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SUPERTRAMP

Crossover Prog • United Kingdom


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Supertramp picture
Supertramp biography
Formed in 1969 in London, England - Disbanded in 1988 - Reunited intermittently from 1996 to 2002 - Reformed in 2010/11 for European tour

A variant of progressive rock that some have called sophisto-rock. SUPERTRAMP is a sophisticated pop band that was able to continuously turn out very good songs. Their music has been described as whimsy, lighthearted, fluff and a million other variations on this theme. This music is the kind of thing that you will put on while you and your wife lounging around after dinner. Mellow and very good. One other thing is that they also have the ability to inject some humor into their music now and then. Althogh most of the songs on the album are rock radio staples. This is something that is hard to find.

For some of their best work you will have to look elsewhere. They had a remarkable change in fortune as "Crime of the Century" became one of the top-selling albums of 1974. The band had refined their keyboard-dominated sound and produced an album that was well-reviewed. The album "Even In The Quietest Moments..." is by far their best work. With over 18 million copies to date, "Breakfast In America" is one of the greatest melodic pop/rock albums of the seventies. After that album, SUPERTRAMP continued to develop a more R&B-flavored style; the change in direction was successful on 1982's "Famous Last Words", but they soon ran out of hits. SUPERTRAMP continued with occasional tours and infrequent albums. Their recent releases, however, have only found minor success.

See also: Roger HODGSON

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SUPERTRAMP discography


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SUPERTRAMP top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.49 | 386 ratings
Supertramp
1970
2.67 | 282 ratings
Indelibly Stamped
1971
4.31 | 1756 ratings
Crime of the Century
1974
3.61 | 538 ratings
Crisis? What Crisis?
1975
4.00 | 679 ratings
Even In The Quietest Moments ...
1977
3.95 | 827 ratings
Breakfast In America
1979
3.19 | 378 ratings
Famous Last Words
1982
3.62 | 368 ratings
Brother Where You Bound
1985
1.87 | 213 ratings
Free As A Bird
1987
3.00 | 175 ratings
Some Things Never Change
1997
2.93 | 152 ratings
Slow Motion
2002

SUPERTRAMP Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.66 | 212 ratings
Paris
1980
2.35 | 31 ratings
Live '88
1988
3.41 | 45 ratings
It Was the Best of Times
1999
3.97 | 30 ratings
Is Everybody Listening?
2001
3.92 | 4 ratings
Alive in America
2014

SUPERTRAMP Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

2.61 | 24 ratings
The Story So Far...
1991
3.04 | 14 ratings
Inside Supertramp 1974-1978
2004
4.02 | 12 ratings
Gateway To New Horizons
2010
4.46 | 61 ratings
Live in Paris 1979
2012

SUPERTRAMP Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

2.64 | 29 ratings
The Autobiography of Supertramp
1987
2.34 | 14 ratings
Classics, Vol. 9
1987
3.40 | 40 ratings
The Very Best of Supertramp
1990
3.09 | 30 ratings
The Very Best of Supertramp - Volume 2
1992
3.32 | 38 ratings
Retrospectacle - The Supertramp Anthology
2005

SUPERTRAMP Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

3.50 | 2 ratings
Your Poppa Don't Mind / Rosie Had Everything Planned
1971
2.86 | 13 ratings
Dreamer / Bloody Well Right
1974
2.74 | 12 ratings
Land Ho / Summer Romance
1974
3.08 | 5 ratings
Lady / You Started Laughing When I Held You In My Arms
1975
4.00 | 3 ratings
Ain't Nobody but Me / Sister Moonshine
1975
4.50 | 2 ratings
Give a Little Bit
1977
5.00 | 2 ratings
Babaji
1977
2.92 | 4 ratings
Goodbye Stranger
1979
3.00 | 5 ratings
The Logical Song
1979
3.18 | 9 ratings
Breakfast in America / Gone Hollywood
1979
3.75 | 4 ratings
Take the Long Way Home / From Now On
1979
5.00 | 1 ratings
Take the Long Way Home
1979
4.00 | 1 ratings
Crazy
1982
3.08 | 5 ratings
It's Raining Again / Bonnie
1982
3.91 | 3 ratings
Don't Leave Me Now / Waiting So Long
1982
3.00 | 1 ratings
Still In Love / No Inbetween
1985
4.00 | 1 ratings
Better Days
1985
3.09 | 3 ratings
Cannonball
1985
3.00 | 1 ratings
Free as a Bird
1987
3.00 | 1 ratings
It's Alright
1988

SUPERTRAMP Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 The Very Best of Supertramp - Volume 2 by SUPERTRAMP album cover Boxset/Compilation, 1992
3.09 | 30 ratings

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The Very Best of Supertramp - Volume 2
Supertramp Crossover Prog

Review by VianaProghead
Prog Reviewer

3 stars Review Nš 540

"The Very Best Of Supertramp ? Volume 2" is the fourth compilation album of Supertramp, which was released in 1992. This one was released two years after the release of their previous compilation album "The Very Best Of Supertramp".

"The Very Best Of Supertramp ? Volume 2" contains tracks from five of their studio albums, which are in general regarded as their five best studio albums "Crime Of The Century" from 1974, "Crisis? What Crisis?" from 1975, "Even In The Quietest Moments?" from 1977, "Breakfast In America" from 1979, "Famous Last Words" from 1982 and "Brother Where You Bound" from 1985. In addition, it has also the title track from their studio album "Free As A Bird" from 1987.

