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ELECTRIC ORANGE

Krautrock • Germany


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Electric Orange biography
ELECTRIC ORANGE is a german (neo) krautrock band, mainly based on two masterminds Dirk Jan Müller (keys) and Dirk Bittner (guitar). Up to now both musicians had uncounted collaborations during their development and produced a huge amount of material on MC, Vinyl and CD-R. Besides some temporary flirts with house/techno elements the band actually delivers modern trippy krautrock adapted music, where Tom Rückwald handles the bass guitar since the year 2000.

The sound is decorated with cheerful electronic elements adapted from Tangerine Dream or Popol Vuh as well as provided with obsessional rhythms in the vein of Can or even Kraftwerk - all you might expect as significant for a contemporary krautrock sound.

The band offer an irresistible blend of hypnotic and tribal beats, soaring organ and synths, spacey guitars, recitatives, samples as well as analogue effects. Hereby they are keen on experimenting with all sorts of rare, obscure and vintage instruments. The song titles are often provided with funny and thought-provoking puns.

In 2009 ELECTRIC ORANGE decided to offer the first DVD release 'Live On The Psychedelic Network Festival 2007' featuring a complete show from 2007 in Würzburg as well as other recordings from a period between 2005 and 2008. And then at the beginning of 2010 the band released the new production 'Krautrock From Hell' where the line up saw a change according to the drums while Silvio Franoli was substituted by Georg Monheim.

Soon after second guitarist Josef Ahns left the band as well. They decided to carry on as a quartet furthermore and once a year from now on a new album was produced, one of them including live recordings from Roadburn Festival in 2012.

Dirk Jan Müller and Dirk Bittner are also regular members of the band SPACE INVADERS

Electric Orange official website

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FleischwerkFleischwerk
Import
Imports 2008
Audio CD$34.90
$68.26 (used)
Orange CommutationOrange Commutation
Import
Deler 1996
Audio CD$318.85 (used)
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ELECTRIC ORANGE discography


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ELECTRIC ORANGE top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.00 | 7 ratings
Electric Orange
1993
2.87 | 4 ratings
Tonbandreste
1994
3.04 | 5 ratings
Orange Commutation
1995
3.05 | 3 ratings
Cyberdelic
1996
2.95 | 3 ratings
Abgelaufen!
2001
3.05 | 6 ratings
Platte
2003
4.00 | 10 ratings
Fleischwerk
2005
3.96 | 22 ratings
Morbus
2007
3.87 | 62 ratings
Krautrock From Hell
2010
3.91 | 15 ratings
Netto
2011
3.14 | 3 ratings
XX
2012
4.05 | 2 ratings
Volume 10
2014

ELECTRIC ORANGE Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

4.05 | 3 ratings
Unterwasser - Live 2002
2002
4.00 | 5 ratings
Live At Roadburn 2012
2013

ELECTRIC ORANGE Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

3.50 | 2 ratings
Live At The Psychedelic Network Festival 2007
2009

ELECTRIC ORANGE Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

ELECTRIC ORANGE Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

ELECTRIC ORANGE Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 Volume 10 by ELECTRIC ORANGE album cover Studio Album, 2014
4.05 | 2 ratings

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Volume 10
Electric Orange Krautrock

Review by Rivertree
Special Collaborator Psych/Space Team & Band Submissions

4 stars Oh ... at the very first I took notice of the album title ... immediately being about to check the truth content. You should know, the ELECTRIC ORANGE members don't take it too seriously. Or, better the other way round, they do not solely deliver exceptional music, they are also fundamentally taking delight in confusing people with uncommon aspects and their play of words. Well, in this particular case, when excluding 'Tonbandreste' (1994) and 'Orange Communication' (1995), both not listed as regular albums on their homepage, the working title 'Volume 10' suits, curiously enough. Now I'm sure we successfully have taken the first hurdle.

