Progarchives, the progressive rock ultimate discography

SUPERTRAMP

Crossover Prog • United Kingdom


From Progarchives.com, the ultimate progressive rock music website

Supertramp picture
Supertramp biography
Formed in 1969 in London, England - Disbanded in 1988 - Reunited intermittently from 1996 to 2002 - Reformed in 2010/11 for European tour

A variant of progressive rock that some have called sophisto-rock. SUPERTRAMP is a sophisticated pop band that was able to continuously turn out very good songs. Their music has been described as whimsy, lighthearted, fluff and a million other variations on this theme. This music is the kind of thing that you will put on while you and your wife lounging around after dinner. Mellow and very good. One other thing is that they also have the ability to inject some humor into their music now and then. Althogh most of the songs on the album are rock radio staples. This is something that is hard to find.

For some of their best work you will have to look elsewhere. They had a remarkable change in fortune as "Crime of the Century" became one of the top-selling albums of 1974. The band had refined their keyboard-dominated sound and produced an album that was well-reviewed. The album "Even In The Quietest Moments..." is by far their best work. With over 18 million copies to date, "Breakfast In America" is one of the greatest melodic pop/rock albums of the seventies. After that album, SUPERTRAMP continued to develop a more R&B-flavored style; the change in direction was successful on 1982's "Famous Last Words", but they soon ran out of hits. SUPERTRAMP continued with occasional tours and infrequent albums. Their recent releases, however, have only found minor success.

See also: Roger HODGSON

SUPERTRAMP forum topics / tours, shows & news


SUPERTRAMP forum topics Create a topic now
SUPERTRAMP tours, shows & news Post an entries now

SUPERTRAMP Videos (YouTube and more)


Showing only random 3 | Search and add more videos to SUPERTRAMP

Buy SUPERTRAMP Music


Breakfast in AmericaBreakfast in America
A&M Records 2008
$21.21
$9.95 (used)
The Very Best Of SupertrampThe Very Best Of Supertramp
Remastered
A&M 2001
$5.89
$2.75 (used)
Crime Of The Century (Remastered)Crime Of The Century (Remastered)
Remastered
A&M 2002
$7.85
$3.59 (used)
Retrospectacle: The Supertramp AnthologyRetrospectacle: The Supertramp Anthology
Remastered
A&M 2005
$11.38
$9.90 (used)
Even In The Quietest Moments. (Remastered)Even In The Quietest Moments. (Remastered)
Remastered
A&M 2002
$5.70
$7.99 (used)
Crisis? What Crisis?Crisis? What Crisis?
Remastered
A&M 2002
$5.42
$2.89 (used)
...Famous Last Words. (Remastered)...Famous Last Words. (Remastered)
Remastered
A&M 2002
$5.29
$5.99 (used)
Very Best Of 2Very Best Of 2
Remastered
Universal Int'L 1997
$6.78
$6.04 (used)
SupertrampSupertramp
Remastered
A&M/Universal Int'l 1997
$6.16
$4.06 (used)
Paris [2 CD Remastered]Paris [2 CD Remastered]
Remastered
A&M 2002
$8.95
$7.69 (used)

More places to buy SUPERTRAMP music online Buy SUPERTRAMP & Prog Rock Digital Music online:

SUPERTRAMP discography


Ordered by release date | Showing ratings (top albums) | Help Progarchives.com to complete the discography and add albums

SUPERTRAMP top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.47 | 318 ratings
Supertramp
1970
2.65 | 238 ratings
Indelibly Stamped
1971
4.31 | 1582 ratings
Crime Of The Century
1974
3.59 | 456 ratings
Crisis? What Crisis?
1975
3.97 | 586 ratings
Even In The Quietest Moments ...
1977
3.95 | 716 ratings
Breakfast In America
1979
3.18 | 318 ratings
Famous Last Words
1982
3.66 | 319 ratings
Brother Where You Bound
1985
1.84 | 187 ratings
Free As A Bird
1987
3.02 | 154 ratings
Some Things Never Change
1997
2.94 | 134 ratings
Slow Motion
2002

SUPERTRAMP Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.63 | 182 ratings
Paris
1980
2.34 | 28 ratings
Supertramp Live '88
1988
3.40 | 43 ratings
It Was The Best Of Times
1999
3.95 | 27 ratings
Is Everybody Listening?
2001
4.08 | 3 ratings
Alive in America
2014

SUPERTRAMP Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

2.58 | 21 ratings
The Story So Far...
1991
3.06 | 12 ratings
Inside Supertramp 1974-1978
2004
4.02 | 11 ratings
Gateway To New Horizons
2010
4.44 | 50 ratings
Live in Paris 1979
2012

SUPERTRAMP Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

2.56 | 24 ratings
The Autobiography of Supertramp
1987
2.09 | 10 ratings
Classics, Vol. 9
1987
3.42 | 36 ratings
The Very Best Of Supertramp
1990
3.07 | 25 ratings
The Very Best Of Supertramp - Volume 2
1992
3.31 | 35 ratings
Retrospectable - The Supertramp Anthology
2005