"The Very Best Of Supertramp ? Volume 2" is the only compilation of Supertramp with new tracks, until that moment, because the first two "The Autobiography Of Supertramp" and "Classics, Vol. 9" have the same fourteen tracks, and the third "The Very Best Of Supertramp" has also the same fourteen tracks plus the additional fifteenth track, "School".

The front cover of "The Very Best Of Supertramp ? Volume 2", depicts the band's name in colours with the starry backdrop and gate from the cover of "Crime Of The Century", with the hand carrying the glass from the cover of "Breakfast In America", and the orange umbrella from the cover of "Crisis? What Crisis?", put in a black background. "The Very Best Of Supertramp ? Volume 2" has fourteen tracks from the following albums: "If Everyone Was Listening" is from "Crime Of The Century". "Lady" and "A Soapbox Opera" are from "Crisis? What Crisis?". "Even In The Quietest Moments?", "Babaji", "Downstream" and "Fool's Overture" are from "Even In The Quietest Moments?". "Oh Darling", "Gone Hollywood" and "Just Another Nervous Wreck" are from "Breakfast In America". "Waiting So Long", "Don't Leave Me Now" and "My Kind Of Lady" are from "Famous Last Words". "Free As A Bird" is from "Free As A Bird".

"Lady" is a song with a nice combination between piano and vocals. It represents to "Crisis? What Crisis?" the same that "Dreamer" represented to "Crime Of The Century". It was a big hit single that reminds me Steve Harley & Cockney Rebel. "Oh Darling" isn't a very memorable song and is, for me, a perfect failure because it failed as a great commercial song. "Even In The Quietest Moments?" has a melodic, an idyllic and a nostalgic sound, where the acoustic guitar and the piano combine perfectly well, as only the band could do so well. "Waiting So Long" is a great song, well arranged, very progressive and with great performances. The development of the song can be connected with the great classics made by them all over the years. "Babaji" is a powerful melodic song with spiritual lyrics and good arrangements. It shows the perfect combination of two styles, the prog and the pop. "Gone Hollywood" is a good melodic song and the interplay between Rick Davies' and Roger Hodgson's vocals is perfect, as always. "If Everyone Was Listening" is a melodic and beautiful song with an easy tune, beautiful vocal harmonies and great orchestration. It shows that is possible compose beautiful songs with quality. "Just Another Nervous Wreck" is a weak song, as happened with "Oh Darling". It's another song made to be a big hit and that has failed to do so, too. "Don't Leave Me Now" is another pearl, one of the best Roger Hodgson's songs. It's a sad song with pessimistic lyrics about solitude and fear of loneliness. This is a very powerful song. "My Kind Of Lady" is a Rick Davies' love ballad well sung by him, who harmonizes his natural voice with a falsetto vocal. It's a typical and decent Davies' song. "A Soapbox Opera" is a classic Supertramp's composition. It's a melodic song, with orchestra and choir, and it has also excellent progressive arrangements. "Downstream" is an acoustic beautiful and melodic ballad only performed by vocals and piano. It's a song with a simple structure but with a great charm. "Fool's Overture" is a lengthy song, probably their most progressive song in their entire career. It's a great song with an intense ambient, definitely a gem in Supertramp's career. "Free As A Bird" is an average sounding pop song with some meaningful lyrics and a choir added to the chorus. This isn't a bad song, really.

Conclusion: Like their previous compilation "The Very Best Of Supertramp", "The Very Best Of Supertramp ? Volume 2" is also a good compilation from the band. It doesn't repeat any song of that compilation and it also covers some of the other best material of their career. It covers some of their best songs released on their best six studio albums. The main difference between both compilations was the shift of a song from "Brother Where You Bound" for a song from "Free As A Bird", continuing without "Supertramp" and "Indelibly Stamped" be represented here. It's worth to have here the presence of one of their lengthiest, best and most progressive songs, "Fool's Overture". As I wrote before, when I reviewed the previous compilation, "The Very Best Of Supertramp ? Volume 2" is the perfect companion to "The Very Best Of Supertramp". If you want have a real anthology of Supertramp you need to buy both, or alternatively, buy their compilation "Retrospectable ? The Supertramp Anthology". Still, "Retrospectable ? The Supertramp Anthology" is probably a better option because is more representative and cheaper, and has songs from their eleven studio albums.

Prog is my Ferrari. Jem Godfrey (Frost*)

 The Very Best of Supertramp by SUPERTRAMP album cover Boxset/Compilation, 1990
3.40 | 40 ratings

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The Very Best of Supertramp
Supertramp Crossover Prog

Review by VianaProghead
Prog Reviewer

3 stars Review Nš 539

"The Very Best Of Supertramp" is the third compilation album of Supertramp and was released in 1990. This is a compilation that has some of the most popular songs made by the band from their six best and most representative albums, "Crime Of The Century" from 1974, "Crisis? What Crisis?" from 1975, "Even In The Quietest Moments?" from 1977, "Breakfast In America" from 1979, "Famous Last Words" from 1982 and "Brother Where You Bound" from 1985.

"The Very Best Of Supertramp" appears after the debut compilation of the band, "The Autobiography Of Supertramp", which was the first greatest hits album released by the group and that contains some of the most popular songs made by Supertramp, and after their second compilation "Classics, Vol. 9", which is nothing more than the version for the US market, and that it was part of A&M's 25th Anniversary series. In reality, "The Very Best Of Supertramp" is really nothing more than a new version of the two previous compilations plus an additional track. It has the same fourteen tracks presented in the same order. The difference is that "The Very Best Of Supertramp" opens with the new track, "School".

