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ELECTRIC ORANGE

Krautrock • Germany


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Electric Orange biography
ELECTRIC ORANGE is a german (neo) krautrock band, mainly based on two masterminds Dirk Jan Müller (keys) and Dirk Bittner (guitar). Up to now both musicians had uncounted collaborations during their development and produced a huge amount of material on MC, Vinyl and CD-R. Besides some temporary flirts with house/techno elements the band actually delivers modern trippy krautrock adapted music, where Tom Rückwald handles the bass guitar since the year 2000.

The sound is decorated with cheerful electronic elements adapted from Tangerine Dream or Popol Vuh as well as provided with obsessional rhythms in the vein of Can or even Kraftwerk - all you might expect as significant for a contemporary krautrock sound.

The band offer an irresistible blend of hypnotic and tribal beats, soaring organ and synths, spacey guitars, recitatives, samples as well as analogue effects. Hereby they are keen on experimenting with all sorts of rare, obscure and vintage instruments. The song titles are often provided with funny and thought-provoking puns.

In 2009 ELECTRIC ORANGE decided to offer the first DVD release 'Live On The Psychedelic Network Festival 2007' featuring a complete show from 2007 in Würzburg as well as other recordings from a period between 2005 and 2008. And then at the beginning of 2010 the band released the new production 'Krautrock From Hell' where the line up saw a change according to the drums while Silvio Franoli was substituted by Georg Monheim.

Soon after second guitarist Josef Ahns left the band as well. They decided to carry on as a quartet furthermore and once a year from now on a new album was produced, one of them including live recordings from Roadburn Festival in 2012.

Dirk Jan Müller and Dirk Bittner are also regular members of the band SPACE INVADERS

Electric Orange official website

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Buy ELECTRIC ORANGE Music


Orange CommutationOrange Commutation
Import
Deler 1996
Audio CD$199.34
$159.47 (used)
NettoNetto
Import
Sulatron
Audio CD$68.80
$48.70 (used)
FleischwerkFleischwerk
Import
Imports 2008
Audio CD$51.37 (used)
Live At Roadburn 2012 by Electric Orange (2013-08-03)Live At Roadburn 2012 by Electric Orange (2013-08-03)
MPL
Audio CD$62.98
Electric Orange by Electric OrangeElectric Orange by Electric Orange
Delerium
Audio CD$595.98
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ELECTRIC ORANGE discography


Ordered by release date | Showing ratings (top albums) | Help Progarchives.com to complete the discography and add albums

ELECTRIC ORANGE top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.14 | 9 ratings
Electric Orange
1993
3.08 | 5 ratings
Orange Commutation
1995
3.04 | 6 ratings
Cyberdelic
1996
3.15 | 8 ratings
Abgelaufen!
2001
2.96 | 4 ratings
Tonbandreste
2001
3.08 | 16 ratings
Platte
2003
3.94 | 16 ratings
Fleischwerk
2005
3.99 | 30 ratings
Morbus
2007
3.78 | 64 ratings
Krautrock From Hell
2010
3.80 | 22 ratings
Netto
2011
3.17 | 10 ratings
XX
2012
4.12 | 108 ratings
Volume 10
2014
3.50 | 6 ratings
Netto Companion
2015
4.12 | 11 ratings
Misophonia
2016

ELECTRIC ORANGE Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

0.00 | 0 ratings
Sessions Nebenan
2001
4.05 | 3 ratings
Unterwasser - Live 2002
2002
0.00 | 0 ratings
Live 2003
2004
0.00 | 0 ratings
Burg Herzberg 20.07.2007
2008
3.93 | 5 ratings
Live At Roadburn 2012
2013