SUPERTRAMP Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

0.00 | 0 ratings
Your Poppa Don't Mind / Rosie Had Everything Planned
1971
2.76 | 9 ratings
Dreamer / Bloody Well Right
1974
2.72 | 10 ratings
Land Ho / Summer Romance
1974
3.00 | 3 ratings
Lady / You Started Laughing When I Held You In My Arms
1975
0.00 | 0 ratings
Ain't Nobody But Me / Sister Moonshine
1975
0.00 | 0 ratings
Give a Little Bit
1977
0.00 | 0 ratings
Babaji
1977
0.00 | 0 ratings
Goodbye Stranger
1979
0.00 | 0 ratings
The Logical Song
1979
3.16 | 6 ratings
Breakfast in America / Gone Hollywood
1979
3.33 | 3 ratings
Take the Long Way Home / From Now On
1979
3.09 | 4 ratings
It's Raining Again / Bonnie
1982
3.90 | 2 ratings
Don't Leave Me Now / Waiting So Long
1982
0.00 | 0 ratings
Still In Love / No Inbetween
1985

SUPERTRAMP Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 Slow Motion by SUPERTRAMP album cover Studio Album, 2002
2.94 | 134 ratings

BUY
Slow Motion
Supertramp Crossover Prog

Review by TCat
Collaborator Eclectic Team

4 stars In 2002, Supertramp, again without Hodgson, tried one more time to make a studio album. "Slow Motion" would be that album, and it would see a turn to a more smooth and jazzy groove. After the album "Brother Where You Bound", the band was having problems getting both the sales back up and the public interested in new music. "Free as a Bird" took a turn to a commercial and more digital sound, "Some Things Never Change" saw Davies try to bring back the old sound of the band again, and recruited another lead singer to try to bring in more variety to the sound, and, even though it was a better album, it still wasn't up to the standards of their more successful years, and at times seemed to be trying to hard to copy some of their more popular songs. Changing to a more relaxed and smooth sound was a definite improvement, and that is what happened with "Slow Motion".

Singer Mark Hart returned for this album, and again his efforts are not as up front as Davies, in fact he is used more as a background singer here, but on this album that is okay because the music is much more enjoyable, upbeat, and yet relaxed. The opener "Slow Motion" just flows along so well and is the best song that the band has put out since "Brother Where You Bound", and that upbeat and catchy rhythm continues with the following 2 tracks. "Over You" shows the return of the band trying new styles and giving their unique spin on it. This track sounds like a slow doo-wop style track with a hard beat, not unlike the older track "My Kind of Lady" from the album "Famous Last Words", but even better, with a nice sax hook and even a jazz guitar towards the end of the track. This is more like the Supertramp we used to love, and the track doesn't sound forced.

The move towards a more "Steely Dan" style of jazz/rock fusion really fits this incarnation of Supertramp quite well, and it would seem that the band was feeling more like themselves again, and the more forward use of improvised trumpets and saxes only adds to the enjoyment of the album. This really works on the track "Tenth Avenue Breakdown", a track that nears the 10 minute mark. This song brings together the peppy and bouncy rhythm of drums and keyboards and the hooks of the brass, especially in the last half of the track, and this brings about memories of "Child of Vision" from "Breakfast in America" when the long instrumental section starts, and then even adds in a guitar solo. "A Sting in the Tail" goes for a blues style and brings back the haunting harmonica that we've heard used before in more popular Supertramp tracks. The sexy sax and trumpet solo is the perfect instrumental break for this track.

They even include an older song on this album from way back before "Crime of the Century" that never got put on an album, that track is "Goldrush" which was used to open their concerts before CotC was released. The last track "Dead Man Blues" is another highlight for the album, with a bit more guitar added in than what we are used to in the classic Supertramp sound, and the track again has the slow bluesy, yet catchy style that really works well on this album.

This would end up being the last studio album for Supertramp, which is a shame because it seemed they were getting their stride back even without Hodgson, but the sales just weren't there anymore. Davies and Hodgson made attempts to work together again, and there were some close calls, but in the end, one or the other would back off. After the release of this album, the band broke up again, but they have returned in various incarnations with Davies in the lead throughout the years, but just for touring purposes. In more recent years, Davies has had health problems, but he has apparently recovered from these issues and has been touring again, but no plans for new albums are currently in the works.

I have no problems playing this album often along with the more classic Supertramp albums as I find it quite enjoyable, and the best of the band's final three albums. The more I hear it, the more I love it, and, even though there isn't a lot of progressive style here, it reminds me more of their classic years even if it has more of a jazz edge to it. On the first few listens, I would have only considered it a "good" album, but it has really grown on me in a good way, where the two albums before this one never really caught my interest as much. This one has become a favorite, still a notch below their best albums, but still better than "Famous Last Words" which was the last album with Hodgson. I can easily give this 4 stars, but it took some time for me to really appreciate it, even though right from the beginning, I knew it was better than anything they had done for a while. It's an underrated and mostly ignored album which should actually get more attention than what it has. It just had the misfortune of following after two weaker albums. But it will have you wishing Supertramp would come back again.