The front cover art of "The Very Best Of Supertramp" depicts the band's name in colours with the gate from the front cover of "Crime Of The Century", with the hand carrying the glass from the front cover of "Breakfast In America" and the orange umbrella from the front cover of "Crisis? What Crisis?", all put in a white background. It's beautiful, really.

"The Very Best Of Supertramp" has fifteen tracks from the following albums: "School", "Bloody Well Right", "Rudy", "Crime Of The Century", "Dreamer" and "Hide In Your Shell" are from "Crime Of The Century". "Ain't Nobody But Me" is from "Crisis? What Crisis?". "From Now On" and "Give A Little Bit" are from "Even In The Quietest Moments?". "Goodbye Stranger", "The Logical Song", "Breakfast In America" and "Take The Long Way Home" are from "Breakfast In America". "It's Raining Again" is from "Famous Last Words". "Cannonball" is from "Brother Where You Bound". "School" is an amazing and fantastic song with good lyrics and a very good piano solo. It's one of the best songs composed by this fantastic duo of composers. This is one of my Supertramp's favourite songs, of all time, undoubtedly. "Goodbye Stranger" is a song with great melody and with a good rhythm section and where the interplay between Rick Davies' and Roger Hodgson's vocals is perfect. "The Logical Song" is a typical classic Supertramp's song with wonderful harmony, great vocals and good keyboards, and with a nice final touch of the saxophone of John Helliwell. "Bloody Well Right" is a good song that, for the type of music of Supertramp, we may say this track is almost a hard rock song with a little funky rhythm. "Breakfast In America" is a classic melodic short song and was a big hit on the radio stations. Personally, I've no problems with it. I really like this song. "Rudy" is one of their best, most progressive, sophisticated and elaborated songs, with many rhythm changes and some instrumental breaks. "Take The Long Way Home" was also a big hit, another top ten single. This is a great musical moment with the saxophone and the piano in evidence. "Crime Of The Century" is a magnum opus, a wonderful song with an orchestration completely divine. This is another highlight and one of my favourite songs by them. "Dreamer" is an irresistible melodic song, a big hit, reaching the top of the charts. Its impact was so huge that we can say that "Dreamer" was one of the most popular singles made by any prog band. "Ain't Nobody But Me" is a very good composition combined with piano and vocals. It's a prog song with rock and jazz influences. "Hide In Your Shell" is a masterpiece of the melodic prog rock with a supreme melodic structure. It's one of the best prog melodic songs ever made. "From Now On" is a nice and mellow ballad with some complexity and it's full of great keyboard and saxophone works. This is a great Rick Davies' song. "Give A Little Bit" is a simple and catchy song. It's a song commanded by acoustic guitar with a good and impressive saxophone work by John Helliwell. "It's Raining Again" is a typical pop song made to be released as a single. It's a perfect example how to make a good pop commercial song with good quality. "Cannonball" is a nice and enjoyable song to hear. It's a kind of a jazz song with a disco-funk style. It has a nice atmospheric ambient but it's a bit too lengthy and repetitive for my taste.

Conclusion: As I wrote above, "The Very Best Of Supertramp" is really nothing more than a new version of the two previous compilations of the band with the same fourteen tracks presented in the same order plus an additional track. So, mostly what I wrote before when I reviewed those compilations applies to "The Very Best Of Supertramp". Thus, we are in presence of a good compilation of Supertramp that includes some of their best tracks taken from some of their best studio albums. About the selection of tracks, I miss the songs "Try Again" from "Supertramp" and "Even In The Quietest Moment" and "Fool's Overture" from "Even In The Quietest Moments?", some of their most progressive songs. Despite the addition of "School", which was great, I'm still thinking that it isn't enough representative of their music. To be more representative, you must have also their compilation "The Very Best Of Supertramp ? Volume 2".

Prog is my Ferrari. Jem Godfrey (Frost*)

 Brother Where You Bound by SUPERTRAMP album cover Studio Album, 1985
3.62 | 368 ratings

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Brother Where You Bound
Supertramp Crossover Prog

Review by VianaProghead
Prog Reviewer

3 stars Review Nš 537

"Brother Where You Bound" is the eighth studio album of Supertramp and was released in 1985. It was their first album without the presence of their guitarist, vocalist, keyboardist, composer and founder member Roger Hodgson, who left the band due to profound musical divergences with Rick Davies, to pursue a solo career. That left the other composer, keyboardist, vocalist and founder member Rick Davies, to handle the song writing and the singing on his own hands.

So, the line up on "Brother Where You Bound" is Rick Davies (vocals and keyboards), John Helliwell (saxophones), Dougie Thomson (bass) and Bob Siebenberg (drums). Beyond the traditional line up without Roger Hodgson, the album had also the participation of a handful of musicians, some of them very well known. So, the additional personnel to "Brother Where You Bound" is David Gilmour (guitar), Scott Gorham (guitar), Marty Walsh (guitar), Doug Wintz (trombone), Scott Page (flute) and Cha Cha (backing vocals).