When considering the song titles though, it really goes crazy again - innovative in their view, and of course that's true, no doubt. As the second hurdle is build up a bit higher here, we stumble upon Black Sabbath infected puns - Paraboiled, Slowbind, Symptom Of The Mony Nurse, Behind The Wall Of Sheep ... and even more riddles, which I wasn't able to solve until today. A bizarre reference or not? What I only can assure is that they are not simply expressing nonsense. There's always at least an iota of truth given, you only have to dig deeper in order to reach for the hidden treasure or so.

As for that at the moment I will be content with the verdict, that the current ELECTRIC ORANGE outcome appears somewhat doomy ... though not depressive really on the other hand, more darkened than ever. And so the third hurdle, or challenge if you will, marks the music as such - well, it would not surprise me if we will detect some more of them somewhere in the future. How could I describe the sound in short at best? Absolutely tension-filled - 'Spannung pur' to say it in German. Going from the general to the particular, they certainly are on the way to enhance the neo kraut label again. So all in all this is what I would call 'provided with a nouveau tag' - or in other words genre pioneering.

Just while taking up the spirit of the past and establishing something pressing forward on top - whether improvised or not. I'm listening to a rather melancholic affair, featuring meandering soundscapes and tribal drums. Hereby they are using (experimenting with) all sorts of vintage and uncommon instruments. I mean, who really knows what a philicorda or a phonofiddle is? At least, headed by both Dirk's, who are currently also underway with the band SPACE INVADERS, this spiritually reminds me of the 'Unterwasser' ambience more than ever at some point.

Impressive - they are back on track again. To be honest, I didn't expect an album offering such a high quality as the next step from this band. Please be keenly aware, this one needs some time to unfold its real beauty, as many other albums of such a caliber too. No chance to emphasize any particular song here (hey, apart from the puns). 'Volume 10' is a very rounded blend featuring eight sections, offering an intensive, dark mooded, certainly inspired atmosphere. However, to describe this gem fitting more exactly seems to me nearly impossible yet - 4.5 stars.

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 Cyberdelic by ELECTRIC ORANGE album cover Studio Album, 1996
3.05 | 3 ratings

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Cyberdelic
Electric Orange Krautrock

Review by octopus-4
Special Collaborator RIO/Avant/Zeuhl Team

3 stars Honestly, after having heard the excellent "Krautrock From Hell" when I happened to pick up this album I have to admit that I've almost skipped it entriely. Apparently this is just chill-out music, of the kind that is useful after a rave while one is waitng for the ecstasy taken to go down. I have never taken ecstasy but this is how somebody explained me that it works.

The album is full of this, effectively, but after quite a long time I have listened to it again, only because I have copied all my Electric Orange stuff on an mp3 reader and, know what? I have liked it!

Yes, it's borderline with the chill-out music, most of the tracks are good for the Buddah-bar but it contains a lot of good kraut, especially in tracks like "Mother's Cake" which is very close to CAN, or the unusual Indo/Raga of "Tartisma Zemini" which was very in advance with its time as indo music mixed with disco drones appeared and became a successful mainstream thing not less than 10 years after the album's release.

The album has much elements of what we use to call Krautrock. One for all, the stunning distorted guitar which cries in the background on some trakcs, barely hidden by a bass and drum base.

Probably, should this have been their only release, this band wouldn't be on PA, but this album even if borderline with chill-out music is borderline with krautrock as well and if somebody has enjoyed the disco-kraut of Kraftwerk in the 80s (and I'm not one of those) why not enjoying this as well?

Non essential and barely prog, but this is a good album. In my case, listening to it carefully with headphones on, respect of just as background, has made the difference.

Really not bad.

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 XX by ELECTRIC ORANGE album cover Studio Album, 2012
3.14 | 3 ratings

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XX
Electric Orange Krautrock

Review by Rivertree
Special Collaborator Psych/Space Team & Band Submissions

3 stars ELECTRIC ORANGE and common song oriented structures - a contradiction in principle. And now 'XX' tops it all. Speaking of a double vinyl consisting of four extended jams, which means every flipside is representing one song, each around the twenty minute mark, simple as that. While missing any solos, equally acting instruments are on a serpentine line through space and time here. And this is a rather deep mooded trippy affair. It's not intended to release this stuff on CD so far, the album is distributed for download and vinyl in limited edition only.