ELECTRIC ORANGE Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

3.67 | 3 ratings
Live At The Psychedelic Network Festival 2007
2009

ELECTRIC ORANGE Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

ELECTRIC ORANGE Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

0.00 | 0 ratings
Hörtest
1996
0.00 | 0 ratings
Totales Brummen
2001
0.00 | 0 ratings
Electric Mutation
2001
0.00 | 0 ratings
Rote Sonne
2001
0.00 | 0 ratings
Cows Don't Dream At Night
2001
0.00 | 0 ratings
XX²
2014
3.95 | 2 ratings
Nein! HITS à Gogo - Golden Recordings
2015

ELECTRIC ORANGE Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 Misophonia by ELECTRIC ORANGE album cover Studio Album, 2016
4.12 | 11 ratings

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Misophonia
Electric Orange Krautrock

Review by BrufordFreak
Collaborator Jazz-Rock / Fusion / Canterbury Team

4 stars Coming in at over 72 minutes long, Misophonia represents another monster of an album from Aachen's Krautrock/Kosmische Musik stallwarts, ELECTRIC ORANGE.

1. "Organized Suffering" (18:09) opens with rolling bass line, guitars, drums and high pitch drone revving up, taking about forty seconds to get into full gear. Then, at 2:16, everything shuts down for some synths and three "explosion" distorted guitar/bass strums spread out over about twenty seconds. Synths then take over the lead above drums and occasional distorted bass notes. Heavily treated, animal-like vocalizations pop in and out of the soundscape toward the end of the fifth minute. Then things quiet down again around 5:20. Militaristic drums slowly build from there with bass, vocalizations and synths continuing their play. Psychedelic lead guitar play is slowly, sparsely added into the drum-dominant mix. Things quiet down again around the eight minute mark with guitar, quiet drums, and slowly penetrating mid-pitch synth note working its way into the soundscape, into our minds. At 9:30 there is a subtle shift as rolling bass, synth chords and drums return. At the end of the eleventh minute guitar and synths start to do some interesting if occasional things but at this point this is really a drummer's show. In the thirteenth minute the bass and synths begin some new activity--both attracting more of the listener's attention--but the, just as quickly, everything drops out (again) as if to reset. Modulated synth (or organ?) goes freaky on us while simple drum and bass lines play modest support. The organ really begins to dominate (finally!) and the bass and drums capitulate to create the song's first melodically based groove. The key/chord change at 16:20 almost blows it, but then they get back into it. This sounds almost like a 1960s DOORS or PINK FLOYD jam. Not a great song as it never seems to really get off the ground nor does it truly establish any kind of 'hook' to engage and maintain our interest. (7/10)

2. "Bottledrone" (11:48) starts out as slowly and uneventfully as the opening song--totally synth-dominated--but really kicks in delightfully by the halfway point and remains full and interesting to the end. (9/10)

3. "Demented" (7:51) opens with some spacey Blade Runner-like synth noises before an Indian-like rhythm section jumps into the field at the thirty second mark. Now, this is Kosmisches Musik! The drummer is in an awesome groove in the low end while his cymbal activity is all creative and playful. Slow space synth movement is gradual and constant while heavily treated guitars and basses flit in and out of the soundscape. The synths remind me exactly of Tony Banks' synth play in the second half of GENESIS's "The Waiting Room." I love it! By the sixth minute the bass has actually committed to a steady rhythm track while the guitar and cymbals continue their free form contributions. The instrumentalists slowly recede to allow for a quiet end to the song. (8/10)

4. "Misophonia I" (8:58) opens with deep synth notes and low end bass play with a kind of metronomic, Native American-like low end drum beat. For the first three minutes I can definitely picture native American tribal dancers around the campfire--maybe readying themselves for war. The disturbing and discordant shift during and throughout the fourth minute leads to the establishment of a kind of groovy Buddha Lounge song at the four minute mark. Bass, drums and guitar riffs are all on fixed groove mode while the bouncy synth sounds like he's performing at an Ibiza all-night rave club. Horn-like sounds are layered and echoed during seventh minute to nice effect. This turns out to be the song's last real surprise or shift as things begin to slowly fade over the course of the next two minutes. Interesting song. I'm not sure of its intentions or reasons--nor am I certain if it really works. It is, however, unusual. (8/10)