 Some Things Never Change by SUPERTRAMP album cover Studio Album, 1997
3.02 | 154 ratings

BUY
Some Things Never Change
Supertramp Crossover Prog

Review by TCat
Collaborator Eclectic Team

3 stars Supertramp has always been one of my favorite bands, and I was heartbroken, along with many others, when Davies and Hodgson went their separate ways. I always loved their use of keyboards and how the band always centered around them. Everyone pretty much knows that the band continued on without Hodges and continued to see success even with the album "Brother Where You Bound", which was one of their most progressive albums. Unfortunately, the band took a wrong turn and decided to experiment with synthesized music and moved to a more commercial sound. "Free as a Bird" was released and was a commercial and critical flop, the worst of the band's career. The band broke up, and it looked like the band was no more.

However, in 1993, Hodgson and Davies reunited and recorded two new demos. This fell apart quite quickly when they couldn't agree on management, however, this would influence Davies to reform the band in 1996. He was able to return with drummer Bob Siebenberg and saxophonist John Helliwell who were both part of the "classic" line-up of Supertramp. Added to the core line-up was Carl Verheyen (guitar), Cliff Hugo (bass), Mark Hart from "Crowded House" (vocals, keyboards), Lee Thornburg (brass), and Tom Walsh (percussion), a total of 8 members. In 1997, the band released their 10th album, "Some Things Never Change".

This new album was supposed to represent a return to the band's earlier sound using more traditional and organic instruments and recording techniques. This was the first time in a long time that the band would go into the studio at the same time and recorded in a more "live" way. However, the public wasn't so sure about the new line-up, and even though the style was about the same, there were less catchy and memorable melodies as what was found on "Breakfast in America". On the other hand, the progressive edge of songs like "Asylum", "Bloody Well Right", "Fool's Overture" and "Rudy" are far gone into the past, and there just isn't much hope of reaching that pinnacle again. The album did perform better in Europe than elsewhere however, producing a minor hit single in Germany and also in Canada with the song "You Win, I Lose".

As was the case with the two previous albums, Davies does most of the vocals on this album. However, this time around, in order to add some variety to the sound, Mark Hart would also sing lead vocals on three of the tracks. The album is definitely better than the previous one, even if only for the leading song "It's a Hard World" with its close to 10 minute run time. The track shows a definite turn back to the organic sound, but also has a nice, jazzy sound with the added brass, almost sounding similar to the smooth jazz fusion sound of Steely Dan. This combination of Supertramp with a jazz style works pretty well, but it doesn't have a lot of progressive sound to it, and it only comes across as being pleasant sounding, but also a bit too similar sounding across the tracks. Yes it's true that "Get Your Act Together" has that strong backbeat, but it isn't quite infectious enough to be memorable, and "Live to Love You" is just not interesting at all.

The title track however, captures a bit of the instrumental excitement of "Cannonball" and brings a bit more of a spark to the album. Again, the leaning is to a groovy jazz sound, and the horn section and keyboard solos on this track are excellent. Unfortuantely, for every excellent track here, there are 3 mediocre tracks. But at least there is some salvageable music to be found. "Listen to Me Please" gives us the first chance to hear Mark Hart's lead vocals as he sings the chorus. He's no Roger Hodgeson, and of course people are going to try to make the comparison. However, his vocals are lighter than Davies, and it does at least provide a break from his heavier vocals. But they are not strong enough to make an impact, and the track just isn't interesting enough to stand out. Hart sings on his own on the next track "Sooner or Later". You have to admit that Hart had some big shoes to fill, and he doesn't come close to the expectations that are set, though the horns, keyboards and percussion solo on the instrumental sections are great, again reminding one of Steely Dan. Thank goodness it has an extended instrumental. Very smoooooooth!

"Help Me Down that Road" sees the return of Davies on a blues-tinged track. "And the Light" goes for the soft rock, slow and soulful sound with a sexy sax solo. "Give Me a Chance" gives Hart another chance at lead vocals, and again the vocals are weak. All three of these tracks are straightforward, and nothing really special. "C'est What?" on the surface might look promising at 8+ minutes, but it seems the album has run out of steam by this time. To finish it all off, "Where There's a Will" finishes it all off with something that sounds like a Randy Newman tune.

So, even though it is better than their last album, it still falls far short of being considered a classic Supertramp album as most of the songs are just so-so, with only a couple of really good tracks. Unfortunately, this is what we would have to be satisfied with for another 5 years, which is when the next album would appear.

 Supertramp by SUPERTRAMP album cover Studio Album, 1970
3.47 | 318 ratings

BUY
Supertramp
Supertramp Crossover Prog

Review by TCat
Collaborator Eclectic Team

4 stars The debut album by Supertramp and the follow up "Indelibly Stamped" are a couple of very different albums in the entire Supertramp discography. These albums portray a band trying to find a sound, and ended up coming up with a couple of interesting sounding experiments, more in the debut than in the second, as Indelibly Stamped at least showed some very clear movement toward the sound they would become famous for. However, in this debut album, released in 1970, there is hardly anything that sounds like the Supertramp that most of us are familiar with. And that is part of the charm of this album.