Is there anything prepared before they start to proceed into such a mission? And is there anything reworked after returning back to Mother Earth? That's a valuable question indeed. Meandering guitar and keyboard interaction underlaid by impressive percussion work marks the fundament, and this surely is provided with professional environment, thus finally mastered by EROC once again. Ahh, by the way, it's a tradition meanwhile to offer song titles in German which are phantoms of imagination, a mysterious issue, not really a coincidence ... but you're missing a serious meaning too on the other hand.

Wechselkröte opens with much spirit, in a relatively promising and groovy way, speaking of propulsive drums, a pleading guitar, this underlaid by a nice spheric keyboard background. Right in the middle though they turn into a somewhat gloomy modus operandi, just following my imagination I can see a trundling starship which has no drive anymore. While seemingly missing any guitar contributions Mischwesen is dominated by drummer Georg Monheim, who comes in serving a tremendous groove after some time. The last four minutes are domianted by a hallucinative spin then.

With vinyl 2 they distinctly turn into a weird experimental attitude - I mean the monotonous keyboard patterns povided with an acid, partially creepy touch, not everyone's taste I'm sure and less inspired when it comes to my taste. Well, this album is dedicated to hardcore jam freaks first and foremost, who are well-provided with a lot of staying power, required for more than any other album ELECTRIC ORANGE have recorded 'til today. As for that the tracks are given with lesser variation this time, but you definitely will detect some thrilling moments again.

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 Orange Commutation by ELECTRIC ORANGE album cover Studio Album, 1995
3.04 | 5 ratings

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Orange Commutation
Electric Orange Krautrock

Review by Aussie-Byrd-Brother
Special Collaborator Rock Progressivo Italiano Team

3 stars A companion CD to their double self titled debut album, Electric Orange's `Orange Commutation' is a collection of new tracks, remixes and reinterpretations of previous works by the modern Krautrock band. Masterminded by main-man Dirk Jan Muller, with contributions from several guests, their style has always been mixing rough noisy Kraut rhythms, spacey and psychedelic progressive rock with modern dance influences, bridging the the gap perfectly between all eras in a vibrant and exciting fashion. Reference points might be Brainticket, early Pink Floyd and the Ozric Tentacles, while their use of the Mellotron is similar in parts to 70's electronic and Tangerine Dream albums. Although full of analogue and vintage equipment, the music never sounds like retro-prog or merely imitating what's come before.

`Electripity Chapter 99' is a very groovy track with lots of head-nodding beats! It's hazy atmosphere is highlighted by eerie sitar and shimmering keys at the start, before stomping programmed beats and thick organ kick in. Murmuring slinky bass all the way, and some nice bouzouki, a plucked string instrument that adds to the middle-eastern hypnotic sounds of the piece.

`Journey...' is full of funky wah-wah guitar riffs, clubby beats, swirling treated other-wordly voices, chunky Leslie organ and relentless bass, all backed to a veil of Mellotron clouds. Listen out for the mumbling and wasted female vocal in the second half, which sounds like parts of the `Psychonaught' and `Celestial Ocean' albums by Brainticket!

A beautiful trip-hop beat loops through `The Return Of Eugene...', a reimagining of the classic Floyd track, more along the lines of the live version from their album `Ummagumma' and endless bootlegs, but with Electric Orange's own ideas and additions. Filled with lovely Farfisa and stoned rising-and-falling electronics, I also love the haunting wolf cries, but the `scream' in the middle is badly implemented and quite obtrusive, along with the murky and noisy live-drum assault with wailing guitar freakout solo. Once that section drops out, we're back to the programmed beat now with ghostly Mellotron behind it and a lonely weeping guitar. These final few minutes drift into blissful infinity.

`Back Is Strange Worlds (Forbidden Mix)' is packed with different types of programmed and club beats, with glistening psychedelic synths, electronic bass and Gilmour-like guitar phasing in and out in the background. If the beats weren't so heavy this might sound more like Tangerine Dream. A very modern sounding track with one foot firmly in the doorway of the ambient floating moodscapes of the 70's too.