5. "Shattered" (4:40) opens like a jazz song with some synths, bass, drums and wah-effected guitar riffing his chords over a cute hypnotic groove. The synth and drum play don't quite fit in, but this could almost fit in with some of the 1970s Black Exploitation film scores. The guitar and synth play feel at odds--as if they're in different universes--or, at least, different sound studios. Not a song that I care to hear again. (6/10)

6. "Misophonia II" (1:19) is a brief interlude which sounds as if it could almost be a classical piece that has been heavily, heavily treated and distorted in the psychedelic fashion. (8/10)

7. "Opsis" (5:25) has more of the feel and sound palette of the music from EO's 2014 masterpiece, Volume 10. The zither and horn sounds and calmer, more steady rock rhythm tracks are so nice to hear again! Beautiful if subtle melody! (9/10)

8. "Misophonia III" (17:36) I keep reading about the power and centrality of this song to this album and I have to say, I agree. It is one monster of a song, with an awesomely powerful opening from the keyboard master, Dirk Jan Müller. The development is slow but seemingly methodical, well-planned, and the keyboard drenched soundscape is joyfully drenched with Müller's strokes and washes. It's funny to enjoy so much the minimalist inputs from the band's other three members and just have the keys going solo over the course of the first six minutes. Once the rest of the band join in and establish their trepidous support, Dirk Jan continues to play around, but gradually his keys become more integrated into the weave, even seem to fade to background a bit--though there are the occasional really cool low end chord staccato hits. In the tenth minute, when things feel like they're starting to stagnate, Dirk Jan turns up the gas, puts on the horn synth, thrashes out a few heavy handed chords. Man! is he giving a great Berlin School keyboard exhibition! Volume levels all around amp up at the 12-minute mark, but then back off, leaving a little "Lucky Man" fade into the 13-minute mark. The bass, guitar and constant drum pattern keep it going, though, while DJ Müller again goes on his creative binging. More this, EO! I love it! (10/10)

While I enjoy all of the electronic space experimentation going on beneath the "lead" instruments by keyboard specialist Dirk Jan Müller, I find this album less cohesive and engaging than either Volume 10 or Morbus. I often find myself feeling as if the oceans of synth heaven going on beneath and the instrumental action above (or below) are disconnected--like sea and air--sea and mud.

Still, this is a nice 3.5 to four star album which I'm rating up for the monster epic "Misophonia III". A nice addition to any prog rock music collection.

 Misophonia by ELECTRIC ORANGE album cover Studio Album, 2016
4.12 | 11 ratings

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Misophonia
Electric Orange Krautrock

Review by Einwahn

5 stars As someone who remembers the classic era albums as new releases, I firmly believe some of today's 'retro' bands rival their Old Masters in quality and, paradoxically, originality. And this new Krautrock release from the 21st century's leading practitioners of the sub-genre is a prime example. I haven't heard a more beautiful Krautrock album since the mid-1970's. It doesn't sound like any other Krautrock exemplar, but this is definitely, definitely Krautrock.

Nothing has impressed me more about Prog Archives than the 'hit' status accorded to Electric Orange's excellent 2014 release 'Volume 10'. This is testament to the open-minded cultural vision of fans on this site. The only thing that has held me back from reviewing 'Volume 10' is the fact that my own rating would drag down its consensus score (slightly). Well, with 'Misophonia', Electric Orange have taken an artistic quantum leap - and it has the 'Wow!' factor I look for in awarding 5 stars. Their best album since the brilliant 'Morbus' of 2007 - and musically the two albums hardly sound like the same band. As others have said, Electric Orange never stop progressing.

Krautrock is not everyone's cup of tea, and I would not pretend there is any special musical cleverness required to appreciate this off-the-wall sub-genre. Really it is more a question of one's psychological state. But if you enjoyed 'Volume 10', you should love 'Misophonia'. And these albums are all on Bandcamp to hear - there is no excuse to avoid checking them out.