"Brother Where You Bound" has six tracks. The first track "Cannonball" was the song chosen to be released as single, but in a much shorter version. It's a nice and enjoyable song to hear, reasonably well made, but I think that we are in presence of an overrated song. This is, in my humble opinion, a kind of a jazz song with a disco-funky style. It has a nice atmospheric ambient but, to my taste, it's repetitive and lengthy. And it's also a song without any kind of new ideas to develop it, and finally, I can't see any kind of progressivity on it, really. Sincerely, this is for me, a disappointing song and one of the weakest songs on the album. The second track "Still In Love" is, fortunately, a better song then the previous track. It isn't, in reality, a great song but, it's very nice and pleasant to hear, and it has also some very good musical moments that remind us the good old times of the band. This is a song with a great saxophone work, good keyboard work and it's also a song with a very good rhythm. The third track "No Inbetween" is a very pleasant surprise and fortunately the things improved on this album. This is, in reality, a very good song that can be considered a Supertramp's classic song. It's a sad ballad with very good and nice musical arrangements, with emotional piano and good lyrics, which makes of it as one of the best songs on the album. This is the kind of songs that can change totally the mood of the album, being a much darker and pleasant song to hear. The fourth track "Better Days" is a song with voices on the radio. The voices are taken from the 1984 USA Presidential Campaign and feature the voices of the presidents Ronald Reagan and George H. W. Bush on the right audio channel and the voices of their advisors Walter Mondale and Geraldine Ferraro on the left audio channel. It isn't a bad track, really, but it's a song more in the style of "Cannonball" than of the other songs. This is another uninspired and lengthy track without new ideas for developing, in the most of it. This track represents, is in my opinion, another low point on the album. The fifth track is the title track "Brother Where You Bound". This is the song the features Thin Lizzy's Scott Gorham on rhythm guitar and Pink Floyd's David Gilmour on the guitar solos. The track has also readings from George Orwell's novel "1984". This is a song that remind me strongly "Fool's Overture" from "Even In The Quietest Moments...", due to the voices on the radio in the background and also because its musical structure. It's the lengthiest song on the album, with 16:30 minutes and it's also the lengthiest song released by the band ever. Only "Try Again" from "Supertramp" and "Fool's Overture" from "Even In The Quietest Moments?" have more than 10:00 minutes. This is a very good epic and one of the most progressive tracks released by them, in their entire catalogue, and represents, without any doubt, the best musical moment on the album too. The sixth track "Ever Open Door" is the shortest track on the album. It's a nice and pleasant way to end the album. This is a powerful ballad where Rick Davies gives to us his best vocal performance on the album.

Conclusion: I must confess that when I bought my vinyl version of this album, I didn't know that Roger Hodgson was no longer in the band. When I saw that, for many years I haven't heard the album. I always thought that Roger Hodgson and Rick Davies were one of the two best pairs of composers of the progressive rock music, and so, I couldn't see them separated because I was afraid of that, really. Unfortunately, I was right. As happened with Roger Waters and David Gilmour of Pink Floyd, the slogan "united we stand, divided we fall" can also be perfectly used in both cases. In my humble opinion, like Roger Waters represented the soul, the irreverence and the creative force of Pink Floyd, Roger Hodgson represented the same on Supertramp. But, I've to admit that "Brother Where You Bound" isn't a bad album. It has even some really very good musical moments, especially its title track. However, it isn't, in my humble opinion, a great album, and it's far from being at the same quality level from their albums that comprises their golden musical era, "Crime Of The Century", "Crisis? What Crisis?", "Even In The Quietest Moments?", "Breakfast In America" and even "Famous Last Words". The excellence of the title track is very little for an album created by a band like Supertramp.

Prog is my Ferrari. Jem Godfrey (Frost*)

 Classics, Vol. 9 by SUPERTRAMP album cover Boxset/Compilation, 1987
2.34 | 14 ratings

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Classics, Vol. 9
Supertramp Crossover Prog

Review by VianaProghead
Prog Reviewer

3 stars Review Nš 530

"Classics, Vol. 9" is the second compilation of Supertramp and was released in 1987. This is a compilation released in the US market and it was part of A&M's 25th Anniversary series. It's the twin brother of their debut compilation "The Autobiography Of Supertramp", which was also released in the same year. It was the first greatest hits album released by the group and contains a compilation of some of the most popular songs made by the band from their studio albums "Crime Of The Century", "Even In The Quietest Moments?", "Breakfast In America", "Famous Last Words" and "Brother Where You Bound". On the original edition of the compilation with only eleven tracks no songs from "Crisis? What Crisis?" were chosen to be part of it. Still, the remastered edition of 2001 includes a song from that studio album.

The album was re-released as "The Very Best Of Supertramp", in 1990 in the US market, with digitally remastered sound and a bonus track "School". It also contains the original album versions of the songs "Goodbye Stranger" and "Cannonball", instead of the original release of the compilation which used the edited versions taken from the singles.

The cover art of "Classics, Vol. 9" shows a suit-wearing, faceless man seated in a train carriage reading a book with his own face on the front cover of the book. The view from the train carriage window shows the wall of the platform with stylised versions of the front cover art taken from three of the Supertramp's studio albums.

"Classics, Vol. 9" has fourteen tracks from the following albums: "Bloody Well Right", "Rudy", "Crime Of The Century", "Dreamer" and "Hide In Your Shell" are from "Crime Of The Century". "Ain't Nobody But Me" is from "Crisis? What Crisis?". "From Now On" and "Give A Little Bit" are from "Even In The Quietest Moments?". "Goodbye Stranger", "The Logical Song", "Breakfast In America" and "Take The Long Way Home" are from "Breakfast In America". "It's Raining Again" is from "Famous Last Words". "Cannonball" is from "Brother Where You Bound".

