and it will blend in your ears. A good but non-essential piece of rock.

 Crime of the Century by SUPERTRAMP album cover Studio Album, 1974
4.31 | 1703 ratings

BUY
Crime of the Century
Supertramp Crossover Prog

Review by sgtpepper

3 stars Crime of the century is a trademark album by Supertramp, it has a very good sound, good lighthearted composition, a few progressive rock touches and fortunately, enough instrumental moments. The music isn't adventurous but is varied enough thanks to a number of instruments like saxophone and a good set of keyboards. Most of the time though it has pop-rock tendencies and is pretty accessible. Note influences by Pink Floyd and Elton John. I won't be talking about the two most poppy tracks with typical electric piano sound for Supertramp. There is a groove, nice saxophone and user friendliness - "Hide in your shell" and "Dreamer". My favourite piece is "Asylum" thanks to its elaborate arrangements and very good moog/synths colours. The melody is quite solemn, the voice by "Davies" is less poppy than by Hodgson. "Rudy" is another track well worth exploring - semi-progressive rhythm with irregular motives, great piano, epic piano/synths/orchestra sound evoking Elton John of the this era. "Crime of the century" is a nice title anthemic track. Overall, it is a mellow easy-going album that will please fans of good melodies, compositions and arrangements without much complexity but enough sophistication to stay popular for a long time.
 Indelibly Stamped by SUPERTRAMP album cover Studio Album, 1971
2.67 | 267 ratings

BUY
Indelibly Stamped
Supertramp Crossover Prog

Review by VianaProghead
Prog Reviewer

3 stars Review Nš 362

'Indelibly Stamped' is the second studio album of Supertramp and was released in 1971. Like their eponymous debut studio album, 'Indelibly Stamped' was also a commercial disappointment, which resulted in the loss of their sponsor and the dissolution of the band at that moment. Musically, this was the most rock and roll of all their albums and it's also usually considered the weakest musical work made by the group while Roger Hodgson was a band's member.

The art cover of the album depicts a photo of an image of the torso and arms of a topless woman with several multiple tattoos. The original edition brings the cover photo in colours, but my CD version has a black and white cover, indeed.

With the abandonment of the group by Richard Palmer-James and Robert Millar, three new band's members Kevin Currie, Frank Farrell and Dave Winthrop were recruited shortly before the recording sessions of 'Indelibly Stamped'.

So, the line up on the album is Roger Hodgson (vocals, acoustic and electric guitars and bass), Rick Davies (vocals, harmonica and keyboards), Dave Winthrop (vocals, flute and saxophone), Frank Farrell (backing vocals, piano, electric piano, accordion and bass) and Kevin Currie (drums and percussion).

'Indelibly Stamped' has ten tracks. All songs were written by Roger Hodgson and Rick Davies, except 'Rosie Had Everything Planned' which was written by Roger Hodgson and Frank Farrell. The first track 'Your Poppa Don't Mind' is sung by Rick Davies and is influenced by the blues. It's an interesting song to open the album with a catchy rhythm and the final result is nice to hear. The second track 'Travelled' is sung by Roger Hodgson and is basically an acoustic song, especially in the beginning. It's a song with a very simple structure, very nice to hear and with also an interesting repetitive saxophone work on its finale. The third track 'Rosie Had Everything Planned' is sung by Roger Hodgson. It's a different song relatively to the two previous songs. This is a nice and calm song made in the vein of a folk song, and like the other two, it's also nice to hear. It's a melancholic song, probably the main thing that has a real appealing effect on me. The fourth track 'Remember' is sung by Rick Davies. It's a good rock song and it has a nice saxophone work all over the song. This is a song that moves between the influences of blues and jazz. It's interesting that, while we hear the song, we have the sensation that it was recorded at the maximum volume. The fifth track 'Forever' is sung by Rick Davies. It's another interesting song, this time totally influenced by the blues. It's interesting to note some similitude between 'Remember' and 'Forever'. I think we can see here the future musical direction of the next songs composed by Rick Davies on the future works of the band. The sixth track 'Potter' is sung by Dave Winthrop. This is an interesting and curious fact, because from what I can remember, this is the only track in the entire career of the band that was not sung by Roger Hodgson and Rick Davies. It's a nice and a catchy simple rock song, very short, as many songs on the album. But, it has nothing to do with the future Supertramp's sound. The seventh track 'Coming Home To See You' is sung by Rick Davies. This is one of the most interesting songs on the album. It's a song with fine instrumental sections where we can hear the different music instruments performed by all band's members as lead instruments. This is one of the songs on the album where we can hear what would become their signature sound. The eighth track 'Times Have Changed' is sung by Rick Davies and represents also one of the finest moments on the album. We may say this is a typical song of Rick Davies, and like the previous song 'Coming Home To See You', this is another song on the album where we can hear what would become their future sound. The ninth track 'Friend In Need' is sung by Rick Davies and is the smallest song on the album. However and despite be also a good and nice song it's, for me, clearly inferior to the most of the songs on the album composed by Rick Davies, and in the end, it doesn't remains in our memory. The tenth track 'Aries' is sung by Roger Hodgson. It's the lengthiest song on the album and it's the only song with a notable lengthy. This is a quite different song on the album and it's also, without any doubt, the best and most progressive song on the album. It's a song with many similarities with songs of some other bands, in those times, such as The Doors, and particularly, it reminds me very strongly some songs of the early days of Strawbs.

Conclusion: Although 'Indelibly Stamped' be inferior and less progressive than their eponymous debut studio album 'Supertramp', and it's also very far away from be as good as their studio albums that belonging to their golden musical era, it's, in my humble opinion, a good album that deserves to be rated with 3 stars. However, it's also, without any doubt, the weakest studio album released by the group while Roger Hodgson was a band's member. Anyway, if you're a Supertramp's fan, even moderately, you might very well find something quite enjoyable here, because it has some interesting things to offer, I think. Despite some flubs and flaws, I still continue like it, really. Certainly it falls just short of being considered a great album, but it's definitely a good one, not prog but good. So let's be fair and give it 3 stars.

Prog is my Ferrari. Jem Godfrey (Frost*)

Thanks to ProgLucky for the artist addition. and to Quinino for the last updates

Copyright Prog Archives, All rights reserved. | Legal Notice | Privacy Policy | Advertise | RSS + syndications

Other sites in the MAC network: JazzMusicArchives.com — jazz music reviews and archives | MetalMusicArchives.com — metal music reviews and archives

Donate monthly and keep PA fast-loading and ad-free forever.