Verdict: A 21st century Krautrock MASTERPIECE.

 Misophonia by ELECTRIC ORANGE album cover Studio Album, 2016
4.12 | 11 ratings

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Misophonia
Electric Orange Krautrock

Review by Rivertree
Special Collaborator PSIKE Team & Band Submissions

4 stars Before and after ... how about your mental constitution, eh? ELECTRIC ORANGE are taking us by surprise each time, obviously ... so what the hell were they thinking by choosing 'Misphonia' as the album title in this case? [Wait, Doctor Psych dissents, you should take note of the fact that this specific sound is not intended to make you sick or crazy, no, not at all!] So what? This is health-promoting? You are sure? Please tell me, who will stop this organized suffering once for all? Who is able to look at the cover sleeve for more than one minute? Where are those promised puns regarding the track titles? ...

... you might get an answer for each particular question anytime soon, lucky you, but meanwhile two new others will come up. Welcome to the ELECTRIC ORANGE club! I mean, I'm wishing you well when it comes to (mental) health care on this occasion. Well, all right, why bother too much. I'll better slip into my (age) demented role ... taking the headphones instead, align myself for the voyage and stop puzzling about the direction mother earth is rotating afterwards. By the way, recently they were on a vintage trip slipping into some spaced-out dance music with Bossa Nova leanings, and the swinging Shattered de facto sounds like a leftover or deliberated transition.

But now reaching for something computable eventually ... never change a winning team! ... the band's line up remains stable since 2010. A reliable constant, such as a proven spaceship crew, which makes you feel safe about coming back to earth, always. What strikes here in any case is the strong and multi-faceted presence of Dirk Jan Müller's keyboard tools, be it the Tangerine Dream alike spheric patterns, farfisa and hammond drenched moments or those eerie synth outings. Maybe this can be called the band's all-embracing element, not in the meaning of something oppressive of course.

On the contrary, as Dirk Bittner, traditionally rather focussed on guitar and percussion, digs up more and more other instruments with each album. For example the trumpet decorating the title track and especially due to the use of a zither on the beautiful indo/raga styled Opsis. In addition Georg Monheim's fascinating drum playing is to notice, somewhat contradictive, while hypnotic and tribal either, but definitely varied during the whole course. Even bass player Tom Rückwald, often acting more restrained by nature in the past, has his flipped out moments.

'Misophonia' appears as an uncommon, unusual, magical affair. Can't believe if this was something coming impromptu. What still stays is the formidable challenge when trying to describe their music. ELECTRIC ORANGE always avoid trodden paths, no repetition please, are on a further expedition here. Especially when starting with the second vinyl they are offering new facets regarding their experimental approach, but seemingly never ever will loose contact to their (krautrock) base. Another must-have. Already waiting for the next bottledrone event.

 Nein! HITS à Gogo - Golden Recordings by ELECTRIC ORANGE album cover Singles/EPs/Fan Club/Promo, 2015
3.95 | 2 ratings

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Nein! HITS à Gogo - Golden Recordings
Electric Orange Krautrock

Review by Rivertree
Special Collaborator PSIKE Team & Band Submissions

4 stars Hey, this on one side intensively reminds me of the early BEAT CLUB times, first and foremost the enthusiastic audience clapping at the very end. I mean the times where some people were spiritually, technically and visually hitting the trail towards prog music in general - and, well, kraut rock in particular on this occasion. So this EP offers some swinging jazz adapted feel, quasi like trying to have a time travel into the German (late) 60's. Though on the other hand it does not sound like totally covered in dust, due to some modern experimental approach to be added, this quasi like transferring the good old inspiration into this present day.

Also taking the album art into account this is reminiscent to STAFF CARPENBORG & THE ELECTRIC CORONA and the creepy VAMPIRES OF DARTMOORE, both projects were equipped with rumours about some hoax and pseudo character at that time, while initiated by pop music producers in reality who at least at this point wanted to freak out. Not untypical for the ELECTRIC ORANGE staff to pick up something like this, not at all.