"Goodbye Stranger" is a song with great melody and with a good rhythm section and where the interplay between Rick Davies and Roger Hodgson's vocals is really perfect. "The Logical Song" is a typical classic Supertramp's song with wonderful harmony, great vocals and good keyboards, and with a nice final touch of the saxophone of John Helliwell. "Bloody Well Right" is a good song that, for the type of music of Supertramp, we may say this track is almost a hard rock song with a little funky rhythm. "Breakfast In America" is a classic melodic short song and a big hit on the radio stations. Personally, I've no problems with it. I really like this song. "Rudy" is one of their best, most progressive, sophisticated and elaborated songs, with many rhythm changes and some instrumental breaks. "Take The Long Way Home" was also a big hit, another top ten single. This is a great musical moment with the saxophone and the piano in evidence. "Crime Of The Century" is a magnum opus, a wonderful song with an orchestration completely divine. This is another highlight and one of my favourite songs by them. "Dreamer" is an irresistible melodic song, a big hit, reaching the top of the charts. Its impact was so huge that we can say that "Dreamer" was one of the most popular singles made by any prog band. "Ain't Nobody But Me" is a very good composition combined with piano and vocals. It's a prog song with rock and jazz influences. "Hide In Your Shell" is a masterpiece of the melodic prog rock with a supreme melodic structure. It's one of the best prog melodic songs ever made. "From Now On" is a nice and mellow ballad with some complexity and it's full of great keyboard and saxophone works. This is a great Rick Davies' song. "Give A Little Bit" is a simple and catchy song. It's a song commanded by acoustic guitar with a good and impressive saxophone work by John Helliwell. "It's Raining Again" is a typical pop song made to be released as a single. It's a perfect example how to make a good pop commercial song with good quality. "Cannonball" is a nice and enjoyable song to hear. It's a kind of a jazz song with a disco-funk style. It has a nice atmospheric ambient but it's a bit too lengthy and repetitive for my taste.

Conclusion: As I mentioned above, "Classics, Vol. 9" is the same compilation of "The Autobiography Of Supertramp". So, what I wrote on that review applies to "Classics, Vol. 9". So, "Classics, Vol. 9" is a good compilation of Supertramp. It includes some of their best tracks taken from their best studio albums. However, lacks to it any track from their eponymous debut studio album "Supertramp", which is a pity, because it's a nice album. In relation to the selection of tracks I deeply regret the incomprehensible absence of songs like "Try Again" from "Supertramp", "School" from "Crime Of The Century" and "Even In The Quietest Moment" and "Fool's Overture" from "Even In The Quietest Moments?" which are, undoubtedly, some of the best and most progressive songs from Supertramp. Probably, and again, the usual commercial criteria of the record labels prevailed over the quality, leaving out some of their lengthiest and less commercial songs. Concluding, despite "Classics, Vol. 9" be a good compilation of Supertramp with some really great songs, it's far from being enough representative of Supertramp's music, by the reasons mentioned by me.

Prog is my Ferrari. Jem Godfrey (Frost*)

 Famous Last Words by SUPERTRAMP album cover Studio Album, 1982
3.19 | 378 ratings

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Famous Last Words
Supertramp Crossover Prog

Review by Sidscrat

2 stars Um??. not so much. Their debut album and "Indelibly Stamped" were not at all very good and to their credit they were finding their way. They hit gold when they drug in John, Bob and Dougie and "Crime Of the Century" pushed them into their style. Tramp is a strange band in that the differences between songwriters was so dramatic. Roger was more pop (with the exception of songs like "Fool's Overture") and Rick was more into blues and prog. Their lifestyles were also very different. Roger Was religious and the rest of the band were not. He stated in an interview that he felt on the outside at times over that. As far as music went, Roger said they had to work at blending their ideas together so that the albums flowed from song to song since their styles were different.

Rick and Roger drifted further apart as the only common threads between them were: 1) They were both musicians and 2) They were in the same band.

When they moved to California they had a geographical space and Roger felt that the band had run its course with him in it. The massive success of "BIA" had to have started wreaking havoc on marriages as fame tends to do. It is conceivable that Roger saw his marriage as something that needed to be invested in and thus he listed his need to raise his family as the one of the primary reasons for exiting. He did dedicate a great deal of time to doing just that before he really came back as a solo artist. His voice and playing to this day are fantastic since he had that huge break. Most musicians keep pushing and by the time they hit 60 they can no longer sing on play as well.

This all led to the problems with this album. They recorded most of it at Roger's home studio up in northern California and Rick never came for those sessions and instead recorded his parts from his studio in southern California. When you are rich celebrities and won't even invest in a plane ticket or go for a nice 6 hour drive to be together with your band, the resulting album will lack something and this one did. The differences in the song styles didn't flow well from track to track. Unlike several reviewers I did like some of the songs quite a bit. Crazy is my favorite track with its hopelessness and the melodies are rich. I was not a big fan of "BIA's" overly pop feel so "It's Raining Again" is just more of the same. Rick's songs were mostly a loss and the video for "My Kind Of Lady" was absent of Roger and was just not at all Supertramp any more than the song was. I will say every album after this one is also not a Tramp album. "Some Things Never Change" was the closest thing Rick did that sounds like the old Tramp and on that album the most Tramp track was one that Roger helped him write ("You Win, I Lose").

"Waiting So Long" was definitely the best Rick track on the album especially with what is the best guitar solo that Roger ever did. And I was strangely attracted to "C'est le bon."