Overloaded with heavy Hammond and Rhodes, distorted urging female voices and evocative dancing flute, `Reflections...' has a nice plodding beat and a grubby guitar solo at the end. Plenty of great flow and build throughout this piece, with loose psychedelic and spacy sounds colouring the track. Admittedly this remix is very similar to the version found on the debut album, so it probably would have benefitted from a little more reworking to make it stand on it's own.

Another quality Delerium release, `Orange Commutation' is a hardly a very important album, but the wonderful music is full of energy, colour and originality. The front cover is quite cool, too! The remixes mostly all stand as unique ideas on their own, and I even think the dance/programmed elements would attract the ear of listeners who usually wouldn't be interested in progressive-related genres.

Three stars!

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 Morbus by ELECTRIC ORANGE album cover Studio Album, 2007
3.96 | 22 ratings

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Morbus
Electric Orange Krautrock

Review by Guldbamsen
Forum & Site Admin Group Site and Forum Admin

4 stars The sea-captain's favourite

I live on the north western side of Denmark. I can almost spot the sea, if only I was 15 feet taller that is. On a daily basis the wind freely sloshes in over the countryside without any form of restraint. This is agricultural lands, so there is literally nothing put in its way, leaving the wind unchecked and free to flow like - yep you guessed it: the wind. It has a way of humbling you. It sets you straight - you often feel these wild powerful gusts crashing into you without warning - reminding you of mother nature and just how fickle she can be.

I don't know why it dawned on me, but earlier during a meaningless walk around the neighbourhood, I felt this particular natural trade in many ways complimented Electric Orange's Morbus record. I might be insane and a bit off, but to me that aforementioned sloshing quality - the sailor-like shifting back and forth, like were you standing on a ship in heavy seas, that is in fact the essence of what makes this album so magnificent.

This is first and foremost simple music. You won't find much in the way of blistering solos or crazy Haydn inspired oboe segments, although you may encounter the odd time sig here and there, - no the music is all about creating brooding sloshing atmospheres, that take you out on windswept journeys where only mad sea-captains have ventured before. For a long period of time I had the sneaking suspicion, that I knew the music - that I at least knew the feel of it. Like it was lying on the tip of my tongue, yet no dice - there was absolutely nothing that came to mind in terms of other Germanic Krautrockers or the likes. Then I attended a social gathering with some old school buddies of mine, and suddenly whilst drinking Tuborg beers and snaps it struck me like a ton of bricks: Damn!!! Is that Cypress Hill we're listening to?!?!?!

We were in fact listening to Cypress Hill playing live at the Filmore. Now don't start with me before you hear me out, because I reckon you may find it hard believing in any sort of redeeming parallels between west coast gangsta rap and modern day Krautrock, but the fact of the matter is that there are a couple of valid references. Firstly, Cypress Hill were playing with a real backing band. On one of their more politically charged tunes called Looking Through the Eye of the Pig they wield a tasty form of psychedelic guitar driven rock, and it is here that I suddenly heard the similar qualities that I'd been searching for. Electric Orange flow much in the same vein. Like the aforementioned sloshing winds, the guitars also feel sluggish, lethargic, thick like melting glue. They are rhythmic figurines accompanied by slow oscillating organ parts that drift and waft like a dense sauce-like fog. On the backbone of this you have the bass and drums keeping things nice and heavy - spreading out roots for this high towering smeared musical endeavour.

Like I said, this is essentially very simple music. It takes some of the best facets of post- rock and apply them to an endemic musical force, making it sound nothing like the genre. I don't hear any post-rock, but the constant bobbing back and forth on these sloshing guitar driven hard hitting psych textures - are testimony of what you can obtain with the approach.

I love everything about this release: the constant overhanging organ thicket occasionally replacing itself with a flügel - or some floating mellotron. Or maybe all of this gets thrown into one big smoothie and the music suddenly feels like it's swimming. I simply adore it. I also am completely smitten by the agitation style of Rote Flocken, that incorporates these German military vocals into a porous and psychedelic piece of Krautrock. And let's not forget about the fabulous Wald that hypnotizes you with it's lengthy stroboscopic washes of worming guitar-riffing.