Traditionally some track titles are puns again obviously, just taking Samba Ohrleck for instance, which is my favourite. Regarding others I spent some time to think about the ulterior motives, but couldn't get it. Excerpts like Video A Gogo are showing Dirk Jan Müller mainly making use of vintage organ instruments. And Georg Monheim's tribal drums are a real attraction here too. Overall this is a fine contribution to the genre, whether you are using this Golden Recordings for your next party ore not.

 Volume 10 by ELECTRIC ORANGE album cover Studio Album, 2014
4.12 | 108 ratings

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Volume 10
Electric Orange Krautrock

Review by Mellotron Storm
Prog Reviewer

4 stars It was ELECTRIC ORANGE's "Morbus" album that made me a fan of these German space rockers. I proceeded to pick up a couple of their earlier albums from the early 00's but they weren't nearly as good in my opinion. "Krautrock From Hell" which came out after "Morbus" was an excellent release but I sort of lost track of these guys until this 2014 release called "Volume 10". Man this is such a good release and one that rivals "Morbus" for my favourite from them. It's interesting how different this one is from "Morbus" though as they've changed their sound to a much darker and melancholic vibe while delving deeper into the roots of Krautrock. In fact while "Morbus" is in my opinion a Space Rock recording, this is pure Krautrock. Again as usual with this band they get as close to 80 minutes as possible with this album.

Oh I have to mention the song titles which are BLACK SABBATH song titles but changed up some and they are quite funny. "Paraboiled" is dark as sounds come and go. I love the haunting atmosphere after 5 minutes and the violin that slices away throughout. "Slowbind" has this relentless beat that leads the way along with plenty of atmosphere as strange sounds come and go. "Symptom Of The Mony Nurse" features guitar feedback and atmosphere as we get this dark and experimental mood with spacey sounds joining in. It starts to build before 2 minutes and the guitar starts to solo. Some electronics later. "Suite Beef" has floating organ as percussion and other sounds help out in this relaxed journey. This is one of my favourites.

"A Tuna Sunrise" has these sparse sounds that come and go but it's slowly building. Despite it building it stays very mellow. Mellotron sounds late as it continues to be very relaxed. "Behind The Wall Of Sheep" is eventually led by a beat that becomes the focus. Fuzzed out sounds join in as well as spacey ones. The beat stops after 10 1/2 minutes as it turns quite spacey. Drums are back before 13 minutes. "Seven And Smell" is led by drums as atmosphere and spoken words help out. "Worn Utopia" is the most experimental track and the hardest one for me to get into. Sounds come and go until we get silence 2 minutes in then drums, atmosphere and more return and start to build. It's experimental after 7 minutes as strange sounds come and go then it turns spacey after 12 1/2 minutes. Organ to the fore after 14 minutes.

4.5 stars for this one. This band really surprised me with not only how good this record is but also with how prominent that Krautrock spirit is here on "Volume 10". A must!

 Platte by ELECTRIC ORANGE album cover Studio Album, 2003
3.08 | 16 ratings

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Platte
Electric Orange Krautrock

Review by Neu!mann
Prog Reviewer

3 stars Studio album number six from the retro-Krautrockers of Electric Orange is even more heavily in debt than usual to the groovier explorations of CAN, sometimes to an almost slavish degree, in tracks like "Holzbock": seven-plus minutes of perfectly simulated Jaki Liebezeit rhythms and spiky one-chord Michael Karoli guitars. The expanded CD even includes a bonus cut with the explicit title "Dedicated to MK", but all the free-form organ vamping makes it more an "Homage to IS" (Can keyboardist Irmin Schmidt).

In truth the young quartet from Aachen isn't really aping Can; they're proudly maintaining a historical legacy of likeminded instrumental wanderlust. And, honestly, the band couldn't have chosen a better guide, even if they never had any hope of achieving the same level of influence or fame.