This album did not see the light of day in America until 1977, after ST started finding their efforts paying off. Of course, people didn't know what to think of it because it was so different than the bright, keyboard heavy music that they were hearing on the radio. Richard Palmer wrote all of the lyrics for this album because none of the other band members wanted to. Of course, Palmer didn't stay with the band long enough to taste their success, but he also had other jobs, like writing lyrics for King Crimson, namely on the albums "Lark's Tongue in Aspic", "Red", and "Starless and Bible Black" and then continued to work with John Wetton when KC temporarily disbanded. The music was entirely co-written by Rick Davies and Rodger Hodgson, of course they were the pair that would later bring success to Supertramp. The fourth member, at the time, was drummer Robert Miller who also played the harmonica on the album, and he would only be a member on this album, seemingly fading out of the limelight after the album's release.

This lineup was one of the main reasons the band's music sounded so different here. Interestingly enough, Rodger Hodgson sang almost all of the lead vocals, and, except for a few exceptions, he sounded nothing like he would in "Crime of the Century" and after. Rick Davies did manage to sing 2 of the songs on this album: both "Nothing to Show" and "Shadow Song", and Hodgson also sung parts in both of those songs. Davies also didn't sound like he would in the following album "Indelibly Stamped" where he actually progressed vocally quite a bit, sounding very much like he would in later albums not just vocally, but musically. Davies would also sing most of the songs on that follow-up album and Hodgson would only sing a couple, and he still hadn't advanced his vocal talents much until "Crime of the Century". Richard Palmer also sang on two of the tracks on this debut album, and, like with Davies, Hodgson sang parts of his songs too: both "Maybe I'm a Beggar" and "Try Again". It is quite obvious that Palmer wasn't as great of a singer, but he gave it his best, however Hodgson definitely out shone both Davies and Palmer on this first album.

So, how is the music? Well, it is quite a bit darker than what you would expect from Supertramp. There is more guitar and a lot of organ, but much less of the brighter synth and keyboard sounds (along with the brass and woodwinds) of the later albums. Most of the music is slow and ballad-like, but still a bit heavier. Yes you do hear some flute on this album from time to time, but it helps the music retain a more pastoral sound in this case. The album starts off with "Surely", a lovely song that seems too short. Don't worry though, the album ends with this song also, but with a longer, organ-led coda attached at the end which effectively ties up the album as a whole. This is followed with the more upbeat "It's a Long Road", and after this song, the only other song that could be considered upbeat is "Nothing to Show". The rest of the songs are mostly slow to moderate, with some instances of faster passages. That isn't to say that these songs are bad, though, they are actually quite good, at least most of them, but they do take time to grow on you. "Maybe I'm a Beggar" is a lovely tune, but has some vocal issues from time to time, "And I Am Not Like Other Birds of Prey" has a nice acoustic style, and "Words Unspoken" has quite a beautiful melody. The biggest standout on this album, however, is the progressive epic "Try Again" which has a run time of over 12 minutes. This track has a few distinct sections that take the music off in different directions and that always bring the track back to the original melody in the vocals. There are some strange, experimental, psychedelic sections, that the music always builds up from, creating tension and some very nice instrumental jamming. This is a great foreshadowing of the greatness this band would end up achieving.

I definitely do not consider this album a write off in Supertramps discography. It did take me some time to fully appreciate it, but I find myself coming back to it a lot, even after all these years, and all of these songs are quite familiar to me. Just be warned that this is not the sound of Supertramp that you are familiar with, and the excellence of the album might not be obvious at first. Of course, the album would be a commercial flop, but there were many critics that loved it and they could hear a lot of promise in the band. The follow up album would also be a commercial flop, and was just about the end for Supertramp. Many people would find that that album was even worse than the debut, but I still find times when I really like it, so I can't say that I like one over the other. One thing for certain, that album would come a lot closer to their trademark sound than this one did, as Rick Davies sound so much better on it and so did his songs. Hodgson wouldn't really improve until their 3rd album "Crime of the Century'". Don't start your Supertramp exploration with either this debut or the follow up though, progressive lovers should start with the amazingly perfect album "Crime of the Century". Save this one for later and marvel at how much this band changed.

 Land Ho / Summer Romance  by SUPERTRAMP album cover Singles/EPs/Fan Club/Promo, 1974
2.72 | 10 ratings

BUY
Land Ho / Summer Romance
Supertramp Crossover Prog

Review by patrickq
Prog Reviewer

2 stars In 1974 Supertramp was poised to emerge as a top art-rock group, with Roger Hodgson providing the art and Rick Davies providing the rock in roughly equal parts. This non-album single, released ahead of Crime of the Century, is a prototype of the then-new Supertramp.