In fact, I find it very hard not rating this with a full 5 stars, but somehow the length of nearly 80 minutes does amount to the tiniest of dents in the armour. So consider this the biggest 4 stars you'll ever encounter. I'm talking 4.99999999999999 here people!

This album is however a brilliant exhibition of modern Krautrock. It is psychedelic, brooding, heavy, lethargic, simple, oscillating, effervescent, floating, relaxing, sloshing, hypnotic and very much in tune with its forbears - yet without ever resolving to borrow anything directly from them. Morbus feels original and like it was conceived in a musical Zoo with lions, tigers and lizards all over the place, if only to rub off that fickle and fleeting animal essence to the proceedings - you know the part of music that makes us into reptiles and humans all at the same time.

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 Krautrock From Hell by ELECTRIC ORANGE album cover Studio Album, 2010
3.87 | 62 ratings

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Krautrock From Hell
Electric Orange Krautrock

Review by octopus-4
Special Collaborator RIO/Avant/Zeuhl Team

4 stars I can't believe that an album like this has been released in 2010. Before it I didn't know anything about this neo-kraut band, not that I know much even now, but at least I know this album that's extremely good.

I want to start from the best: the last two tracks are an epic and a spacey drone the first is a 25 minutes track full of different things, the other is very reminding of very early Tangerine Dreams. What is very remarkable is that the instruments are not "so much" electronics as one could expect. They have flute, guitars, percussions, they are closer to Electronic Meditation than to Atem.

All the other songs are good, with a strong old-krautrock fashion. Ash Ra, Can and Amon Duul II can be some references.

Now by order: "Bandwurm" is opened by German speech, not infrequent in Krautrock, then a bass riff comes from behind toether with some electronic noises. The production is typical of Krautrock but the track is more easily listenable than most of the 70s krauts It's not as challenging as some Can's tracks for example. The bass riff is a sort of 70s spy movie soundtrack. The noises are not dissonants and the last part of the song with more drums sounds like early Pink Floyd.

"Sundos" is not very different, but there's an upbeat section in the middle that shows its modernity. Try to imagine it with some distorted guitar and a bit of growl. Drums and organ are in evidence on this song.

"Chorg" starts with a bass organ note, but when guitar and drums enter we are in proximity of a Tsunami. I mean the omonimous track of the Dutch band 35007(LOOSE). At half the song, it's again the bass which starts repeating its riff, quickly joined by guitar, organ and drums. It's just a passage to another section more relaxed. A very good and hypnotic track.

"Hers" opens between Syd Barrett (Lucifer Sam) and Amon Duul II (is it psychedelic enough?) but after about three minutes we are back to the 60s in the psychedelic period of the Beatles. Amazing.

With "Kunstkopf" we are again in the Barret's territory. The opening has the same flavor of Astronomy Domine but after the drum crescendo instead of an acid guitar it goes repetitive, even more acid. At about half of the song the drums stop for a while. If you like this part, give a listen to a 80s band called "Felt" and their "The Splendour of Fear". The last minute and half is very Floydian instead.

A Paraphrase of the HP Lovecraft's invented grimoire Necronomicon gives the title to the epic "Neuronomicon". A simple acoustic guitar harping occupies the first minute and half, then a rhythm a-la-Jarre brings in chord passages a-la-Senmuth. Just one minute and there's a part with the drums in the frontline just backed by the other instruments. The guitar sounds "end 60s" but not properly acid. At minute 5 there's a bit of piano solo. Just chords (and harpsichord?). then drums and keyboards. A bass note over a slow rhythm and few bass, like the intro of Floyd's Obscured by Clouds on which there's some distorted speech in the background, maybe recorded reversed. There's a crescendo including a more than decent guitar riff while the bass becomes obsessive. until at minute11:30 the music stops and there's time for bass and keyboards. Here the sound is cold and subtle. It reminds me to Bo Hansson's Lord of the Rings, but in general the band is never too distant from Barrett or from the early Waters. The sounds used are "retro" enough to make it sound like it was written 40 years ago. A long slow hypnotic part in 6/8 (I think) proceeds for some minutes. At 16:00 its coda leaves only a ooh keyboard and some noises behind. It's a transition to the following part which starts with a sequence of long guitar notes. Well, it can be a guitar with a lot of sustain or a keyboard. The Korg M1 has a similar sound in its default bank. On those six notes we proceed repeating and adding drums, bass and violins (keys). It slightly develops in a slow crescendo. Tracks like Camel's Nimrodel come to my mind until the drums stop leaving only spacey sounds and drums behind. At minute 22 another section. The six notes are now six chords, not exactly the same as before but similar. The tempo is increased and we are now in the Ozric Tentacles realm, with a touch of Porcupine Tree. All the instruments leave one by one, the drums slow down and the track ends.