But overall this album is a disappointment and the band admitted that from the beginning. Sadly Roger departed and Rick has never allowed a true reunion to occur but falsely advertised tours as just that and Roger basically got the shaft. While they separate don good terms, the terms Roger verbally laid down would spell disaster for the band. The agreement was that Rick could not play Roger's songs. Okay, letmeseehere??. The band's fortunes were made off Roger's songs far more than Rick's. Omitting them on tours would be band suicide. Roger essentially told Rick to dissolve the band and start over with a new name. But Rick conformed to that agreement for a time but then due to fan pressure, he started playing them so they ended up with a rift that has never been resolved.

 The Autobiography of Supertramp by SUPERTRAMP album cover Boxset/Compilation, 1987
2.64 | 29 ratings

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The Autobiography of Supertramp
Supertramp Crossover Prog

Review by VianaProghead
Prog Reviewer

3 stars Review Nš 522

"The Autobiography Of Supertramp" is the debut compilation of Supertramp and was released in 1987. It was the first greatest hits of the band and contains a compilation of some of the most popular songs of the band from their albums "Crime Of The Century", "Even In The Quietest Moments?", "Breakfast In America", "Famous Last Words" and "Brother Where You Bound". On the original edition of the compilation with only eleven tracks, no songs from "Crisis? What Crisis?" were chosen to be part of it. Still, the remastered edition of 2001 includes a song from that studio album.

The compilation was also released in the USA market, in 1987, as "Classics, Volume 9". It was part of the A&M's 25th Anniversary series. The compilation was re-released as "The Very Best Of Supertramp", in 1990 in the US, with digitally remastered sound and the bonus track "School". It also contains the original album's versions of the songs "Goodbye Stranger" and "Cannonball", instead of the original edited versions which were taken from the singles of those songs.

The cover art of "The Autobiography Of Supertramp" shows a suit-wearing, faceless man seated in a train carriage reading a book with his own face on the front cover of the book. The view from the train carriage window shows the wall of the platform with stylised versions of the front cover art taken from three of the Supertramp's studio albums.

"The Autobiography Of Supertramp" has fourteen tracks from the following albums: "Bloody Well Right", "Rudy", "Crime Of The Century", "Dreamer" and "Hide In Your Shell" are from "Crime Of The Century". "Ain't Nobody But Me" is from "Crisis? What Crisis?". "From Now On" and "Give A Little Bit" are from "Even In The Quietest Moments?". "Goodbye Stranger", "The Logical Song", "Breakfast In America" and "Take The Long Way Home" are from "Breakfast In America". "It's Raining Again" is from "Famous Last Words". "Cannonball" is from "Brother Where You Bound". "Goodbye Stranger" is a song with great melody and with a good rhythm section and where the interplay between Rick Davies and Roger Hodgson's vocals is really perfect. "The Logical Song" is a typical classic Supertramp's song with wonderful harmony, great vocals and good keyboards, and with a nice final touch of the saxophone of John Helliwell. "Bloody Well Right" is a good song that, for the type of music of Supertramp, we may say this track is almost a hard rock song with a little funky rhythm. "Breakfast In America" is a classic melodic short song and a big hit on the radio stations. Personally, I've no problems with it, really. I really like this song. "Rudy" is one of their best, most progressive, sophisticated and elaborated songs, with many rhythm changes and some instrumental breaks. I think it's one of the best songs made by Rick Davies. "Take The Long Way Home" was also a big hit, another top ten single. This is a great musical moment with the saxophone and the piano in evidence. "Crime Of The Century" is a magnum opus, a wonderful song with an orchestration completely divine. It has great lyrics, good lead guitars and a nice sax solo. This is a highlight and it's one of my favourite songs of them. "Dreamer" is an irresistible melodic song, a big hit, reaching the top of the charts. Its impact was so huge that we can say that "Dreamer" was one of the most popular singles made by any prog band. "Ain't Nobody But Me" is a very good composition combined with piano and vocals. It's a prog song with rock and jazz influences. "Hide In Your Shell" is a masterpiece of the melodic prog rock with a supreme melodic structure. It's one of the best prog melodic songs ever made. "From Now On" is a nice and mellow ballad with some complexity and it's full of great keyboard and saxophone works. This is a great Rick Davies' song. "Give A Little Bit" is a simple and catchy song. It's a song commanded by acoustic guitar with a good and impressive saxophone work by John Helliwell. "It's Raining Again" is a typical pop song made to be released as a single. It's a perfect example how to create a great pop commercial song with good quality. "Cannonball" is a nice and enjoyable song to hear. It's a kind of a jazz song with a disco-funk style. It has a nice atmospheric ambient but is a bit too lengthy and repetitive for my taste.

Conclusion: "The Autobiography Of Supertramp" is a good compilation of Supertramp that covers some of the best songs of the band. It covers some of their best songs released on their best six studio albums. About the selection of tracks, is lamentable and inexcusable that had been left out songs like "School" from "Crime Of The Century" and "Even In The Quietest Moment" and "Fool's Overture" from "Even In The Quietest Moments?", which are probably the three best and most progressive songs ever made by them. Once more, the usual commercial criteria prevailed over the quality, leaving out their lengthiest and less commercial songs. So, "The Autobiography Of Supertramp" is a good compilation with great songs, but it isn't very well representative of Supertramp's music. In addition to all I mentioned, "The Autobiography Of Supertramp" doesn't covers all the musical career of the group at the time. It doesn't cover their two first studio albums, the eponymous debut and the second studio albums "Supertramp" and "Indelibly Stamped", respectively. Despite they aren't great albums they have some good songs, especially "Try Again" from "Supertramp".