"Land Ho" is a bouncy Hodgson piece la "Dreamer." Compared to later Hodgson songs, the lyrics are two-dimensional, and the music is missing some of the oddness that will mark his future work. In particular, the bridge strikes me as out of place. It seems like the band and/or the producer recognized that something needed to be done to prevent the song from becoming monotonous, and a bridge was duly inserted. Anyway, Supertramp's songwriting was improving, as its following albums would demonstrate.

Davies contributes "Summer Romance." It's nice enough, but clearly b-side material. It's vintage Davies, kind of a less-funky Dr. John production, complete with backing singers and multi tracked sax. Like the a-side, it's a rough draft of Supertramp to come, presaging "Ain't Nobody But Me" and even (to my ears) "My Kind of Lady."

For thirty years the "Land Ho"/"Summer Romance" vinyl single was the only release of either song, making it essential for Supertramp fans. It's now more of a curio, as both sides were released in 2005 on the double-CD Retrospectacle: the Supertramp Anthology, which is still in print and reasonably priced (as of 2019).

 Crime Of The Century by SUPERTRAMP album cover Studio Album, 1974
4.31 | 1582 ratings

BUY
Crime Of The Century
Supertramp Crossover Prog

Review by VianaProghead
Prog Reviewer

5 stars Review N 124

'Crime Of The Century' is the third studio album of Supertramp and was released in 1974. It's the first Supertramp's album to feature its classic line up and was co-produced by Ken Scott, an English experienced record producer and recording engineer, who previously worked with other famous artists and bands like David Bowie and The Beatles.

The line up on 'Crime Of The Century' is Roger Hodgson (vocals, guitar, keyboards and pianos), Rick Davies (vocals, keyboards and harmonica), John Anthony Helliwell (vocals, saxophones and clarinets), Dougie Thompson (bass) and Bob Siebenberg (drums and percussion). The album had also the participation of Christine Helliwell, Vicky Siebenberg and Scott Gornham (backing vocals) on 'Hide In Your Shell', an unaccredited and unknown street musician (musical saw) on 'Hide In Your Shell' and Ken Scott (water gong) on 'Crime Of The Century'.

While not properly a conceptual album, there is much recursion and referencing among the tracks. Lyrically, many of these tracks deal with themes of youth, isolation, loneliness and mental stability, leaving many to initially compare the group to Pink Floyd. So, we have education with 'School', dream with 'Dreamer', love with 'Rudy', shyness with 'Hide In Your Shell' or authority with the title track. However, the musicianship and style of Supertramp is obviously distinct, which has become evident over the past four decades. Every track is instantly recognizable as Supertramp, and the album, as a whole, runs together perfectly well, as we can expect from all the greatest albums.

'Crime Of The Century' has eight tracks. All songs were written by Hodgson and Davies. The first track 'School' has lead vocals by Hodgson and Davies. It's an amazing and fantastic song to open the album. I always loved this song, and as far as I can remember this was the first song I heard from the group. For me, it's one of the best songs composed by this fantastic duo. The second track 'Bloody Well Right' has lead vocals by Davies. It's the second song of the album released as a single, after 'Dreamer'. For the type of music of Supertramp, we may say this track is almost a hard rock song with a little funky rhythm. Despite be a very good song, this isn't one of my favourite songs on the album. The third track 'Hide In Your Shell' has lead vocals by Hodgson. This is without any doubt one of the highest points of the album, and consequently, it's one of my favourite songs too. This song is a real masterpiece of the melodic progressive rock with a supreme musical melodic structure. It's one of the best progressive melodic songs ever made. The fourth track 'Asylum' has lead vocals by Davies and Hodgson. It's an interesting and nice melodic song mostly performed on piano. It's a song very well composed with good orchestration, but like 'Bloody Well Right', isn't also one of my favourite songs on the album. The fifth track 'Dreamer' has lead vocals by Hodgson and Davies. It's the song chosen to be the hit single of 'Crime Of The Century'. It's an irresistible melodic song that became a big hit, reaching the top of the charts. Its impact was so big that we can say that 'Dreamer' was one of the most popular singles made by any progressive band. It only can be compared with 'Money' of Pink Floyd. It's the pop touching on the album. The sixth track 'Rudy' has lead vocals by Davies and Hodgson. It's another great song and it's the lengthiest too. It's one of the most progressive, sophisticated and elaborated songs on the album. It has rhythm changes and instrumental breaks, which makes of it a fantastic progressive track. The seventh track, 'If Everyone Was Listening' has lead vocals by Hodgson. It's probably the most melodic and beautiful song on the album. It has a light and easy listening tune and beautiful vocal harmonies. The orchestration is also really beautiful. It's the living proof that it's possible compose very beautiful songs with great quality. The eighth track is the title track, 'Crime Of The Century'. It has lead vocals by Davies. It's the song which closes the album, perfectly. This is another highlight on the album and it's also one of my favourite songs. For many, this is also its best track. It's the magnum opus of the album. It's a wonderful song with an orchestration completely divine. This is one of the best final tracks I've ever listen on any album. What a song!