Don't expect anything too deep or challenging here. The music, even in longer workouts like the 20- minute "Kwark", is structured like a casual jam session instead of the more intuitive 'instant composition' practiced by their role models. But on a strictly superficial level the album is very satisfying: an often thrilling and always affectionate '70s throwback with a very contemporary sound (not a contradiction, for these guys).

What's ultimately missing is that vital spark of Inner Space originality, and the excitement of true discovery. But even secondhand Krautrock can be an adventure worth taking.

 Volume 10 by ELECTRIC ORANGE album cover Studio Album, 2014
4.12 | 108 ratings

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Volume 10
Electric Orange Krautrock

Review by LearsFool
Collaborator Post/Math Rock Team

5 stars It took me awhile to realise that I should listen to this, but now I have and the stars should tell you what I think of Electric Orange's "tenth" outing. I had listened to "Platte" in the past and loved it, so my lack of awareness of this 2014 release - up to not listening to my raving fellow reviewers - was rather foolish. None of that matters now, as I now know that the Orange is the uppermost of the various and varied krautrock revivalists. "Suite Beef" is a crystalline example of their ability to forge great soundscapes, sounding like a beautiful dark orange haze. The other two exceptionally long tracks, "Behind The Wall of Sheep" (har har) and "Worn Utopia" are alongside it the best tracks. It is, yes, a dour record, with the result being that their ethereal backgrounds, killer guitar work, and various other instruments and influences come to together into a magnificent and unique album. And I have to agree with Guldbamsen: Electric Orange have truly put themselves into the shoes of the early '70's in West Germany, actually sounding like a krautrock band of old. I just relisten to this record again and again, and I have yet to stop chuckling whenever I read "A Tuna Sunrise" *chortle*chortle*chortle*. Here is a future for krautrock, and you will enjoy listening to this "Shape of Kraut To Come".
 Volume 10 by ELECTRIC ORANGE album cover Studio Album, 2014
4.12 | 108 ratings

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Volume 10
Electric Orange Krautrock

Review by FXM

5 stars 2014 was a poor year for exceptional new progressive rock releases. Sure there were plenty of good albums released but very few that could be classed as outstanding; the two that come to mind are IQ's 'The Road of Bones', and 'Distant Satellites' by Anethema. But then towards the end of the year Electric Orange released a new album: 'Volume 10'. This is probably the masterpiece of their career (I say probably since I have not heard a couple of the earlier releases and their previous recording 'XX' was not issued on CD, only on vinyl and download, I was waiting for the CD release but it doesn't appear to have happened).

Electric Orange have been leaders in flying the flag for Krautrock in the 21st Century. I have enjoyed all their albums that I listened to but 'Volume 10' takes their music to a new level. Many of their past albums had a strong Can influence and sometimes with a bit of modern electronic thrown into the mix but the new album shows hints of Ash Ra Temple, Popol Vuh and early Tangerine Dream with a bit of early psychedelic Pink Floyd. But this is a not a rehash of 1970's style German electronic music, Electric Orange are developing their own sound, dark and menacing at times, spacy and mind stretching in places.

I can't single out any one track as better than the rest, they are all superb slices of krautrock, with plenty of variation and not a dull moment.

This is the most interesting release that I have purchased in 2014 and just maybe one of the greatest krautrock records of all time. It is a true masterpiece and is most deserving of a 5 star rating.

 Live At Roadburn 2012 by ELECTRIC ORANGE album cover Live, 2013
3.93 | 5 ratings

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Live At Roadburn 2012
Electric Orange Krautrock

Review by Einwahn

4 stars This digital-only live album belongs to Electric Orange's current-decade period, in which they have improvised spacey, drifting and mildly dissonant pieces. This is in contrast to the composed and more structured tracks of 'Krautrock From Hell' and its predecessors, which I rather prefer (as fellow fans might guess from my site-name). If you are improvising your music, then a live setting is a logical vehicle, and 'Live At Roadburn 2012' does work extremely well. It maintains an interesting and arresting ambience throughout, avoiding some of the slightly aimless moments that periodically detract from its studio counterparts.