Prog is my Ferrari. Jem Godfrey (Frost*)

 Brother Where You Bound by SUPERTRAMP album cover Studio Album, 1985
3.62 | 368 ratings

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Brother Where You Bound
Supertramp Crossover Prog

Review by Sidscrat

2 stars Uh..... not so much.

Problem: One half of the songwriting team is gone. This is a similar story to Kansas when Kerry Livgren left the band. Ironically that occurred the same time Roger Hodgson left Supertramp. In Kansas, Steve Walsh wrote some of the band's hits but Kerry's songs were the ones that catapulted them to fame. Like Supertramp, Walsh wrote some of the bands memorable songs but it was Kerry's songs that really defined the Kansas sound. Roger wrote most of the songs that made Supertramp famous so him leaving created a black hole.

After Hodgson's departure, Supertramp was but a shadow of its former self and everything that was released was very weak in my opinion. Both Rick and Roger cited the fact that they were both so different in musical styles and lifestyles as well. I get that but what they didn't see was that it was that difference that defined the greatness of Supertramp. Every album from "Crime Of The Century" through "Famous Last Words" demonstrated the different approach each had to songs and it worked. On "?.. Last Words" it was a disjointed album to a point but that was largely due to the fact they weren't even together during its recording. Rick stayed in LA and everyone else shifted to Roger's studio. You cannot expect the 2 songwriters to collaborate on anything if they won't even show up together to record. That album was better than this one even still.

I also understand it was Roger's choice to walk away some due to family (cannot blame him) but also he felt that Supertramp had gone as far as it could go with him and to that I greatly disagree. They canned it at the pinnacle of success. Later the two got together in the early 90's and almost reunited. They wrote a few songs together, one which ended up on Supertramp's "Some Things Never Change". That was "You Win, I Lose". That song is Supertramp!

Now that I have bored you with all the details surrounding this album, I have to say I was resoundingly disappointed when I heard this after it came out. It is the Supertramp instrumental sound and Rick's voice fits its usual place but the songs were only mediocre in my opinion. The song "Brother?.." was meant for "?.. Last Words" but it didn't fit the theme. It was originally a much shorter song and it would have been best left that way. It felt too dragged on.

Rick wanted to take the band back into its progressive roots and I believe he did that to a point but it is missing that crucial link in Hodgson. Supertramp is a tragic story. To this day I think it is foolish for Rick to refuse to put on an actual reunion tour. He labeled the 40th anniversary one a "reunion" but without Roger it isn't. They have lost the opportunity now.

 Crime of the Century by SUPERTRAMP album cover Studio Album, 1974
4.31 | 1756 ratings

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Crime of the Century
Supertramp Crossover Prog

Review by A Crimson Mellotron
Prog Reviewer

5 stars A timeless classic for a reason! There are bands that at a certain point in their career release albums that simply go on to transcend their age or just define their entire body of work with the sheer excellence and apex creativity, pieces of work that mark the pivotal point in which the stars align and a group of immensely talented musicians go on to create something with a seemingly divine touch, something that sounds strikingly good in any decade - Supertramp's 'Crime of the Century' is one such album, recorded and released in 1974, this is the band's third studio LP, one of the most comprehensive and cathartic albums to have ever graced the ranks of rock music.

Whether you are in for the pop-tinted sing-along pieces of Roger Hodgson, or the heavier prog-infused compositions of Rick Davies, this album will certainly satisfy the needs of even the most pretentious of rock connoisseurs with its mind-blowing musicianship, the fantastic, intellectual and sometimes provocative lyrics, the graceful songwriting and the unforgettable suspense of the longer songs, alongside the moments of joyous climaxes, present in numbers on this record. As for the songs on 'Crime of the Century', we can safely state that the album is packed with 70s classics - opener 'School' is one of the most recognizable songs by Supertramp, a beautiful build-up at the beginning leads to the vibrant verse, with Hodgson's fabulous singing impressing all along the way; 'Bloody Well Right' is another more accessible number, this time having Davies singing the leads; we could say it is his attempt at writing an upbeat pop hit. Then things become a hair more serious with the 7-minute 'Hide in Your Shell', a gorgeous philosophical exploration with dreamy keyboards and stunning musicianship. Side one concludes with Davies' 'Asylum', a very strong prog rocker, absolutely theatrical and contrasting starkly with the more lightweight tone of the previous songs.

Side two opens with 'Dreamer', a song that needs no introduction. Then comes the fabulous 'Rudy', probably the best song on the whole record (this is an entirely subjective statement, of course) with the jazz-tinted playing of Rick Davies, and the gradual unfolding of the whole composition into a cinematic prog rock fiesta that could easily rival the strongest moments of Yes, King Crimson or ELP. 'If Everyone Was Listening' is a lovely Roger Hodgson piece, a bit more mellow that the rest of his songs on this 1974 classic album, and finally there is the title track - a wholesome ending to a very otherworldly listening experience, and another very strong example of these musicians' impeccable abilities to write engaging, magical songs, full of essence and charming charisma.

I firmly believe that everything about 'Crime of the Century' has already been said; What is left for us now is just to embrace its qualities, and praise the immense beauty of this 44-minute stellar release that showcases how intense and flamboyant the crossover between prog rock and pop could be - intricate, layered, suspenseful, melodic and maybe happily melancholic, this album is one of those very special LPs that could be tagged 'perfect', depending on how you perceive it and how open-minded you are.