There is still time for a travel in the deep space inside a wormhole (Wurmloch). Think to a starship approaching a black hole, the noises produced by the structure under the pressure of the gravity, All around is dark and silent. In the vein of Zeit and Aplha Centauri this could be considered a drone, but as in the works of the pink period of Tangerine Dream it's not just a keyboard. The bass is a constant presence, we can hear an ethereal flute while the drums add some accents here and there. In the middle of the track it's like the second section of Saucerful of Secrets but when at minute 9:30 a sequence of bass supports a drum riff, the track is more reminding of Phedra and Stratosfear. The flute is always present and even in the background plays a very important role in this track. Probably this part represents the passage in the wormhole, so that one may wonder what the starship will find out of it. The track ends suddenly with some drum hits. The starship is out. No information about what's next. Hopefully another great album like this.

This band has interpreted the best of the German electronic (and not only) music of the 70s, composing and playing like the time was not passed, taking into account the various influences but creating something fresh and technically speaking at the level of the best Tangerine Dream. It's a band that I will surely explore more deeply. If the whole album was on the same level of the last two tracks I would not hesitate in rating it five stars. It's "only" 4 but it's one of the best things that I have heard in the last two years.

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 Netto by ELECTRIC ORANGE album cover Studio Album, 2011
3.91 | 15 ratings

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Netto
Electric Orange Krautrock

Review by Rivertree
Special Collaborator Psych/Space Team & Band Submissions

4 stars ELECTRIC ORANGE already started in the mid 1990's, but now have reached for a very productive and successful period. With the predecessor albums 'Morbus' (2007) and 'Krautrock From Hell' (2010) they have refined their neo krautrock style which is based on space rock mixed with hypnotic rhythms a la CAN as well as spheric cosmic excursions in the vein of TANGERINE DREAM - that said just exactly offered in best tradition of many German bands which began to make music in the 1960/70's with experimental and mind-expanding attitude. Better recording conditions and technical skills in times like these are for me the main reason to call this neo krautrock.

How do they manage to produce music in such a manner? Usually it all starts when masterminds Dirk Jan Müller (keys) and Dirk Bittner (guitars) contribute some loose ideas, riffs, motifs - and then the band consequently enters the studio for some jamming experience, to bring in the harvest so to say. Reduced to a quartet since last year (Josef Ahns unfortunately left) they are ambitious enough to chose whacked-out song titles again, which means modulated German expressions specifically, quirky and funny puns. Say goodbye to common song structures - 'Netto' should necessarily be inhaled in one go because this sounds like recorded in one go exactly, like one extended meandering jam - something which differs a little to the forerunner albums as for my impression.

The sound is compact, you won't find instrumental solos. Outfitted with electrifying potential they present trippy and trancy moments more than ever on 'Netto'. Sometimes with the emphasis on percussive tribal propulsion like it is on the short Basslochner or in a similar way on the irritating Perpetuum Mobiliar - basically though besides those spacey guitars the impressing keyboard input sets the note, creepy gloomy here, wonderfully melancholic there with opulent mellotron and Solina string backing, to name the fascinating Auslauf for example. Another strong and entertaining ELECTRIC ORANGE effort.