Conclusion: As I said before, 'Crime Of The Century' was my first introduction to Supertramp. It's a great progressive melodic album where many of the songs have some complex structures with strong melodies. 'Crime Of The Century' is without any doubt one of the most progressive albums of the group and it's also one of their best musical workings. It's one of the landmarks of the 70's and is among some of the best progressive studio albums ever made. The sound of 'Crime Of The Century' just takes you into another world. It's one of the few albums I know that perfectly combines catchy songwriting with the epic darkness of the progressive rock music. I don't think any of Supertramp's other albums come anywhere close to this. I love some of their other stuff too, but there is just something special about this album. It isn't simply a progressive rock album. It's a piece of art. This is really why I like progressive rock music.

Prog is my Ferrari. Jem Godfrey (Frost*)

 Crime Of The Century by SUPERTRAMP album cover Studio Album, 1974
4.31 | 1582 ratings

BUY
Crime Of The Century
Supertramp Crossover Prog

Review by hi_t_moonweed

3 stars I was never really a big fan of Supertramp when they first hit the scene although I have over the years softened to appreciate their music. I only scored three stars because I do not consider them to be progressive enough to be a true Prog band, and personally think they sit at the Heavy Rock end of the pop spectrum at best with a few songs that venture into prog territory. Crime of the Century is a good album of which I possess in vinyl form (all my music is in vinyl) and the title track is to me is Supertramp's best score and the rest of the album is pleasantly enjoyable. The only concept that ties the album together is the harmonica that opens and closes the album. I do not believe this album should be rated as an essential album and masterpiece but I do think that it is an excellent addition to not only prog rock collections but collections of any genre.
 Crime Of The Century by SUPERTRAMP album cover Studio Album, 1974
4.31 | 1582 ratings

BUY
Crime Of The Century
Supertramp Crossover Prog

Review by HarmonyDissonan

5 stars ONE OF THOSE ALBUMS WHICH WILL ALWAYS BE FONDLY REMEMBERED!

I still remember hearing this in it's entirety outside of my good friend's bedroom window with his speakers turned out in that direction. It was a warm Wisconsin summer evening while out on summer break and free as a bird. "Those were the days". If only a person could REALLY appreciate the moment that one is presently being in, life would be such an awesome event! Anyway enough of the folksy philosophizing. It was awesome! He turned some of our gang on to a few classics back in the day-PF Wish You Were Here was another. It was a memorable evening. Some years later, along with a slew of other high school time period concerts, I saw them live! It was a great show and as I remember the Rudy instrumental break w/train film - and some assistance from the freely attained recreational smoking paraphernalia that was being passed about generously, became a lasting memory from that show, though the whole thing was outstanding! In Milwaukee, back at the concerts in the 70's, cannabis was just handed around pretty freely and always seemed to be fairly ubiquitous. One other thing if I may, as I digress, which I often do, as far as memorable concert moments go, I have to include one of my favorites here for posterity. That would be from an Al Stewart concert I attended back in '78-'79 were Al and I believe it was Peter White sat on bar stools and performed Roads to Moscow and during the acoustic break in the song a large screen shown black and white photos of the German advance on Russia in WWII! Another amazing concert moment, and I apologize profoundly for my rambling. Getting back to the classic album at hand, all of the tracks on the album are IMHO - classics! If I had to choose a low point for me, it would probably have to be Dreamer. Don't get me wrong, it's a great song, but a hair too poppy for me. Otherwise the rest are all great! My personal favorites are Hide In Your Shell, Asylum, Rudy and If Everyone Was Listening, although I like them all! They're next three albums are all very good albums also, but they never quite come near the stratospheric production that they acquired here! If there is anyone out there who hasn't purchased this album as of yet, I jump on board the bandwagon to say that this is highly recommended from me also!

Take care and enjoy God's gift of music!

 Famous Last Words by SUPERTRAMP album cover Studio Album, 1982
3.18 | 318 ratings

BUY
Famous Last Words
Supertramp Crossover Prog

Review by VianaProghead
Prog Reviewer

4 stars Review N 98

"Famous Last Words" is the seventh studio album of Supertramp and was released in 1982. This was the last album with the presence of their guitarist, vocalist, keyboardist, composer and founder member Roger Hodgson, who left the group to pursue a solo musical career.