Verdict: a great example of current Electric Orange.

 Volume 10 by ELECTRIC ORANGE album cover Studio Album, 2014
4.12 | 108 ratings

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Volume 10
Electric Orange Krautrock

Review by Guldbamsen
Special Collaborator Retired Admin

5 stars The Peyote Diet

Strange time in a band's career to be experimenting with hallucinogens, but then again what do I know? David Gilmour started flirting around with cocaine in his 40s...

Starting out with a a series of menacing violin strokes, screeching and writhing over an elegant, if not rather mumbling piano, hazy synth percolations from way in the back and then something as disturbing as strings being plucked like a rooster losing it's feathers. There is no melody only brooding atmospheric noise.........but navigated through by the utmost care and fragility that the piece becomes musical, albeit a strange hybrid of it though, with ambient whiskers attached and long yearning cello like cries.....and then the hypnotic Shaman drums commence and you're out on the prairie running with the buffalo.

To me it feels as if the opener, Paraboiled, welcomes you into an album that seeks out the same as the old Indian medicine men of the west. As a matter of fact, I hear a lot of Indian spiritualism in Volume 10. Paraboiled is like walking into an Indian séance - with Richard Harris suspended from the tee-pee roof, dangling away in eagle's claws. The whole track is like a small 7 plus minute raga that ends in those drums and an organ that only rarely takes form, and when it does it's like a warm gust of winds.

By stripping their expression down to a raw caveman-like essence Electric Orange have succeeded in doing something, that I thought was near impossible. They have actually managed to do a modern Krautrock album, that not only sounds incredibly unique and original, but interjects itself straight into what the real and genuine Krautrock of yore was all about: mystery and fumbling around in strange dark places with but a mere flashlight and an adventurous soul. Volume 10 takes Krautrock back to the trip - the interstellar space voyages and freak out sessions of 1971.............but it's never a real "throw-back" album. It utilises some of the same instruments sure, but the overall musical expression has more in common with a modern SWANS release than say Yeti, Tago Mago or NEU!'s debut. I often think of SWANS The Seer when I listen to this album. Maybe I've completely gone fishing, but there's a similar magnitude of sound going on - something that almost sounds teutonic and Magma-like huge, only far more loosey goosey, wavering and Hiawatha inspired.

Another one of Volume 10s defining qualities is the free form of the material. The music often wafts overhead you in swirling patterns for then to be sculptured into something altogether different - a sporadic rhythm intervenes, an organ cuts through, a guitar slushes away and swoosh now the music seems to have caught wind of something intriguing and consequentially adapts and transforms into a collective sonic force: The tune is now under way.

Ranging from phonofiddles and banjos to double bass, moog, mandolin, mellotron and guitars in reverse - the arsenal of this group is anything but ascetic, even if the flow of the music occasionally can feel that way - meaning that it sounds like a 'back to the basics' kind of thing 'Let's just jam together, although it'd be cool if none of you had any preconceived ideas coming into it'.

What more? Well some of this album genuinely sounds like a band trying to make ambient music - only with all acoustic instruments...............and then suddenly the electronics turn on together with a full rockin' explosion of the aforementioned Shaman sensibilities, and what you had in mind with those thoughts about ambient music are suddenly put to shame; -everything now is different and a thousand miles from the tee-pee where Richard hung (out) at the very beginning.

If you have ever wondered about how prog would've sounded like, if the Cherokee had been a major contributing factor in sculpting it, then this is the album for you. Dig out your old tomahawks and some peyote and get ready to party like it's 1999, there's dust and colourful feathers everywhere and you're in a drug induced trance. HEIYAHH YAHH YAHH!!!

Thanks to Rivertree for the artist addition.

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