 Breakfast In America by SUPERTRAMP album cover Studio Album, 1979
3.95 | 827 ratings

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Breakfast In America
Supertramp Crossover Prog

Review by VianaProghead
Prog Reviewer

4 stars Review Nš 509

"Breakfast In America" is the sixth studio album of Supertramp and was released in 1979. The album was recorded in the previous year at the Village Recorder in Los Angeles, California. After their previous fifth studio album "Even In The Quietest Moments?", Supertramp decided to concentrate totally their attention on the USA market. And I must confess that, in strictly commercial terms, they totally won the bet, because the album was an extraordinary sales success.

"Breakfast In America" was also the album where the first tensions between the members and main composers of the band, Roger Hodgson and Rick Davies started to come to the fore. Those tensions were focused on divergences with the choice of the songs for the album, because Rick Davies didn't like the song "Breakfast In America" and he didn't want it on the album. But the divergences were also about the title of the album because Rick Davies didn't want the album to be titled "Breakfast In America". He would rather prefered the names "Working Title" or "Hello Stranger".

"Breakfast In America" has ten tracks. The first track "Gone Hollywood" written by Rick Davies is a great song to open this album. It's a very good melodic song and the interplay between Rick Davies and Roger Hodgson's vocals is absolutely perfect, as always. The second track "The Logical Song" written by Roger Hodgson was one of the songs chosen to be released also as a single and it was really one of their biggest radio hits ever. This is, without any doubt, a typical and classic Supertramp's song with wonderful harmony, great vocals and good keyboards, and with a nice final touch of the saxophone of John Helliwell. This is really a great song. The third track "Goodbye Stranger" written by Rick Davies is another great song. This is one of the songs from this album that have a video music. It's a song with great melody and also with a very good rhythm section, and where, once more, the interplay between Rick Davies and Roger Hodgson's vocals is absolutely perfect. The fourth track is the title track "Breakfast In America". It was written by Roger Hodgson and is the song that Rick Davies didn't want on the album. This is another song that was chosen to be released also as a single. It was also a classic song and a big hit on the radio stations. This is the shortest and most commercial song on the album. It's very melodic and, personally, I've no problems with it. I like this song very much. The fifth track "Oh Darling" written by Rick Davies is, until this moment, the weakest song on the album. This isn't a very memorable song really and it's, in my humble opinion, a perfect failure because it isn't a great commercial song. There isn't much more to say about it, really. The sixth track "Take The Long Way Home" written by Roger Hodgson was the fourth song to be chosen to be released as a single and was also a big hit of this album, another top ten single. This is another great moment on this album with the saxophone and the piano in evidence. It helps to maintain the level of the album in a high quality position. The seventh track "Lord Is It Mine" also written by Roger Hodgson is a mellow ballad very calm and nice. But unfortunately, this is an example of a case that doesn't keep the level of the album in a so high quality position. It's a good song, but sincerely, I can't see anything special on it. The eighth track "Just Another Nervous Wreck" written by Rick Davies is another good song but with the same problem of "Oh Darling" and "Lord Is It Mine". It's the third weaker song on the album and once more, the high level of it decreased because it isn't a song made to be a big hit or even a great progressive song. The ninth track "Casual Conversations" also written by Rick Davies is the second smallest song on the album with a jazzy touch and with a very nice saxophone sound of John Helliwell. However, it doesn't save the song and we may say this is the fourth, but fortunately, the last weaker song on the album. The tenth track "Child Of Vision" written by Roger Hodgson is the lengthiest and the epic song on the album. It's probably the best song on the album, the most progressive and it's my favourite too. It's a wonderful, classic and typical Supertramp's song with all the typical ingredients of their music like the beautiful harmony and a catchy rhythm. This is the real usual trademark of the band on this album. I think this is a perfect way to close this album.

Conclusion: "Breakfast In America" is a very good album and represents, in my humble opinion, a change on their music to a more commercial approach. I disagree with those who believe that "Even In The Quietest Moments?" is the album of that approach. Definitely, "Even In The Quietest Moments?" is a much better album and it's also much more balanced than "Breakfast In America" is, but above all, it's much more progressive. By the other hand, and as I said before, "Crisis? What Crisis" isn't, sincerely, inferior to "Breakfast In America". I even dare to say that in a certain way, it's better than "Breakfast In America" is. "Crisis? What Crisis" is more balanced than "Breakfast In America" is, because it has less weak points, but above all, it's more progressive and less commercial. I agree with Easy Livin. By the time of "Breakfast In America", Supertramp were big, but prog lost out to the lure of commercial success again.

Prog is my Ferrari. Jem Godfrey (Frost*)

 Crime of the Century by SUPERTRAMP album cover Studio Album, 1974
4.31 | 1756 ratings

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Crime of the Century
Supertramp Crossover Prog

Review by Nhelv

3 stars A good pop album

This is enjoyable, although I can't say much more about it. 4.31 score is absolutely ridiculous in a site like this one. There's no doubt that musicianship and musicality is top-notch (even if it isn't used in the proggiest way), and songs are very solid, but there's really nothing that shocks me or leaves me dumbfounded.

There's strong jazz influences (as found in "Rudy") throughout the album, combined with a theatrical mood (as found in "Asylum"). I find this album to be good, but not essential, at least in a progressive rock context. I personally give it three stars!

Thanks to ProgLucky for the artist addition. and to Quinino for the last updates

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