"Famous Last Words" has nine tracks. All songs were written by Hodgson and Rick Davies. The first track "Crazy" is a very good song to opens the album. It's a typical Supertramp's song and represents perfectly well their unique and unmistakable sound. It's a song very well written and based on the piano that sounds so typical of the band. It's very well accompanied by John Helliwell's saxophone and by Hodgson's voice. The second track "Put On Your Old Brown Shoes" is a typical Davies' song. It's clearly a song influenced by jazz and blues with reminiscences from many other songs composed by him. Despite being a very nice and fun song, I think it doesn't work so well on this album. So, this is my less favourite song on the album. The third track "It's Raining Again" is a typical pop song and represents on the album the most commercial track and a typical song made to be released as a single. This is a typical song of the band, that we love or we hate since the first listening, such as "The Logical Song" and especially "Dreamer". Sincerely, I must confess that I like very much the song and I think that it's a perfect example how to make a good pop commercial song with really good quality. The fourth track "Bonnie" is another kind of thing, because it's, in my humble opinion, one of the best songs on the album and represents one of its highlights. This is a love song that describes the obsession of a fan who wants to be closer to a movie star. However, some think that the lyrics are only symbolic and describes the intensely and difficult personal relationship between Davies and Hodgson. Anyway, we are in presence of a great song, one of the best composed by Davies, and curiously, it's a song with no wind instruments and where Helliwell plays keyboards, which I think was the only time that happened on the entire Supertramp's musical career. The fifth track "Know Who You Are" is another great song and represents also one of the highlights of the album. It's a perfect song, at the same time sad and beautifu, made by the hand of Hodgson, and sincerely, only he can write songs like this. It's a song with great melody performed by a great sensitive singer alone with his acoustic guitar. Here we have Hodgson and Supertramp at their best. The sixth track "My Kind Of Lady" was the second single taken from the album, after their first single "It's Raining Again". It's a Davies' love ballad very well sung by him, who harmonizes his natural voice with a falsetto vocal. It's a good song, a tribute to the 50's, magnificently arranged and performed and with a nice saxophone work by Helliwell, as usual. I think we can consider that we aren't in presence of one of the best musical moments of Davies, but like "Put On Your Old Brown Shoes", we are in presence of two typical and decent Davies' songs. The seventh track "C'Est Le Bon" is a great song and unfortunately is an underrated song of Hodgson. It's a classic Hodgson's song that stood perfectly well the test of time. It's a song very well arranged with a catchy melody and good lyrics and where once more, and like "Know Who You Are", we have a great sensitive singer performing with his acoustic guitar. The eight track "Waiting So Long" represents one of the highest moments on the album, if not the better. This is in reality a great song, extremely well arranged, very progressive and with fantastic individual musical performances by all band's members. The epic development of the song can be connected with the great classics made by them all over the years. This is a genuine progressive song and here we have Davies and Supertramp at their best. The ninth and last track "Don't Leave Me Now" is another pearl of the album and closes it in a great style. This is, in my humble opinion, the best Hodgson's song on the album. Despite being a sad song with pessimistic lyrics about solitude and fear of loneliness, it's a very powerful song that closes the album magnificently.

Conclusion: "Famous Last Words" is an underrated album. So, I can't agree with those who consider this album a minor work of the group. It has all the ingredients that made of Supertramp a great band. It has one of the most creative, one of the most respected and one of the most successful duo of composers in the progressive rock music. It's true that it isn't as good as "Crime Of The Century" and "Even In The Quietest Moments", but it's almost at the same level of "Crisis? What Crisis?" and "Breakfast In America". But unfortunately, "Famous Last Words" puts an end in this great duo of composers. The future has shown that the whole is better than the sum of the parts. Hodgson and Davies can't really be replaced and they worked better together than apart. So, "Famous Last Words" represents the Hodgson's last contribution to the band. But we may say that, with this album, he leaves Supertramp by the front door.

Prog is my Ferrari. Jem Godfrey (Frost*)

 Dreamer / Bloody Well Right by SUPERTRAMP album cover Singles/EPs/Fan Club/Promo, 1974
2.76 | 9 ratings

BUY
Dreamer / Bloody Well Right
Supertramp Crossover Prog

Review by Matti
Prog Reviewer

3 stars After two unsuccesful and uneven albums SUPERTRAMP released Crime of the Century, which is regarded as their finest work, at least in the prog circles (the more commercial world probably favours the bestselling Breakfast in America, 1979). The 1974 album was excellently produced by the legendary Ken Scott, who had worked with e.g. David Bowie and Mahavishnu Orchestra.

This is a typical single, both tracks taken from the album and representing its more hit-oriented material. Roger Hodgson's 'Dreamer' is a charming and very energetic song in a fast tempo, with a slower mid-section featuring also Rick Davies' vocals in a dialogue-like manner. The electric piano sound that colours the whole Crime of the Century is extremely dominating on this one.

Rick Davies composed the more bluesy 'Bloody Well Right' which I don't enjoy as much; it's the heavy repetition of the boring chorus that annoys me a bit. Together these songs are almost like Supertramp in a nutshell, with both unique songwriters represented. Except that of course the more progressive tendencies and the emotionally deeper songs are to be found elsewhere on that album.

Good, but totally non-essential for the album oriented listeners.