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 Krautrock From Hell by ELECTRIC ORANGE album cover Studio Album, 2010
3.87 | 62 ratings

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Krautrock From Hell
Electric Orange Krautrock

Review by Bonnek
Special Collaborator Prog Metal Team

4 stars Krautrock is a term applied to the early 70s experimental/psychedelic art-movement in Germany, so I was quite skeptical finding this relatively new band being advertised as Krautrock. Would this be "Neo-kraut" then? A logical contradiction of sorts for me, as how can music cloned from other examples keep up the whole idea of creativity and artistic expression that is so essential to progressive music, not in the least to kraut.

Hell no! This band has a history as an experimental electronic act and they brought along their sense for experimentation, creating a rocking album that not only sounds like Krautrock, but that also represents the true spirit of it. That being said, I will of course slam a few names around to get an idea of what you might expect.

Bandwurm is a short mid-paced instrumental that brings Neu! to mind with its insistent beat and repetitive bass line. Heavily processed organ sounds and droning feedback add a thick atmospheric layer on top. Sundos is more melodic and composed, with varying melodies and tempos, nice psychedelic organs, flutes and feedbacking guitars here. Chork is the first of two epic masterpieces on the album, a little brother to the majestic 25 minute Neuronomicon that follows later on. Both are slow-paced with beautiful sweeping melodies, bubbling synths and big mellotrons. The effect is highly psychedelic and emotive, and with their dry rocking sound and dark melodies those two pieces also remind me of Anekdoten.

Hers starts with guitar noises, familiar from post-rock but obviously going back to the real sources being early Tangerine Dream and Kraftwerk. After the intro, an actual song follows with dreamy vocals and a percussive beat. Somehow it reminds me of The Beatles' Tomorrow never knows. The next track Kunstkopf is another Neu! tribute. Both songs are OK but hardly the best on the album. Considering the entire album is 78 minutes long they create a bit of a lull that makes the album too long really. Neuronomicon and the closing Wurmloch more then make up for it. The last one is kind of interesting as the band strikes a vibe here that sounds very much like what Tangerine Dream's Green Desert album might have been like had it not been tampered with in 1986.

Overall an excellent album for lovers of Kraut/psych/space rock and one that has fired my interest to discover some of this artist's back catalog.

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 Tonbandreste by ELECTRIC ORANGE album cover Studio Album, 1994
2.87 | 4 ratings

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Tonbandreste
Electric Orange Krautrock

Review by snobb
Special Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

3 stars Second Electric Orange release contains some out-takes from the same sessions released on debut album. This album contains four long (between 9 and 25 minutes) compositions, airy spacey and trippy.

All compositions are improves,played and recorded by Dirk Jan Müller himself ( synth, organ, some guitars, tapes,loops,etc). Music there is kind of spacey rock, but heavily psychedelic, with strong influence from Krautrock bands of 70-s (Amon Duul, etc). Main attraction there is recordings atmosphere, which quite authentically brings you to early 70-s.

Originally this album was "recorded at home and released as Limited Edition of 56 CDr's", re- released in 2001. Hardly essential, this album could be of interest for band's fans,being interesting evidence of their early years.

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 Krautrock From Hell by ELECTRIC ORANGE album cover Studio Album, 2010
3.87 | 62 ratings

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Krautrock From Hell
Electric Orange Krautrock

Review by Prog-jester
Prog Reviewer

3 stars ELECTRIC ORANGE is a Neo-Kraut band from Germany led by keyboardist Dirk Jan Muller . They've been around since early 90s, releasing some stuff from time to time, and jammy "Platte" (2003) was their most balanced and enjoyable album, to my taste. "Krautrock from Hell" wears its influences on a sleeve, and sometimes it sounds "almost like -insertKrautrockbandnamehere-": some Damo Sudzuki madness, some ASH RA TEMPEL soundscapes, some AMON DUUL horror atmosphere, some KRAFTWERK loops...I can't accuse ELECTRIC ORANGE in being unoriginal (it's almost impossible to stay original within the genre based on jamming and proto-Electronica soundeffects), but such "collage" approach is a bit too obvious. Anyway, it's a pretty good record, even though a little bit too long

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Thanks to Rivertree for the artist addition.

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