 Crime Of The Century by SUPERTRAMP album cover Studio Album, 1974
4.31 | 1582 ratings

BUY
Crime Of The Century
Supertramp Crossover Prog

Review by FragileKings
Prog Reviewer

4 stars Supertramp is a band I've known about since I first became interested in pop music. I can recall visiting a friend's house while still in elementary school and he let me listen to Black Sabbath's "Iron Man". I saw the album cover for "Crime of the Century" and never forgot it. Supertramp, however, were not my taste in music. I remember hearing songs like "It's Raining Again" (catchy chorus but nerve grating vocals), "The Logical Song" (pretty good actually), "Bloody Well Right" (kind of good), "Give a Little Bit" (kind of catchy), and "Dreamer". That last song there was the reason why I never got into Supertramp. To me it was one of three most annoying songs on classic rock radio, along with War's "The low. Ry. Duh. Is a little lower" (like who the fudge cares?!) and that song that went, "Blinded by the light / Wrappped up like a douche / Another runner in the night". What were these people thinking to write such tripe like that?

Strangely enough, I always associated Supertramp with Pink Floyd in my late elementary school days. Perhaps it was because "Money" and "Another Brick in the Wall Part 2" and "Bloody Well Right" and "The Logical Song" seemed to have been concocted by the same cultural views of the same culture. The big difference was that by the time I was 16, I loved Pink Floyd but still wouldn't go near Supertramp. It would not be until 2016, when I had reached the ripe old age of 45, that I would finally permit a Supertramp album into my music library (three albums in fact as I ordered two more soon after). The change came after I went through a period of fascination with French Canadian 70's prog and I read that many English prog bands had achieved their first success in North America in Quebec. Bands like Genesis, Camel, Gentle Giant, Yes, Pink Floyd, King Crimson and Supertramp were popular among the Quebecois. I had albums by all except for Supertramp and so I decided to give the band a try.

"Crime of the Century" is the highest rated Supertramp album on PA and so I figured that was the best place to start, though I was soon dismayed to discover that the dreadful song "Dreamer" was on this album. The order arrived and I brought the disc home, plugging it into my iTunes library and dumping it onto my phone. Thus the journey began.

I was surprised to recognize the first track "School". I had heard it before and perhaps it is the laughing, playing children that reminded me of "Another Brick in the Wall Part 2". That and the theme of the English school system. The song certainly goes beyond the standard pop song, sometimes sparse and atmospheric, sometimes building towards a jaunty pop segment but then dropping abruptly into sparsity and quietude again. It's very well arranged and from this it's already easy to understand why Supertramp would be considered progressive.

"Bloody Well Right" turned out to be my favourite and that darn chorus jammed itself into my brain for days. The song is the only one to feature a hard rock guitar sound and that's probably why I can take to this song so easily.

"Hide in Your Shell" begins so candy pretty like that I get turned off right away each time it begins. But it does pick up and become more interesting as the music develops. My least favourite song on the album but still not a total write off. I much prefer "Asylum" which, like "School" reverts to quiet piano whenever the music builds to a climax. Richard Davies insane howls and hollers at the end fit right in with the music.

I'll have to admit that listening to "Dreamer" on the album is not so bad and in fact the song goes through some twists and changes so that the annoying "Dreamer / Your nothing but a dreamer" is actually a small part of the song. The middle part where Richard Davies sings is much more enjoyable and more in tune with what Supertramp seemed to be trying to do with their music at the time. There's also a lot of subtle instrumentation I can hear on the CD that I missed by walking away from the radio every time the song came on at work back in the 90's.

A word of mention should go towards "Rudy", which starts off pretty quietly but builds again in a beautiful fashion and really hooks me when the 70's strings come in in the last 3 minutes or so. When Davies and Hodgeson trade vocal lines the song really reaches its apex.

The album overall intrigues. It's not highly technical prog nor is it really very rock-like except for that guitar in "Bloody Well Right". There's a lot of piano and organ and not much guitar. The drums and bass also are pretty standard for the day and neither would make it to a list of top ten for the instruments. But the song-writing, and the musical construct shows great creativity and attention to detail. Supertramp show that they can alternate between the loud and the soft within a single song. The whole band can come in to hit a single note and then drop out, leaving just the piano or organ. There are rises and swells, peaks, and sudden punctuations of silence. The songs are not entirely predictable and tease by going toward straightforward pop but only briefly. It's an album for those who can appreciate very fine song writing and crafty music that doesn't aim to be loud and technical but rather cleverly creative and full of poignancy and emotion.

The eight songs on the album alternate between Roger Hodgeson's and Richard Davies' lead vocals. I personally enjoy Richard Davies songs more but not so much more. I just prefer the timbre of his voice more over Hodgeson's. The piano parts are often skillfully composed and sometimes a stand out feature in a song, like the closing of the title track.

I will admit that because the music doesn't rock out except for on "Bloody Well Right", Supertramp don't appeal to me as much as the other bands mentioned above. However, that doesn't stop me from appreciating the artistic merit and musical talents on this album. I'll give it a solid four stars, hesitating with that one extra star.

Thanks to ProgLucky for the artist addition. and to Quinino for the last updates

Copyright Prog Archives, All rights reserved. | Legal Notice | Privacy Policy | Advertise | RSS + syndications

Other sites in the MAC network: JazzMusicArchives.com — jazz music reviews and archives | MetalMusicArchives.com — metal music reviews and archives